34 Burst results for "Ajay"

"ajay" Discussed on Mosaic of China

Mosaic of China

06:56 min | 6 months ago

"ajay" Discussed on Mosaic of China

"You have made in china. Every time i buy something on tau it's the worst thing you can buy impulse buying things. You look at picture. You don't know what you bought at one point of time. I decided i'm going to quit smoking. I ended up buying mahogany e pipes. That look like sherlock holmes. Actual mahogany pipes look like pipes but were pipes of this. Is your midlife crisis. They not a good thing. I i did buy a projector one of my first purchases from talbot and that was a good one eight still in the box. I haven't opened it. I don't know dude. You are the worst impulse. There's interval between this being recorded and going out so old checkup on. You unwrapped okay. What is your favorite. We chat sticker. But one i sent quite often and i've been known to send it to. My friends is Happy friday sticker. I don't. I don't actually look for the sticker. It just comes up in a right. Tgif it's become a thing that i send a whole bunch of friends Happy friday sipa cute so simple. But i've never seen it before. Actually what is your go-to to to sing at k tv. I've never been to katy agenda show katie's dodgy okay. I know what image you have of them. No it's about singing joyfully sir Really well and now. I'm never going to get a chance. Because my daughter's got microphones at home yet with that speaker system and they will never let me they own them. The ass of they want me to appreciate that thing Shocked doodoo whatever. You're not allowed to sing about one. Okay next one what other china-related media falsity rely on sitting join cars all day. I've got a lot of time to listen to things. Second multitask dot. And i started audiobooks and got into podcasting so i listened to a hell of a lot of stuff does obviously mosaic of china. Now i subscribe to the communist. And i listened to the whole economists covered cover and that has a very very good and china's action does the sinica podcast which is very good bbc. News always seems to have something on china but for me the the economist china sections every week you get the best bits yeah. Aj fascinating compensation. Thank you so much. It's been a great experience being here. And before i let you go back to work. Probably the last thing i would ask you is who would you recommend that. I interviewed for the next series of mosaic of china. I recommend somebody who quit his career and moved into a very creative field and his prolific and his work and express his work and very successful than geico soup and obviously shang. I transformed him. great. I can't to meet few thank you so much for that and thank you for your time today. Aj brilliant. Thanks a lot so the biggest. I have to share if that after around a decade in china. Aj and his family have recently said goodbye. They are now in mumbai where aj has taken up the position of head of advanced design at the indian. Auto company mahindra. Well that also means is that we are now free to say that at the time of this interview. Aj was working at the chinese company. Geely spelled g. e. e. l. y. When written in english and the company he worked at before that was saic motor. I'm also relieved to report that. Aj had found an apartment in mumbai had unpacked his container from shanghai and had moved his father up from bangalore just before the country went into its most recent corona virus locked down so i wish him and anyone else listening to this in india all the very best as with the previous twenty episodes of the season. If you want to hear more from the conversation with aj. There's an extra fifteen minutes into dave premium version of the show which you can subscribe to on again in china or on patriot. Everywhere else had to say of china dot com for instructions on how to subscribe. And here's a little taste of get. It's such a dynamic and changing world right. now there's going to be self driving cars driving buses that focus. I still see a driving. Around and movies seethed america. All over the world actually. They don't have one hundred years of knowledge so they make a lot of mistakes and then there's a lot of things. Starting that all adds to the excitement and the experience but one point that was one hundred fifty. I believe new electric cars startups in china. It's going to be very difficult very soon to tell the difference between European car or chinese. Yeah you can change direction. You can change the course of the country. There are some nice connections between aj and other episodes of the show. First of all the object he chose. The sketchbook was the same as chosen by the journalist. Eric lander from season one episode three. They both obsessively carry their objects to jot down ideas. Be they words or in pictures. Aj said that car design sits in between the well. It's of fashion design and architecture. So be sure to check out the episodes with the fashion designer. Upto john from season one episode. Thirty and the architect. Wendy saunders from episode twelve this season when aj said about the chinese that said if their innovation this is the same as the favorite fact from gena lee. The innovation theo from season. One episode six and finally. Aj's choice of shanghai as his favorite destination in china whilst the same as a luzio the marketer at colour from season one episode five and john jay win the humanities professor at shanghai jiao tong university from three of season two last but not least. Don't forget to check out the images alongside today show on social media. You can find us on instagram and facebook or connect with me on my which at id mosaic of china and ask you to a listeners group there among a bunch of images you'll find aj with his object. If favourite happy friday we chat sticker and selection of him inaction including with the geometry range of electric cars that he designed for g. League china is me. Oscar fuchs with artwork by bennie. Newell thank you as always for listening especially if you've made it this far and we'll be back again next week..

Eric lander india mahindra china john jay bangalore shanghai mumbai next week Wendy saunders one hundred years bennie fifteen minutes twenty episodes today facebook talbot bbc Thirty and the architect aj
"ajay" Discussed on Mosaic of China

Mosaic of China

20:25 min | 6 months ago

"ajay" Discussed on Mosaic of China

"Little emperor image res- I i think most of the european young guys would not really listen to an old guy in the studio. It'd be more competitive. The way did try to show the superiority and the ambition younger chinese designers. They want to learn i. They want to simulate the knowledge when they think they've learned enough. They stopped becoming entitled door challenging a competitive. But then they've it right. They've earned it for sure. And then it's what the chinese industries doing right now where they've realized that we've learned how to make us. We've leapfrogged in terms of technology We've got into electric cars and we have probably better than anyone else before. And we've done it faster than anyone else Way faster than the koreans before them and japanese before them. So you see this confidence. That's just building in just the same way you see it on the country scale and i see it on the personal scale for me. I'm not a coffee fanatic. So when i chinese car i didn't really pay attention to it. Like what are the brands like. There's about five hundred brands. What the about five hundred car brands and all of them are difficult to really know. Many of them belong to a big conglomerate. You'd think it's a different brand. But actionaid's part of dongfang group the the the other groups and every state every region seems to have these big industrial players that big employers and they've got multiple brands and then there's also all these little start ups. I don't know this for a fact that i can imagine somebody up. Top says a look. We manufacture way too many cars but we can't shut those factories down because a lot of people are dependent on those jobs. And that's what we used to bring people out of poverty into the middle classes and now we got to do something else with us. Factories and semi says yeah. We're gonna make delivery drones. All mars exploration veihcles or whatever and the fact that they've got their eyeballs in. The future is just going to propelled this country. Further and further well. Let's pivot back to you. Because i'm sure there are people out there who understand cars more than i do and they're shouting asked him about the car design. So here's what. I'm going to ask you first of all so now you're in this current setup. How many people are in your design studio in. Why don't you talk me through all the different people you work with. So i mean firstly no matter how well you know cars. I don't think anybody appreciates that. A car has over thirty thousand different pieces to go together but it is a really complicated piece of industrial engineering in mass production. I guess when you compare with a piece of furniture that you compare the mobile phone as well you know which is which people consider very sophisticated manufactory. You you take it apart. And there's not that much that goes in there and there are a lot of regulations to keep you alive in a crash to keep you safe to keep you moving you moving at one hundred kilometers an hour and everything that you touch or feel or conc- on the car has been designed by somebody so while the dream of design or the image of car design somebody sitting in sketching beautiful exterior. There's a lot of putting together little bits and pieces and in a design studio. We've got designers who designed the exterior. But then you'd have some who are specializing in lamps and other details We split up into six different as people. Who do the branding. There's people do all the communication all the publicity. The logos the way project ourselves beyond the cause Including the motor shows the dealerships typically Design today will have some influence on the dealership Point of sale two colors even the costumes of the hostesses which is also pot off car design thought if god design right and then you've got what i do people who do strategy where we look at the plan for the next ten years. Look at synergies look at different products. Look at different different situation. Points try to create vision for the future that can then be translated into the all the other projects today. you know. you've got people doing the software or the interaction. The screen human machine interface faith. Hmi and then there's Will be called color material. Finish designers so a car is the only product that sold in a multitude of different colors. Specifications mccollum trim levels each of them should look homogeneous take shoes for example. You get a pair of fatty desk trade as maybe three or four color choices on one physical object you know apple did five different colors. And it's like wow. I probably got ten fifteen different permutations combinations and then all those colors and all those finishes need to work together. And then there's always special edition spo traditions. Then we've got casts smarter learners Physical klay sculptors fabrication specialists. Who make things out of hot materials of that that level of craft in there. It's like a massive factory. I call it the creativity factory here. Then we've got to have an area to take the car outside because when you look at a car inside it's not in its right environments. You've gotta take it outside to look at it in reality in nature and against other cars with natural light I don't know i would say it's like going to the zoo. And looking at a tiger or going to the getty and seeing the lions hunter something and of course you're not working in isolation you have to work with the marketing team. You have to work with the engineers right like you have to work out. What looks good but what. He's actually possible to right. Yeah unfortunately we do. What is a general interaction that you are likely to have with either department. The marketing departments a tricky one. Because they know what selling right now they have a lot of data and it gets more and more. They have a lot of intel dana. what's successful. They don't hot and very often that clouds their judgment of what could be successful in the next five years. So it's really difficult to try and explain to them that they need to look beyond. Today we have a hunch which is what we have because we don't have that kind of data receive a trend towards this. We're going to extrapolate that. So that's with marketing. How about then the engineers. For example most of the engineers are very very specialized and organizationally. they're also very siloed. I remember my first job. That was a lady. She was called badge component engineer and she was fighting with the water jet engineer. Because the badge was interfering with the water jeff on the back of the focus so teddy thousand pots. Each of them has a specialization of engineers. Who know how they made. And then they probably have different suppliers for each of these puffs who have another expertise so they look at really really really a small section of what the big picture is. And they got very fixated on that focusing on their project or their car and they don't look at the bigger picture of the brand of the whole lineup of cars which is really challenging right. It's the interaction between the idealism. The creativity of designing versus the practicality the cost control of the reality of making this car right here. Yeah thank god we have something called concept because and that's when design as can show a vision of the future without the constraints And a little bit of breathing room as it were but then you get people looking at it and oh why didn't you make that com- if you get it. I didn't that company make exactly that because of the cost constraints because of the cost because time because of technology yet concept cars are rolling creative ideas there the cure of fashion. How i can see exactly what you mean with the parallel between design and fashion design. Now yeah yeah. Have you seen 'cause on the market where you think. Oh i can tell exactly what went wrong in the process where perhaps designer too far or perhaps the engineer rain things in like. Can you see on the road examples of when that's happened. Woo i really try not to judge other people's work what we should be getting judged by employed by is by what we put in to the job and we are a little bit of snobbish industry where designer who's done a lot of concert cars without any engineering constrain seems to have a very high profile whereas designers who've been slogging it out and are actually extremely competent and good at their job. Don't seem to have such a high profile. it's such a big collaborative effort right. Yeah what about them. The call that you see on the street where you think. Oh i wish. I had designed that one. Oh there's a lot of those I'll tell you the ones that are even worse. Look at are the ones that you look at and say. I had that five years ago i was there. I had just done it and my boston. Pick it up and my engineers taught. It was too crazy. And there've been a few of those and that's the one that you really look at with envy and a little bit of regret totally you know because it's not like you can say right. Screw year i'm going to go make it by wish. I hope that's where the industry is gonna evolve with all these new technologies and three d printing at home three d. printing manufacturing own cars open manufacturing zappia that drawings and somebody who making in somewhere in tianjin is. We'll be talking about the future. So what are the trends coming down the pipeline that we should be looking forward to. It's funny because two years ago. If you asked me what i was doing and i said you know. I'm designing electric cars. It was like. I'm on the cutting edge of cod design beyond maybe designing ferrari or the craziest concept 'cause and it looks like somehow that bubbles already burst while all the european companies are now getting into gear to start making electric cars china's going to move into hydrogen and fuel cell. How does that then affect the design work. For example when we moved from a horseless carriage the host disappeared and then we could design this area to put the engine in and then put the wheels next to the engine and change the cabin and then from that or over one hundred years engine. Cabins almost pretty much stayed the same then. Electric cars come along and then you say hey. We don't need an engine cabinet but you've got this great big battery to worry about. There's also an ascetic element you know When you're designing of fuel combustion kyw you've got things like exhaust pipes and events to show that kind of a roaring power and then you get into electric cars and then you like who i wanted to look like a dyson vacuum cleaner look efficient and erin namic in soundless and gives up thirty fifteen years ago. My ex boss and a good friend of mine had posted on lincoln. What does electricity look like. And that's a really interesting thought. That gets me moving. And i wrote to him the other day i said You've got stop thinking what hydrogen looks like. He said why'd ya. Maybe we're going to be driving the street in these clouds. Certainly feels like it on. Scooter chang yes. We haven't even talked about the sounds. Because you have to. Also design into the car like no rattles right. yeah actually The latest bmw concept. The sound is done. By hans. Zimmer of all the hollywood movies oh so all the soundscape often noises of the sound so there is also this discipline of of sound design With just coming into our industry you know the brings into bunks that you have obviously apple phones or any mobile phones. They've got this sound universe That also links with their marketing and advertising so yeah sounds this is going to be all kinds of things even the little haptic. Oh gosh okay. Yeah you're making my mind little. It's just too much that goes into what you do. get it. i get it and what about you then. I mean we've talked at the beginning about how you've come from india to switzerland sweden to france to england to germany. I it's kind of mind blowing. I can sort of see your progression. Just hearing your story. I can see it as one. It's you chasing adventure. But you're also trying to run away from becoming redundant in your own field right yet. I mean the field changes. I mean just drawing. We used to draw in a certain kind of paper. That paper stopped. It'd be got onto drawing on computers. It's a new skill that i had to learn. So there's all these technologies keeps throwing at you and you have to keep up with it. Yeah well at the beginning of that development you said drawing and writing and sketching. And i'm looking at your object still sitting here between us on the table. Maybe it's making me. Think about my family. My my father is an engineer. My brother is an engineer is an engineer. I think i'm the only one who's not an engineer. You're not quite an engineer. But was closed as an engineer. As i've had in the studio. So i hope that my father is in some way proud of me for interviewing you. All right yeah. I'm sure my father will be proud to hear the into there you go. Aj thank you so much. That was fascinating. We are now going to move onto your part to all right right the ten questions. Are you ready. I think question one. What is your favorite china-related fact yet. This one's interesting because it's Kind of related to india by india banging into china and means all the water flows south and all the rivers flow south saw india's got plenty of land and arable land and rivers and fertile plains of the ganges. And what have you. And they've got the luxury of being vegetarian's living off the land varies china's got to find arable land and only two percent of the world's arable land is convened by twenty percent of the world's population. So that means The chinese people our super resourceful whether they cut steps into mountains. They eat different things. And i think that is also what makes them intrinsically program for innovation. Survival is day innovation right. Do you have a favorite word or phrase in chinese. No i don't. And if i did i think my daughters would correct the pronunciation and tones because they call me the. Why goran is there. Something you here in the office on a regular basis in a lot of my car designer friends are gonna go crazy when the here this would call dodgy literally. Every foreigner comes to design cars is told by his boss i one dodgy and something like prestigious or grand or premium or and. This word drives all the car designers absolutely bonkers because a lot of the time to see of the company will say daci now. This is not enough you need to be dodgy and what is daci and it's this word that doesn't translate it's a word that doesn't seem to have any specific but it's just something where basically you're not good enough for china you know it's not good enough for me and you gotta do better. It's not cheap enough. Your everyday bane of your life is something. I've never even heard. Just show you that. There are different. Lives being lead here in china. What is your favorite destination within china. Shanghai traveled quite a bit in china of moved around all my life. I've lived in many different places. Shanghai gives me the impression that i'm living in a different city every day. Everything just constantly dynamic the city. Br invents itself as it were five years ago. I was in pasadena in college. That i went to and these kids were drawing. What they thought was the future of transportation and then they ask me how i went to work and i told them that i scan a qr code and get on any bicycle. Get on metro and get off the metro and take my segue and then zip into my office and that sounded more futuristic and some of the things that they were conceptualizing. So yeah if you let china what would you miss the most. And what would you miss. the least. I'd miss everything should have just told you about the dynamism. You know the reinvention. The excitement Convenience of everything the actual efficiencies of how things if they didn't work today they are definitely working tomorrow. And what about anything that you wouldn't miss being around my vpn. One of the biggest conveniences in china is to do with the internet and one of the biggest frustrations in. China is the intimate. Yeah it's a union young baby. Yeah it's it's the. It's the chinese experience. You can't have both ways. You kind of have only the convenience without some of the frustration and currently they blocked we chat in india so now people keep trying to contact me through whatsapp fiddle around and try to get online and they're trying to call me and messaging me wondering why i'm not responding to the messages. Yes it is a interesting window into a potential future. Is there anything that still surprises you about life in china i just came back from From beijing motor show and deal this new cult of journalists are all people with rigs around them selves holding cameras and filming themselves. Next to 'cause they're like goals dressed up for tv or nightclub they could be selling cosmetics. I wonder are they scripted. What do they say you know so it just everything in every respect felt out of context of the rest of the world. That's interesting because that really is how the world treats the car that you've spent five years pushing through like. Isn't that weird. When you finally see your baby come onto the market. It is weird in fact It's like being a parent. You hope you did the best job you could. Your kids are never gonna turn out exactly how you want them to. You still have a certain amount of pride and a certain amount of misgivings regrets show. Yeah it's it's. It's all of that every every few years. Well i was saying. It's your baby whereas metaphor but but you know it's your child your baby well. Where's your favorite place to go out to eat or drink or just hang out. This one is a question of taught about a loft because it depends when you asked me this. You know there was a time. I used to love nickel or used to love young. Do we used to go to sugar before that. So right now. The nicest place for us to hang out is right. Opposite are house less than one hundred meters away. A little place called poetry. No i'm sure next week it'll be something else another place. What is the best or worst purchase..

