5 Burst results for "Alabama Pueblo"

Washington State sues government, push for COVID vaccine uptake, and indigenous rights activist dies

Native America Calling

03:57 min | 5 months ago

Washington State sues government, push for COVID vaccine uptake, and indigenous rights activist dies

"The national native news on tonia gonzales washington state attorney general bob ferguson announced. The state is suing the federal government to stop. Its plans to sell the national archives building in seattle the government which ship off digitize records to archive centers out of state as steve jackson reports. Tribal nations are among those that. Want the information to stay in the pacific northwest. Bob ferguson says. The plan violates current law. Because there's an exemption for buildings the archive being put up for sale if it's used for specific types of research in addition he says the federal government didn't consult with those who would be impacted by the closure that includes twenty nine native american tribes have signed onto the suit. Fawn sharp is the president of the chronology indian nation. She says native americans in the northwest are seeing a resurgence of language and culture and the archive is a vital source for information leading to a point of just having a basic understanding of this rich and baskets and if if this information were to ever leave the pacific northwest there would be a loss gnarly his tribal nation. It'd be lost entire at pacific northwest and put a price on a value of what those are. House at tribal nations ferguson says the suit seeks an injunction to stop the sale of the building. He hopes the case will receive an expedited hearing in federal court for national native news. I'm steve jackson reporting from spokane leaders and tribal communities are getting creative to encourage uptake of the cove. Nineteen vaccine the mountain west news bureaus savannah mar reports. The northern arapaho tribe has been hit hard by the pandemic and many tribal members are eager to be vaccinated. That's according to lisa. You're walking with the tribes medical clinic. However there are some that do have questions she says. Clinic staff have been fielding those questions via social media. And they've been getting help from arapahoe. Ceremonial elders like george moss. Who agreed to get the first shot in to have it. Broadcast live on facebook people. To have mr moss him so i can take the vaccine is speaks volumes tribes like the navajo nation had council members get vaccinated on camera. The black feet nation in montana is using the black veep language to counter misinformation and educate members about the safety and efficacy of the vaccine for the mountain west news bureau. I'm savannah mar georgina. Lewis from alabama pueblo in new mexico intends to run for congress. The five term state democratic lawmaker and attorney is joining the race for the anticipated of the first congressional district currently held by deb holland holland. Who's a member of laguna pueblo has been picked by the biden harris team for secretary of the interior. If holland's confirmed the state would call for a special election wants the. Us house vacancy occurs with candidates nominated by major political parties in new mexico on her campaign website. Lewis says she's been a tireless champion for the earth people and future generations and would continue. The fight holland began holland. Strong advocate for native american issues environmental issues and missing and murdered indigenous women and girls rancher and indigenous rights advocate carry. Dan has died in nevada. At the age of eighty eight democracy now reports kerry and her late sister. Mary long fought the federal government over land rights and environmental issues. The western shoshoni sisters were committed to protecting their way of life and the rights of their people fighting for land back and land restoration from poisoning. Their legal and political battles began in the nineteen seventies and they spent their lives advocating for indigenous rights. I antonio

Tonia Gonzales Attorney General Bob Ferguson Steve Jackson National Archives Building Bob Ferguson Fawn Sharp Pacific Northwest Federal Government George Moss Mr Moss Holland Savannah Mar Georgina Alabama Pueblo Seattle Washington Ferguson Deb Holland Spokane Laguna Pueblo Biden Harris
"alabama pueblo" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

