26 Burst results for "Aitken"

"aitken" Discussed on Kris Soutar's Tennis Journal

Kris Soutar's Tennis Journal

04:50 min | 3 months ago

"aitken" Discussed on Kris Soutar's Tennis Journal

"But i was a swamp there so i i can. I locked up in the fact that he he led by example. Yeah he hugged and lt a cheater. Outcasts leuke go. But this allusion time and felt that wasn't riley or kim. Based i think he he broke away i mean. I don't know an edgy. Just decided he would like to clean up people to two coach in that way and it wasn't an official qualification. It get some kind of higher education further education certificate attached to but it wasn't like when i came back up after it that meant nothing in terms of qualifications is incredible. What year was that. you went. Eighty five eighty five eighty six. Yeah weird when you think back of them night that was eighty five is when i first started playing so we probably i met maybe eighty six. Maybe arrived at times to in my mind. You've been coaching for decades. But obviously the so. That's incredible the thirty six years ago. Plus because obviously done it for a few years before that someone had the gumption to break rian setup a specific coaching academy for purely precautionary For players and it was a year long. That mind-blowing relief. You think about that when if somebody did that now. How many scientists who had to get under different neighbor well he and it continued for quite a long time. I don't know how many years ago it stopped but it was mainly just for well. I don't know if it was health reasons. Or just i mean Exactly what will the is not but You know he he he just loved and had so many. I was actually trying to get a union going recently. So we'll maybe get going but yeah that quite a few people have been stonebridge like the rainy and from cults and robin care. Who oversee you he cooks. You have to say when when i came back and alan and i were coaching a bit. No one not many food. Ten coaches newsday's few in the west of scotland a couple in the eastern that..

kim riley thirty six years ago alan two coach Ten coaches eighty first Eighty five eighty five decades rian years scotland west a year six
S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | 3 months ago

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

VA Greg Aaron Perkins Navy Greg Colton Will Simmons Gregg Golden Simmons Law Simmons Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | 3 months ago

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

VA Greg Aaron Perkins Navy Greg Colton Will Simmons Gregg Golden Simmons Law Simmons Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
"aitken" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

