10 Burst results for "Ajc Global Forum"

"ajc global forum" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

05:18 min | 5 months ago

"ajc global forum" Discussed on People of the Pod

"It is a time honored AJC tradition to feature civil yet forceful debates at the AJC Global Forum each year. We weren't going to give that up. Just because we are meeting virtually without further ado here is AJC director of communications. Avi Mayor to introduce our great to be on the future of the West Bank. The West Bank is in many respects. The Jewish heartland known in Hebrew as Some alone or today and Samaria. It is where Jewish kings reigned Jewish prophets preached, and it is today home to some four hundred and fifty thousand Israelis it is also home to an estimated two point seven million Palestinians many of whom have lived there for generations and none of whom have ever had a sovereign state to call their own. The question of what to do with the West Bank has vexed Israeli decision makers since this all came into possession of the territory during the nineteen sixty seven six day war now the Israeli government appears to be considering. Considering the unilateral extension of Israeli sovereignty, two parts of the West Bank a move fiercely opposed by Palestinians who claim the territory for a future Palestinian state? Where should Israel go from here with us to debate this pressing question today are two distinguished guests and friends of AJC member of Chris admit ally, of Israel's Labor Party, who was previously a prominent journalist and commentator, an ambassador gold, a veteran Israeli diplomat, including as permanent representative to the United Nations and current president of the Jerusalem Center for public. Affairs welcome to you both. Let's get started member of. Your opening statement, please. The state of Israel has existed unfortunately twice as long with the Palestinian Israeli conflict at this form twice as long as it has without. So to a large extent, it doesn't know itself without this contract. But we need to go back to the forming of the state of Israel and ask ourselves. What is design is dream what has designed vision, and I think it is very clear. It is a state for the Jewish people, a democratic state, or all the Jewish people now in order to have that we need to have a border which separates us from the two seven million Palestinians live in West Bend. If possible a border of peace, which.

West Bank AJC Israel Israeli government West Bend Samaria Avi Mayor director of communications Labor Party United Nations Jerusalem Center representative president Chris
"ajc global forum" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

03:30 min | 5 months ago

"ajc global forum" Discussed on People of the Pod

"Jersey served two terms as mayor of Newark before he became the longest serving Black Democrat currently in the Senate last year he addressed AJC Global Forum video as a twenty twenty presidential candidate on Wednesday, he sat down for a conversation with my colleague Julia Raymond Ajc's Deputy Director of policy and diplomatic affairs to share his thoughts on the fight for racial equality in the United States, and how the Jewish community can be effective allies. Here is a portion of that conversation. It is my great pleasure to introduce a leader in the fight for American civil. Rights and Racial Justice Senator. Cory Booker of New Jersey senator. Thank you so much for being with us today. Good to be with you, thank you, of course you've been on the ground floor of many recent bills to address racism from finally making lynching federal crime to the Justice Policing Act two, a bill to remove confederate statues from the capital. Recognizing that it has taken us four hundred years to get to this point in the much progress needs to be made. Can you help us understand? Is We prioritize advocacy? What's the hierarchy of knee in your appeal? Well first of all I. Just want to say thank you. Aj has been extraordinary champion for justice. You live so many of the highest ideals of Judaism. This idea that if I'm not for myself, who will be for me if I am only for myself. What am I if not now? And I think the thread that ties together all of the issues that I know you to your core justice equality in end to racism, anti-semitism bigotry of any kind I think a lot of this work on the bills that you mentioned have to deal with getting people's consciousness raised. We've become too comfortable with injustice in this country, if a criminal justice system that is way out of whack with the rest of humanity, we are the mass incarceration nation, incarcerating often the most vulnerable people into our prisons and jails people that need health care the need addiction treatment folks that are often in criminalized just for being poor and the challenges is most. Most of us just aren't aware of the injustices. What we see now across this country with people protesting in the streets, all fifty states, thousands of cities is that it's a wonderful thing that you see such diverse groups of folks who are confronting the injustices of our times, and so if there's an area for AJC to in terms of prioritizing, it's just that awareness where people need to be maladjusted to injustice again and need to recognize the are invested in the outcomes and to do nothing is complicity that mixed legislation passing a lot easier and a lot quicker a win. They're more Americans. Who Voices are demanding that we create real change. You? Make it sound sort of common sense, but sometimes the most common sense efforts ended up being really difficult I feel that way I have a very frustrating day as we're trying to get gearing going around the justice and policing issue, and I have to remind myself when I feel on days like this frustrated, or if like banging my head against implacable walls of resistance now. Now I have to remind myself that how long it took to pass civil rights legislation voting rights legislation, but people didn't give up and as we say the names of Brianna Taylor George Floyd let's just say their name, but remember the conviction of people who face the same wretchedness or worse Emmett till yet still found a way like Mamie..