10:57 min | 1 year ago

"alabama pueblo" Discussed on Native America Calling

"National native news is produced by Broadcast Corporation with funding by the corporation for Public Broadcasting Support by the law officers of snarky chambers. Sexy Miller and Moncton a national trouble rights law firm with offices in Washington. DC New Mexico California and Alaska an online at www dot CERNA ski dot com support by vision maker media envisioning a world changed and healed by. I understanding native stories and the public conversations. They generate Ottawa airs. On Independent Lens December Sixteenth More Info at vision maker Media Dot Org native voice one the native American radio network. This is native America. Calling I'm Tara Gate. Would hundred awesome native items. Some of which are secret have been stolen from tribes over the centuries occasionally the end up overseas and auction houses recently. Recently those included a sacred deer From the hoopoe tribe. A war shirt from the LAKOTA 's in items from the Hopi nation and masks from the Navajo the whole nation. There aren't very many success. Stories that include tribes getting secret items back but the people of Alabama did today the abdomen shield old a sacred item that was stolen from the Pueblo. ended up in a Paris auction house but now it is making its way back to the Pueblo. Here in New Mexico cold and it took years of work from the PUEBLO nation in multiple. US government entities. We'll take you through this journey with some of the folks who were instrumental in the legal the process. And we want to hear from you to give us a call tells what you're thinking about this about the way this story ends we would like to hear from you. Phone lines are open and one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is the number you can ask questions to and if we have any other tribal leaders in our listening audience were real curious to hear what you're thinking Especially when you hear the method that the tribe used in standing their ground saying we will not pay to have this item comeback. You're welcome in this conversation to again. The number to reach us one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight and here in Studio forty-nine with us today is the Alabama Pueblo Weblog Governor Brian Video. He is here. Welcomed governor vile and also here too is former governor of Akamot Pueblo. Kurt Riley our pleasure to have him here and governor. Thank you for joining us to though though it's expect Russia Matz in good morning or good afternoon afternoon. Everyone Sharon here and we air at different times in different places. So it's good to cover all your bases Also here in studio with us is Aaron Sims. He's an attorney for the chestnut law office and academic levels General Legal Counsel our pleasure to have him here. Aaron thank you for joining us for another one of our discussions go out to helper. Thank you and here in studio forty nine with us. As well as John Anderson. He is the United States attorney for the district of New Mexico. Our pleasure to have having here John Welcome. Thank you very much pleasure to be here and so I gave a really brief run through of the story of this shield. But let's backtrack back in talk a little bit more about what it means to now. Say that the shield will be returning home and governor via want to start with you anything. Do you want to share about. Just this journey in one. It's led to thank you. Tarot go out to the like the PUCK. Doc I might you Martha out the trash Koba. Thank you for the opportunity to come on the program this morning. There are a lot of emotions today And it's you know we've reached a point in this process where we will actually transport the shield backed to Alabama today this afternoon. And so there's we do this with the rate anticipation And the community hideous Most definitely excited grateful And what a perfect time to have this occur during this time of giving thanks and And really that's I think at the end of this process and having carefully considered all of the time and work in prayers and sacrifices that have been made throughout this process that we have this opportunity to embrace our protector and to return to its home and to give. Thanks for everyone who have has played a part in this process. It's been difficult. It has required a tremendous amount of time. I am of many people and we At the Pueblo are very grateful for everyone's efforts. But this also signifies take a time in our living history with Alabama Always at the forefront on issues around cultural resources protection and repatriation and our commitment and our a need to fulfil our inherent responsibility posssibility of ensuring that the culture continues that this time in our history represents a EH recognition by us as Adema people and native people and Indigenous People that we have of an opportunity. We have an opportunity to do more. We have an opportunity to make a difference. An impact policy and impact the ways in which the public at large and maybe more specifically the collectors and dealers those within the museum realm federal agencies. He's who are dealing with these types of issues that we can be successful if we work together and that there is a an acknowledgment and that individual tribes tribal leaders the cultural leaders and the communities that comprise our tribes can really make a significant contribution towards these types of efforts so we are very grateful today and and On behalf of our tribal council and our community at Alabama we give thanks and Look forward to this afternoon's short trip from Albuquerque to Alabama to With the sealed in Governor Baio when when you think of here forward your community will have this machine item in future. Generations will not have to start a day knowing that you know this part of their culture is somewhere in the hands of someone else or some place where it shouldn't be. Tell me what you are thinking here. Forward Future Generations won't have to endure whatever kind of loss or whatever kind of obstacles that have been here. It's going to be gone. There is a bit of a sigh of relief but we also to the issue of Are Inherent responsibility in this time but also in the future yes our children and our grandchildren and those not yet born will continue knowing and they have their protector they will also I pray. We'll hold in very high regard this item and use it. Use It in a way that does indeed protect them and our land and our animals all living beings. So I am. I believe at our children who are the beneficiaries. Really of all of this Are Set up to do just that and Like I said earlier. We have a lot of work to do. There's there's significant language loss is Reductions and the ways in which we are communicating and transmitting traditional knowledge. And so we we have to make a much more aggressive in the way in which we do that work together and Set our children for that good life I had and all these things connect in governor video. You also ask for the privacy talk of the Pueblo to be respected on this return and a lot of times in that makes everyone go. Why why are they saying this or you know? Why can't we know But anything you want to share about that of course you know that plead of respecting privacy in this return. There isn't going to be a big parade that everybody can line up for and You get a t shirt to commemorate that moment this something more it is and we ask this of the public because because it is our time and This is a message that comes from the trouble government. This is a request made by a cultural leaders on behalf of the shield and so there's a process that needs to be instituted to welcome the shield and give it time to re engage But it also gives us that time to reflect because is there is a a a level of trauma that we have realized an experience as the result of this experience and so that cultural process.