06:52 min | 6 months ago

"aitken" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"You can model leverage on that and bec- somewhat comfortable in your returns and second thing is that volatility itself was predictable and volatility predictable. I can scale up my exposure to also to risk assets around the world. And i have to say that people talk about volatility targeting. It's a phrase that gets chucked out there lots there any number of instruments and indices. That could help. An asset aleka target volatility. But really ted. The past several years have been all about volatility scaling olas gigantic multi strategy businesses absolute return strategies toll about volatility scaling when implied volatility comes down. I have to increase my exposure to keep up with the plight. All implied volatility guys up on clever than else. I can hedge before everyone else. I'm going to be a case. I saved to reduce my books and really again. Volatility scaling all the assumption of volatility skyline. I think had a large hand in the disruption with saying and just a finnish this point there was a mob Article written in the ultimate nineteen ninety. Seven bon extraordinaire. Chicago tried to cold richard. Dennis and richard wrote of the slow of full theory and his idea was in it. So brilliant that it's perfectly okay to an all the same instruments as everyone else signed cue tips the same issues. It's perfectly okay to apply the amount of leverage. But don't worry. I'll be quicker than everyone else to get out and just had another real time reminder of that sake. There's two things. I'd like to touch on with you while we have the time. One of them that i think as you a broad brush. There's a lot of topics we can talk about. But the one that has to be most on people's minds as this notion of of the system and the potential for the system to be broken left tail risk way in the same way that happened after the lehman bankruptcy and eight and tied to that. What's happened relative to that with the policy response is something that i think you understand the plumbing as well as anybody i know and so maybe start there with the policy response and we can get into sort of what does that mean for a real existential risk to the market as opposed to something. Maybe we can understand in terms of a drawdown and the health issues and maybe that comes back in and unknowable period of time right and to paraphrase. If i might. Ted think about the near-term complexity the problems why central banks to try to respond and then quite frankly so what and how might we think about it. And what should we do about. So let's go through that process. Look up spend an awful lot of time with my clients. Have the past month. That's no surprise but also an awful lot of time. With k policymakers around the world and all the same not the ending market participant has been doing that trying to help people understand. What's going wrong. And what's going right. And one thing is clear about the central bank response and if one looks carefully every case central banker around the world is saying the same thing the very strong actions with potential for mole that central bankers have and thus far a designed to provide a bridge to the necessary medical in fiscal response to address the covid nineteen disruption. So this is not two thousand night about saving the financial system for itself about foreign asset prices on anything like that to be cle- if the combined offensive central bank activity is to by financial markets. Time great but none of this is about flooring risk assets po sites about a bridge to the necessary fiscal response and on that we can say how countries around the world is slowly getting lined up with fiscal policy. We can talk about that lighter but think about incentives for central bankers and governments all around the world. Ted we have a double supply side shock. Covid nineteen is what. The imf would coal amish. Has this liable cold. Sudden stops which they used to apply to emerging markets when capital inflow to an emerging market stop stead currency foles current-account deficit problems all sorts of things. The wealth actually got now is. I wasn't synchronous global sudden stop and calibrating. The head is very difficult. that's why all central banks and now long providing full which is unprecedented. Because now that he knows so we have the covid nineteen supply. Sean shock combined with aids the energy supply-side shock as nba and putin duke. It out and that's the first point now. The second point is as the world is forced to lock itself down oval entirely self isolates way of building the risk of a simultaneous demand shock. Because as we all stay at home other than endless binge-watching of niche flicks amazon prime. With not really gonna be getting out and abou- small businesses on safa and the engine room of global demand has always been the us consumer so the risk is. If we die tight very strong steps we will have not only a double supply shock but a demand shock and the worst thing of all you can throw on. Top of that is a financial crosses so to be clear. The fiscal policy is an to address. Not just the supply side shock but also the health shock of covid nineteen and the energy dispute between the saudis in russia demand. Shock is slowly being addressed for example in hong kong handing out citizens checks. That might be what everyone. Mr. macron in france last night set a new bob basically nobody will default. Nobody will go bankrupt now. Bet might be the ultimate whatever takes and that will slowly serve to underwrite the risk of the demand shock and on the narrow point of central banks the primary objective. Right now ted is to ensure that the financial systems are functioning that the banks a liquid that the around the world combined from their local central banks against collateral in the case of the.

richard ted Ted lehman Dennis Chicago putin duke imf Sean nba aids Mr. macron amazon russia hong kong us france bob
Hiker whose heart stopped after Mt. Rainier rescue recovers