switzerland india germany england twenty percent france five years hans ten next week Shanghai five years ago three China pasadena tomorrow five different colors two years ago ten questions Today
"ajay" Discussed on Mosaic of China

Mosaic of China

06:34 min | 6 months ago

"ajay" Discussed on Mosaic of China

"Find them so optimistic and suzy last week with a nice dash of ambition and willingness to go the extra mile and and achieve great things. Call it maybe a hunger which you do get in europe. But i guess it's a different kind little more entitlement in europe Right you everybody. Points out the young emperor's when they talk about young chinese kids but there's also the side of them wanting to prove to their parents that they are good at doing what they're doing and and and you know shake off they're mollycoddle little emperor image res- I i think most of the european young guys would not really listen to an old guy in the studio. It'd be more competitive. The way did try to show the superiority and the ambition younger chinese designers. They want to learn i. They want to simulate the knowledge when they think they've learned enough. They stopped becoming entitled door challenging a competitive. But then they've it right. They've earned it for sure. And then it's what the chinese industries doing right now where they've realized that we've learned how to make us. We've leapfrogged in terms of technology We've got into electric cars and we have probably better than anyone else before. And we've done it faster than anyone else Way faster than the koreans before them and japanese before them. So you see this confidence. That's just building in just the same way you see it on the country scale and i see it on the personal scale for me. I'm not a coffee fanatic. So when i chinese car i didn't really pay attention to it. Like what are the brands like. There's about five hundred brands. What the about five hundred car brands and all of them are difficult to really know. Many of them belong to a big conglomerate. You'd think it's a different brand. But actionaid's part of dongfang group the the the other groups and every state every region seems to have these big industrial players that big employers and they've got multiple brands and then there's also all these little start ups. I don't know this for a fact that i can imagine somebody up. Top says a look. We manufacture way too many cars but we can't shut those factories down because a lot of people are dependent on those jobs. And that's what we used to bring people out of poverty into the middle classes and now we got to do something else with us. Factories and semi says yeah. We're gonna make delivery drones. All mars exploration veihcles or whatever and the fact that they've got their eyeballs in. The future is just going to propelled this country. Further and further well. Let's pivot back to you. Because i'm sure there are people out there who understand cars more than i do and they're shouting asked him about the car design. So here's what. I'm going to ask you first of all so now you're in this current setup. How many people are in your design studio in. Why don't you talk me through all the different people you work with. So i mean firstly no matter how well you know cars. I don't think anybody appreciates that. A car has over thirty thousand different pieces to go together but it is a really complicated piece of industrial engineering in mass production. I guess when you compare with a piece of furniture that you compare the mobile phone as well you know which is which people consider very sophisticated manufactory. You you take it apart. And there's not that much that goes in there and there are a lot of regulations to keep you alive in a crash to keep you safe to keep you moving you moving at one hundred kilometers an hour and everything that you touch or feel or conc- on the car has been designed by somebody so while the dream of design or the image of car design somebody sitting in sketching beautiful exterior. There's a lot of putting together little bits and pieces and in a design studio. We've got designers who designed the exterior. But then you'd have some who are specializing in lamps and other details We split up into six different as people. Who do the branding. There's people do all the communication all the publicity. The logos the way project ourselves beyond the cause Including the motor shows the dealerships typically Design today will have some influence on the dealership Point of sale two colors even the costumes of the hostesses which is also pot off car design thought if god design right and then you've got what i do people who do strategy where we look at the plan for the next ten years. Look at synergies look at different products. Look at different different situation. Points try to create vision for the future that can then be translated into the all the other projects today. you know. you've got people doing the software or the interaction. The screen human machine interface faith. Hmi and then there's Will be called color material. Finish designers so a car is the only product that sold in a multitude of different colors. Specifications mccollum trim levels each of them should look homogeneous take shoes for example. You get a pair of fatty desk trade as maybe three or four color choices on one physical object you know apple did five different colors. And it's like wow. I probably got ten fifteen different permutations combinations and then all those colors and all those finishes need to work together. And then there's always special edition spo traditions. Then we've got casts smarter learners Physical klay sculptors fabrication specialists. Who make things out of hot materials of that that level of craft in there. It's like a massive factory. I call it the creativity factory here. Then we've got to have an area to take the car outside because when you look at a car inside it's not in its right environments. You've gotta take it outside to look at it in reality in nature and against other cars with natural light I don't know i would say it's like going to the zoo. And looking at a tiger or going to the getty and seeing.

europe last week three five different colors one hundred kilometers an hour two colors over thirty thousand different one physical object four color today ten fifteen different permutat about five hundred brands first about five hundred car each apple chinese european six different of fatty
"ajay" Discussed on Mosaic of China

Mosaic of China

07:40 min | 6 months ago

"ajay" Discussed on Mosaic of China

"Six years Two years in france then. They sent me to india for two years to set up a design studio in india at renault and then i came back and going to have a fantastic. Okay well there are so many questions i could ask. But i guess i'll say that until we do mosaic of franz. Let's go to the next step. Was that china then. China's where the car industry is booming at twelve. The jobs are right. Now it's where the so much happening here. And i had a friend who is coming to shanghai and i and i knew that the own the car designed jobs were in shanghai. I applied to my previous employers ex colleagues of mine. They were at what used to be empty rower and is perfect. Perfect job for me to come here. That was nine years ago. Most of the time. I work in a very china dominated environment in my last job was just a couple of us then for while it was only me as a foreigner in in a department of about two hundred people and Again i just find them so optimistic and suzy last week with a nice dash of ambition and willingness to go the extra mile and and achieve great things. Call it maybe a hunger which you do get in europe. But i guess it's a different kind little more entitlement in europe Right you everybody. Points out the young emperor's when they talk about young chinese kids but there's also the side of them wanting to prove to their parents that they are good at doing what they're doing and and and you know shake off they're mollycoddle little emperor image res- I i think most of the european young guys would not really listen to an old guy in the studio. It'd be more competitive. The way did try to show the superiority and the ambition younger chinese designers. They want to learn i. They want to simulate the knowledge when they think they've learned enough. They stopped becoming entitled door challenging a competitive. But then they've it right. They've earned it for sure. And then it's what the chinese industries doing right now where they've realized that we've learned how to make us. We've leapfrogged in terms of technology We've got into electric cars and we have probably better than anyone else before. And we've done it faster than anyone else Way faster than the koreans before them and japanese before them. So you see this confidence. That's just building in just the same way you see it on the country scale and i see it on the personal scale for me. I'm not a coffee fanatic. So when i chinese car i didn't really pay attention to it. Like what are the brands like. There's about five hundred brands. What the about five hundred car brands and all of them are difficult to really know. Many of them belong to a big conglomerate. You'd think it's a different brand. But actionaid's part of dongfang group the the the other groups and every state every region seems to have these big industrial players that big employers and they've got multiple brands and then there's also all these little start ups. I don't know this for a fact that i can imagine somebody up. Top says a look. We manufacture way too many cars but we can't shut those factories down because a lot of people are dependent on those jobs. And that's what we used to bring people out of poverty into the middle classes and now we got to do something else with us. Factories and semi says yeah. We're gonna make delivery drones. All mars exploration veihcles or whatever and the fact that they've got their eyeballs in. The future is just going to propelled this country. Further and further well. Let's pivot back to you. Because i'm sure there are people out there who understand cars more than i do and they're shouting asked him about the car design. So here's what. I'm going to ask you first of all so now you're in this current setup. How many people are in your design studio in. Why don't you talk me through all the different people you work with. So i mean firstly no matter how well you know cars. I don't think anybody appreciates that. A car has over thirty thousand different pieces to go together but it is a really complicated piece of industrial engineering in mass production. I guess when you compare with a piece of furniture that you compare the mobile phone as well you know which is which people consider very sophisticated manufactory. You you take it apart. And there's not that much that goes in there and there are a lot of regulations to keep you alive in a crash to keep you safe to keep you moving you moving at one hundred kilometers an hour and everything that you touch or feel or conc- on the car has been designed by somebody so while the dream of design or the image of car design somebody sitting in sketching beautiful exterior. There's a lot of putting together little bits and pieces and in a design studio. We've got designers who designed the exterior. But then you'd have some who are specializing in lamps and other details We split up into six different as people. Who do the branding. There's people do all the communication all the publicity. The logos the way project ourselves beyond the cause Including the motor shows the dealerships typically Design today will have some influence on the dealership Point of sale two colors even the costumes of the hostesses which is also pot off car design thought if god design right and then you've got what i do people who do strategy where we look at the plan for the next ten years. Look at synergies look at different products. Look at different different situation. Points try to create vision for the future that can then be translated into the all the other projects today. you know. you've got people doing the software or the interaction. The screen human machine interface faith. Hmi and then there's Will be called color material. Finish designers so a car is the only product that sold in a multitude of different colors. Specifications mccollum trim levels each of them should look homogeneous take shoes for example. You get a pair of fatty desk trade as maybe three or four color choices on one physical object you know apple did five different colors. And it's like wow. I probably got ten fifteen different permutations combinations and then all those colors and all those finishes need to work together. And then there's always special edition spo traditions. Then we've got casts smarter learners Physical klay sculptors fabrication specialists. Who make things out of hot materials of that that level of craft in there. It's like a massive factory. I call it the creativity factory here. Then we've got to have an area to take the car outside because when you look at a car inside it's not in its right environments. You've gotta take it outside to look at it in reality in nature and against other cars with natural light I don't know i would say it's like going to the zoo. And looking at a tiger or going to the getty and seeing.

shanghai two years india france europe Six years Two years nine years ago renault three five different colors china last week China one hundred kilometers an hour over thirty thousand different today about five hundred car about two hundred people two colors
"ajay" Discussed on Mosaic of China

Mosaic of China

08:19 min | 6 months ago

"ajay" Discussed on Mosaic of China

"Working at very conic brand in sweden called saab ho sabathia net and that was wearing sweden. I was working in. Gothenburg seems to be a patent salvadorian bankrupt And so your ak in fact. Even the college i went to close down. So this is the third time So i moved to a place that east to apply to almost every time i was in a crisis and looking for a job at dream car design students which is renell in france. Reynaud okay It's Close to her size south of paris i i was at runoff. Six years Two years in france then. They sent me to india for two years to set up a design studio in india at renault and then i came back and going to have a fantastic. Okay well there are so many questions i could ask. But i guess i'll say that until we do mosaic of franz. Let's go to the next step. Was that china then. China's where the car industry is booming at twelve. The jobs are right. Now it's where the so much happening here. And i had a friend who is coming to shanghai and i and i knew that the own the car designed jobs were in shanghai. I applied to my previous employers ex colleagues of mine. They were at what used to be empty rower and is perfect. Perfect job for me to come here. That was nine years ago. Most of the time. I work in a very china dominated environment in my last job was just a couple of us then for while it was only me as a foreigner in in a department of about two hundred people and Again i just find them so optimistic and suzy last week with a nice dash of ambition and willingness to go the extra mile and and achieve great things. Call it maybe a hunger which you do get in europe. But i guess it's a different kind little more entitlement in europe Right you everybody. Points out the young emperor's when they talk about young chinese kids but there's also the side of them wanting to prove to their parents that they are good at doing what they're doing and and and you know shake off they're mollycoddle little emperor image res- I i think most of the european young guys would not really listen to an old guy in the studio. It'd be more competitive. The way did try to show the superiority and the ambition younger chinese designers. They want to learn i. They want to simulate the knowledge when they think they've learned enough. They stopped becoming entitled door challenging a competitive. But then they've it right. They've earned it for sure. And then it's what the chinese industries doing right now where they've realized that we've learned how to make us. We've leapfrogged in terms of technology We've got into electric cars and we have probably better than anyone else before. And we've done it faster than anyone else Way faster than the koreans before them and japanese before them. So you see this confidence. That's just building in just the same way you see it on the country scale and i see it on the personal scale for me. I'm not a coffee fanatic. So when i chinese car i didn't really pay attention to it. Like what are the brands like. There's about five hundred brands. What the about five hundred car brands and all of them are difficult to really know. Many of them belong to a big conglomerate. You'd think it's a different brand. But actionaid's part of dongfang group the the the other groups and every state every region seems to have these big industrial players that big employers and they've got multiple brands and then there's also all these little start ups. I don't know this for a fact that i can imagine somebody up. Top says a look. We manufacture way too many cars but we can't shut those factories down because a lot of people are dependent on those jobs. And that's what we used to bring people out of poverty into the middle classes and now we got to do something else with us. Factories and semi says yeah. We're gonna make delivery drones. All mars exploration veihcles or whatever and the fact that they've got their eyeballs in. The future is just going to propelled this country. Further and further well. Let's pivot back to you. Because i'm sure there are people out there who understand cars more than i do and they're shouting asked him about the car design. So here's what. I'm going to ask you first of all so now you're in this current setup. How many people are in your design studio in. Why don't you talk me through all the different people you work with. So i mean firstly no matter how well you know cars. I don't think anybody appreciates that. A car has over thirty thousand different pieces to go together but it is a really complicated piece of industrial engineering in mass production. I guess when you compare with a piece of furniture that you compare the mobile phone as well you know which is which people consider very sophisticated manufactory. You you take it apart. And there's not that much that goes in there and there are a lot of regulations to keep you alive in a crash to keep you safe to keep you moving you moving at one hundred kilometers an hour and everything that you touch or feel or conc- on the car has been designed by somebody so while the dream of design or the image of car design somebody sitting in sketching beautiful exterior. There's a lot of putting together little bits and pieces and in a design studio. We've got designers who designed the exterior. But then you'd have some who are specializing in lamps and other details We split up into six different as people. Who do the branding. There's people do all the communication all the publicity. The logos the way project ourselves beyond the cause Including the motor shows the dealerships typically Design today will have some influence on the dealership Point of sale two colors even the costumes of the hostesses which is also pot off car design thought if god design right and then you've got what i do people who do strategy where we look at the plan for the next ten years. Look at synergies look at different products. Look at different different situation. Points try to create vision for the future that can then be translated into the all the other projects today. you know. you've got people doing the software or the interaction. The screen human machine interface faith. Hmi and then there's Will be called color material. Finish designers so a car is the only product that sold in a multitude of different colors. Specifications mccollum trim levels each of them should look homogeneous take shoes for example. You get a pair of fatty desk trade as maybe three or four color choices on one physical object you know apple did five different colors. And it's like wow. I probably got ten fifteen different permutations combinations and then all those colors and all those finishes need to work together. And then there's always special edition spo traditions. Then we've got casts smarter learners Physical klay sculptors fabrication specialists. Who make things out of hot materials of that that level of craft in there. It's like a massive factory. I call it the creativity factory here. Then we've got to have an area to take the car outside because when you look at a car inside it's not in its right environments. You've gotta take it outside to look at it in reality in nature and against other cars with natural light I don't know i would say it's like going to the zoo. And looking at a tiger or going to the getty and seeing.

shanghai two years india europe sweden france saab ho sabathia net Six years Two years nine years ago apple Reynaud conic renault one hundred kilometers china three last week today third time
"ajay" Discussed on Mosaic of China