Alabama Pueblo Alabama Pueblo New Mexico Aaron Sims governor vile Akamot Pueblo Tara Gate Broadcast Corporation US America Public Broadcasting Support LAKOTA Sexy Miller Washington Governor Baio DC Moncton John Welcome
"alabama pueblo" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

10:44 min | 1 year ago

"alabama pueblo" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Two eight four eight and here in Studio forty-nine with us today is the Alabama Pueblo peddler governor Brian Video. He is here. Welcomed governor vile and also here too is former governor of Akamot Pueblo. Kurt Riley our pleasure to have him here and governor. Thank you for joining us to though though it's expect Russia Matz in good morning or good afternoon afternoon. Everyone Sharon here and we air at different times in different places. So it's good to cover all your bases Also here in studio with us is Aaron Sims. He's an attorney for the chestnut law office and academic levels General Legal Counsel our pleasure to have him here. Aaron thank you for joining us for another one of our discussions go out to helper. Thank you and here in studio forty nine with us. As well as John Anderson. He is the United States attorney for the district of New Mexico. Our pleasure to have having here John Welcome. Thank you very much pleasure to be here and so I gave a really brief run through of the story of this shield. But let's backtrack back in talk a little bit more about what it means to now. Say that the shield will be returning home and governor via want to start with you anything. Do you want to share about. Just this journey in one. It's led to thank you. Tarot go out to the like the PUCK. Doc I might you Martha out the trash Koba. Thank you for the opportunity to come on the program this morning. There are a lot of emotions today And it's you know we've reached a point in this process where we will actually transport the shield backed to Alabama today this afternoon. And so there's we do this with great anticipation And the community hideous Most definitely excited grateful And what a perfect time to have this occur during this time of giving thanks and And really that's I think at the end of this process and having carefully considered all of the time and work in prayers and sacrifices that have been made throughout this process that we have this opportunity to embrace our protector and to return to its home and to give. Thanks for everyone who have has played a part in this process. It's been difficult. It has required a tremendous amount of time. I am of many people and we At the Pueblo are very grateful for everyone's efforts. But this also signifies take a time in our living history with Alabama Always at the forefront on issues around cultural resources protection and repatriation and our commitment and our a need to fulfil our inherent responsibility posssibility of ensuring that the culture continues that this time in our history represents a EH recognition by us as Adema people and native people and Indigenous People that we have of an opportunity. We have an opportunity to do more. We have an opportunity to make a difference. An impact policy and impact the ways in which the public at large and maybe more specifically the collectors and dealers those within the museum realm federal agencies. He's who are dealing with these types of issues that we can be successful if we work together and that there is a an acknowledgment and that individual tribes tribal leaders the cultural leaders and the communities that comprise our tribes can really make a significant contribution towards these types of efforts so we are very grateful today and and On behalf of our tribal council and our community at Alabama we give thanks and Look forward to this afternoon's short trip from Albuquerque to Alabama to With the sealed in Governor Baio when when you think of here forward your community will have this machine item in future. Generations will not have to start a day knowing that you know this part of their culture is somewhere in the hands of someone else or some place where it shouldn't be. Tell me what you are thinking here. Forward Future Generations won't have to endure whatever kind of loss or whatever kind of obstacles that have been here. It's going to be gone. There is a bit of a sigh of relief but we also to the issue of Are Inherent responsibility in this time but also in the future yes our children and our grandchildren and those not yet born will continue knowing and they have their protector they will also I pray. We'll hold in very high regard this item and use it. Use It in a way that does indeed protect them and our land and our animals all living beings. So I am. I believe at our children who are the beneficiaries. Really of all of this Are Set up to do just that and Like I said earlier. We have a lot of work to do. There's there's significant language loss is Reductions and the ways in which we are communicating and transmitting traditional knowledge. And so we we have to make a much more aggressive in the way in which we do that work together and Set our children for that good life I had and all these things connect in Ohio. You also ask for the Privacy Chrissy of the Pueblo to be respected on this return and a lot of times in that makes everyone go. Why why are they saying this or you know? Why can't we know But anything you want to share about that of course you know that plead of respecting privacy in this return. There isn't going to be a big parade that everybody can line up for and You get a t shirt to commemorate that moment this something more it is and we ask this of the public because because it is our time and This is a message that comes from the trouble government. This is a request made by a cultural leaders on behalf of the shield and so there's a process that needs to be instituted to welcome the shield and give it time to re engage But it also gives us that time to reflect because is there is a a a level of trauma that we have realized an experience as the result of this experience and so that cultural process of healing reflection as the reason why we are asking for the privacy in this gets to the heart in governor Riley. We will hear your thoughts too about this whole process but he gets to the heart of I believe Steve What has been one of the largest struggles in this whole process is our ability to say. Here's here's a line. This is as much as we are willing to share in. That should be respected and a lot of times when it comes to all of this You know people don't Phil. There is a line that if you want something you need to give us information. And that's something that a lot of our tribal nations can relate to where they are constantly being forced to cross Austin line in order to protect their community And when you get to that point when you say you know that's just not up for public view. That's not up for public knowledge edge then. Sometimes that can create more hurdles in and I'm also curious to airing Aaron your thoughts about this When you are looking at the legal side of this and you know that there are certain items to win a case you got to present certain information and John Being on the receiving end indepth being told you know this item sake or the the information is sacred? This is as far as we can go. How do you make your decisions? or how are you able to inform the people in levels that you need to in order for things to balance and I know this is a huge thing that we're really talking about today and what happens when we stand her ground What happens when we're told well that's not enough information we can help you? There's a lot there we're going to continue with this conversation here but you're also welcome to join has to any thoughts. Give us a call. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is the number we look forward to hearing from you. Bison were hunted to near extinction. Eighteen hundreds today remain scattered herds. Many of which are part of determined efforts to revitalize the iconic species drives playing a key role in restoring bison herds to public and tribal lands..