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:05 min | 7 months ago

Hiker whose heart stopped after Mt. Rainier rescue recovers

"Fistfights and fires in the nation's capital. I'm pam who so fox news supporters of president trump gathered by the thousands in washington dc. They cheered and chanted yesterday and things were mostly peaceful until it got dark counter protesters throwing fireworks clashing with those rallying for the president throughout dc streets from fistfights to all out brawl overall. There were twenty arrests. according to the mayor's office and at least seven guns were recovered. One man was stabbed. He is expected to be all right. Fox's lauren blanchard in washington to police officers were said to be heard. At least twenty arrests were made president elect. Joe biden is putting together his cabinet and could make some announcements in the coming days. This as president trump's legal team continues. Its push to overturn the election results. I am working on the massive aspect of of system wide election fraud. Definitely impacting the swing states and likely going far beyond that attorney said the powell on fox. Justice with judge janine. A number of the president's legal challenges have been thrown out of court. Alarming surges across the country in corona virus cases have state leaders taking steps to try and curb the spread governors of california oregon and washington issue joint travel advisories on friday in an effort to get a handle on surging cases in those three states. What that means is that if you traveled to any of those stage you'll be to self quarantine for fourteen. Days are also asking residents to avoid all nonessential travel out of state and limited interactions to only people who live in their homes. Fox's charles watson tomorrow another stay at home order takes effect in chicago. It will last thirty days new mexico also ordering all residents to stay home. America's listening to fox news big names and big money are descending on georgia ahead of two critical senate races. Republican incumbents kelly leffler. David purdue are heading into january fifth runoff against democratic challengers raphael. Warnock and jon ossoff and with the balance of power in the us. Senate em- play spending for these. Two run in georgia is expected to set new records exceeding at least two hundred million dollars but perhaps reaching as much as five hundred million. Fox's jonathan serrie. Last week senate republican marco rubio campaign for leffler president elect joe biden has said his campaign will do anything aitken to help off and warnock because the presidential race was so close in georgia. Five million ballots are being recounted by hand in a tweet yesterday. President trump suggested the recount is of time because signatures aren't being matched georgia's secretary of state pushed back with his own tweets explaining how the state's voting process works later today. Nasa and spacex hoped to launch four astronauts to the international space station. The crew goes up for six months. They dock their crew dragon spacecraft to the space station. It will stay there with them for the six month. Expedition former nasa astronaut. Tom jones saturday is planned launch from cape canaveral. Florida was postponed because of bad weather. A remarkable story of recovery for a hiker rescued from washington's mount. Rainier one week ago michael. No pinski was airlifted off the mountain but he died shortly after arriving at a seattle hospital. The story could have ended there but doctors work tirelessly to get us heart beating again and after forty five minutes they did lipinski who woke up two days later still has some trouble with his heart and kidneys but it continues to improve. I'm kim russo. And this is fox news. Stamps dot com brings the post office and ups shipping rights. Your computer go to stamps. Dot com to start a four week. Trial plus free post agenda digital scale with promo code fox that stamps dot com. Click on the microphone at the top of the page and type in fox. Welcome into tomorrow with dave line the interactive radio network programs with the latest in high tech products and services and the experts. Who bring them to you. This is into tomorrow. Here's dave grave line from the decks com g six studios. The future of diabetes management. Is here visit. Decks com dot com. That's d. e. x. c. o. m. dot com and. Yes as the announcer dude. Said i am dave grave line. I am chris grave and the team gathered round to answer your question including horatio out of new york rushmo in south beach him in coconut. Creek danny in pembroke pines. Yes i have to watch out. I lose my breath. Fast and beth in naples. We're here to answer your consumer tech dilemmas. any questions. you have about consumer tech today and into tomorrow. How clever and speaking of answering your questions. This is the last week to participate in win in the big cool into tomorrow hot summer and into the fall kill. That's very true so if you have been waiting to call. Why on earth would you wait but don't wait any longer. Don't be breathless. Like me from the rona. You have to call now and participate because we're back to regular cool prizes so it's not your chance to win a chance to win those specific prices. Yes because of course we all know the mantra here. Come know win. Stuff thank you. Thank you cameron. He's absolutely correct. Because we want to hear from you anytime on the show but if you're interested in some of the particular cool into tomorrow hot summer into the fall giveaway items then you need to call now last chance this weekend. Participate that way. Some tech news and commentary. And then we'll get back to your many award winning prize winning calls it's official. The moon is getting a four g lte network. Why does the moon native four g. Lt eanet well therese it's Twenty two thousand eight goal to build a lunar base and eventually sustaining human presence. On the moon nasa has awarded three hundred seventy million dollars to over a dozen companies to deploy technology on the lunar surface while those technologies of course include four g nasa says four g could provide more reliable longer distance communication than the current radio standards that are in place on the moon like the earth like on earth the four g network will eventually be upgraded to five g. Now i wonder if it'll be considered local calling from the moon to your family. Maybe you know if an astronaut on the moon working there on the on moonbase wants to call home unlike not will it be a local call. It's four g network. Maybe probably not probably not a four. G will probably work better on the moon than it does here. It won't have any trees buildings

Fox News Washington Lauren Blanchard Georgia President Trump Judge Janine FOX Joe Biden Charles Watson Senate Kelly Leffler David Purdue Jon Ossoff Jonathan Serrie Nasa Pinski
"aitken" Discussed on Fistful of Chords