Aj AJC Julia Raymond Ajc Cory Booker Senate Newark United States Senator Deputy Director of policy Jersey New Jersey senator Brianna Taylor George Floyd Mamie Emmett
"ajc global forum" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

03:18 min | 5 months ago

"ajc global forum" Discussed on People of the Pod

"Have seen in the Middle East in recent years, and you're alluding to that and the US has played an important role in you personally played an important role in this changes new thinking about Israel's place in the region while your government has always been clear about support for the Arab peace initiative and the creation of independent Palestinian state. There have been visits to the UAE by Israeli government ministers. What's the way forward to realizing that vision and what obstacles if any lie on the way? Fundamentally is can I have a political disagreement with Israel, but at the same time try and bridge other areas. I think I can't and I think this is fundamentally where we are today, we are for example facing hoover, nineteen challenge, and if I am able working with the UN and working with a through the with Israel, to try and bring support to the Palestinians very fragile health service A- Tetra How does that really affect my physician? Reserve the issues of the day such as for example, the proposed annexation I think sixty seventy years. Our relationship has shown that the. Breakup of the relationship between Israeli out of countries has increased animosity and built in my opinion is huge and Gulf. That could have been much easier to bridge in my opinion, so clearly the need today is. Out of consensus that basically looks at the solution as a two state solution, Hartselle. Do you A. also wants to see continual stadium is reading. The. Is clearly against any annexation as being used by the is later. Having said that that is the political now. Do I have to really look at all of the. And make them basically. Almost sort of static because of the political me, and I think we've tried that over many years as a group of Arab, countries and I. Don't think it has really led to what we want the bringing stability to that each. This is enlightening on fascinating and really encouraging on. Thank you for addressing the AJC Global Forum. And for your thoughtful, your candid observations and more than anything for the refreshing outlook that you and is Hynix Abella and the entire leadership of the consistently bring to the challenges, confronting the Middle East and the challenges confronting all of us who are dedicated to peace and progress in your region in conclusion I. WanNa, thank you I wanNA thank the UC and I. Want to show you that ideally you will continue on its path of moderation on its back of our specialty and on it's also leaching very successful and forward looking country in each. Academic Argyle. Senator Cory Booker of new..

Israel Middle East Senator Cory Booker UAE Hartselle AJC Global Forum UN Hynix Abella US Gulf
"ajc global forum" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

05:30 min | 5 months ago

"ajc global forum" Discussed on People of the Pod

"This week thousands of global Jewish advocates were supposed to have been in Berlin for the AJC Global Forum. Unfortunately, the pandemic had other plans, but we weren't just going to cancel our critical conference, so we took the global forum virtual all week. Thousands of people from around the world have been tuning in on AJC DOT ORG to watch high level addresses, intimate conversations and fierce debates over the future of Israel, America in Europe over the course of. Of this episode, we're going to bring you. Parts of those conversations Dr Anwar. Gosh is the United Arab Emirates Minister of State for Foreign Affairs this week. He joined the J. C. Virtual. Global Forum for conversation with his friend and our chief policy officer Jason Isaacson in doing so he became the highest level official from an Arab country without relations with Israel to publicly address an American Jewish audience. Let's listen in to some of that conversation now. I want to begin by thanking the distinguish minister, not only for taking the time to share his insights with AJC and our many thousands of guests on this virtual platform, but for the multiple times that he and his colleagues in the leadership of the UAE have met with AJC over the twenty plus years that we have been regularly traveling to his country in pursuit of regional peace and cooperation and understanding or meeting with government officials when they have visited the united. States Dr Guard Gosh. It's very good to see you again. Thank you, Jason. Thank you I'd like. Like to begin by thanking you for boosting need today and <hes> I that this would be opportunity for a frank and constructive discussion, which is much needed I want closer to take the opportunity to thank ag see for what has been quite remarkable bridge to the ridge. There has been an octave work that was done to numerous visits to all the countries of ragent, all the countries of the Gulf and I think this sort of visiting and understanding the food of Fiji sees. Look over this city has been quite busted sounded, so thank you very much for that. Thank you very much. His remarks Dr Garg. The has a proud tradition of philanthropy including major charitable dishes here in the United States. How has your country contributed to the global fight against Akron bars pandemic, and what is your assessment of international cooperation in this fight generally closer to home, please talk about public health cooperation across the Middle East. How successful has it been? How can it be improved going forward? What specific role has the UAE played and I note by the way that the has twice in recent weeks, Asakusa and medical aid to the Palestinians by Israel feel free to discuss that as As well. I would actually agree with lock analysts who have said that our national responses have been more important than what I recall regional responses or googlers, every country, really as sort of look into its own and thermal situation, and this raises a lot of issues rarely about global cooperation, regional cooperation on issues such as the CAL now. If you look really adept policy, it's interesting, because in my opinion, we have come with a very I would say organized which nationally which is allowed us to actually and pry and help others and Binat relations originally and. We I think done something very successfully. Separate. Elliptical from the humanity so here for example we have no relationship with is ran, but at the same time we have recognized that this isn't Adia that we need to cooperate together because it is one that edges human beings finally from the religious affiliations at. Let's look at the long term effects of the pandemic on. The long lockdown of the widespread in deep economic disruptions, the effect that they will have on regional stability and security. Not every country in the region has the kind of resources that the UAE. Does you throw in the recent plunge in oil prices on the crisis across the region really is amplified. Are you forecasting a regional power relationship restructuring a potential conflict between states, says spike and out-migration, perhaps from the Gulf states. Where do you see a softer landing after the pandemic? I would say that things will change and things will stay the scene. To suppose that fundamental issues that we have not been able to tackle for forty and fifty and sixty s will suddenly change overnight I think is expecting too much unfortunately, but at the same time I think that we need to try and work at the edges of. So clearly I think we need to avoid rhetoric that leads plus colletion. We need to avoid confrontation because everybody will be affected the dubs. Demographics guns. Economy and so on so

AJC Global Forum Israel AJC United Arab Emirates Minister Jason Isaacson Dr Anwar Stephie Cogan Berlin J. C. Virtual Dr Guard Fiji UAE Europe officer America
Highlights from the First-Ever AJC Virtual Global Forum