Alabama Aaron Sims governor vile Kurt Riley Alabama Pueblo Akamot Pueblo Governor Baio Russia Matz Sharon John Welcome Brian Video PUCK John Anderson New Mexico Martha Albuquerque Steve What
"alabama pueblo" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

09:21 min | 1 year ago

"alabama pueblo" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is National Native News Antonio Gonzales. The State Tribal Relations Committee is pressuring Montana's congressional delegation to do more to increase public input and tribal consultation on the Keystone Excel pipeline as Olivia rheingold reports. The move comes as the end of the public comment period area for recently updated environmental statement. Nears this state tribal relations committee unanimously adopted a motion Monday to write a letter demanding more meaningful meaningful public comments process on the updated keystone excel pipeline draft environmental impact statement. The letter asks Montana's congressional delegation to put pressure her on the State Department which controls the forty five day public comment period. That is scheduled to end next Monday. The eighteenth there's been one public meeting to discuss the draft left late last month in billings. That's not good enough. According to the letter by the State Tribal Relations Committee bipartisan body of legislators that acts as liaisons John's between the state and tribal governments. It says people who attended didn't have enough of a chance to openly engage in dialogue and provide input it also says tribal consultation has fallen short for the Fort Belknap in Fort Peck tribes which the pipeline would nearly come in contact with Republican congressman. Greg Gianforte and Republican senator. Steve Daines say they look forward to speaking with committee members. A spokesperson for the Democratic Senator Jon Tester says the State Department should solicit further feedback from tribal leaders. The public for national need of news. I'm Olivia wrangled in billings Montana Navajo nation president. Jonathan Nez has decided. The tribe will not financially Ashley back bonds necessary for the purchase of three coal mines by a Navajo owned company Arizona. Public Radio's Ryan Hinds. Reports tribal leaders is worth the investment can negatively impact the tribes finances president says the Navajo Transitional Energy Company hasn't given leaders key financial information about the minds. He also says the tribe should be moving more toward renewables and energy experts questioned the wisdom of the Navajo nation expanding its interests in coal. As the industry industry struggles as a result is cancelled agreements. INTECH might have relied on to seek the tribes financial support in tech is owned by the Navajo nation but operates independently of the tribal government. The company announced in August that it bought three mines in the powder river basin of Wyoming Montana had an auction of the bankrupt cloud peak energy among them is the third largest coal mine in the nation and they collectively employ more than a thousand workers in a statement and intact. Spokesperson says it respects. It's the president's decision and that the company remains profitable while it explores future options in Texas the purchase of the three minds mixed the Navajo nation. The third largest this co-producer in the country for National Native News. I'm Ryan Hinds in flagstaff. This week the Minnesota Supreme Court heard arguments over the name change of Popular Minneapolis. Neapolis Lake the Associated Press reports. The court is considering whether the state's Natural Resources Department had authority to Change Lake. Calhoun to its Dakota name. PAYDAY Makarska Koska. A lower court ruled. The agency overstepped its authority and it should be handled by the legislature. Members of the native community are in support of the name. Change the group Save Lake. Calhoun is fighting it. Signs already reflect. The Lakes Dakota name. A decision by the court is likely to take months. Meanwhile public public input has been gathered for the renaming for part of the Minnesota landmark for smelling which resides undecoded homeland. The Minnesota Historical Society has received more than six thousand comments for the renaming of twenty three acres known as historic smelling. The name of the eighteen twenties. Fort Structure will remain for smelling. The