Fistful of Chords

05:17 min | 11 months ago

"aitken" Discussed on Fistful of Chords

"Love the more height them. Still a woman were an integral part of nineteen ninety s culture. The songwriting production team of mike stock matt aitken and waterman also known as the hit factory chief astounding success from the mid eighties to the early ninety s they wrote and recorded eighteen number one singles in the yucai india. Us and had more than one hundred top forty entries. They also introduced. Dozens of new artists like kylie minogue andrea castelli while reviving the career of donna summer sailing around forty million records in total guest on fistful. Of course this week is mark stock. Who still making music three decades later. Okay mike thanks for coming on the first question really is where did you start writing songs and who we first influences. Well look Wrote songs as a kid now. Don't quite know why other than you know back. Then it was. A lot of the was no social media. I'm talking about in the fifties roams about seven years. You know Television started around six o'clock so most of the days you had to amuse yourself But i'm so. Some of the films i saw on television we're about american is one about american songwriter. Who sold a song for off a dollar or something A very famous and went on to make millions fascinated. Me i so. I don't know ready so i heard on the radio. My family has classical music in the background. My brother played for the german national of or is life. died recently and the You know my mom and dad both quite musical. My sister was a trained musician. I'm not trained but there's a piano in the house and so i just got on a music area early very early to herself. When i thought i needed to know never never never bothered trying to go and get training partly because i though i'm doing all right without the training and whenever i play my brother was classically trained. It became quite wooden. You playing talk. I wanna play beatles song them and he was trying to do that on the video. Violence and he struggled is because you see. You can't write down pop music. The way you can classical music is written for every demi semi hemi cueva every dot every dash and. That's what you play pop. Music is gonna portion of it. That's feel swing if flavor of sweden..

mike matt aitken andrea castelli waterman kylie sweden
"aitken" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

02:22 min | 11 months ago

"aitken" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Maybe I will actually clip out everybody's answers into a special episode of that before we get into that kind of closing segment. Is there anything that we didn't touch on that you covered in the book that you feel like is important or anything that you you know you were hope you had in your mind. Okay? We gotta make sure we mentioned this that we didn't. Not that comes immediately to mind. I mean I. Do get a bit more forward looking at the very end and I look at how we can you know if we settle space? What will those shelters look like and I think the interesting opportunity. There is to sort of do just what I was talking about. It's you know an opportunity almost to start from scratch, and so detained everything that we've learned and these environments you know on the Mars or on Mars or the moon or wherever it is are very different. But we as humans as homeless Aitken's will not be that different, so we will still need create structures that serve our basic human needs, and it's an opportunity to sort of apply all the best of what we've learned so I. think that's sort of a fun thought experiment how how he would do that, but I will leave that as a teaser for anyone who might want to check out the book. Awesome, yeah, absolutely I mean it definitely makes sense it kind of in some ways reminds me in other ways it doesn't but of. These concepts of areas that are. Less developed from an infrastructure perspective that are just starting to get more modern infrastructure online like maybe really rural areas, and sometimes in developing nations were kind of in a good position where the people who live there can skip some of the trial and error, really dirty crap like let's just not even bother with coal-based. You know infrastructure. Let's just move straight to a solar kind of infrastructure or let's not. Waste our time with this thing that's actually going to make us ill. If we can build it right from the beginning, and we can like you, said benefit from all the trial and error like not be conservative, nor approach just because feels comfortable. Let's say what we know works better right I love that so good. Okay great so before before we dive into the last few questions. I want to remind people again. The book is the great indoors..