People of the Pod

05:30 min | 5 months ago

Highlights from the First-Ever AJC Virtual Global Forum

"This week thousands of global Jewish advocates were supposed to have been in Berlin for the AJC Global Forum. Unfortunately, the pandemic had other plans, but we weren't just going to cancel our critical conference, so we took the global forum virtual all week. Thousands of people from around the world have been tuning in on AJC DOT ORG to watch high level addresses, intimate conversations and fierce debates over the future of Israel, America in Europe over the course of. Of this episode, we're going to bring you. Parts of those conversations Dr Anwar. Gosh is the United Arab Emirates Minister of State for Foreign Affairs this week. He joined the J. C. Virtual. Global Forum for conversation with his friend and our chief policy officer Jason Isaacson in doing so he became the highest level official from an Arab country without relations with Israel to publicly address an American Jewish audience. Let's listen in to some of that conversation now. I want to begin by thanking the distinguish minister, not only for taking the time to share his insights with AJC and our many thousands of guests on this virtual platform, but for the multiple times that he and his colleagues in the leadership of the UAE have met with AJC over the twenty plus years that we have been regularly traveling to his country in pursuit of regional peace and cooperation and understanding or meeting with government officials when they have visited the united. States Dr Guard Gosh. It's very good to see you again. Thank you, Jason. Thank you I'd like. Like to begin by thanking you for boosting need today and I that this would be opportunity for a frank and constructive discussion, which is much needed I want closer to take the opportunity to thank ag see for what has been quite remarkable bridge to the ridge. There has been an octave work that was done to numerous visits to all the countries of ragent, all the countries of the Gulf and I think this sort of visiting and understanding the food of Fiji sees. Look over this city has been quite busted sounded, so thank you very much for that. Thank you very much. His remarks Dr Garg. The has a proud tradition of philanthropy including major charitable dishes here in the United States. How has your country contributed to the global fight against Akron bars pandemic, and what is your assessment of international cooperation in this fight generally closer to home, please talk about public health cooperation across the Middle East. How successful has it been? How can it be improved going forward? What specific role has the UAE played and I note by the way that the has twice in recent weeks, Asakusa and medical aid to the Palestinians by Israel feel free to discuss that as As well. I would actually agree with lock analysts who have said that our national responses have been more important than what I recall regional responses or googlers, every country, really as sort of look into its own and thermal situation, and this raises a lot of issues rarely about global cooperation, regional cooperation on issues such as the CAL now. If you look really adept policy, it's interesting, because in my opinion, we have come with a very I would say organized which nationally which is allowed us to actually and pry and help others and Binat relations originally and. We I think done something very successfully. Separate. Elliptical from the humanity so here for example we have no relationship with is ran, but at the same time we have recognized that this isn't Adia that we need to cooperate together because it is one that edges human beings finally from the religious affiliations at. Let's look at the long term effects of the pandemic on. The long lockdown of the widespread in deep economic disruptions, the effect that they will have on regional stability and security. Not every country in the region has the kind of resources that the UAE. Does you throw in the recent plunge in oil prices on the crisis across the region really is amplified. Are you forecasting a regional power relationship restructuring a potential conflict between states, says spike and out-migration, perhaps from the Gulf states. Where do you see a softer landing after the pandemic? I would say that things will change and things will stay the scene. To suppose that fundamental issues that we have not been able to tackle for forty and fifty and sixty s will suddenly change overnight I think is expecting too much unfortunately, but at the same time I think that we need to try and work at the edges of. So clearly I think we need to avoid rhetoric that leads plus colletion. We need to avoid confrontation because everybody will be affected the dubs. Demographics guns. Economy and so on so

Ajc Global Forum UAE Israel Jason Isaacson AJC United Arab Emirates Minister Dr Anwar United States Berlin Dr Garg Dr Guard Gulf J. C. Virtual CAL Europe Middle East Fiji America Binat Akron
"ajc global forum" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

02:22 min | 5 months ago

"ajc global forum" Discussed on People of the Pod

"Each week we take you beyond the headlines and help you understand what it all means for Israel, and the Jewish people I'm Stephie Cogan and I'm on Uber Sheer men. This week thousands of global Jewish advocates were supposed to have been in Berlin for the AJC Global Forum. Unfortunately, the pandemic had other plans, but we weren't just going to cancel our critical conference, so we took the global forum virtual all week. Thousands of people from around the world have been tuning in on AJC DOT ORG to watch high level addresses, intimate conversations and fierce debates over the future of Israel, America in Europe over the course of. Of this episode, we're going to bring you. Parts of those conversations Dr Anwar. Gosh is the United Arab Emirates Minister of State for Foreign Affairs this week. He joined the J. C. Virtual. Global Forum for conversation with his friend and our chief policy officer Jason Isaacson in doing so he became the highest level official from an Arab country without relations with Israel to publicly address an American Jewish audience. Let's listen in to some of that conversation now. I want to begin by thanking the distinguish minister, not only for taking the time to share his insights with AJC and our many thousands of guests on this virtual platform, but for the multiple times that he and his colleagues in the leadership of the UAE have met with AJC over the twenty plus years that we have been regularly traveling to his country in pursuit of regional peace and cooperation and understanding or meeting with government officials when they have visited the united. States Dr Guard Gosh. It's very good to see you again. Thank you, Jason. Thank you I'd like. Like to begin by thanking you for boosting need today and I that this would be opportunity for a frank and constructive discussion, which is much needed I want closer to take the opportunity to thank ag see for what has been quite remarkable bridge to the ridge. There has been an octave work that was done to numerous visits to all the countries of ragent, all the countries of the Gulf and I think this sort of visiting and understanding the food of Fiji sees..