Mosaic of China

07:08 min | 6 months ago

"ajay" Discussed on Mosaic of China

"Coming to shanghai and i and i knew that the own the car designed jobs were in shanghai. I applied to my previous employers ex colleagues of mine. They were at what used to be empty rower and is perfect. Perfect job for me to come here. That was nine years ago. Most of the time. I work in a very china dominated environment in my last job was just a couple of us then for while it was only me as a foreigner in in a department of about two hundred people and Again i just find them so optimistic and suzy last week with a nice dash of ambition and willingness to go the extra mile and and achieve great things. Call it maybe a hunger which you do get in europe. But i guess it's a different kind little more entitlement in europe Right you everybody. Points out the young emperor's when they talk about young chinese kids but there's also the side of them wanting to prove to their parents that they are good at doing what they're doing and and and you know shake off they're mollycoddle little emperor image res- I i think most of the european young guys would not really listen to an old guy in the studio. It'd be more competitive. The way did try to show the superiority and the ambition younger chinese designers. They want to learn i. They want to simulate the knowledge when they think they've learned enough. They stopped becoming entitled door challenging a competitive. But then they've it right. They've earned it for sure. And then it's what the chinese industries doing right now where they've realized that we've learned how to make us. We've leapfrogged in terms of technology We've got into electric cars and we have probably better than anyone else before. And we've done it faster than anyone else Way faster than the koreans before them and japanese before them. So you see this confidence. That's just building in just the same way you see it on the country scale and i see it on the personal scale for me. I'm not a coffee fanatic. So when i chinese car i didn't really pay attention to it. Like what are the brands like. There's about five hundred brands. What the about five hundred car brands and all of them are difficult to really know. Many of them belong to a big conglomerate. You'd think it's a different brand. But actionaid's part of dongfang group the the the other groups and every state every region seems to have these big industrial players that big employers and they've got multiple brands and then there's also all these little start ups. I don't know this for a fact that i can imagine somebody up. Top says a look. We manufacture way too many cars but we can't shut those factories down because a lot of people are dependent on those jobs. And that's what we used to bring people out of poverty into the middle classes and now we got to do something else with us. Factories and semi says yeah. We're gonna make delivery drones. All mars exploration veihcles or whatever and the fact that they've got their eyeballs in. The future is just going to propelled this country. Further and further well. Let's pivot back to you. Because i'm sure there are people out there who understand cars more than i do and they're shouting asked him about the car design. So here's what. I'm going to ask you first of all so now you're in this current setup. How many people are in your design studio in. Why don't you talk me through all the different people you work with. So i mean firstly no matter how well you know cars. I don't think anybody appreciates that. A car has over thirty thousand different pieces to go together but it is a really complicated piece of industrial engineering in mass production. I guess when you compare with a piece of furniture that you compare the mobile phone as well you know which is which people consider very sophisticated manufactory. You you take it apart. And there's not that much that goes in there and there are a lot of regulations to keep you alive in a crash to keep you safe to keep you moving you moving at one hundred kilometers an hour and everything that you touch or feel or conc- on the car has been designed by somebody so while the dream of design or the image of car design somebody sitting in sketching beautiful exterior. There's a lot of putting together little bits and pieces and in a design studio. We've got designers who designed the exterior. But then you'd have some who are specializing in lamps and other details We split up into six different as people. Who do the branding. There's people do all the communication all the publicity. The logos the way project ourselves beyond the cause Including the motor shows the dealerships typically Design today will have some influence on the dealership Point of sale two colors even the costumes of the hostesses which is also pot off car design thought if god design right and then you've got what i do people who do strategy where we look at the plan for the next ten years. Look at synergies look at different products. Look at different different situation. Points try to create vision for the future that can then be translated into the all the other projects today. you know. you've got people doing the software or the interaction. The screen human machine interface faith. Hmi and then there's Will be called color material. Finish designers so a car is the only product that sold in a multitude of different colors. Specifications mccollum trim levels each of them should look homogeneous take shoes for example. You get a pair of fatty desk trade as maybe three or four color choices on one physical object you know apple did five different colors. And it's like wow. I probably got ten fifteen different permutations combinations and then all those colors and all those finishes need to work together. And then there's always special edition spo traditions. Then we've got casts smarter learners Physical klay sculptors fabrication specialists. Who make things out of hot materials of that that level of craft in there. It's like a massive factory. I call it the creativity factory here. Then we've got to have an area to take the car outside because when you look at a car inside it's not in its right environments. You've gotta take it outside to look at it in reality in nature and against other cars with natural light I don't know i would say it's like going to the zoo. And looking at a tiger or going to the getty and seeing.

shanghai europe nine years ago apple last week ten three two colors five different colors china today about two hundred people one hundred kilometers an hour over thirty thousand different each four color about five hundred car brands one physical object about five hundred brands european
"ajay" Discussed on Mosaic of China

Mosaic of China

02:19 min | 6 months ago

"ajay" Discussed on Mosaic of China

"Odds and ends and doe handles. That was one fine rear view mirror. Aj great job but presumably because it was your first job you already felt like wow. I've made it like even though it's just a small mirror i shouldn't complain or There was a moment when i was complaining and fifty five year old engineer came up to me and and told me how lucky i was because he thought he was going to be designing and By the time he finished his engineering college got his job and bent into an engineering department..

fifty five year old first job one fine rear view mirror
"ajay" Discussed on Mosaic of China

Mosaic of China

06:25 min | 6 months ago

"ajay" Discussed on Mosaic of China

"What are the brands like in china. There's about five hundred brands. Welcome to of china a podcast about people who are making a mocking china. I'm your host oskar kooks in today's show i'm talking with. Aj jane who is a senior car designer. This is a very special episode to me. Because i grew up in a household of coughing attic. My older brother could reel off all the statistics about every car model. You could think of and my father always kept a stack of the latest car magazines in the corner of what he called his library. And what everyone else in the household. Cool the downstairs toilet. I had absolutely no interest in cars. And what i think. I always quite enjoyed the school. That this elicited. I couldn't help but also feel like i was missing out on something so today's episode is not just an amazing discussion which encompasses so much about. Aj about china and about the very nature of artistic collaboration in a commercialized setting. It also feels like some kind of personal redemption for someone who's on to the question. What's your favorite car have always been blue ones say much. Aj okay. i'm here with age. Eighty nine and a j you are what is your actual title. I am senior manager. Head of strategic design got hit in short. You are a car designer and you work at one of the big private companies here in china. We're not going to mention company already. Because you're talking in your personal capacity so we're gonna make sure that there is a distance between you and the official word of the company. Yeah i believe it's did largest privately owned car. Only 'em in china there you go. Yeah what is the object that you have brought him. That in some way describes your life in china. It's this little sketchbook so as a design. I walk around with a sketchbook all the time i have until very recently resisted the temptation of going digital. The one i've brought here today is actually from my previous employer. It's a british coal company. The with ninetieth anniversary sketchbook. It's what comes using between transitioning from my previous job to my current job and at the last few pages just noticed has a few editions by my daughter's with pink fluorescent felt pens That kind of sums it up because My daughter's born here in shanghai. They've lived all their life here. Five years in two years contributing to my creativity. How lovely well. I'm not sure. I would buy the car that she had just tried to draw. Looks a little bit. Surreal but the rest of the drawings. Look very technical no vision. This is why you're doing your job and doing mine. If beautiful and i think it's such an amazing insight into what you do. I mean as a car designer. Is it basically mainly sketching. Yeah yeah. I mean it's creation is coming up with ideas. It's it's it's a lot of drawing. Drawing is the language of car design. Especially when you work in different countries with different languages different disciplines. You're talking to engineers talking to marketing people. There's only one quick way of expressing ideas. And i think this works for most any creative field. This is where. I'm jealous. Because i'm a terrible juror icon sketch to save my life. No way it's like anything. Of course there are many people who are born with talent and there are others who hold the talent and it's like anything with practice You just get better and better at it. It's a fluency that comes from practicing right. And which one are you. I thought i had talent but then went to college in switzerland and air. I realized that. I didn't have talent but what i did have. It was like a boot camp. I mean literally. First day of college we had to grow five hundred cubes one thousand lines so it was rare practice. Practice practice practice. Just build fluency. And that wasn't yeah. What was that school then. It's called the art center. College of design Its original campuses in pasadena in california and In the eighties. I think they decided that they wanted to create a global footprint of design colleges so they created this college in switzerland. It is now the private residence at believe of shania twain. Oh you're kidding. Yeah it's it's beautiful chateau with a farmhouse overlooking lake geneva looking in the french alps. Yeah well there's a connection did not think would come up in this conversation and so for you like that. was your first foray into the specialization of cardi vinyl. Had you had any experience before seventeen. And i just come straight out of school so i just knew what i wanted to do. you knew since when trees a ride one of those guys. Yeah yeah Been drawing ever since. I can remember playing with cars and think most fascinating manmade object. There is this is west of. Where were you growing up. I was growing up in india teenage years and early years in mumbai. Okay maybe this is a good chance to actually work out. How the hell you got to china. Because i'm thinking about your object and you said that you were transitioning that point between a british company before you came to shanghai. So what is the whole time line then at seventeen. I left india to go study in switzerland. I had an internship. Nine hundred ninety four at opel in germany. After which i went back to college finish my college graduated in ninety five a move to work in cologne germany as their Until ninety seven hang on what is still open though. No this was at ford big american influence in the company in my colleagues And this was your first proper job. This is my first proper job yet right and that was already in car design. Yeah that was as a car. Designer working on the rear view. Mirrors of the ford focused and.

shanghai china india switzerland Five years germany two years california five hundred cubes mumbai ford pasadena oskar kooks Aj jane one thousand lines eighties opel Eighty nine shania twain one
"ajay" Discussed on Work Inspired - A BOS Podcast

Work Inspired - A BOS Podcast

02:30 min | 6 months ago

"ajay" Discussed on Work Inspired - A BOS Podcast

"American nation in terms of guests while sad and i've heard it over and over again this show. It's it's it makes you take a minute to enjoy the journey right. If it's just about the destination it's going to go by too quickly and you're going to get there and say well what just happened here but if you take a minute each each data or each week or each experienced say this is this is. This is the journey. This is what i this is my passion. I love i love. It's always going to be easy but it but appreciate it because it's you're building something and it's very cool. I i love. I love the advice. You give give thanks for educating me and our listeners on and lithium and on the recycling process. I think we know that it's a big deal and that it's important but i think now we know a little bit more about why and how again congrats on your success. Looking forward to fall on you guys. You got some big.

each week each each data a minute American
"ajay" Discussed on Feliz Dia Novo

Feliz Dia Novo

02:26 min | 7 months ago

"ajay" Discussed on Feliz Dia Novo

"Also thank you for talking is going. I'll show bean release absolute auto hot shaya seeing a size commutable r. Ajay chiku nazi bumper karumba. You start losing massey capacity. That might as well. They kept keynesian by panels. Bob was thought sewer keith. Much into think that's is is some as talk. Pursuers while kicked poise persona have socked bella. Sega rasi pasqua his food. Some we to board is is this being followed. The car being cigarette..

Bob keynesian Ajay keith
DACOR - An Original Five

Scuba Shack Radio

07:10 min | 1 year ago

DACOR - An Original Five

"When you own a dive shop people routinely either stop by or call us to see if we're interested in buying their old scuba gear or they have equipment that they used many years ago and went to try to get back into diving and wonder if we can service it. Well that's a whole different discussion than where i wanna go today. Many times the gear that they bring in is from decor one of the original five. Us manufacturers scuba diving equipment in the united states. We've already covered two of those five here on scuba shack radio voice and health ways and i'll get to the other to swim. Master stivers down the road today. We're going to talk about decor. The davidson corporation was founded in nineteen fifty three by samuel davidson junior. Sam took the da from davidson and decio are from corporation and put them together to form decor i read somewhere online at sam patented the name and even gave the patent number three dot one two eight four eight one. Why tried to find that specific patent and couldn't find that where he patented the name but that number came up with something called a safety float that was submitted by samuel davidson junior filed in nineteen sixty. One so interesting. So how did sam davidson get interested in scuba diving. Well sam richard klein who started health ways was also in the united states marine corps during world war two he was stationed on guam and it said that he had gotten hold of some japanese goggles and started to explore underwater after the war. His interest in exploring underwater continued back then. Getting reliable. scuba equipment wasn't easy. So sam hooked up with an old neighborhood friend named bob olsen and they decided to build their own double hose regulator well somewhere along the way a buyer from montgomery ward department store chain found out about the regulator and purchase ten later. They update to three hundred. Sam had a business. He borrowed ten thousand dollars from his mother and got rolling by nineteen fifty five decor was producing what they called their dial breath. Double hose regulator sam along with another engineer while he mitchell continue to work on regulator development along with other scuba diving equipment from my review of the old decor catalogs. It looks like they didn't introduce their first. Single hose regulator the decor dart until one thousand nine hundred sixty two although they had developed earlier some say four years before sports ways introduced. There's but as a as we've seen with health ways and dick anderson's work a lot of folks who are innovating at this time. One of the ways. I like to research. these early. Manufacturers is look at their old catalogues. The cg forty-five website has a lot of reference material. Along with these old catalogs the earliest decor catalog that i was able to review from thousand nine hundred sixty one. That was the same year that see honda ended. The catalog was a whopping four pages. Long it had there are three double hose. Dial breath regulator for eighty two dollars. They complete single tanks system for one hundred and forty four dollars and a double host set up for doubles. Set up for two hundred and twenty nine. You could pay an extra five dollars to get yellow tanks. The cadillac had one mask one snorkel and one set of things by nineteen sixty two their line expanded with the d one day corridor. Single hose regulator and a new are four dial breath double hose. Remember that patented safety float. Well it was in thousand nine hundred sixty two catalog over the next couple of years. They continue to innovate with the dart d. Two and a dart with ajay valve for three hundred psi reserve on the first stage they also had the clipper series double hose regulators c two and c three by nineteen seventy decor came out with yet another new regulator line the olympic series with the one hundred two hundred four hundred and eight hundred. The last catalog. I went through was from one thousand nine hundred eighty and decor was touting twenty-six years of diving innovation with a doubling of their space at northfield manufacturing headquarters and the installation of a hyperbaric chamber for regulator testing. Looks like nineteen eighty was the year. They introduced what they touted. As a revolutionary regulator their decor pacer regulators pacer is short for positive air controlled equalizing regulator claiming to have totally balanced first and second stages with a remarkable point zero five inches of water. Cracking pressure wow. That's pretty low. They say they harnessed venturi with something called. Ventura matic something really innovation at this. Time was there microsoft Circuit dive computer. It looks like it took up. Most of your forearm with indicators for deco cent rate depth time readouts and more. It was quite a marvel for the time. Sam davidson passed away in nineteen eighty seven and sam's wife. Joan became ceo by nine thousand nine hundred ninety eight. Joan sold decor tomorrow's an overtime the decor named faded into our diving history. I did see a short article in two thousand five edition of sport diver and it was from nari and they indicated that they could no longer get replacement parts for decor regulators because the parts suppliers had destroyed their mold before they can move all of that to the marez a facility in palo italy. So that's a little bit of the history of sam davison junior the davidson corporation and decor one of the five original scuba equipment manufacturers in the united states.

Scuba Equipment Scuba History Davidson Corporation Sam Davidson Dacor Samuel Davidson Master Stivers Decio SAM Sam Richard Klein Bob Olsen Montgomery Ward Department Sto United States Dick Anderson Davidson Guam Marine Corps Olympic Series Northfield Manufacturing Headq
"ajay" Discussed on Video Marketing Value Podcast

Video Marketing Value Podcast

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"ajay" Discussed on Video Marketing Value Podcast

"With the transcript and links and hey send us a message on twitter. Let us know how you like the show and today we have a special guest. It's a j. Welcome jay. Thank you thanks dane. Thanks for having me. I think i said it wrong. It's a j. bam you almost there. You got it okay. So so you so we want when we want to make sure i in this In this podcast that everyone can look up the products and people we talk about and your spell out names lot. You're eating and spelled a. g. a. y. b. a. m. Is that right correct. Okay so we're going to be talking about your great product today and that also has a special spelling it's viral. Am i saying it right. That's right it's it's a play on the would viral marketing. How is the spelled. It's vivo y r. I l l so there's two else dan. Okay v. y. r. i l. l. and So we asked you on the video marketing value. Podcast today because viral is a multi purpose. This is my definition. You tell me if i'm wrong. It's a multipurpose video searching tool. And i've got a lot of questions about it is this. Is this good. Did i get it right. Is that what it is yes. Viral in a in a in a nutshell is google for video focusing on Videos like reviews on boxing videos how to videos essentially videos that customers watch out to make their shopping decisions and varos also one of the very few companies in the world. That can google inside the video as well to enable insights envio commerce. This is so this. Even when i talked to my producer of this podcast. Jason perria he. Oh that sounds interesting. I can't wait to hear it so he's going to be. He's going to be editing this later on so he's looking forward to it as well. Now let me make sure i understand. Companies can search for mentions across youtube and social media to understand Essentially both what people are saying about them And then you can track in a track a campaign in the right direction. Yeah yeah so so. Let me let me just share with you what we do so essentially what we what we have what has done is we have trained machines to watch the videos on social media platforms and also on your smartphones to help brands and retailers find authentic video content such as reviews unboxing. Does how do videos and more that. They can leverage for insights demand gen and content marketing so essentially. What varos does is able to help. Brands and retailers find authentic video reviews that customers are posting about their favorite product and brand on social media or we can also help brands and retailers capture videos..

Jason perria google jay twitter dane youtube producer
New round of evacuations for Colorado fire

Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

New round of evacuations for Colorado fire

"Wildfire in Boulder County has firefighters and officials scrambling. We're watching a fire the cow would fire grow near James Town, the town Ajay in town. We've had a mandatory evacuations around the town of Jamestown and many road closures up near there as well, Gabby Boer Creature with a Boulder Office of emergency Management says because of growing road closures, even people outside the mandatory evacuation area should consider leaving. No word on what caused the fire or what its size is. Keith works at a shop not far away from here in North Boulder. There's no smoke here where we are, but we can see a big plume of smoke up near Jamestown, Jamestown's about 10 miles northwest of Boulder,

James Town Jamestown Boulder County North Boulder Boulder Office Of Emergency Ma Gabby Boer Ajay Keith
"ajay" Discussed on JustATouchof_J

JustATouchof_J

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"ajay" Discussed on JustATouchof_J

"She's mine. Took me? Patch. Sizes give. Cases All. This You. Know Breaking. Light Lifetime town tissue. Divorce Mayor Kane you throw them back. Young Jason. Casting. Deputies. Your. took. Sciences. All My. Set. Can Be. Say. I think. You. Again to. Kim. Alice. Kitchen. Is. On instagram baby download adjusted says Ajay at Google. A hundred and fifty countries now, Baby. This is..