Aitken
Turning Proteins into Device Coatings that Provide Therapeutic Benefits

The Bio Report

06:16 min | 1 year ago

Turning Proteins into Device Coatings that Provide Therapeutic Benefits

"Lou thanks for joining us. It's great to be here. We're GONNA talk about Regenerative Medicine Third DA- positive and your efforts to improve the ability of bones to heal. I'd like to start with your own journey and how you became involved in the field of regenerative medicine. A West Point graduate. Masters in Chemical Engineering in a PhD in biological engineering from MIT. You've also got twenty years of active military service and earned both a combat action badge and a Bronze Star medal. How did you come to West Point? When did your interest in science begin? Were A. it's an interesting trajectory. One would necessarily recommend to others perceive career in science, but It's been quite a right unless but the. Interest really started the early school. In I always knew I wanted to devote my life to science, but about round the time that I was graduating high school light. I got an niche to prove myself physically maybe militarily, so I I decided to go to West Point. Actually provided a very good foundation for my Further studies later on in science had the bigger and and kind of engineering focus, West Point, being engineering school originally, and still is, so. It provided a good backdrop for me to continue my studies after. After finishing a West Point. Military service included time in Iraq. How much of your time was an active military zone? Right so after finishing west point. Miami actually was lucky enough to receive a hertz, Foundation Fellowship, this foundation that that pays for regular school in the in the sciences. And that allowed me to remain on active duty, but to pursue graduate school, and then after that. Two years than I was reassigned to units were traditionally tactical. Army units, and that included time both US industry said in Iraq so I a deployed with the First Cavalry Division to Iraq as an intelligence officer and. That tour was a little over a year, but that period of time between the masters in the was about a five year period of time. What was your experience in Iraq? So. It was actually in Iraq that that I think this idea crystallized in my mind. You know what it is that I. WanNa do in science. A lot of people come in. To a scientific field and maybe have a question about what direction to take so many options, but. What I saw there and what I almost nearly experienced myself several times. You know these injuries that lead to lifelong. Disability. Several if he was serving with head injuries. For example to the limbs lower limbs. I'M GONNA. Get back to the states. Medical scientists able to save their lives, but some of them suffered amputation, and the now have lifelong disability, and all that was due to the fact that there really wasn't anything out there to regenerate tissues, so that that ideas what motivated when I got back from Iraq to to go back to mit again under the leadership to the the focus on this idea, precise tissue regeneration. How much contact had you had with with people who who became amputee? Well after I got back, I did have a lot more interactions with folks in the region near the Walter Reed. Military Medical Hospital. Just others that had served with who who had suffered injuries so. It was a period of time in two, thousand, five, six, seven, eight. Where you know, there were really a surgeon so more and more people that had served with people that they knew. Were suffering injury. So you know it's a close knit community end up. Seeing many of them again. You returned to mit to earn a PhD in biological engineering. What was the work you did there? How did it connect? Sure so when I went back, the army gives you three years basically to do a PhD so I knew I had to hit the ground running. And and have a plan for what to do and MIT's department of biological engineering was very. Welcoming and said you don't pick the professor that you want to work with also a worked with Linda, Griffith, who is really Tinier in the field of regenerative? Medicine Tissue Engineering. Actually! She was a post doc in the Bob Langer's lap. Developed the ear on the back of the mass back in the ninety S. So you know real rich tradition of tissue engineering there it was on her group that I was able to focus on this idea for good delivery of proteins to induce the body to regenerate tissue. was well understood why these? Soldiers. Who would come home would. have their lives save, but then end up losing limbs. That's a great question. It's something that maybe doesn't get a lot of attention so if you injure limb. Normally. That injury affects bone. Can AFFEC-, nerves and vessels, if any one of those tissues doesn't heal properly. Then you end up with a limb? That isn't usable. Actually becomes a burden to you and the medical guidance is that what's recommended? Amputation, which is a? This is amazing to me that you would. Basically discard limp because one of the wires is not the NACCHIO correct Civis, so to me I wanted to. Address a problem on a very detailed level this Aitken we regenerate? Let's say bone so now. You can save a bit if if the problem is that the bonus inhale. So. It's a piece wise approach to try to salvage alums. What are bone void fillers? And how are they used

Iraq West Point MIT Regenerative Medicine Third Army Tissue Engineering LOU Military Medical Hospital Bob Langer Aitken Foundation Fellowship Walter Reed Miami United States First Cavalry Division Officer
Valium: Mothers Little Helper

American Innovations

03:01 min | 1 year ago

Valium: Mothers Little Helper

"It's nineteen seventy two in the emergency room of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Tracy Pierce a young woman in her mid twenty s doubles over in pain clutching her stomach. Her face is Pale and sweat drips down her forehead and soaks her red hair. She groans loudly is a sharp stabbing. Pain shoots through the right side of her abdomen. I know it hurts. Honey that appendix is really angry right now. A nurse gave tracy pain medication a few minutes ago. But it hasn't kicked in yet. I just need to complete this medical history for the doctors and then we can get you into surgery. Okay Tracy inhales deeply breathing through the pain and nods her head. The nurse raises our clipboard and reads the next question. When's the last time you ate? Tracy clinches her jaw as another stab of pain hits her breakfast around eight o'clock. I only had a piece of toast. You take any medications no no. I'm well valium. Everyone takes out right. And how often do you take it? I don't know about four or five times a day. The nurse raises her eyebrows and writes it down in the chart. Okay I got everything. We need sit tight. We'll get you into surgery as soon as we can a few hours later. Tracy WAKES UP POST SURGERY? Her throat aches and abdomen is numb. She blinks trying to remember where she is. A man takes her hand. Eight there sleepyhead. Tracy and sees her husband's sitting next to the bed. How are you feeling cry? Where's Johnny he's next door? Mrs Aitken Tracy nods then grimaces. She doesn't feel well. She's nauseous and her head is throbbing. I feel weird. Yeah I talked to the doctors. They said you might feel a little often. You woke up. I'll get you some water. He gets up and pours water from a pitcher into a small cup Yugo. Just take a SIP. He stops talking. Tracy is staring intently at the wall. A look of abject horror on her face tracy she doesn't answer just keep staring at the wall her face completely frozen. Tracy. What is it snakes. What they're snakes on the wall. Her husband looks at the wall. There's nothing there except o'clock. Suddenly Tracy is convulsing her eyes rolling back in her head. Her husband doesn't stop to react. He runs into the hallway screaming. Help we need help in here? Doctors and nurses rush into the room and quickly sedate or Tracy. Stop seizing vital signs. Return to normal. Her husband standing in the corner starts to breathe a little easier. What the Hell was that? What happened Dr reads to her chart. He taps something on it. That was most likely a severe reaction to valium withdrawal. Those pills are supposed to be