AJC Global Forum Israel AJC United Arab Emirates Minister Jason Isaacson Dr Anwar Stephie Cogan Berlin J. C. Virtual Dr Guard Fiji UAE Europe officer America
"ajc global forum" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

04:33 min | 6 months ago

"ajc global forum" Discussed on People of the Pod

"Us such a robust discussion. Thank you you too for several years. Ajc has welcomed representatives from the my Muna Association to AJC Global Forum. My Muna is a nonprofit founded more than a decade ago by young Muslim students dedicated to preserving Jewish and culture in Morocco over the years my Muna. Ajc have put together the Moroccan Jewish University to introduce young Moroccan Muslims to the Jewish culture and Muslim Jewish dialogue. My Muna also has implemented Jewish Moroccan heritage days and other events to celebrate Jewish culture and it has developed educational resources about Moroccan Jewish history for high and Graduate Students. L. Medi Boudreau is the founder and president of my Muna and joins us now from robot L. Medi welcome to people at the POD. Thank you for having me with you know. Thank you for being here so I already tell our listeners. What gave you the idea to create my Muna back in two thousand seven you know. My Mona is culture. American NGO created seven by a group of young Moroccan Muslim student willing to promote and preserve the Moroccan Jewish Heritage Association was started at the university change because we find there is a gap between these all generation which all quitting US challenge Moroccan and the generation. Who Don't know nothing about two days and on top of all destroy types with the Israeli Palestinian conflict Association Muna has since expanded his activities on a national level in order to engage in education of the Moroccan us about American Jewish heritage. This organises particular achieve true the Moroccan Jewish days. Organize every year at campuses in Morocco. Like moreover like watch we can't say he's like in Morocco everywhere. Where we can go? You will find that. Today's sparks of the Moroccan national identity. And it's here in. Morocco are really proud of the diversity of our identity. We don't see diversity as a threats but we see it as an opportunity to build a better future in our country you know in miracle before the independence of the country we.

Moroccan Jewish University Moroccan Jewish Heritage Assoc my Muna Association Morocco Association Muna American Jewish heritage AJC Global Forum L. Medi Boudreau founder and president American NGO US POD
"ajc global forum" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