Mayor Kane Ajay Google Jason Alice Kim
The US Hits 8 Million Cases Of Covid-19

Rush Limbaugh

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

The US Hits 8 Million Cases Of Covid-19

"Million cases of Corona virus Today, With cases on the rise in more than 40 states. Fox's tongue, Ajay Powers has more live. He's a 25 states have already set records for New Cove in 19 cases this month, the Midwest and Northeast, getting the worst of it with new cases doubling in the past four weeks and states like Wisconsin, South Dakota and in Hampshire. Health experts are worried that local hospitals will run out of capacity with an eye toward the onset of cooler weather that could drive people indoors, which could spur virus spread more than 217,000. People in the US have died of covert 19, according to Johns Hopkins, Lisa. Catania, Italy, just

FOX Ajay Powers Johns Hopkins Catania New Cove Midwest United States South Dakota Lisa Wisconsin Italy Hampshire
The CEO of Team Secret on Dota 2 & Team League Models

BIG Esports Podcast

06:09 min | 1 year ago

The CEO of Team Secret on Dota 2 & Team League Models

"So can you talk about like the you know the foundation of take grit out is different to say traditionally sports organization you know how the how the play is kind of at the center of everything. Sure sure you know when I look out in the ecosystem and not everything is like this right but a lot of teams are It's a it's kind of split where a lot of teams are player own operated in lead right which which is really good for content creation engaging with the community that kind of thing but usually like on the business side economy falters. And then you know you have a lot of new entrance into east sportswear. It's a very traditional business executive-led right whether it's you know a private Equity Company that invests eastwards. Put say a leader in place or someone from traditional. Traditional. Media The comes in place and weeds on these sports team. Where connection to the fan base in the audience is not so great. And generalizing here, right there's all different kinds of other other models I'm for us. We kind of saw this happening and what we wanted to do was to say, okay, you know, I, come from a background of traditional business. I can come run the business, build the business, but we wanted to also have very authentic and have a huge amount of player lead influence into how we build the brand into how he engaged with the fan base and the community and so that's why you know working with the DOE team has kind of foundation we said, let's build out team secret originally adopted team, but we can expand the business. We can build it into an actual business rather than just a, you know a player T-. Even today you know we. on the business side, you know run the business but on the ownership front we have some players that have ownership in the business and are also involved in the day today activities. You know we've been lucky enough to have on the PODCAST and scraped content with a few kind of like OJ's is the industry especially you know you had. We've had God's. All the you know he's being paramount in in a lot of commentary and building the same globally and we had pay p day kind like the shining light out of trying to build anymore it's America We've had unloader from Sweden as well and I guess you guys have another one especially, which is in the interim with poppy. So I'd love to I'd love to talk from your perspective around a lot of my discussion with paper day especially was around the business structure of the way that daughter to works versus are other Games. So there's like an article that came out about a Singapore tame, which is just disbanded was like the the shining stuff out of that region and. One of the major reasons they said that it that it disbanded his Ju to just a lack of understanding or the lack of support from valve in the to infrastructure it's it's you know it's great presence and cradle content around how you know the DOJ to international is the largest single single price police boats tournament. You know thirty plus million dollars in the first place team will often walk away with ten million dollars in the pocket and it's fantastic. You Ajay and you win those inter but it's it's not great if you don't qualify for the international or you know if you want to rely on something other than simply pros money so be interested in talking about. How do you say that the dietary market obviously guys legal agents Tuesday say by Candidate that franchise very strict model of detaining applying onset and Thomson indicts. You've got all that structure heady. This is done until you, which is just really all over the place but but massive priciples. Yeah I mean I think there are pros and cons of both models I think in. League of legends at the the model tends to be more Even across more equitable across tons of opportunities where all the teams and I think in Doda, it's very much like feast or famine I if you know. If you look at all the teams right from previously is it's like. Either you're a top four team and you. kind of break even or slash make a small profit or you're not a top four team and you're just like losing money all the time. Basically note right and it's like the the price was a little bit of a Mirage because. In Doda, the majority, the vast majority of the price will go to the players and this is not knock on the players because I think the players are super telling that they deserve everything that they that they earn right But outside of price full, there's not a huge amount of other opportunities except for direct sponsorship. For teams actually drive right and you need teams because you know. Not every player is like some players are very mental to be in contact creators influences on all that stuff but the vast majority players I know just WanNa, play I. WanNa play, and so in order for Doda and Doda brands to to build into sort of products. And to market the players into engage and build the audience and do all these things. You'd Orquesta do that right? Because the players are not going to do it themselves and they didn't WanNa do themselves they want to they want they WANNA play right? They want to figure out strategies they want perfect game. And so you need to have an ecosystem around as supporting structure around that to be able to enable them to do that as well as. Create this product around Doda so that the fans can engage in consume it. And I think the I think the finances did the structure Doda is is dangerous because you know the the the kitchen seen not not super well supported even in the tier one scene beyond top four teams I don't think you're doing too well. and you'd see you know teams exit. You see teams go in and out. I'm for these reasons because it's like you either you're winning all the time and you're kind of stable from that because you have some price earnings or. You know you're just like middle of the pack number seven, number, eight, I, I don't think you're doing too well. You're really relying on brand sponsorships and things

Doda Equity Company DOE Singapore Thomson Indicts DOJ America Ajay Sweden
"ajay" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"ajay" Discussed on How I Built This

"Hello everyone, , and welcome to how I built. This . resilience edition on these episodes were talking with entrepreneurs and other business leaders about how they're thinking creatively during such a disruptive time and today we're going to hear from the Co founders of Rinse Ajay precaut-. . James June. . Rinse is a laundry and dry cleaning service that picks up cleans and delivers close right to their customers. . Doorsteps Rinse was founded in twenty thirteen. . When Ajay wanted to start a business. . so He approached his college friend James who'd worked at his parents dry cleaning shop as a kid this year rinse has seen a drop in dry cleaning orders, , but their laundry service has stayed steady and they've been able to avoid layoffs so far I spoke with a j James from their office where they're practicing social distancing in order to keep their essential business running. . Explain what what is what is ranch? ? How does it work? ? Yeah, , I mean Ranson had simplest form is pickup and delivery of dry cleaning and laundry. . We started in two thousand thirteen to give you a little bit of background at the time I was looking to start a company and I was excited about a couple of trends. . One was the idea. . Of bringing technology to Old-school Industries and then. . James Actually. . Came to me with the idea of doing something dry-cleaning. . You guys are college friends, , right? ? Yeah exactly. . I'm not Ajay for twenty years and you know my background was more healthcare but my first job and live album my parents into dry cleaner store. . So they put me to work when I was young. . My uncles and aunts are awesome in the industry and so for as long as I can remember during family gatherings, , we would talk shop we talk dry-cleaning you know all the time more recently the discussion is really Focused on wise business. . So slow why isn't there as much business as there used to be in? ? So in two thousand thirteen, , Noah Janai were <hes> for breakfast to discuss ideas start businesses i. . just come back from my parents store ends wanting to hear that business slow and then to seen in person is just stark. . appeared see customers machines running in silence, , and so that image stuck with me, , and so it was <hes> going to eat breakfast with Ajay Ajay <hes>. . You know, , what can we do to help drivers? ? Yeah, , and and that was a moment for me where the the bells kind of went off and I thought dry-cleaning was perfect for the trends I was looking at I'd always. . Be James as a potential co founder but you know I think it was too good to pass up unique advantage we brought to the table with him understanding <hes> the dry cleaning side of the equation. . So we ran out a week later, , the test with eleven of our friends we picked up their clothes we cleaned them James James's parents shop we delivered them back and from. . All of them. . We got this unanimous responsive. . Hey, this , is awesome. . When you guys coming back well I mean I love that because the business model right for dry cleaning has been more or less the same. It's . been small mom and pop shops like James like your parents or maybe they've got some people have a few dry cleaning shops and there there's like zips and some. . Of these small chains but really, , it was an industry ripe for a completely new approach. . Absolutely I think the biggest thing is that as consumer behavior has shifted, , what's become very clear dry cleaning is that it's just it's full of a ton of friction and it's not one big point of friction. . It's a lot of little points of friction along the way. . So if you think. . About the the dry cleaning experienced historically, , you don't know who's a good dry cleaner. . So you just go to nearest one your held hostage proximity. . You can't assess quality until after the clothes come back. . So it's a bit of a crapshoot for us as customers. . The model is very vendor centric in the sense that they're open nine to five closed on weekends, , which doesn't work if. . You're actually at work during that time and there's limited technology limited customer service, , limited transparency. . We call internally death by a thousand cuts and when we were getting rinse started our idea was, , let's systematically create a seamless experience from start to finish work with the best cleaners out there who are struggling, they , don't know how to get volume. . Let them do what they do best which. . is clean the clothes and then manage everything else and so that's that's that's how started. So . essentially, , I mean, , you get you get an APP and you putting your order and then it <hes> somebody comes picks it up, , and then you partner with different dry cleaners to clean it. . You don't you don't own your own facilities on cleaning facilities. . That's right. Yeah. . . So you schedule A. . Pickup, , we only serve the customer. . We continue to serve the customer between eight PM and ten pm because that's more in line with the customer scheduled more customer centric, , we send our valets to come pick it up. . They're all W. Two employees. . They're the front lines of the customer experience and they'll come get your clothes answering questions similar to counter person might do at a cleaner. . and. . Then we bring it back to to Pacific and our cleaners. . We'll clean it, , and our goal is to work with the best cleaners. . The the reality in the industry is that all cleaners are underutilized olive excess capacity and they don't WanNa know how to get volume and then to because of the vendor centric approach, , their world tends to be very spiky during the week they'll get that Monday morning rush, , and then the rest of the week is Kinda quiet. . What we've done is built a model where we're GONNA send our cleaning partners of predictable steady stream. . Of volume allow them to clean the clothes, , fill their capacity, , but then also allow them to grow and actually be able to plan for growth because we're we're sending volume

j James Noah Janai Ajay Ranson
Interview With Ajay Prakash And James Joun of Rinse

How I Built This

05:11 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Ajay Prakash And James Joun of Rinse

"Hello everyone, and welcome to how I built. This resilience edition on these episodes were talking with entrepreneurs and other business leaders about how they're thinking creatively during such a disruptive time and today we're going to hear from the Co founders of Rinse Ajay precaut-. James June. Rinse is a laundry and dry cleaning service that picks up cleans and delivers close right to their customers. Doorsteps Rinse was founded in twenty thirteen. When Ajay wanted to start a business. so He approached his college friend James who'd worked at his parents dry cleaning shop as a kid this year rinse has seen a drop in dry cleaning orders, but their laundry service has stayed steady and they've been able to avoid layoffs so far I spoke with a j James from their office where they're practicing social distancing in order to keep their essential business running. Explain what what is what is ranch? How does it work? Yeah, I mean Ranson had simplest form is pickup and delivery of dry cleaning and laundry. We started in two thousand thirteen to give you a little bit of background at the time I was looking to start a company and I was excited about a couple of trends. One was the idea. Of bringing technology to Old-school Industries and then. James Actually. Came to me with the idea of doing something dry-cleaning. You guys are college friends, right? Yeah exactly. I'm not Ajay for twenty years and you know my background was more healthcare but my first job and live album my parents into dry cleaner store. So they put me to work when I was young. My uncles and aunts are awesome in the industry and so for as long as I can remember during family gatherings, we would talk shop we talk dry-cleaning you know all the time more recently the discussion is really Focused on wise business. So slow why isn't there as much business as there used to be in? So in two thousand thirteen, Noah Janai were for breakfast to discuss ideas start businesses i. just come back from my parents store ends wanting to hear that business slow and then to seen in person is just stark. appeared see customers machines running in silence, and so that image stuck with me, and so it was going to eat breakfast with Ajay Ajay You know, what can we do to help drivers? Yeah, and and that was a moment for me where the the bells kind of went off and I thought dry-cleaning was perfect for the trends I was looking at I'd always. Be James as a potential co founder but you know I think it was too good to pass up unique advantage we brought to the table with him understanding the dry cleaning side of the equation. So we ran out a week later, the test with eleven of our friends we picked up their clothes we cleaned them James James's parents shop we delivered them back and from. All of them. We got this unanimous responsive. Hey, this is awesome. When you guys coming back well I mean I love that because the business model right for dry cleaning has been more or less the same. It's been small mom and pop shops like James like your parents or maybe they've got some people have a few dry cleaning shops and there there's like zips and some. Of these small chains but really, it was an industry ripe for a completely new approach. Absolutely I think the biggest thing is that as consumer behavior has shifted, what's become very clear dry cleaning is that it's just it's full of a ton of friction and it's not one big point of friction. It's a lot of little points of friction along the way. So if you think. About the the dry cleaning experienced historically, you don't know who's a good dry cleaner. So you just go to nearest one your held hostage proximity. You can't assess quality until after the clothes come back. So it's a bit of a crapshoot for us as customers. The model is very vendor centric in the sense that they're open nine to five closed on weekends, which doesn't work if. You're actually at work during that time and there's limited technology limited customer service, limited transparency. We call internally death by a thousand cuts and when we were getting rinse started our idea was, let's systematically create a seamless experience from start to finish work with the best cleaners out there who are struggling, they don't know how to get volume. Let them do what they do best which. is clean the clothes and then manage everything else and so that's that's that's how started. So essentially, I mean, you get you get an APP and you putting your order and then it somebody comes picks it up, and then you partner with different dry cleaners to clean it. You don't you don't own your own facilities on cleaning facilities. That's right. Yeah. So you schedule A. Pickup, we only serve the customer. We continue to serve the customer between eight PM and ten pm because that's more in line with the customer scheduled more customer centric, we send our valets to come pick it up. They're all W. Two employees. They're the front lines of the customer experience and they'll come get your clothes answering questions similar to counter person might do at a cleaner. and. Then we bring it back to to Pacific and our cleaners. We'll clean it, and our goal is to work with the best cleaners. The the reality in the industry is that all cleaners are underutilized olive excess capacity and they don't WanNa know how to get volume and then to because of the vendor centric approach, their world tends to be very spiky during the week they'll get that Monday morning rush, and then the rest of the week is Kinda quiet. What we've done is built a model where we're GONNA send our cleaning partners of predictable steady stream. Of volume allow them to clean the clothes, fill their capacity, but then also allow them to grow and actually be able to plan for growth because we're we're sending volume

James James Ajay Ajay James June Ranson Noah Janai Co Founder Partner Stark.
Cybersecurity and the SMB

Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

05:08 min | 1 year ago

Cybersecurity and the SMB

"But yet, you guys are geared towards helping small businesses from policy in ready perspective on cyber right. Absolutely. So I can tell you what we do I. Just WanNa make a comment on your diversity common because I'll. I'll make a a plug for diversity across genders races. The capabilities and skills are out there, but you have to work to find them So it's just a question. If you really believe in diversity than you have to build it from the ground up get people into the position to acquire the skills, and there's plenty of there's a diverse skill that's out there but you have to look forward. and. Not just be complacent and go to the usual suspects. So that's that's my plug on diversity it it. They are particularly in this space and it's important to for US particularly cybersecurity, which is about building things and creating solutions to actually get divers, thoughts and ideas in. Well, if I made injected diversity of opinion is so important because we. I I've been in the industry. You know roughly twenty some odd years and I feel like while we continue to innovate actually like the solving things is is the difficult part right and so every couple years ago we need a fresh perspective and what we have disabled people like this is not how it is going to happen. Yeah exactly. Exactly and so the the Cyber Readiness Institute in Two Thousand Sixteen I served as executive director of President Obama's independent bipartisan commission on Enhancing National Cyber Security, and it was a nine month commission as. We're finishing up the commission and the Vice Chair of the Commission Sam Palmisano, who's the retired CEO of IBM in I came together to talk through how do you carry this momentum forward so the CO chairs were all involved co chairs of CRI were all involved in the commission of Penny. pritzker served as US Secretary of Commerce at the time and she was oversight and then Microsoft participated on the commission Ivanka the CEO of MasterCard was a commissioner and the idea was to your earlier point that by convening senior executives to come together. And say small business cybersecurity is important. You create momentum for this purpose because small businesses themselves don't have the voice and don't have the resources for this and so if you take and convene large companies and ask them to share their best practices and resources to create free tools for small businesses, then you're truly helping businesses and you're also improving the security of global value chains. The point that Ajay Banga the CEO of MasterCard with all the time is you know we're only as strong as our weakest link and particularly for a company. Like MasterCard helping small businesses make sense but it's true of all companies are members include Exxon, Mobil, General Motors, city, those companies, all recognize the importance of cybersecurity for small businesses will, and I think it's interesting as cyber security We'll save matures and it's it's time as thing One of the things that I think we we keep coming back to insert recognizing pretty readily and it's happened a few times over the years where your smallest vendor, your most insignificant from but number of dollars you pay them vendor or partner. Tends to be one of your weakest. Of A cybersecurity perspective right. So if you think about the overuse example although I haven't heard it in a while of the h back company that you know. Is your is your H, back to provide a provider of choice for the six hundred, seventy, four locations you have right or or even or even the one like you've got a shop or something of live in an area that's got a lot of these small companies that are the warehousing and electrical companies and right. These are not like global companies but they've got somebody that maintains their grounds. They got somebody that does their payroll. They've got somebody that maintains the electrical and all that and I sort of wonder How much of the companies that? These companies rely on actually do. In terms of cybersecurity sometimes, they have such A. Wealth and abundance was an embarrassment of riches as the attorney in terms of how much data they have a about some of the world's largest companies. Blows my mind that they spent like. Maybe sometimes nothing on cybersecurity will holy cow possible. Well exactly and I think one of the things that you are calling attention to, which is so critical as that supply chains are not linear. There are parts of your supply chain that people don't think about it's the catering company. It's the HVAC company and there was a story in the. New York Times by Nicole for over a couple of years ago about an oil company in Texas that was firewalls, six ways to Sunday. But they were breached because the militia actors were paying attention to the it department and saw that at six o'clock at night typically, they would download the menu from the Chinese restaurant around the corner and. To in order to order, and so they put them out where on the Chinese restaurant. because. They see a lot easier to breach

Mastercard United States CEO Cyber Readiness Institute Penny. Pritzker Ajay Banga New York Times Sam Palmisano IBM Microsoft Secretary Of Commerce President Obama Vice Chair Exxon Executive Director Texas Attorney
George Clooney Directing, Producing ‘The Tender Bar’ for Amazon

News, Traffic and Weather

00:14 sec | 1 year ago

George Clooney Directing, Producing ‘The Tender Bar’ for Amazon

"Be teaming up with Amazon on a new movie deadline, reported Friday that Clooney was closing in on a deal with Amazon studios to direct and produce the tender bar based on Ajay Arm Oringer memoir about growing up on Long Island. That's your money now I'm

Amazon Studios Ajay Arm Oringer Amazon Long Island Clooney
Lets talk about OLYMPUS!