site is being revitalized and slated to be finished next year. I'm Antonio Gonzalez. National Native News is produced by Colonic Broadcast Corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting support by Freedom Lodge inviting you to join the two hundred our intertribal historical trauma masterclass masterclass twenty twenty to learn remedies for recovery on the ONEIDA nation in Wisconsin. Training has no charge for tribal members at freedom lunch dot org support by the National American Indian Housing Counselors 2019. Legal Symposium at Bali's resort in Las Vegas December ninth and Tenth Information and registration at N. A. H. C. Dot net slash legal native voice. One the native American radio network. This is native America calling. I'm Tara Gatewood. It is the official official rock. Your mcstay it's an international celebration of native culture. In pride by wearing are indigenous footwear. This year marks eight years since founder. Rounder Jessica Jalen at sea from Laguna Pueblo. Started the phenomena on social media. It started as one day encouraging people to come to work or school in traditional footwear. But it's expanded to a week in many schools and organizations are taking the opportunity to include special programming in conjunction with with native American heritage month. And maybe there is an event that is kicking off this week today. Maybe you started off the week wearing your moccasins and or traditional footwear. And what kind of attention has it brought has given you that moment to speak a little bit about your own pride in your culture sure to pay tribute to those who sacrifice so that you could be here and understand who you are as an indigenous person today we want you to call in talk all about it Join US today as we celebrate native heritage as we walk her monks. And Right. Now I wanNa let you know here in studio forty nine. There are three Pairs Of moccasins before these microphones and we understand what it means to step into our moccasins. In what it connects us to and and you're gonNA hear a little bit of that coming up here But again you are invited to join us to Whether you're mocks or made a with hard soles or maybe even With a certain element that is natural to your own community maybe even lined with for you are welcome to join us and join the celebration today. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is a number where you call in and share your moccasins story. Tell us why you you are rocking your mocks. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is the number in right here in studio forty nine with us today. Miss Jessica Jalen at sea and she is the founder of rock your mocks she's Laguna Pueblo. And it's our pleasure to have her here in. Most people know her as Jess. Just thank you so so much for being with us. Welcome in go ahead in a greeting folks gorgeous. They Hopefu- I how are y'all doing today. skits Bahira. Come back again and talk about rocking mocks. And how much it has really grown and also here in Studio forty-nine with us is Melissa Melissa Sanchez She is a producer with emergence productions she is from Alabama Pueblo and Laguna Pueblo. Our pleasure to have her here in-studio forty-nine today to Melissa thank you for being here thanks for having us here really excited in so jalen eight years. That doesn't seem like a long time since I remember the first conversation with you About wearing Your moccasins and Y. You wanted to do this and now here we are. For the past eight years the hashtags start rockier mucks And then even more heritage It comes out with some of those hashtags needed pride native heritage and it's grown in and I wonder if we were to just tally up every time somebody is posting Their pride in their traditions Through this event in through this week how many people we would hear and when we start looking at some we're also learning people's stories and so talk to me about everything that you have absorbed from that first moment that I Post on social media. Go ahead tell me more every year I. It's like a good overwhelming. Feeling that you know I just take shape on my feet one day and wanted to wear my moccasins amongst my friends and people wanted to know what I was doing and it just became in this huge like a lit up like fire and Not knowing that were Iraq earmarks is going to take you know what it stood for what it stands for today.