10:56 min | 7 months ago

"ajc global forum" Discussed on People of the Pod

"Place and there were loads of different sections of the party. Dot Stu make a place that I wouldn't rejoin. I do know people young Jewish people who have rejoined the Labor Party having resigned from antisemitism for me. It's not the right time yet. I don't know when it will be auto say. Want to see the results of the chassis report coming out but who knows when this story was leaked on twitter it was just more factional infighting more bickering more accusations of Anti Semitism. And I just thought you know. Is this a party? That is even working to change the country or are they just working to shout at each other until they prove that they are forced for good in the UK like home. Look at rejoining. Okay Well Hannah. Thank you so much for joining us. And all of us here at people the pod. Hope that you are staying safe and staying healthy and staying sane. Thank you thank you. Thank you so much for having me. Now it's time for our closing segment. Chabad table talk and joining us at our table. This Week is Jessica Steinberg the culture editor at The Times of Israel. Jessica when you're talking with your family and friends that you're Shabat table this week. What are you gonNA be talking about well for the first time in a very long time? We're going to have other people at our Chabad table so we'll talk. Yes I'm married and I have twin eleven year old sons and we've been together for many weeks now for many meals but my sister lives up the block and she's married with three kids and her youngest who is twenty three and has down syndrome is living at home with them and they will be coming to us for dinner and that is a big deal for obvious reasons. And I think we're going to be talking about the fact that here in Israel were we are emerging a little bit more than a little kids from first through third are going back to school on Sunday in smaller groups and and staggered staggered. Hours kindergarten. Kids might also be going back. The government is going to decide that Finally tomorrow my kids are in fifth grade. So they're not going back and yet at the same time we're feeling this return to some level of normalcy and that's what we're GONNA be talking about at the table as we eat together with our extended family as we of course eat homebake Kala. Which now I've been doing for eight weeks and is much better than the bakery stuff I bet right and we're eating a lot of asparagus all the time. Because Israeli farmers who haven't been able to export their produce or sell it to hotels and restaurants have been selling it and it's been coordinated by all these what's at groups all over the country so I have made mounds of Pesto and tons of ASPARAGUS and fresh. Rosemary is on everything. And those are the things we're going to be talking about because we're sort of reintroducing what's been going on in this around the table together for the first time and what feels like a very long time. Well you should raise Lewis. I am to normalcy. Hopefully we here in. The states are not too far behind you money. What are you guys? GonNa be talking about at your table this week. Well Steffi Jessica. Hac recently released a list of ten nonfiction. Titles that help readers understand why? Israel observes its independence and Memorial Day's side-by-side staff recommended five books that addressed Israel struggled to defend itself and five books that talked about the progress. Israel has made and the contributions it has made to the rest of the world but there was one thing missing from the list which is so often the case women. That's not to say. The titles aren't good their incredible even definitive works of history and journalism. But unfortunately including no books by women is a shortcoming that takes a concerted effort to overcome. I encountered this challenge a lot as a religion reporter across the religious spectrum. I'd report a story. And just when I thought my reporting was complete would realize I had quoted all men. I would scramble to find a woman's voice to insert and sadly more often than I care to recall. Women often declined to comment or suggested someone better suited a man. I became more and more wear in the process of reporting as well as transparent telling women how important it was to me that our voices included in the conversation sometimes worked. Sometimes it didn't in this case. There were several women who already had written works of nonfiction tied to the Israeli journey. Historian Anita Shapira has written a dozen books and biographies on Israeli leaders that shape the nation's struggle from Bulgarian to Brenner in her collection of essays. The Art of leaving I yell at Sabari Recounts Her story of leaving. Israel after serving in the IDF and returning ever so often to examine and come to terms with her Jewish Mizrahi identity and her family. History Fania sells burger the daughter of Hamas but herself in Israeli historian and writer wrote a moving account of Israelis in Berlin exploring the question of whether ties between Israel and Germany could ever become normal after the Holocaust that was in two thousand and one. I'm sure she would have been intrigued to see. Ajc Global Forum in Berlin before AJC cancelled it to keep everyone safe from the corona virus and these are just nonfiction authors. There are a number of novelists whose fiction reveals more truth than some historians can the importance of women and their voices. That's what we'll be talking about at archambault table. But now I turn to you guys Seffei Jessica. What books about Israel's history by women would you recommend well in the realm of nonfiction? I tend to be almost always on a history. Binge Anita Shapira is one of the foremost living Israeli historians and her book Israeli history is magisterial and actually probably about. Oh you know what? It was exactly. Two years ago on a young hearts but podcast that I interviewed Francine Klagsbrun about her then new biography of mayor lioness which is phenomenal. Cool Call Jessica. How about you? Well I have to say that. S- I was looking on myself the other day because of course cleaning out weeding out on my shelves and I came across St John's all the rivers with her. Two Thousand Fourteen tells the love story of a Palestinian man and Israeli woman who meet in New York and put it on my night table. And I've been sort of rereading parts of it partially because it takes place in New York and even though it says outsiders view of New York. I'm a New Yorker originally and I what's been going on with the krona virus in New York to says made me want to see read hear as much of New York Miss As I possibly can but of course it's a it's a story and it's taken on this historical context here in Israel about you know. Even though there's a coronavirus they're still the Israeli Palestinian conflict. And this is a story that kind of normalize it in a sense. And that's hard that's hard for Israelis it's hard for Palestinians. It's hard for everyone and it's something that you can think about. Of course Amounts mode and Israel Independence Day which seventy two years in still got the same problems. But but you know this kind of reading During the book is really masterful. I think and pushes you pushes you to think. Think about what could be what you'd like it to be what it could be over. The next year is and maybe that would possibly ever happen. So that's what I'm looking at. Oh I do like to be pushed. Saffy what are you going to be talking about your table? Well back in my camp. Ramadi as one of my favorite educational activities was learning about the different early streams of Zionism. There was never one right way to be as INS Theodor Herzl. The father of modern Zionism believed that through the practice of politics. Jews could convince the world to grant the mistake. That's why his approach was called political Zionism Labor Zionists like David Ben Gurion drew on the socialist principles popular at the time and said it's not enough to ask the world for a state we need to go out and work the fields and build one religious. Ins Like Rabbi Avraham. Yitzhak Cohen Cook. Believe that the creation of a Jewish state was the expression of God's will on earth and revision Zionism the branch founded by Zebra within ski and lead to power Menachem begging emphasize territorial maximalism getting as much of historic land of Israel as possible. Now why am I talking about all this because they wanted us to get creative? And our counselors offered many other types of Zionism to choose from one that struck a chord with me and that one of my friends claims her own personal ideology to this day is culinary Zionism. And that's the forum. My family and I practiced on Wednesday of this week as we celebrated Israel's Seventy-second Independence Day though we skip the typical lavish Israeli breakfast of eggs and cheese and salads and pastries. It was a work day in America after all my sister and I made Chuck Shuka for the family and our first attempt at the dish featuring eggs poached in a simmering tomato and pepper. Stu was a great success then for dinner my mom fried up delicious chicken Schnitzel which we ate with sides of philophical and Hummus is rarely salad. French fries with Tina drizzled Oliver it. It's hard for me to believe this now but I was in Israel just two months ago. Something about the knowledge that right. Now I can't go. There makes me miss it so much more. And I'm feeling very in touch with my culinary Zionism right now missing the Middle Eastern foods from Zura in Jerusalem's math noodle market and the way too sweet way to caloric overloaded waffles from waffle bar of macrame and the Schnitzel from peanuts and the shucks Shuka from small she'll show-me and the Brunch at cafe and the philosopher Shawarma from Hello Tame on which is literally attached to a gas station. But some of the Best I've ever had and I'm missing ice cream from absolutely anywhere in the country and some of the more high end dishes have gotten to eat at eighteen forty eight and Malka and Lumina and blue sky where you sit atop the Carlton Hotel and look out over the beautiful tel-aviv Beach Below. I missed the snacks you can buy disraeli convenience stores on Yom hats mood celebrating all of it and so many other beautiful layers and nuances to our Jewish state of Israel so to all of our listeners. Let me wish you a belated cots. Some ask a joyous celebration of this festival of independence and from all of us Chabad Shalom Shalom Subodh Salaam. Everyone you can subscribe to people of the.