This Week in Photo

05:35 min | 1 year ago

Lets talk about OLYMPUS!

"Put on his makeup, but before we start I want to talk a little bit about why do this livestream real quick in the main reason. Is this big announcement that now? That Elizabeth's put out earlier this week? That triggered a lot of media outlets. Arguably mine included inside of our community to kind of talk about it as Olympic is fall in the sky's falling. It's all over for Olympus etc I. Know Rob, or I knew rob was affiliated with the company, so I sent him a quick message like rob you okay, man, what's going on and he was like dude. There's a lot of disinformation. Let me! Set you straight. ABC and I was like okay well. Would you be willing to come on and say that on the show so hopefully use the platform of whip to demystify this stuff and lucky enough he said yes, and here we are so rob night man, welcome to the show man how you doing. Hey, I'm good man. Thanks, traveling I I appreciate the opportunity to actually. Have a real conversation about all this crazy stuff. You mean versus salacious headlines. I've read a lot of expert opinions on facebook over the last few days in. It's A. Very few experts actually chiming in anything's. The you say expert opinions, you say expert opinions with with quote marks right indeed. UNINFORMED, experts agree that ABC. So. Let's listen before we dive into the let's talk a little bit about just set. The stage of who robbed night is and what your affiliation with Olympus gives us that. Give us the back story. Yeah, well I'm I'm basically photography teacher I'm from predominantly do destination photo workshops, but obviously with all this stuff. I'm not doing that so I teach photography I go to events and give presentations I go to camera stores. All all sorts of anyway I can interact with photographers and and teach photography socially nature, photography, travel, photography, and about going on a year ago, Olympus, approached me and asked me to be a part of their new. Team they have the they've had the visionaries for a while and. There's the educator team now and then the what is it explores which is their social media folks? And I'm basically a brand ambassador. That's that's what we're called. You know I'm a part of the educating which is is not a job as much as it's a relationship, you know I use their equipment to do what I do, and they understand the value of that. People come on workshop with me and they see me shooting with you know my gear and they want to go buy it and that's that's kind of you know my job, and then they send me out to do things and and you know what would have been a full spring of birding events and nature photography events. You know on behalf of Olympus was be. Sitting at my house, my kids trying to figure out what he'll do, but but that's. That's the nature of what I do I'm I'm a brand ambassador as far as Olympic is concerned. I love. I love that. Okay, so let let's let's dive in and talk a little bit about where things are today right so. On the heels of that I know you and I sort of interacting, you know we were ambassadors of different. We I still am, but you were ambassador on Panasonic side, and then made the jump over to Olympics. That's a whole `nother show. We're going to save that for a different show about the impetus and driving factors behind that decision. Which is deep I? Really I don't want to do that an injustice, but let's let's let's focus on this side so olympus right so. Looking looking at the company of Olympics, a story brand right so Olympics. Olympics I think like I think Panasonic. Especially Panasonic because microphone thirds I think Sony Canon to when I saw that news, the knee jerk reaction was Oh crap. Okay, we're losing one of these. These pillars in the industry story brand like a Kodak is folding and okay. So what's going to happen and people that are shooting at what's going to happen to their cameras? There's suddenly going to stop working. Not The case, but you know you those things go your mind. The doom and gloom hits I. Think is maybe human nature, doom and gloom first, and then the reality of what it is. It's so set that stage for. What's the reality of this announcement? Is Olympics like just? Sin And everybody in the Camera Division home and know people that have the cameras you gotta go. Buy Spare parts at garage sales now or is it? Well the first thing I want to say is that I do have a relationship with Olympic, but I'm not I'm not speaking for you. Know Olympus. Corporate when I'm talking about this and the things that I'm going on to answer that question are the things that. Mostly, what everyone else can read online? There's there's the the letter of intent that has posted on Olympus website. I have pieces of that to sort of reference and then we did as an ambassador. I do have sort of Cuban a sheet that that Olympus sent me, so that's as much insider information as as you can get. But basically they they have announced that they are going to talk to company about buying the imaging division from Olympus and Olympics makes they have an imaging division. They have medical. You know medical devices, and you know they don't only make cameras. So what they're talking about is taking the camera business and selling it to this company and Japan Ajay. Ip and

Olympus Brand Ambassador Panasonic ROB ABC Elizabeth Facebook Kodak Japan Ajay Sony
Multicloud MySQL with Jiten Vaidya and Anthony Yeh

Software Engineering Daily

13:45 min | 1 year ago

Multicloud MySQL with Jiten Vaidya and Anthony Yeh

"More about the networking challenges for implementing a multi cloud database. So we used eight engy. Cpa's support VPN Address and BJP outing so appealing. Aws engineer was fairly straightforward but Uzun and support the BJP protocol. So we couldn't use the being raised so as we had to manually set up. The routes cleared firewall rules and forward the traffic from Manu Be Glaspie in so it was basically Im- by an metrics of like we had three brothers and four regions in each cloud provider. All with each other. Can you explain what? Vp appearing as BBC painting is basically it just? It's done that allows lousy route traffic from one in one cloud provider another club. Reuter BBC meaning virtual private cloud so the communication between two clouds between getting to to VPS's to talk to one another. Explain a little more detail why that was difficult. It's easier to route packets within the network boundary of a cloud provider. But now you're sending packets across loud providers and that's why you need. Vpn Gateways and be bit outing. I see and did you have to write your own. Vpn Gateway to route the traffic from one cloud provider to another Juicy support the Ajay. Bbn Get race but Azoulay doesn't so we needed to setup the routes manually grier Rules and forward the traffic from Amanullah Parisian. Ib to the classic VPN. How else do the different cloud? Providers differ from one another significantly. Their Communities Implementations Defer the maturity of the Coordinated Implementations Bicarbonate Implementations. I mean they're hosted community services have different maturity. Some of them work as advertised and some of them. We have to put in scaffolding to make sure that we are working on there. Flaking seizure like the Kuban eighties is a service platforms on the different cloud providers. Yeah by blood is the best I think is pretty good too it. We had problems with. How does the failure domain of Vitesse Change when it goes multi cloud so one of the previous episodes? We talked about how the tasks running on Cooper netties in a single data center can recover from failures handle failures. But I'm sure. The failure domain becomes much more complex when you have multi cloud scenarios. Talk me through. Some of the failure cases that you've solved for right with us. Conceptually affiliated domain is a cell and we mapped the cell to coordinate is cluster in a region in glower in we have sixteen different cells and each cell corresponds to urbanize cluster in a region in the cloud. So we have cloudy different cells. Four regions Antigua Bells outs so conceptually. Cell is the federal domain invictus. And the same is true in this declawed. Derision world even the cloud providers tend to think of vision as failure domain. It's a set of computing resources. I mean Ability zones which is yet another failure domain. Which is slightly more granular. That's how we deploy when we are deployed Vidana single region but when you have deployed across legions been deployed across cloud riders. We tend to think of a region in a given cloud as a unit of domain Anthony. You want to add anything. I would add that. Even in the cross cloud or multi region case we do still define each availability zone within a region as its own failure domain. So for example if you tell us to launch end replicas in region cloud one. We're going to do our best to spread out across the availability zones within that region. Maybe talk through the resolution of a failure that could occur. Let's say like I'm doing a right to the database instance on the cloud that's accepting rights and so I do a right and somewhere in this right. The entire cloud provider fails. What's the process of recovering from that failure? That cloud provider has received the right. How do the other clients or how did the other databases on the clouds identified? That failure has occurred. There are different types of failure scenarios that we recognize one is kind failure and one is bland failure. What plan failure is that? You know that this region is going to go away at one point in time for maintenance for whatever reasons that's harrys hundred British in a straightforward fashion where failure your bastard out of that region in either another region in the same cloud provider. Auden do originally different. The second which is more problematic is if it's a catastrophic failure with very little warning a whole region goes away. Your master wasn't a governor discussed which was in that region. So let's see what will happen rate. I is not the right itself will fail. The second thing that will happen is that we have a global at city cluster with members in different regions and if there was a member region when I say city parking lot at apologies so the member in that region will go away the second thing that might happen but because are multiple members which cleared that Corum. Today will still continue to respond and our operator detects that the master has gone. Antony will be able to explain it better than I do. I guess picking up. Richardson left off. You know he made sure to talk about the fact that we still have the ability to read and write to this at CD topology server and that's important for ensuring that vitesse can do this automatic fail over in a safe way while taking account for the fact that one region might be unresponsive. So there's a couple of different train offs you can make as a user you can choose different trade offs so one for example is you could say. I WANNA do. I let me think across clouds across regions. And if you do that then you can know that before you were told. Any transaction was committed it has been replicated to a different region. So if you sign up for that setting it means that you won't lose any transactions that reported to clients has committed the downside of that the reason it's a trade off because that means every right you have to wait for the year round trip to Go to a different region and comeback in report that it was acknowledged so the other option that I used have is to say. I'm going to roll the dice and say you know. If an entire region goes down I will abandon any transactions that got orphaned in that region and repairing somewhere else while saying you know if that region comes back up all kind of take a look at what transactions were orphaned in replay them as necessary and this rule choices actually the way that we chose to run at Youtube so we only did within a region or given cell and we said if it ever happens that we have to continue somewhere else where you will figure out how to replay transactions. During the time I was in this never happened and I think Subaru also has said it didn't happen while he was there because what we saw much more frequently was if not that an entire region suddenly disappears. It was more that you have degradation in our region wrapping up getting worse and worse. And so what we did is we just had policies in place to say as soon as the degradation gets passed. Some facial we will preemptively shift our masters over to a different region and that might be slow. Because maybe there's a network packet loss or things like that but we were kind of babysit that wait for it and then once out of that region we say okay we're safe. We have avoided the POSSIBILITY OF TRANSACTIONS BEING ORPHANED. So those are two different offs. You can make in a condition where databases get out of SYNC. You might need to have a voting procedure to determine a quorum. Can you give an example of when that might occur and how databases would communicate in that scenario to resolve an inconsistency so the way we run our system we don't use voting and according to figure that out my sequel has this concept of GD idea global transaction ninety as Antony described you have a master in multiple replicas and different might have replicated who are different extent? Also if you have semis? Implication turned on what that means. Is that before? The master says that something was successfully committed that the data who it read that particular transaction is guaranteed to be applica- somewhere else in logs. So all that needs to happen is that it needs to get over the network and it needs to get into the really log. It doesn't need to be materialized into the target database the latency required for that is Lloyd than actually getting into and into the database. Long Story Short. What we need to do is to talk to all the mccaslin figure out which -LICA- has progressed to the highest judy. Id which has jetties which is as close to the master as possible and the Jews that as the new master so this is something that is done post-facto after the master has gone down at mark for the transaction. So that's how we allied a split brain with semi sink turned on. We don't pay the cost of figuring this out for a transaction. We just do this at the title fellow or semi Turned on that make sense. It does and I'd like to change the conversation to actual production deployments. So have you put the multi cloud database into production for any particular users? Who are the people that would want to switch to this more aggressively from just a single data center? We have trials. Nobody is actually using it in production yet but I was telling you about this company in Japan who is interested in it. We are talking to them. They have created an account. I don't exactly at what point the trial is. Somebody like them would be very interested in it. We also have some conversations going on with government agencies early conversations who are interested in this and we destroyed this out about two weeks ago so but leaders yet totally zooming out talking about the business more. Broadly you've had some large customer deployments that you've worked with worked slack and square and hubs spot and Bolat of other companies and the overall business of planet scale is around this control plane that you can sell and license. How does the control plane that you sell? Compared to what the Open Source Vitesse model contains so let me just clarify that. Slacks squid Who HAVE DONE. The guest is for open source with us. We do provide support to slack and squad sport. We don't have a relationship with and what you said is exactly right. I mean we do want to provide vitas support for any company that wants with support because we want As Open source project we as successful as possible and we adhere to help the community. But that's not how we are going to scale the company so what we have built is basically the technology that we have built is this operator which allows us to create an API on top of coordinates that allows us to databases safely in single or multiple Clusters right that is like that. We have built. We have actually taken our operator and we have made a subset of that open source we will be doing an announcement about that etc pretty soon. And it's a pretty full fledged open-source Planet scale operator that will allow you to run with us well and safely in the cluster. It just doesn't have some features related to teams and Cross Cluster Federation and so on that Anthony talked about that our planet's guilty be operator has so the operator version that we use to run our own clusters we call that panicle debut so what we are going to scale the company on is this database of service that we are running as planet scale. Db What is coming is a multiple ways to apply planets. Guilty one of them recalled. Byu Okay which is your own Kubler. Cabanas where you'll be able to create custom regions by giving us access to your one of this cluster. You could use our control Blaine. But many said the pride actual parts get stopped at CLUSTER. So that the data never leaves your GonNa Cluster. We will also cream of Finance Kennedy. Beware weekly at a separate account for you. We can associated with your billing account and rerun awarding of Db In separate For you so that. You're not in Bite Environment

Antony Anthony BJP BBC CPA Manu Be Glaspie Gonna Cluster Cross Cluster Federation Vitesse Change VP AWS Corum Azoulay Vitesse Uzun BYU Ajay Youtube Subaru
React Stack with Tejas Kumar

Software Engineering Daily

09:23 min | 1 year ago

React Stack with Tejas Kumar

"Task are welcome Software Engineering Daily. A happy to be here. I want to start by getting some historical perspective. Over the last six seven years of react react came out and it was just a view layer and we could still describe it that way but it has had downstream impact on the rest of web development. What have been the downstream impacts of react so? Laurie Voss did a really great talk. Ajay's concert last year where he kind of shared a lot of insights based on NPR data and one statement he made was really profound. He said react has dominated the web right. That's a downstream effect. If I understand the question correctly I think the biggest effect in really the most profound is that react brought this lack simple yet. Extremely clever component model to the web which was desperately missing at the time. I mean you think of Jay Corey prototype script Oculus all the stuff that came before and there was coupling in it was very hard to re factor like a large scale application you move backbone and Marionette back in the day I'm an react. Just brought this component model that now people have adopted even angular view and I think that honestly is the biggest effect that react his hat in the web industry. I think of the react ecosystem as a demarcation point in post rails web development and that's not entirely fair description obviously because rails is a fully fledged framework for building a web application. React is just a front end. That sort of PAT. All these downstream impacts but the fact that it's open ended that has really let the web take a different direction than the rails ecosystem. Do you have any perspective on how that open ended nature of react rather than the out of the box experience of rails? How has that affected web development? Well I can tell you. How has it affected me as a web developer and and many if not all of my peers right and this is not just my peers. Who Work with react but my peers work with angular and other kind of I don't WanNa call them frameworks although angular is a framework. But you get the idea is that the open ended. Nece is has kind of been applauded by everyone as being this thing that cultivates community because of the open ended -ness of react. We see things like react router. We see things like emotion very popular C S J slavery even. I've made a few libraries just to solve some problems that are not reacts to solve and so it kind of gives an opportunity to other developers and say this is an amazing project. I'm as an ecosystem and I'd like to contribute to it and I don't need to contribute to. The core can still contribute by virtue of like a library or something I also think in keeping it open ended react his really modeled a fundamental principle of software engineering. That I really appreciate. Which is the single responsibility principle because react like from? The get-go was just meant to solve one problem. Solve It really well. I don't think I I you know I may be wrong here Jordan walk might correct me you know I. I don't think it was intended to be created to solve all the problems like authentication like routing but not solve one problem and solve it really well and it does you know. And the other the other problems it's plug -able and modular things that hooks where we can chime in but it does what it does and it doesn't well so. I think that is something that has also influenced the way I along with my friends create software as we usually will now create these units. That do their job and their job. Well in an integrate them whereas in prior times that was wild West Cowboy Lynn j there are react centered frameworks what role the react based framework serve. That's I love this question because my website my personal website and my blog is built using a react framework by some friends. I really respect and appreciate the people over at site. So my friend Guillermo and Tim Newton's Nikon's create next year and it's you know it's this framework right. That religious solves whole bunch of things that I know how to do but I don't really want to do them so I don't want to configure what pack I don't want to set up a routing structure. I don't want to set up service rendering. Like how cool would it be if I could create a new project? Create a pages folder and put my pages in there and then it magically becomes either static website or server entered thing based on the content. The free does and I think that's amazing because like I could build actually started working on a website for my mother-in-law right and it's just I create a new folder pages. Put some stuff in there and it's just I don't even have to run like next. Dev even I just type in next in the terminal and I spin up a local depth server magic. It's so magically so I think to answer your question I think these frameworks really bring the magic and they do something that really would react. Tries to do and does well and succeeds. Mike React tries to abstract the dumb and Web API is away from people so the original components and then react. Does the rest react? Renders it to the dom react gifts and all that Jazz? So you can essentially focus on the product. You WanNa Bill. You don't have to think about dummy P. is you don't have to think about events you don't have to think about updating certain parts of your APP you don't have to think about optimizing them and I think frameworks take that approach and follow it to say. Hey you can focus on building your product. You need to think about DEB tooling. You don't need to think about serving rendering. You don't even need to make the decision if this should be static rendered or server entered like all that's handled you can create your great thing that you want to create right and I think that's what they solve right. So you've touched on two sides of the development process that they help with the getting started boilerplate side of things as well as the scale ability side of things and I think the boilerplate side of things is if I was a react developer when react I came out or I'm a new web developer. When react I came out I tear? That react is is the thing to do. But I don't know enough about web development to really piece together. What should my back NBA. I mean people tell me node but you know I don't know and you know on on the later. Stage side of things. React helps with scale ability issues which might be manifested in the server side rendering question like where am I rent winning my rendering my pages? Can you dive a little bit deeper into each of those things so you have on the one side the beginner the I'm just starting a new application boilerplate side of things and then on the other end you have the I'm a later? Stage REACT application. I need to figure out how to skim application and you think about service. I'd rendering take me through each of those sides of the Development Process. And how the frameworks help with that sure. Yeah so when you you know. I actually mentor a ton of people on twitter. We'll talk over. Dmz kind of figure out the best way to do things or at least the best way that I can see that we can see together and you know if you're a beginner and you hear react to things. How do I do it? You pretty much go on Dev dot to or you know medium and go heya. How do you search for a blog post and follow it or actually? This happened as well. A friend of mine just found like get hub repo that was like a starter kit and didn't just cloned it or use create reactive which I don't know if create react qualifies as a framework but it is a boilerplate right and they do that you start it and then you can just create kaput and then it's a matter of following the react docks creating opponents and so on and I think the frameworks really compete in in a sense if you know what I mean with with create. React Africa's frameworks. Do what create react. App does but more so I think in terms of the boilerplate stuff. I don't see that much value from frameworks. I think the bigger value comes from the later stage stuff. Which you know if if you've even if you're a beginner and you've built something you have a boilerplate is working on it starts to get traction and some of these huge and you're seeing millions billions of hits. How do we handle the scale? And that's where the frameworks really shine particularly next gs because when you couple it with and this isn't like a paid placement or anything. I just have a deep respect for these products when you couple it with now which is lights. Cloud solution it literally. You don't have to care about scale. I don't have to carry like my website is built this way. I don't care about scale at all. Like if when I hit thousands when I hit millions like it just horizontally scales for the static stuff it uses a CDN and places static assets on edge nodes and for the server side stuff it. I don't even know what it does really but I trust it and it works and all that to say that the frameworks they take this complexity away from me so I can just focus on creating content. That my friends appreciate.