State Tribal Relations Committ Montana Jessica Jalen president National Native News Ryan Hinds State Department Laguna Pueblo billings Olivia rheingold Calhoun Melissa Melissa Sanchez Antonio Gonzales founder Navajo Transitional Energy Com Senator Jon Tester Minnesota Supreme Court Fort Belknap Steve Daines
"alabama pueblo" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

09:36 min | 2 years ago

"alabama pueblo" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Afternoon. Welcome back to another edition of coffee and culture for a Saturday afternoon. I'm Richard easier host today, very delighted to have in studio with this the director of the New Mexico museum of art Mary Kershaw Mary. Welcome back. Good to see. It's great to be here, Richard. Thank you. All right. We have a lot to talk about a of the the art museum always shows coming in coming and going creating new things telling the story of New Mexico. The let's start with kind of the building itself in the fact that you guys are kind of an anchor kind of a touchdown a real really wonderful place during the holidays, and the here we are in the holidays, and we look at downtown Santa Fe, and it's always wonderful during the holidays, the plazas now lit up with all the trees and the holiday lights the fairly does go up. People are walking around drinking hot chocolate. I'm romanticizing the whole thing. But I mean that is kind of Santa Fe. During the holidays. You know, you're only romanticizing a little bit, Richard. It really is you painted a beautiful picture and a very accurate one. I've been all around the world at this time of year, and I can tell you there is no better place to be than downtown Santa Fe. It's like living in a Christmas card and at the museum of art were really lucky to be right on the plaza. Last Monday, our volunteers came in and did a lot of Christmas decorating for us, and we have a Christmas tree donated to us by Delancey street, and that's in the beautiful courtyard. So we're right in there. Joining in the festivities with everyone downtown and. I really do think that everyone who lives in or around Santa Fe should make sure they come down. And enjoy the plaza at sometime enjoy Santa Fe this time of year is wonderful fairly to walk Canaan road. You know, do as much as you can beat the in. You know, you. I'm sure, you know, your museum director, you take everything really seriously, and it's all academic. And you know, we have to make sure everything is hung properly in this story is told properly, but it's also about having fun and being an inviting and warm in educational and wonderful place to visit absolutely. Our entire focus is on making sure that people firstly want to come to the art museum. And then when they do that, they feel welcome. And that they have a great experience. And if they want to engage at that level. Absolutely. That's wonderful. If they want to come and just enjoy great art, that's fantastic. And if they want to come and just see a really wonderful historic building here in Santa. Faye? That's okay. To the building has been there for how many years, well, there's several buildings there. And they probably range, you know, the day when they were built and became part of the museum system in New Mexico. So kind of tells the history of the New Mexico, art museums. Well, the New Mexico museum of art opened in nineteen seventeen. So last November twenty seventeen we celebrated our hundredth birthday. And that was a big, oh we did. It was great fun. Do you know we had over seven thousand six hundred people through the museum that day. On one day. That's more people than lived in Santa Fe when the museum first opened. I mean, it was amazing. And then in the year that followed because we've just finished our one hundred year, we held one hundred events during the course of that year. So we wanted to make it a big celebration for everybody. But the the museum founded in one thousand nine hundred seventeen grew out of the museum of New Mexico, which was at the palace of the governors. So we really are a partner institutions as well as being state run museums now. But clearly, you it had started doing art exhibitions there. And they realized with the artists communities that were growing they needed more space. Long story short the civic fathers decided to build a new style of architecture. It was emerging in different places, but the Spanish Pueblo revival style was really solidified and made popular by the building of the New Mexico museum of art. And it's very much. Why Santa Fe looks like it does today? Just a little bit of the history of the same Francis auditorium as well. So the Saint Francis auditorium was built as part of the museum, and it was modelled on Akamot, Alabama Pueblo mission church. So it's really interesting when people go in they often ask me, why did you build a museum next to a church, and it speaks to