Israel Steffi Jessica Anita Shapira The Times Israel Independence Day New York twitter UK Labor Party Chabad Shalom Shalom Subodh Sa archambault table Jessica Steinberg Seffei Jessica Berlin Theodor Herzl Middle Eastern homebake Kala AJC Stu Ramadi
"ajc global forum" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

09:49 min | 1 year ago

"ajc global forum" Discussed on People of the Pod

"Dr Kirk Graham is the director of the Harry. S Truman Presidential Library in Independence Missouri next year will be seventy five years since Truman succeeded. FDR's president and an anticipation of that anniversary sorry the Truman Library has undertaken a major renovation. Kurt join me in studio last week for a wide ranging and fascinating conversation on the importance of history. Sorry the founding of the State of Israel and Truman's legacy today Kurt. Thank you so much joining us great to be here. I WANNA start with kind of a Meta question from that thirty thousand in foot view before even dive into Truman. Why is it important to study history well. I mean if you think about where we've been that gives us. A good sense of is it provides context for where we are so I think the main reason to study history is to get context for your own time but also to expand your your experience we all lead fairly limited lives and I think you go back in the past and meet characters in the past for the same reason you take a plate of cookies and go meet your neighbors because that that expands your horizons expand your experience. It introduces you to people who don't think an act and talk and look like you do and I think that's always very beneficial. There's an interesting kind of debate. The in the community of historians think about or maybe a debate in the general public about whether history repeats itself your typical historian would say no but you can still learn something thing from history about maybe not learn about the future but as long as we know the lessons of history it can inform the way we address the future. Where where do you fall out. I think yeah I mean I think that people who who are fearful that somehow we're not learning the lessons of history. We're doomed to repeat some catastrophic decision. The fact of the matter is the context. The circumstances are always different so you you can't go back and say well see we learned this from World War. Two or we learned I mean honestly one of the reasons that Vietnam went the way it did is because we were applying the lessons of World War Two and it was a very different kind of engagement and so I I is obviously very worthwhile to study history to know ourselves better and to have a broader experience because it just makes us better the decision makers in general but the idea that we can go back and figure out what you know what Abraham Lincoln do in this situation well you know I mean you know people. Ask that all the time. What would the founders under. Do you know around this. You know global warming or something well. That was the furthest thing from their mind. They wouldn't have even known where to start with that question so we need to be bold enough to make our own decisions and not try to pass it off on other people who you know grab a quote and taken out of context and say we'll see here's what Emerson would have done or here's what Jefferson would have done well yeah. Maybe I'm picturing someone explaining leaning twitter to Abraham Yeah. I'm not sure how that would and trying to explain it. Not only one hundred forty characters Kurt your. AJC AJC story starts in two thousand eighteen at the AJC global forum in Jerusalem when you spoke on our main stage and you said quote you believe there's no better place in the United United States to tell the story of the founding of Israel than the Truman Library for our listeners who don't know that part of history. Can you tell us about Truman's role in the rebirth of modern Israel well. It is just to pick up on that on that statement. I appreciate you starting there. Because there is no other place there is no other museum. There is no other think tank. There is no other sort of university department or unit that is pursuing this important question and the thing that is important to me is that Harry Truman literally changed the map of the world. The fact that this farmer from Missouri became president it says a lot about a lot of things but it does have an impact on the world far beyond just farmers in Missouri so certainly his decision and desire hire to recognize Israel immediately upon its declaration and to have been concerned about that problem to have been concerned about the Holocaust about the DP camp. Some of this had been playing him for years. This was not oh he got three memos and you know sort of weighed this in in an afternoon decided what to do this decision which was momentous. Mantis was years in the making and and it speaks to the heart not just a crisis in the world and what needed to be done it speaks to WHO Harry Truman was he always was concerned about people who are being abused or or taking advantage of some ways I mean his civil rights. Legacy speaks to that he was ahead of his time in terms of an I don't know maybe that's not even the right phrase ahead of his time. He was concerned about others. It was a very basic principle whole there's a humanity to that. There's there's a reality that that Truman just always went back to kind of moral core when he made those kinds of decisions. I'm glad you mentioned that and Holocaust there. If I recall correctly Truman spoke at a rally in either New York or Chicago in Chicago. It was called. I'd like Rally for our Doom Jewish brothers in Europe something like that right to demand rescue the doom Jews I believe was the phrase and this was where where was this was in nineteen forty three when he was still in the US Senate yeah so he was a little known political figure at that time I mean he was getting known and being known for the Truman Committee which he went around the country in a crisis that we have on display at the museum the traveled No no first class jet travel in those days so he went from place to place and he was investigating fraud and abuse in government contracts around military installations and that kind of thing so so that was kind of what he was known for him he was getting known a a sort of a a guy that really knew how to find waste and fraud and the budget and whatnot but the idea that he was this voice for the underdog that he was this great humanitarian this champion the rights of other people even though those of us who look back on his career well of course I mean this was this was this was this was growing all along but the fact of the matter is that speech in Chicago was was a turning point for the rest of the world to hear from him with with that kind of clarity and this is a young senator with ambition establishing a foreign policy credential or this is just someone who feels called to speak out against injustice in the world. Oh I think it's I think but I think it's more the latter. I mean I really don't. I don't know that Truman at that time. I think that you know not only was he not necessarily trying to carve out his exact thing. You know we're we're used to the United States Senate Senate today being a place where as soon as people get there they start thinking about how they get on the ticket and what they do to position themselves for that next bump Truman was a senator senator. He was very hesitant to become vice president he wanted to stay in the Senate. you spoke a little bit about what the founding of if Israel would have meant to Truman and certainly what it meant for the world. Can you just back up a little bit and tell us the story you know my understanding is that kind of all of his advisors here in the states. All of his official advisors were saying you pump the brakes right so what happens in. May Nineteen forty eight well you know it is an interesting moment and it is not a moment that would be the easy to predict. I mean if you didn't know how the story turned out and somebody said okay. Here's all the data points leading up to this decision. How do you think it's going to go. I don't think you can clearly guess us what is going to happen because I think the decision was rooted. Not In policy not in the particulars was rooted in character and it was rooted in this deeper kind of humanity yeah the story was was that Truman with these DP camps and we had the Harrison report. He had all these things telling him look things are not good in Europe. These people are displaced in many cases. Don't have homes to go back to so this idea of a of a partition plan of the following through on the Balfour Declaration. which was you know? World War One product which basically basically promised the Jews a homeland and Truman just felt that that's something that should be honored but you're right. I mean he had to go against his own State Department. Many of his I mean including General Marshall who was very close friend mentor advisor someone he respected probably more than anybody else at the time he also had a to grapple with an ally the British who were were not wanting to take people from Europe allow them to land in in and with a called Palestine because they didn't you know the problems at that would create from their perspective but Truman valued and follow that partition plan that idea of sort of what we would call today a two-state solution didn't go that way obviously but but nevertheless it was something that he felt was important so when when the country was going to be declared this this new nation was going to be sort of birthed if you will he was right there within literally within hours of that declaration the United States recognized the new state of Israel. There's this famous story of high invites men who would go on to be the first president of Israel was in D. C. and the Jews in mandatory Palestine the Jewish community designers community unity in America kind of thought that the best chance for US recognition I think would be vitamins sat down with Truman and there's a fellow named Eddie Jacobson who kind of facilitates dates this right right the so Jacobsen is a as a World War Two buddy of Truman's they ran the commissary together and then after the war they went into business together in in Kansas City and that's the you've heard the failed haberdashery clothing store that went out the because the economy was bad they couldn't make a go of it but he Jacobsen Simpson Jacobson of course with Jewish and they were very close friends which when you go back into that time thinking about a southern Baptist an Jew being close enough friends to to actually go into business together you know I it speaks a lot about about Truman. I think even even then but they went into business and you know when that business failed. Truman's mom was the KKK supporter or something they were there. These overcoming some family history overcoming civil rights legacy the same..