Mike React Web Developer Laurie Voss Ajay NPR NBA Jay Corey Nece Africa Twitter Nikon Jordan Lynn J Developer Guillermo Tim Newton
Miss Mercy Shares Stories From Her Days in the GTOs

Rock N Roll Archaeology

09:28 min | 2 years ago

Miss Mercy Shares Stories From Her Days in the GTOs

"Is my second bout with Ms Mercy here on Pamela Durbars podcast and we're GonNa talk about some things. We didn't get to talk talk about last time we Manley spoke about the GTO's last time. Okay and so this time I WanNa talk about you know your history you know when did did you start getting into rock and roll in a huge way. My mother was into it in the fifties. She was had all sun records and just traveling because my father was a gambler and he was always GonNa Cement. Shoes promised to anyway cement shoes for those of you. I didn't quite understand that. Cement shoes promised to him gambling money so we were every race. Track was all all over from Florida to Dallas Seattle to San Mateo. I keep going back to wherever there's always a race track right there here you know and I would hear all sorts of music actually country roots and blues things and all that stuff. It wasn't even Rockin roller who is basically music all kinds of all kinds all kinds. But but when you even that terrible stuff that that awful stoplight lords as well okay. That was pretty awful. Really terrible parade are your hip. Parade wasn't too bad. There was some decent recent things on that. Name me one why. How much is that Doggie in the window? That's how much you say it. It was cute okay. She doesn't like it. Okay so I'm GonNa try to hear walking the dog saying you I know you would. That was a good segue mercy from Doggie in the window to walk in the dog. CRIPES say Segue segue way. What does that mean like? I know what it means. Okay okay so when you were like fifteen years or so though. Oh something changed right now. Twelve twelve twelve. What happened at twelve? Tammy show how was Tammy show. We're about fifteen. That's why Taylor penelas very confused about my life because at fifteen hours all also in Haight Ashbury. Yeah I was almost in Haight Ashbury. It must have been the end of fifty okay and ms been the beginning of fifteen came out yes the AM. I it's A. It's a American music. I don't know what it all means. Either maize show. Ed blended all blit everybody from this stones. The animals Jan and Dean on their actually on their sidewalk surfing was really skateboard. report that there were hosting. Yep were it's an incredible show you can find. James Brown was so great on that. Show that the stones than even WanNa follow him they had so many people on that show is just. I don't even know how it was allowed to get out. Because it was an interracial thing and at that time things were very racial. Yeah yeah I know it's a very important thing and I remember it real well too of course because I was a stone's freak of course yes We spoke a lot about them on the last time. We had this wonderful experience together. Yes we did so after that. Okay when when did you actually decide. Okay I WANNA meet the people playing this music. God It just so you know there was Tom Donahue Kyi anyway. is ever Cisco well. Here's just always in San Mateo okay. But the bow Brembos came down so I wanna the followed them and and and also you have to realize it. Tom Donahue started of FM radio. Oh he didn't he's inventor of FM radio and he was your favorite Dj. Ajay listen to law now so I was Casal at the same time they were friends. Wow I was not so but okay. What made you know people always want to know what is a groupie really? And how does it begin Groupie so for some reason you decided. Okay I'm going to meet the Beau Brummel 's I mean well actually. I did decide that they actually walked into a restaurant. While he's there is my mother at the mall and they're they came walking in. Yeah how'd you know it was them or you could help. Always nobody looks like that in San Mateo. Okay so and and now he's Tom Donahue's group by the way what do you mean. That was his group. He Made Bobo Group assignment of you know nothing about Tom. Donahue Oh my God you. The people who need to know about Tom Tom Donohue he was a big very heavy set. Dude but There was. He's a began to look it up. FM radio he's one okay so you were lucky to have to be able to hear that. That young yes. I was when he started running on those long albums. But I wanted to go back to uh-huh Brummel so when you saw them walking the mall having lunch with your mom what did you see my mom. I was did inch. Did you say okay mom. I'M GONNA go meet those guys no. I don't I don't know if I met them but I did. They came back doc and got in trouble for being because I was underage for being at their gig. I remember They played Sarah Jail. And how'd you meet them. I just followed John Around. He was drummer. John Peterson. A photo lost it. You followed him around and the and then I got in trouble for being you know under Asian Asian conform around anymore. Okay and what happened next. I mean I've followed the stones is a Sacramento with my high school girlfriends. I'm as fifteen. That is a one. Were we were in Sacramento Keith. Got Electrocuted we. Oh no shoot patty in the bell bluebells. That had I sold my heart to the junk man out over the rainbow. I Love I sold my heart to the junk man because I really did so. Anyway I was with my my One of my high school friends had moved up there with her family. And so we were in a car moved up where Sacramento. Okay Sacramento you went all right them. Okay Anyway Oy so. We went to the stones concert and then suddenly Keith gets elected you did and goes like five feet off the ground and Dan you witness that they shut the curtains so I said let's go so we all jammed out of there and got in the car and the car came out of the garage garage. I believe and We follow that car which had the stones in it all the stones down the freeway everyday then. They stopped at a gas station and change into another car. And we follow that car. And I can't do a little bungalow. Oh Hotel and motel and We got out and we pass where Mick wise and you could hear him kind of like pacing and really upset about of course keys was in the hands of the ambulance police. I have heard stories I have. I heard rumors not gonNA verified him because I was there the big beat him up. I'm not sure who beat him up. Please on that yeah yeah. I'm not sure but there was. That's what they did might have. You know. There's a threat to them. Yeah so then we. We went to this other room which happened to be Brian. Jones grow knocked on the doors open so we just walked in. I earth three was going to his suitcase looking to close at that time. I was really interested in insects that I was really ever interested as sex anyway but anyway yeah I know I know that about you for a few ties. It three times a happened but that was good anyway so he was. You're going to a suitcases. Your cases and Charlie watches in there because he had lost his key or didn't have a key to get his his apartment. We sat there and just watch them and Brian Jones is one of my favorite in the world. Was He. Okay at that point were you offend fanatic of his like he became later or did that hell is being. Yeah they're Kinda you know too seriously. Want her it. Wasn't it in as off that I would have been probably a little later. Okay in other words it I just was cool. It was just kind of cool so then we got an eating asses leave. I don't think but we laughed APPS and that was one of my first encounters. Yeah well so you hung out with Brian and Charlie at age fifteen yes. That's pretty amazing.

San Mateo Brian Jones Sacramento Tom Donahue Beau Brummel Tom Tom Donohue Haight Ashbury Doggie Shoes Tom Donahue Kyi Pamela Durbars Manley Tammy Donahue Florida Charlie Parade Taylor Penelas
"ajay" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"ajay" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Here **** my pants you're kidding you should be passed right here here that I ship my pants for free well I just may ship my pants yes she prepares bill you can ship your pants too I can't wait I think it's that I just checked my pants and it's very convenient very convenient I just set my drawers Ajay ship my nighty Joe shipped well if I was looking for in store find a Kmart dot com right now and should be to you for free yeah that ad agency or whoever they are that's ever wonder face it can't make an though okay sure it kept I mean they wimped out and took it off the air that was how I still laugh I I know it's coming but I still laugh that is the best but yeah that is one of those things it said little life hack I learned about this couple years ago and everybody I tell about it they're like home I had no idea I could find out what males coming today it's really cool really cool too I was actually having some problems with my mail carrier they kept changing and I was missing stuff that I was expecting so when you know it's supposed to be coming and it doesn't come yes right you know how to then you know when a follow up get ahead right so that's it's really important for that too and also vacation holds if you know your house your mail you can do all that you can actually can do that online to with your with your account when you have the postal service can you can put your mail on hold from there instead of going in the post office to do it now you eventually do have to go to the post office to get the mail delivered to you if you need there's an option where you can choose to have it there at all okay ma'am nice so yeah it's you know and and people of the year we read on the post office a lot because they do sometimes are less efficient but let me tell you some some like this it really works is is.

Joe Ajay
Self-Tanning & Self-Love With Jules Von Hep

Breaking Beauty Podcast

05:00 min | 2 years ago

Self-Tanning & Self-Love With Jules Von Hep

"I am Gills on Hap- I I'm renowned global spray town artist county. Believe doesn't even a jump title I basically spend my life looking at the China's Nipples I'm dope by my clients. And they leave me feeling incredible and probably better than they did a nice job. I founded the Hunting Company the eye of paradise which is essentially my whole career in a bottle. I'm it combines. Collaborative makeup with South Town at and I'm I'm all about natural healthy looking skin. I think Tanning House lend so far into dryness orange tones that do I have to wait ages to my skin too dry. Is it GONNA look fake. Is it GONNA lie. I'm that was just never will. I was a bow and all about looking like yourself. But it's about how you feel when you look in the mirror. Defeat Amazing guy out that it'd be a kind past make good pass said and just be happy. Tanning is a huge part of your life. Obviously now you have of your own business around it. What were you doing before you got into this line of work so I started my career. Why studied fashion at university? It was accost that literally changed my life oboe. Scores like really posh on everyone went to do law or medicine and I just did not fit in. I decided my the university calls by flipping a coin it landed on heads and so instead of doing interior design and fashion studied for three years and had an intense shape in fashion PR agency. I'd say I liked it but I didn't. I wasn't about the people fashion is I like to look at it but to be in a is quite quite different I met a faceless Nikola colledge office and she said to me. I think it'd be really good at spray tanning and I was like no. I don't know like I'm not sure let's park now. Come back to it. I flipped cleaning. Gada move to Australia. I worked for vogue as a beauty assistant in Australia. Loves beauty was no about aditorial and there was just something about being in an face. I'm being a desk that it was quite soul destroying at the time. I thought that is what everyone's career is supposed to be. And nobody. I had never had career advice of. You don't have to work in an office and you have to wear a suit to work. And I just didn't know that these other careers existed so came back to the UK. So Nick Lurgan and she said you know. Let me try new timing so I tried to tanning I trained in like facial massage and then I did a course in makeup and I just loved it. I loved the fact that it wasn't a bow. There was no obvious louder. There was no structure. Which I'm I'm very good? I have the most creative brain. I'm an every single day I would make people feel good. I'd go into you saw here. I just walk in. I don't care it's my. That's my job. I walk in people's houses and I have to make myself really comfortable very quickly and I have to make them comfortable with may actually it transpired that being a spray tunnel isn't just about painting fans as it were. It's everything else that comes with it. And it's almost like being a life coach and confidence boost And and you're almost your kinds cheerleader. Your when they're naked and you're you are amazing you this and you have to be a certain type of person to say. Oh you know. I'm training assistance at the moment. And I'm trying to teach them in the art of giving and Ajay and it's not just about the spray time that is secondary to what we do. They say I then Mike kind of break as it were. I was tanning. I'm just hunting grantham clients in this one Client was a makeup artist and she said to me she was like you know you really good at Tommy Bailey. Am I know I have no comparison and she said look look. I'm the head make parts. It's on the x factor. Do you want to do the spray tons. I had been touting for six months and I was like okay. This is a window opening to me and then and from that I got poached onto dancing with the stars in the UK. That show was known for bad orangutan's that's all the headlines written about. It's like everyone everyone who went on it. They were like. Oh I'm going to have spare time orange and I just thought I'm going to change this. I'm GONNA flip this about. Why is this show known for time? It shouldn't be about about that. People forget that the best time should look real. You should look like you've been on holiday not like you've been involved bottle of time. So I really carved entertains changed the way that people thought about town on that show and I did it for three years and by the end of it no one was writing about the timeless and my clients. They all call me like the Secret Tana because I I'm not really contradicts myself. I'm not a big mouth when it comes to Korea but I it's it's not about me. It's about them so I'm not gonna it do outrageous things. I just want them to look their best and gone the red carpet and feel amazing with glory. Skin it's not it's not about looking

UK Australia South Town Hunting Company China Nikola Colledge Nick Lurgan Grantham Mike Kind Ajay Korea Tommy Bailey
Virtual Game 'Neopets' Turns 20