the wonderful atmosphere of that place. So we use that as our auditorium. And it was built in one thousand nine hundred seventeen the murals were specifically designed for the same Francis auditorium. They were designed by Donald Beauregard who sadly passed away before he could finish them. And they were finished by Carlos vierra and a couple of other artists, and they tell the story of the Franciscans and Saint Francis in the Franciscans because of course, Saint Francis is the patron Saint of Santa Fe, right? The the murals almost Frisco like in a way are done in what kind of paint and how durable are there. They are actually paintings on canvas. They look like murals because they're placed in the wall. And because we do have murals in the courtyard, but they are oil paintings on canvas. So there is gerbil oil painting on canvas is a pretty durable. Type of artwork coughing culture on a Saturday afternoon. We're here every Saturday at two o'clock and Richard your house today. Our guest is the director of the New Mexico museum of art and in Mexico art museum Mary Kershaw area. You've been there for how many years in January. I will be coming up on nine years. It's got to be a wonderful job. You know, just be able to go to work downtown Santa Fe every day and experience, you know, everything that you create around the art museum to be kind of the director of the museum to have, you know, the the ability to to create the direction of the art museum and the exhibits of the art museum is got to be a great pleasure. You know, it really is a great honor. And a great joy to have that job. And we have a wonderful team that we work with great team of staff great team of volunteers. Wonderful people all of whom come together. And it's a real pleasure to work with them. All there's the big picture. And then there are the details. I mean, just the detail of of imagining connecting Santa Fe one hundred years ago. Building the church which is now. Saint Francis auditorium. Wasn't it shirt? But it was in the style of the church at academic, connecting Santa Fe to Ackerman Sky City, which is you know, sent south central New Mexico. That's a great. That's a great threat of history as well. It really is a wonderful threat of history. And it's a story that going forward. We wanna tell a lot more. Last year. We did a lot of internal refurbishment to the galleries in the museum and the lobby and a big part of that was to help better reveal the historic features of the building. So that people can really appreciate what was done one hundred years ago and to see how it connects to the wonderful historic structures that are all around New Mexico. It is used also as a community room. It is used for music. It is used for memorials. It is used. So how do people how do people rent this space to be crass? Good question. First thing is plan ahead. People are always surprised at how well booked that auditorium is one of the biggest challenges I had when I first moved here was to create space in the calendar. So we could do our own program out. Voucher. The short answer. Is you contact the events manager at the museum? But the longer answer is that position is bacon. Into the moment. We hope to have it filled in a month or two you guys are hiring. We will be hiring very soon. So having posted the job, you know, we're hoping opportunity for the right person. It's a wonderful opportunity, and you meet such wonderful people. But all of the details are on our website. You can find all of the staff there and how to contact including a calendar for the remainder of this year in twenty nine thousand nine maybe into twenty twenty s you can look at weekends or weeknights. That might be available. You can't look at the calendar for Saint Francis. But it will give you the contact person. And that's the easiest way to call them and find out. All right, all kinds of things going on at the museum of art right now in downtown Santa Fe things coming up. We'll talk to Mary about the president. Well, the past the present and the immediate future. Lot of great things going on. Mary Kershaw is the director of the New Mexico museum of art part of the museum of system here in New Mexico in Santa Fe, which is one of the. The best in the world. It is an amazing amazing thing mazing resource. We're lucky to have it. We'll be right back. It is a Saturday afternoon. You want to be on the show wanna get in touch with me. Maybe make suggestions of of cultural things that should be on coughing culture. Email me at Richard at Santa Fe dot com. We'll be right back and talk twelve sixty one zero three seven KTAR. See Santa Fe's news talk. Back.

Santa Fe New Mexico museum of art art museum New Mexico New Mexico museum of art Mary museum of art museum of New Mexico director Richard Saint Francis auditorium Mary Kershaw Francis auditorium Santa museum of system Mexico Saint Francis Carlos vierra Faye