Harry Truman Truman Presidential Library Israel Truman Truman Committee United States president Kurt Europe Missouri Senate Abraham Lincoln FDR Dr Kirk Graham AJC World War One senator State Department
"ajc global forum" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

14:36 min | 1 year ago

"ajc global forum" Discussed on People of the Pod

"We'll chat with experts from around the world to help you better understand the weeds headlines and what they all mean for Israel and the Jewish people. I'm your host Seffi Kogen. DC Van is the director of AJC's Arthur. and Rachelle Belfer Institute for Latino and Latin American affairs. She joins us now to fill us in on her recent trip to Winter Cyrus to talk about the nineteen ninety-four for Armenia bombing there in the capital of Argentina and to discuss recent developments in the way that Argentina treats the Hezbollah terrorist organization position Deana. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you so much if he once again many of our listeners don't remember the early nineties but this past week marked the twenty the fifth anniversary of a horrible tragic event in Argentina. Can you tell us about the one thousand nine hundred four bombing of the Jewish community center in Buenos Aires of course if the July eighteenth nineteen ninety-four was really a day that change perceptions not only of Argentina's gene jewelry and Argentinian society as a whole but I believe of world jewelry and also Latin America in general on July fourteenth a van exploded in front of Amu- which is I'm just glad he's that I leave that hinting that it is the let's say like the Jewish family service of Argentina the institutional heart of Argentinian jewelry and resulting in eighty five dead and hundreds of wounded it was a the lobbyists and the worst anti Semitic attack at that moment in world and as I said it really had a terrible effect on the sense of security of Argentinian jewelry and of Argentina as continues society as a whole two years before he nineteen ninety-two we have to remember there was another terrorist attack that took place in these rayleigh the embassy windows so this you know having a second attack two years later undertaken by John and his lap was really a a an incredible effect in Argentina's a hole and you know the twenty five years later. Unfortunately nobody has been brought to justice and for twenty twenty five years we have really encountered you know all kinds of promises from the government from different governments Tina to tale well. Do you know you anticipate my next question because whenever something like this happens one of the first questions that is on everyone's lips. Is You know who did this. Who carried this this out? You just said very authoritatively that both bombings were carried out by Iran and Hezbollah but I don't believe that Argentina has ever been quite so oh why is that why has no one been brought to justice for these attacks. Argentina has been definitive. I'm in two thousand and six legal ready had identified his Iran as those responsible and in fact during the Interpol meeting in two thousand and five they we had prosecutor Special Prosecutor Alberto knees man who we can. You know I'm sure will come up in later questions but Alberto needs man already had had been very successful in having red alerts raised two four six individuals five live high government officials of Iran and won his up red alerts were already in place and it was a clear charge that that's you know Iraq is responsible for that so they have have has been they have been identified but there's very little that can be done by urgency Agentina without being trained national community putting pressure also on this country so that has been a huge problem and last week fortunately President Moldy Sumati the incumbent president of Argentina finally created a registry Ed Bouchette decree by presidential decree that identifies individuals a terrorist individuals organizations including his Orla so this is really one of the concrete step in the right direction by the Argentine government but we have known about Iran in his for many many years. This is probably a naive question but why attack Argentina what beef did Iran have with Argentina. There's all all kinds of hypotheses you know which have been put forth bud that one of the reasons why it could happen is because they could because you had a country were security was lax were corruption existed and therefore you could enlist local resources and people to help you undertake the attack because two years before you already had had at an attack against Israeli embassy nothing had been done and when there's impunity we know that we're you're setting the groundwork for other attacks to happen. I and you had the six large as you have the six largest Jewish community in the world the largest Latin American Jewish community so if Iran wanted to send the message that it was a right place to do it. You mentioned Alberto Nissan who had been the special prosecutor in Argentina four four for decades working on this until he was shockingly found dead in his apartment. just a couple of years ago. What what is the Nissan Story? How is it that he had so much success in identifying you know following back the footprints and yet was stymied in some key ways and then what happened to him yeah well Alberto newsmen who was a personal friend of AJC David Harris and and I had the chance to meet with him many times in window side is ending Washington and in fact when the Interpol red alerts were established established when he came back from a ruckle we weren't window scientists and really we were the first organization together with our partners that he met with the to let us know what had happened so there was a very close partnership relationship so we really were distraught when we heard the news again? There's a lot of theories that are floating their hypotheses about what happened to him now we know that he was murdered at some point. They said that he committed suicide. But now I think it's very clear that he was murdered. and he was appointed by President Nestor Gift Schnitt in two thousand thousand five the Tiffany bursary of the attack to look into what Willie was What's left of the evidence? One of the problems albums was that evidence had been tampered with and contaminated