The Polygon Show

11:52 min | 2 years ago

Virtual Game 'Neopets' Turns 20

"Neo pets were virtual pets and in in fact perhaps the most popular virtual pets ever to have existed on the Internet. So obviously we talked about Tom. Gotschi in a previous episode. But that's a little bit different right because that's like a little virtual pet inside of a physical thing. These yaps only live on the Internet. Okay hold on a second so when you originally this it was sort of referring to earlier when you originally said that you were going to do neo pets I said Oh. It's those ones where it's a stuffed animal and you can connect to the Internet and they live on the Internet to But no no. You're very well weren't very wrong but you wear wrong. Those are web kipnes. That's web kipnes. Okay probably more fun to be honest. Just having on a computer seems like a downgrade. Oh Oh Russ you are so wrong. Okay we'll get into it so neo. Pets have been around for almost twenty years now. Yeah at one point. It was the most popular one one of the most popular websites on the Internet. One of the most visited huge advertising opportunity but That and several other things actually contributed needed to. It's sad downfall until we got to it now where it's a sort of twinkle in Miss Stall GIC millennials is but we'll go back to one thousand nine hundred nine when it began so neo pets started in the UK by a couple that was in college. Actually they were both college age Adam Powell and Donna Williams so adams like kind of studying marketing and Donna was into art and Adam when and made his own online online at agency so this was toward the end of college So throughout call to dating and then toward the end Adam went and made his own ad agency which is pretty smart but the thing is like they were making all these banner. Ads wasn't really doing a ton. A ton of numbers for him. So Adam and his girl Donna. They as everyone does does loved animals. They loved pets because who doesn't so they had a ton of pets. They're kicking around. They didn't have a ton of money but they had a ton of pets for super into into animals and one day Adam was like Yo Donna. I'm on the computer all day. Work in the terrible job making ads. Why don't I just make pets on the computer? Everyone loves pets. Wait what yeah. That's the leap that he made like. I feel like we're missing a few steps okay. Here's here's my guests because he's making ads right Did he maybe invent the punch. The monkey add nope if he loves animals. Why would he make the punch? The monkey add just saying like maybe that was the progenitor neo. Pets was like well. He's got this monkey already. I don't need to punch. Maybe I could feed them a banana. I mean it's very much like key worked in AD agency and had coding shooting experience. Like that was kind of where he came from a programmer he like obviously understood marketing to an extent but was more of like a coder programmer. Guy Guy also nine hundred ninety nine so this is this is after the rise and fall of Tamagotchi like was that at all and inspiration for him. Yeah there has been no mention of Tamagotchi in my my reading but okay yeah I mean it really just kind of boils down to Yo. Let's figure out a way to make money money. Let's make pets online. which is a weird moneymaking scheme but I guess again like maybe he didn't think of it but me thinking about it like Tamagotchi but without having to carry a stupid egg around pretty good? Yeah I mean it makes perfect sense to me again because everyone loves pets. So Adam and Donna Collab- d- But the thing is so adam like coded the website the actual site itself and then Donna was in charge of the graphic design because she's artists. The thing is in two thousand five Adam told wired. There's a really big piece on the pets which we will which I got a lot of Info from so we'll we'll come back to it but he said the Donna literally did not know how to draw which sort of lake issue when it's just the two of you and you hire her on your artist But maybe he came to learn this through working with her Because essentially Donna was tasked with making the pet cells which is kind of key here right like. That's the how the very first neo pets. Were not very cute. They were Kinda weird. Look in some of them. Were literally just like sprite spaced off actual things. There was this one that was like literally a picture like Ajay peg of this British comedian. And that was one of the pets. Selena peg of a human being and you and what did you do with this comedian So I mean the point was still like you could hang out with them them. Raise them feed them play. Was it like like who was it. Like a known comedian. No one I've ever heard of some kind of like niche. It was a very British enterprise so sort of like a British like comedian. Who'd never really wasn't like filler? Like a temp piece of art. Well when it went up on the site yeah it literally was one of the one of the first neo pets. He actually went on to inspire one of the actual Lake Neo pets. So people recognized because we thought he was very funny so anyway. Yeah the first neo pets for Kinda weird looking Adam and Donna Donna. Just kinda seemed like they were goofing around even though they tend to stake their livelihood on this little bit. Because as far as I can recall at this point atom basically was committed to doing the neo pets thing full-time because it turns out. They started like dumping the link on all these virtual pet sort of like link groups newsgroups back in the day and a lot of people were really into it. There was a huge virtual pet community already and I feel like okay. Okay so like thinking back There was like pets with Z.. In Yeah and feel and like I guess the Sims was before. I don't remember when this came out but like now I think that's out there. Is there like troll creature things creatures. Yeah features yeah creatures right. Yeah like Weird Alien Things Ya ya like a it was a thing. It was like a little period of time for gaming. Yeah and I mean like as we said Tamagotchi did do well for a while. They're so like clearly is interest in folk Ammann to write like this was right after Pok mon on people like cute animals you guys. I don't WanNa keep beating this into your heads. People like pets so neo pets even in this very primitive state did super well like literally they were like. Okay Yo. This is our job. Now we're just GONNA keep making this neo. Pets thing that people inexplicably are very into despite like are very low quality and price. Sorry I wanna go back really quick you said that they would just drop links in forums to to get people to figure out about it. Yeah like there. Are these virtual pet sort of like communities. You know you guys know better than me. There's like those sort of like newsletter a group Shannon's newsgroups so and then people would just click the links and be i. I WANNA take a peek at chew maintenance our work yeah yes they would all make pokemon punts. Yeah okay okay. Yes until they got banned by me me so anyway yes so neo. Pets was doing pretty well and it was just kind of not not super complicated quite yet uh-huh but then in two thousand the sky named Doug doering who owned the the during company. Which is this market research firm heard of neo pets which this was like killing it? Like you CH- They had some additional things they had like some basic games at this point. They had people. Even I don't even understand. What are people doing with the pets? Okay so essentially what neo. Pets is or was at that time and then we'll go into like what it ended up. Having more of his you have you can have up to four pets. There was like a limited selection of them. And did you pay for the pets for it was totally free free to play and you could. Yeah so you had like a limit of four and you'd go into like the create a pet center and you can choose which of the pets he wanted. You can choose. What color was you could name Eh choose its personality and then you would have to take care of it? Basically I mean. It's kind of like Tom. mcgauchie literally just like feed it or and like make sure it's Ian or whatever and you play games pretty I wouldn't like level up and grow not really so the other thing is you're trying they get neo points which will come back way. You're going you guys. which is the virtual currency? And you use Zack. To like buy additional items you can go take your neo pets too like but grooming parlour. Go to the vending machine by different kinds of food. The whole thing is like getting money to take care of your pet. It's essentially yes reality basically but yes so. That's sort of the premise S.. which was it had like a very obviously loop right? So you're like going on neo pets to take care of your new pet which requires you to make money and then you spend all your money on food. Whatever so a lot of people were spending hours and hours and hours within the first few months as little promotion as they were doing they had ten thousand users continues to grow? Oh and so yeah in two thousand this American Dude who was like in Glendale California. I believe was heard about neo pets and he was like dude. This is a really good idea. There's legit money ops. Here Ma Dude so doug doering came to Adam them in. Donna was like yeah I can help you guys. I run a market research firm and my my guru. Here's the thing. E was a huge huge scientologist. So he would reference l Ron Hubbard and dianetics as much as possible L. H. L. R. H.. So he with the power of l Ron behind him the power of Zeno or whatever He was the bad guy needs to the back. I don't I could not finish battlefield earth. I'm sorry but anyways with the power of dianetics guiding him he signed on a C. has CEO of Neo Jio Patsy bought neo pets INC him. Co and used his market research team which was already at the door and company and helps to seriously grow neo pets into this huge money making company And Yeah another side about the scientology thing is literally. There are some employees in two thousand five after they left the company when they went on record saying yeah. We were super uncomfortable with how often he was referencing. Rinsing Scientology in some employees said they saw like some actual like celebrity scientologists occasionally get towards the office. Oh Yeah Yeah. 'cause like especially when new was tight I guess like I don't know Tom Cruise. Maybe Little Surrey Neo Pets Travolta checking out. Oh Yeah

Donna Donna Adam Powell Neo Pets Inc Lake Neo Tom Cruise Doug Doering UK Ron Hubbard Donna Williams Donna Collab Programmer Ajay Peg Ad Agency Selena Peg Glendale CO CEO Shannon California
Developing a Mailing List Tool on Top of Gmail

How I Built It

06:33 min | 2 years ago

Developing a Mailing List Tool on Top of Gmail

"My guest is. Aj goal the founder of G Mass Aj. How are you today. I'm doing great and I'm excited to be here Joe. Yes thanks so much for coming on the show you booked at a point right before I got sick and then I traveled and then I moved into a new house so I have you in evernote like four times based on each time. We've had to reschedule so I'm glad that we're able to finally get together and do this. Yeah and I got sick eventually as well and had to reschedule also also. I think that just makes for what is going to be an awesome episode because the weight has been so long. Yes yes we've been building it up like waiting for the next star wars movie so hopefully the next star wars movie will be good so this is well. So why don't we start off with who you are and what you do yeah so. I'm a software developer by profession. I've also been an entrepreneur for most of my career and G. Mass is my product in my business. Gymnasts is a chrome extension for g mail that lets you send email marketing campaigns from directly inside side your g mail account. That's that's fantastic. I'm so I'm excited to talk to you about this for a few reasons awkward developer myself but I've never written a chrome extension. I'm usually in the realm of PHP Java script and stuff but I I love this idea of being able to send and email marketing campaigns right from g mail right because I feel like you've probably found this yourself in the quest for the perfect email clients a lot of people generally fall back to g mail yes so I live my life in g mail all day all night when I'm working and I wanted an easy way to send the email campaigns without leaving that environment and a few years ago when I first started working on this I assumed that somebody had to have already built this because it seemed like such an obvious idea and it turned out that a couple of people had tried but because because g mail has never done a a good job of supporting developers that built on top of g mail they weren't very well designed products and so I saw this opportunity eighteen eighty awesome. I I love that I mean I don't love the lack of support that Google provides g developers but I love that you yeah for sure somebody wrote this and then you saw the opportunity so it's it's like I I feel like if you see a product that is just so so there's two schools of thought right. I can make it better or there's a reason. This developer is not making it better and it's probably not financially feasible or it's. It's not worth it. so you took the more positive happier yeah yeah definitely. I mean email marketing has been on a growth trajectory as an industry ever since the early two thousands and actually I had another email marketing company that I built consoled prior to starting work on g mass so when I saw that there wasn't already a good plug for g mail and and when I recognize that I'm already sort of an email marketing expert. I decided that I have to be the person to build this yeah so I I love that and you're absolutely right about email marketing right because I think a lot of people well. At least let's say like the mindset two or three years ago was like email is dead long live twitter and facebook as the best way to get to people but since I've started this show show more more and more of my guests have said email is so important. It's been their main driver of their business growing. The email list is they're. They're number one goal to get an audience like a good like qualified audience right. That's what you're really looking for. Yeah it's interesting because so I have a lot of entrepreneur friends and just to give you a counter perspective to what you just said. I have a couple of entrepreneur entrepreneur friends who are not in tech who have pretty much given up on email so they don't use email as a medium and knee more however the vast majority of entrepreneurs especially tech entrepreneurs and people inside these organizations are using e mail more and more often and the biggest evidence. I see that because I'm always worried about the death of email because the death of email represents the death of my career at the but the the thing that I look for is anytime I send out a campaign to my own users. It's the most exciting thing for any marketer. After sending out a campaign is watching those stats come in and seeing who's opening your email and when they're opening your email and sending out an email campaign gene compared to any other communication channel like posting a facebook message or or tweeting a tweets or posting on any social network the time it takes for those opens to come in immediately after sending an email campaign like I'm talking seconds. It's like emails get opened within like seconds minutes after sending a big email campaign out and that's pretty good evidence of how how tied I two people are to their email accounts yeah yeah absolutely I mean personally speaking like emails of the first thing I check in the morning though I feel really unhealthy and I shouldn't I just can't help it like I pick up my phone and I'll get the time and I'm like I wonder what emails came in overnight so I fully believe that and and you know and I know that some people like you said maybe people not in the text based like the influence or space is probably more like instagram or instagram stories or whatever as a good way to reach your audience but as far as like in my experience and the people I've talked to you like you said those qualified leads. Those people who are on tailing list are the people that you're most likely the most connected

Developer Facebook G Mass Aj JOE Founder Instagram Software Developer Google G. Mass Twitter Three Years
Chin Implants: The Procedure You Never Knew You Needed

Art Beauty

13:24 min | 2 years ago

Chin Implants: The Procedure You Never Knew You Needed

"We've an interesting kosovo because this is something that admittedly the topic i i was so surprised about i met a woman younger woman and i was like what do you do. What's your skin care routine. Tell me everything and she admitted that she had recently. They had a chin implant. I think my chin fell to the floor because i had always thought that chins were for big beefy dudes. It's like <hes> like the guys who get calf implants. Yes seriously. I am so so excited to get a chin implant. I'm not even to i've waited. It's part of my. It's in my next five. You know five your plan. Plan your your your your plan. Got a beijing five year. Plan of beijing has indefinitely includes injectable at so smart. I love the descendants when people are like what your five year plan in like of aging yeah. No i got the here we go. So do i bring in. Are we talking like ricky. Martin from the always go to live in la. Vida need a loka okay. Well like listen. I used to really look like county yeah and as we've age like i'm trying yeah. He's my jaylo. Oh okay. He is my jaylo. Make sense. Make sense and you know what i love today our our guest today dr al loss is really going to explain to us. The misconceptions options that around jenin plants yeah. I really don't have any especially after that quote. Unquote self made billionaire redid her entire vase allegedly with her lips and i was like but what about everything yeah i'll talk about it. You're so right. I love the pay attention to this stuff but in my defense today even dr yale loss our guest so that there is a big misconception about who needs needs a chin implant so i'm just gonna let her tell us all about it so a lot of the times i e even i am a little bit loathe to bring it up because your reaction on is not a typical. A lot of people are like a chin plan. What the heck are you talking about like. No i'm fine and but if you think about it what is the dividing border between in our face and our neck we we really do have to have a nice good border. You have to have a nice defining jaw line and if you don't have that then it just is like a big blob going running together. <hes> and it's not just so you can have a good profile just want to have a good division between green the two and if you don't have a strong good chin and i'm not talking about jay leno but you just want to have like a clear border between face the neck and a chin is really that's it's all important job and we looking at models and even when we look at models of like wow they're being so inclusive there. They haven't aged model. They have a stake steer old a fifth year old on the cover they always have these great joy aligns and it's because they have like a good strong chin not ajay leno but like a good strong defining chen how this is something that you're all up on and also be getting one really yeah. I mean yeah yeah well. I guess even at for like maybe forty five but it's on my leg ten year plan overthrowing. Everybody doesn't have to get an implant. I totally disagree if you look at somebody's profile and you can basically draw a line down from dropping down from the lip up straight down to the chin if he saw a vertical straight down and it lines up your good if it's behind then you're a little it back. Don't you find that with harmony in the face. <hes> you know when when people do face-lifts when people alter their noses sometimes when they add in a scotch epa chen or even just like us coach of a cheek like it all brings together but the chin is the like as you. I said it's the border. The chin really can do a lot of things because yes. I mean one hundred percent so many times that people are coming in for ryan up last dave or for hurt their nose and they think that their nose is huge and i'm like the nose is not an issue. It's because the chimney so far back that the noses looking so prominent in just i put a little bit of chinon we balance the face the cheekbones all of a sudden were look a little bit more prominent that knows doesn't look as prominent and even if they then still refused to do the is is always a bit of an issue because how far back indy bring the nose when the chin is still going to be an issue and as a person ages if you don't have a good strong strong chin think about it the second that those jowls form and they start to descend if there's not a good strong chin. They're not a good strong jaw line. You're gonna st those jowls. Forming in three seconds. I hate is a chin implant like i'm like a very baby retargeting silicone. Is it like a little pouch so can be made a little silicone. It's not it's very different than than the breast implant okay breast implants. If you think about it have to again interesting visual with my hands right now or move around. She's doing squishy but <hes> chin implant. Arch implants are being placed on it in a very precise pocket any top of your bone. They are not moving got it. That could be one of the reasons why we think that you don't get that some issues that you get with breast implants scar contraction actor and the need to replace it. Was it harder so it's definitely firmer okay <hes> you actually will not feel will the difference between your bone and where the chin implant is. Oh so why did the grafted along the bum. It's placed in such a precise pocket underneath breath the on the fibrous envelope of the bone that you really just blends right in. I love when you talk nerdy to me. Okay i feel like i'm talking committee so now for me so selfish question only go in through the mouth and i don't need this car underneath you. You can absolutely why what are the two aways that we address as we can either go through the mouth or we can go through right underneath the chen and the difference. The friends is <hes>. The mouth is a dirty place isn't that we don't love to do that because you're putting a permanent implant so ideally you you want to be with nobody serious. That's why sometimes make the mouth isn't so preferred but yes for men who have a incredibly sexy beard heard. Sometimes you don't want to give them that. External scar though offense so many particularly guys already have a little scar underneath i do my husband does do and i was just russian all man i'd like you to i simply ask sledding accident trying to be a figure skater but without he's on oh aw almost all men actually already have scar there so actually usually not such a big issue and since i do a tremendous large number of bureaucratic arctic transplants no no biggie. It's not a biggie because i can take a few. I can actually even take some of your beard. Hairs entrance led to this guard some point okay salta and with the chin implant canada along gave to my jaw line to can you add a little more to my jaw line where the less yes yes. I mean we're talking about shape so used to be years back that we put in this little these little shaped like mccormick little button there look like will overall will footballs but now we tend to use more what we call an extended anatomical that fills that pre jowl space and when you do that you get that elongated gated gel and actually a lot of times that women are complaining so early about getting pre jowls or feeling that chubby face and the reason men are growing growing beards or go t's is because they want their hiding the fact that they don't really have that great jal that they wished they had and then once you pop that jin implant and all of a sudden they have that defined jawline inch also people who love it are people who feel like they have that little like under <unk> under the chin like fat pouch yeah and they lose weight but they still have that pouch there even without doing liposuction. You just put the chinen all all of a sudden that's gone so what is the procedure like for coming in and we're not sure that we're ready for this. Is there any way to sort of envision this. Yeah we definitely definitely have an imaging system that we can take your picture and we can draw on you right what has been credibly popular over the past few years and maybe because of instagram because the apps <hes> people come in having image themselves with an app that they have on their found or we do fillers all the time. We have fillers that last six months we fillers that last two years and try before you buy you try before you buy. We do injectable all the time so do you use a specific civic type of filler in the chin or is it the same that you use in the face there there are many different types really a lot of the i always prefer natural fillers so any of the hyler electronic acid fillers really work well and they're so many that good ones that are f._d._a. Approved and have different longevity. Write a love it okay so then if we're going to have this done what what is that procedure like walk through it. Come into the office that day you come to the office that day. Believe it or not. I actually performed quite a few of these under local anesthesia anesthesia wow yeah they got. They do <hes> so we can. Maybe give you a valium pill to relax even an ambien. <hes> the the incision is going to be marked. <hes> area is sterling cleaned in. We have our own accredited operating room here. <hes> local anesthesia can injected. You may not feel that at all. If you choose to go with a little bit of mild anesthesia we have board certified anesthesiologist here which case you take it happen. You know make up and it's totally done a little bit of soreness frequently. We do it from an incision right underneath the chen those to just come out a week later her <hes> yeah you could be a little bit sore <hes> so maybe i'll say have milkshake right first day or two but otherwise i've actually performed perform this on colleagues and they went and covered the facial plastic clinic the next day wow so like is there anything because i think that we don't realize how much are chin is involved in speaking speaking in but you're saying you're good to go. You'll be a bit swollen. You may look slightly. Sorry jay leno you might look slightly jay leno as for the first week because you'll be a little a bit swollen nothing that is so outrageous that people are stopping you down the street right and no big bandages. You'll the first day i mean when you leave. We sure on your late night in a over are left totally big. Samantha hats on an ahead yelling l. hoodie yeah. He's hell of it. I mean it does take a couple of weeks to the swelling goes down. The most people love it. Love and other people are not aware. We always talk about it two or like it. The problem is when you do any sort of facial thing whether it's filler mall really return that filler and you get home that day and you see the swelling and if you think if this doesn't look swelling they have it doesn't look super bowl anti than you didn't do a lot of the times it filler. You'll be like swollen. You're like oh this looks great and then it goes away and it's like wont wont law <hes>. Should it up more but that's great thing about florida. You can always try and the great thing apparently about these implants now is that you can come in. You can do the imaging you can do a a filler simulate that before are you go under the knife. -actly ballpark costs on this because we always have to ask and i know it varies from surgeon to surgeon in state to state but what are we looking at <hes> <music>. I'm going to say about five thousand. Oh okay so on the low end of facial procedures shall proceed to try before i buy because i'm ready to go shave. My face right now depends on how many syringes to be honest. I'll need like four or five then you actually could be looking at the cost of surgery surgery so like but again i love test drive you do <hes> so the value is always at is what i always say patients. Who do the injections the value. Is there because you at least know how is half the battle. Knowing is half the battle joe but now it is yes. It is real merkin kim euro if we were to do it implant and hate it. Is it something that's reversible. It is okay so okay so you're also not sounds like you were grafting it to the bone and there's lots of different shapes and they're even customizable so all right doctor. Thank you so much for really taking food procedure so we can put our best face