and he was able to recreate whatever way he could this evidence this and get to the conclusion that Iran and his beloved were responsible for that of course he got help from the United States he got help from Israel he got help from other services services intelligence services and therefore he was successful in doing so unfortunately you know he had discovered that the alleged there was some alleged charges against it President Cristina Kirchner incumbent President Cristina Kirchner she she can sign a memorandum of understanding with Iran and dates bumped that was very criticized by JC by international Jewish Jewish community by the families of the victims and many nurturing Tina because you know it's you cannot invite those who are victimized or to try to find you know to try to clarify the case so it was kind of ridiculous to do so but it was you know was that they were trying to come to some agreement agreement with Iran you know economic agreement and then you know kind of under undermined investigations and needs was about out to declare before Congress when he was found dead now. We don't know if that was the reason why he was assassinated. We don't know there were other reasons why he was assassinated. Everything's speculation. What remains is that you know? His murder remains a mystery Jaaz as the case in many any respects and this is a huge sane on Argentina which is a country of loss in a country that believes that it has to clarify in this cases so dino. Let me see if I have this timeline right in nineteen ninety-two Iran and its terror clients blow up a van Dan outside the Israeli embassy in Buenos Aires and I think killing twenty something people and in nineteen ninety four they blow up a van outside ride the AMIGA building this Jewish community center this social service center killing eighty five people wounding three hundred people at some point after Nineteen Nineteen Ninety four the Argentine government enters into this agreement with Iran some kind of an economic support from Iran in exchange range for not pursuing the case further in two thousand and five Alberto Newsman is appointed nonetheless as a special investigator and it does Incredible Investigative Work Traces this conclusively to your on Gets Interpol red notices placed on six Iranian people all who are responsible for the attack continues doggedly pursuing the history here the facts and then about ten years after that is murdered murdered on the eve of when he's about to present evidence against the then president of Argentina to the country's legislative body is that right that is right. That's that's that's. That's a movie in the Movie Continue Surfing. The movie continues because you know we we now have of course president McAfee has been very committed to seeing the the case move forward so now he did this decree that I told you about this registry and he really wants to stem the activities taste of Hezbollah you know and and all of its operatives in the region including the tribe or their area which is this area so were Argentina Brazil Argentina Paraguay come together and it's a no man's land where there's were his bully supposed to be doing money laundering activities and were the mastermind of the attack against them. Mia came from so president Oh has has done a lot at so far to move the process forward but to be very honest with you. We believe that the Argentine state in general has has been really at fault here. You know we want to be optimistic. Who wants to be hopeful but at the end of the day because of what you have described described you know we are skeptical? We are skeptical we many times. We've heard you know that new developments are taking place than things are moving in the the right direction and then we are we are totally a frustrated and disappointed well Dina as you know at the twenty one thousand nine hundred. AJC Global Forum in Washington Lewis on Magro the secretary general of the Organization of American States which is you know kind of like the EU of of Latin America. Oh that's that's that's not exactly the perfect analogy but he announced that the Os would now be viewing Hezbollah as a terrorist organization. you mentioned this very welcome. Step by President Mockery. Do we think that other Latin American nations are going to follow suit. I think it was very important that last week you also had a ministerial or second ministerial counter-terrorism convened by the United States Tena when Secretary of state bomb bail was there and he's a there was a ceremony Nambia where you had many ministers of Security Curitiba and foreign ministers and of course we had the president and members of Congress that went to window side is especially for the occasion and the message was very clear by the foreign minister. If Argentina Argentina cannot do it on its own and that's the reason why Iran is Bola have prevailed all these years without any punishment in they don't even recognize her culpability and this has to do with the fact that Latin American countries and the world at large have remaining the difference was certain extent and in fact many of the Iranian government officials that have red alerts against him have traveled around around the world. I've been in China. They've been Russia. They've been in Bolivia and they have not been extradited. So you know even the Latin American community. He doesn't come together the nations of the Americas. Don't come together and follow Argentina in what it's doing. You know there's no hope there's no hope the same thing around the world with with Hezbollah the only way that we can fight effectively is by all of us understanding that terrorism arisen doesn't recognize any boarders and that we're all vulnerable to its effects and we're all complicit if we don't do anything to stop it so so you know we are going to be undertaken as you can imagine AJC through our institute. We're GONNA be undertaking now a very and we've already in the process of up doing it a very firm campaign to convince other countries in the region to follow in Argentina's food sticks otherwise otherwise.

Argentina Iran Hezbollah president Argentina Brazil Argentina Par Interpol AJC Israel Buenos Aires Alberto Seffi Kogen Latin America President Cristina Kirchner President Nestor Gift Schnitt prosecutor Latin American community United States Congress