Jay Leno Beijing Kosovo Ajay Leno Instagram Soreness LA Vida Ricky Chen Dr Al Jenin Florida Martin Ryan JOE Mccormick Samantha T
Donald Trump, Elizabeth Warren And Joe Biden discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:25 min | 2 years ago

Donald Trump, Elizabeth Warren And Joe Biden discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"From the u._s. I warren says i'm viewing person can be trump yeah. This is really interesting because <hes> donald trump of obviously he's. He's grabbing the headlines. He's the u._s. President but also he's making a lot of noise not necessarily for the right reasons but we shouldn't forget that whilst he's been grabbing the headlines the the democrats have been trying to choose news the candidates who all go all the candidate who is going to run against him in twenty twenty and it was a very crowded field and it was hard to pick count who was likely to stand head and shoulders above the rest now there was a bit of a division because you have people like joe biden who of course was the vice president to <hes> barack iraq obama who is mr trump's predecessor and he was seen as a pretty safe pair of hands etc. You have people not camera. Harris peak book league and elizabeth warren anaylyst both warren came to the fore so to speak because she was dumped pocahontas by donald trump exactly because she said that that she had native american ancestry and he then he he gave her this this soubriquet and <hes> she then he then he then said oh well you know prove it and i'll give give it. I'll give a million dollars to to a charity and she did actually have d._n._a. Tests which proof that she does have native american descent in her and of course surprise surprise donald trump didn't didn't actually cough up the money but the pointing not no he didn't in fats the reason why we know this is because it is worn appeared at form for native american indians on the native american vote is actually quite important because there are something like over three million votes three point seven million voters and <hes> there's a gentleman who is quoted in the article mr ajay siemens of the rosebud sioux tribe and he said that d._n._s. dna has wasn't to prove she was an indian. It was to meet donald trump. Pay that million dollars he put out there and then instead of honoring in his words he just got more derogatory but the point about it is the elizabeth warren is appears to be catching up on joe biden. She seen is very folksy. She seems to have an answer for everything thing. He's seen as a little bit accident prone. She's seventy. He's seventy seven and the worry is is that perhaps if if he does actually beat off the field that is really going to be pulverised by donald trump but certainly it is warren she is. She's she's doing well. She's pretty much neck and neck with joe biden in some of these polls and <hes> she sees having having a very good chance of beating donald trump in two thousand

Donald Trump Elizabeth Warren Joe Biden Vice President Barack Iraq Obama President Trump Harris Million Dollars
737 MAX pilot sues Boeing for career damage

Joel Riley

06:42 min | 2 years ago

737 MAX pilot sues Boeing for career damage

"Got word yesterday class action lawsuit pilots a little more than four hundred of them getting together and the targeting in on boeing so we thought it'd be appropriate to talk to our aviation expert jay ratliff this morning ajay appreciate the time tell me what you know about the lawsuit well basically you mentioned more than four hundred pilots that fly the boeing airplane have joined together in a class action lawsuit basically charging boeing with an unprecedented cover up also states pilots suffered from a loss of pay while others were shaken by the fact that they were operating an aircraft with what they're calling known deficiencies i don't think anyone can argue with that and basically without boeing morning eat of the airlines or the pilots what was going on into nedeli are the families of those lost three hundred and forty six live suing investors are suing you have airlines that have purchased the max aircraft which right now are nothing more than super big paperweights in pilots lining up to see this thing i mean to me it becomes a much more serious thing you know we have to accidents and that's very serious but then when you say boeing knowingly covered up the problem they knew it was an issue and that's why these souls lost their lives and why they're having all the trouble with the plane if they knew that was the problem they should be held accountable they do they have problems now whether or not that led to the the you know the death of those three hundred forty six passengers still completely unresolved but we're certainly headed down that path i mean we're member boeing the company that had their test pilots test airplane before they were ever delivered without telling him about some of the safety upgrades involving that impressed system boeing was also the airline that sold the aircraft without forcing the airlines to have their pilots go go through simulator training and didn't even tell the airlines that by the way we have this very aggressive anti-stalking system on the aircraft they did not come forward with that until the lion aircrash and that's when they notified the airlines some of the emergency procedures for that anti-seoul system was not even an contained within the emergency checklist pilots reference during an emergency in the idea that the boeing engineers would tell american airline pilots who were basically saying why did you not tell us was onboard our aircraft and those boeing engineers on tapes that we did not want to overwhelm you with a lot of unnecessary information certainly goes to point out that boeing is if not negligent certainly you know i don't know what you can call it when you see time after time after time of them making decisions such as when they knew there was willing to be software problem and they said well we'll fix that but we'll fix it in three years well of course the line aircrash happened they said they were going to have to do it much much faster yes they were aware there was a problem the didn't communicate it to the federal aviation administration nor did they communicate it to the airlines that we're binder jay ratliff our guest our aviation expert here on newsroom jio six ten w._t._v._n. so how different is what happened with the max jet versus when they roll out other jets i mean have there been other instances whether this flies similarly here are the differences there's some other stuff but we don't wanna overwhelm you i mean is there any precedent for that at all the boeing seven twenty seven was probably the one in the sixties that immediately leaps to mind because it was such a completely different type of aircraft to fly and during nineteen sixty five we had multiple airline crashes back we had to go down within three days because pilot simply were not used to that type of advanced avionics based on what they get flown before they were point where eventually everything got worked out people said they've never fly the boeing seven twenty seven of course once the problems were fixed and the training issues and other things it became one of the most popular aircraft until the seven thirty seven over shortly thereafter is kind of the workhorse of the industry so it's happened before but really it's the placencia of the last ten years we've thank god not had a major airline accident in the united states since february of two thousand nine and i think that that that safest there ever commercial jet travel lends itself to people becoming humanly complacent thing yes on a scale of one to ten or safeties at six and a half or seven yeah we might be able to push to an aid but that would slow down our production schedule things are going well so things are safe so let's just keep doing as we have been maybe trim corner here there and of course that's what's got us to this point in i honestly think that the confidence in the boeing max aircraft will be restored long before the confidence in boeing once we're seeing all of these idiotic decisions that have been made from the top of the organization down to the production line jay before let's roll ask you kind of put your judge hat on you know we've talked about the impact of the max being taken off the table recall correctly you say it's very small small percentage of you know planes that handle routes in this country so there shouldn't be a lot of ripple effect through the summer travel season with that in mind when the pilots come and they wanna sue for lost wages pilots actually not being able to make as much money do they have much of a leg to stand on that i mean have they really lost millions of dollars in wages i collectively they have certainly because of the fact that that's your aircraft that's what you have been assigned to fly out your picking up additional routes or other routes to subsidize certainly think that there's there's support there in the idea in the backdrop that boeing is in my opinion very guilty and a lot of the things that we're we've been discussing i think probably speaks of the backbone they'll try to make this go away they'll do something before it ever gets to court because all that becomes a matter of public record in the last thing you want is a further deterioration of confidence in the boeing macrey if it goes much longer look for for them to actually rebrand remain that aircraft before it takes on a new at the paris airshow airbus was outselling the boeing's that still it's shown twenty one which is the extended range version of their narrowbody aircraft flies farther than the boeing max carries more passengers than the boeing and they were selling like hotcakes because boeing eight airplane to compete the one that they do is still on the ground dag on jay great stuff we always appreciate the time jay ratliff aviation expert here on newsradio six ten

Jay Ratliff Boeing Three Years Three Days Six Ten W Ten Years
"ajay" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"ajay" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"To be like Ajay skate, something bad bad. They arrested in revenue the athletes asking me, not mad at me. Knob in a coup in west coast, six trampoline fix breakout put it on triple bane from Canada. But I see a lot of teams. I know how to handle. The club club. No method than me. One bad like a masterpiece. What you called me? I. Stars. Beca. To look back low down. Beckham picture somebody got shot, but you're talking about Willis in the lobby would the quicker butter, which I. I got the dirty money ringtone. Who? No method. Than me. Masterpiece. Looking for athlete. What's true? You got. Takeout limited to catch attempt. Get started get some back with Brandon. But we already lane. Jay won't take you wanna spend fit. They hit the same whether done. That is on..

Ajay club club Beckham Canada Jay Willis Brandon
"ajay" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

09:31 min | 2 years ago

"ajay" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"You know, the covers and she like with a clause. I mean, not not to hurt me. She likes strokes my hair. I mean, you know, because she says he thinks he's brushing your hair may be. But you know, you see I've had my cats are groomed where they've been shaved. And Daniel last year used to get nuts all the time. And I brush him. Religiously every day, if maybe I miss Ajay, certainly the next day, you know, and I have the ones that thin the hair out Br and they love it. I could hold up a brush, and they will come running, you know, with the big tail and everything so he was getting nuts all the time. And when I did have carpeting, I felt that him rolling on the carpeting, you know, like you say unusual he'd lay on his back with his got gas hanging out. And he would get nuts. Missiles what hanging out because it's just an expression everything hanging out. So I took him to the groomer and the groom's him they shaved him and ever since. Then no more nuts. What I was doing. I would wash them put them in the sink. I mean, it wasn't pretty, you know, they sit there all stiffened up, but I bathed them. And then I'd rough him up with the towel to dry because you know, they like to lick themselves dry and that made knots, but this time the groomer took care of it shaved them. And I let it grow in naturally. You know, he was like a marine bowlegged. I mean, you know is like a marine. Yeah. Real short real buzz-cut and he loved and especially in the summer. I mean, they're hot also. But I just kept brushing them. I mean, I don't wanna Pupo it. But no nuts. That is the secret and one about this Daniel lying. He does. He lion is back exposing his belly to you. Yes. Okay. Dennis does that too. And that's supposed to be like their us. Yes. That's like the holy grail of. I love you. I trust you because cats don't like the only person in the home who feeds me, you know, how to open cans. Yeah. Sure. Of course, they love. They love it when your belly. No is exposed. And then there's something else. And I think it's I find this annoying. When it's done to me. And you mentioned it, you know, when your cat is on top of you. And it's like needing you like pressing back and forth back and forth. And Molly does this. And she is nails and. She's not a light little Cutie Katny Marsh. She's getting a little chubby when she needs. I could feel the nails and Shalini lean on one leg, and it's like fifteen pounds and pressure. So it gives you black and blues, but I was reading that that is supposed to be like a very comforting thing for them. And it means they love you entrust, you Daniel lays on my chest. All the time. Oh, that's one too. But the needing is one of the things that also brings them comfort because that's one of the first things, they learn when they're, you know, suckling at their mother to get milk they need, and that's why you'll see sometimes cats will flex their paws out or when they're on on. You don't do that back and forth thing with two front paw. And that's when we started to mouth a meow. And then he would like I'm serious. We hold hands. Like, I'll take his poor my in his in the sign of affection. And when I go to take my hands away. He strong. I could feel his muscles. Tighten and he's like pulling me near. It's this is I would say within the last within the last eight months this happened. I mean, you know, people change. Yeah. Animals do. Yeah. I think it's, you know, it's I think it's wonderful. He's the first Maine Coon I've had. But I will he will not be the last. I they are wonderful loving. They really are loving animals. You know, this is kind of funny. Maine Coon was the Dennis was the first cat. I had because I know I host cat achieved button. I've had Dennis nine years, but I grew up with dogs. And I thought, you know, Dennis was so easy and everything and not like most cats with something that followed your home from school. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, Dennis was outside my door open it up and he walked in. And that's how I guy ended up the Dennis. But I thought all cats were like Dennis and or most cats I remember telling a neighbor that I would catch it further from time to time. And I said, you know, you're just nasty. I mean, my cat doesn't do any of this thinking, I'm, you know, I don't know. I'm so fortunate. I have the best cat, blah, blah, blah. And she said, no, your cat is not normal. And now the name Charlotte in Mali. It's like, yes, you're so right. Maine coon's are different not saying all cats are wonderful in their own way. No, I would not give up Molly or Charlotte for anything. But they're all different and Maine coon's are a little different than some of the other, you know, weeds of cats mixes of cats. They just are. Yeah. They're like gentle giants. Yes. But they are very dog. Like, they if I'm. I'm in my kitchen cooking. I could turn around. There's daniel. He's hanging with me. He likes to be in my company, I relate both to. But I mean, he certainly, and you know, I have to tell you. I got this new feeder 'cause I'm going to go away for a couple of days. So the feeder I had I really didn't like it. The lip was very short on it. So when they were eating it would get messy. So I retired that and I went out, and I bought I went looking for a different type of feeder, and I found one, and I thought it was pretty cool. I don't know the company, but it, you know, they're all plastic. It looked like a Mason jar on the top. And I thought this is great. But the problem is if I'm not there to shake it. It doesn't feed to the bottom where they could eat it. So you have to hear what I did. So you know, I'm going away. And you know, I very I could pull out the old one or I could leave a big bowl. I'm going only going for four days. So. So I was trying to teach them, you know, they'll eat in a circle, and there's no more food. But it's in the you could see it, but I'm not going to be there to shake it. So I took I took both their paws. And I shoved it in there and it came out. I thought Cheyenne for sure got it Daniel who's, you know, bigger head bigger brain. I finally was able to get him to do it. But nope. So I have to shake it. I even put a chopstick in the middle. I thought maybe that. I mean, I'm going to have to add to it because I can't go away with the thought that they're not gonna be able to get to their food. But I mean crazy, you know, you wanna teach an old cat in new trick. So when I left the house today there was some space. I'm going to see if they figured it out yet for themselves. They might they might they're very innovative. I mean, not innovative. They're very intelligent with things like Dennis when Iberian not hungry enough navy. When I first got Dennis what he would do if he was hungry, and he liked dog food for some reason. It's not good for him. And he ended up having to have surgery. But I don't think it's just because the dog food, but he would slice the bags open. We had to buy a canister that held all the dog food from simple human. I remember the name, and which is better anyway 'cause eliminates about little microscopic Bugsy can hardly see all that. But he would just slice it open and say, I'm meeting it. I don't care. And so we just have to be careful with anything with Dennis. But he's gotten better over the years. You know, so we're almost out of time. Tell me what is the weirdest thing that you're that either Schanzer Daniel does. Well, I think his new habit of pouncing not terribly strong. I don't want our your listeners to think that they're gonna but his little pouncing on the glass glass patio door to let me know he wants to come out and be with me that was a new sound see with Cheyenne. She'll do it him because she has claws. I hear the click but him pouncing. I think that's pretty smart. I think he doesn't mean how that but he meows in the house, and I hear that. It's like what are you want? Like, what are you calling me for, you know, but it's different like, you know, it's a different meow than they're getting sick. Because that's how we react instantly. Now. I think almost a how on meow. Yeah. No. He's just calling me. I think he just found his voice. Well, this is my new thing that I don't think I really liked so much but Mike being turned around. Molly likes to go on my chest and do the needing thing. But then. She likes to turn around. So otherwise, see catchy. I mean, she sitting but still I don't really want the but right there by my face. So I tried to turn around. She didn't go for that. So that's her new thing. So I don't know. She's laying I may which means she's being loving. Maybe she thinks she's being lookout or something. I have an when she cuddles with me. She'll come up and she'll say, which.

Schanzer Daniel Dennis Molly Maine coon Maine Ajay Cutie Katny Marsh Shalini Mike Cheyenne Charlotte Mali fifteen pounds eight months nine years four days milk
"ajay" Discussed on Critical Role

Critical Role

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"ajay" Discussed on Critical Role

"So you guys make your way to the tunnel. Enjoying kill. As you all step in the interior. You can also take that smell of long sealed underground water hearing the Russian of the of the small river. You can see where the path continues on. And with the dingo ended vision occurs forward. You can see what looks to be the faint natural arch. Looks to be a continuation. Tunnel curiosity those crystals feel utterly natural. Right. This just feels like those those we're not the like nature chick. Floto? Seven seven vote probably. Boat. Yes. Just before we move on. Is anyone bothered by these crystals? Hear anything. Do you? Do you see any kind of oil? Which is surprising to say traps. On the ceiling. I'm sure I'll look. Anywhere perception, it's difficult because we don't really understand how that word investigation is perception because you're center looks looking at things in the distances opposed to carefully checking seventy four. Before seventeen does not appear to be. We're just let's all prepare to be a little confused by whatever we find. We're going to be way out of our element. Two. Stuff. There's nothing to hide from nobody down here. But your spells. We start to hear something always things hide from. Okay. I guess that Ajay your. You know, what I would rather go rescue my husband with? Did you all get a honeymoon? No. We never did on the way back gray road trip. You're right. Seven of your other best. We never we always talked about going to. Tell dora..

Ajay