Mrs Aitken Tracy Tracy Pierce Pain University Of Pittsburgh Medic Valium Johnny
"aitken" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"aitken" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"Push under a KALPA with a north swell coming lucious and suddenly you find yourself almost weightless gliding through the ocean floor and get along to see a return to realize Victoria Miro before he closes on December twentieth. You're listening to the Monaco weekly very own Monaco Library is growing into core theme of.

Monaco weekly Monaco Library Victoria Miro
"aitken" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"aitken" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"Our project and with the underwater pavilions which we did with partly for the oceans and ocean accident activist group and in the same way with issues of the ocean with you know interesting it was kind of revelatory in a sense that kind of living in the society where we're fed these false myths of virtual reality AI and these technological myself for my own beliefs and I'm very invested in the idea that a robust collection of well-turned titles for an in depth look into our.

"aitken" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

15:11 min | 1 year ago

"aitken" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"Monocle twenty four we I heard from an artist who draws on the past let's me a one who reflects on the president's now US based stunned filmmaker Doug Aitken is known for his is bold epic and often public works he's electic practice spannis mediums Baath returns to essential focus how we look at and inhabited the world around us today and in doing so how we might imagine a new future dogs later solo show is on now Victoria Miro Gallery in London entitled return to the Real it's an immersive audio visual exploration of how digital technologies inform our own lives it urges us to stop look around and stock I caught up with Doug finished installing the show at the gallery to learn more the eternal exhibitions returned to the real ad I think I became very interested in this idea. of the separation between screen life and physical life and I found myself more fascinated by the questions posed this kind of idea of moving into a new rain new landscape which in some ways we don't really know how to navigate I think we're we're equipped with tools we barely knew how to use we're kind of moving into a space which is largely undefined it's difficult did you see that as one of the kind of key rows of the artists in the twenty first century working out how we navigate spaces well I think the Oh you've art is it's a space outside of over capitalism it's a space outside of direct function and survival and I think in many ways it kind of is a space that allows us to question it allows us to have a discussion that discussion can be social or it can be internal without room for that what is their society when you order take it then I noticed as mirrors in this exhibition than you've used mirrors before and in other words I always think coining Nazis put some MIRA in a show could you reflect as it were no pun intended of editing that my mother was a journalist okay I think the installations designed and away really where the viewer can kind of merge with it they can kind of become part of it I was very interested in creating something that was passed wasn't simply an image that you look at consume but instead something that was spatial that was perceptual something that you could really explore both in a material sense but also de material sense when I D- material I'm talking about sound sowed is a huge component to this exhibition there is two separate compositions which are critical most entirely of a human voices layers of overtones and they go back to a kind of musical minimalism taking certain words or phrases repeating them seen them until they become abstract becomes cups salads gifts washes we were sitting outside in the garden between Mira we're looking at this amazing wind chime sound sculpture echoed upstairs they have some sort of awesome antennae today that generate sound random I was wondering because the charm of wind chime is it's randomness it's the way that the hormone ickes operate according to how that blown up says you have these very beautiful sculptures rotating that kinetic sculptures but which have no flexibility he to move so I wondered why the randomness comes in there if it does a tool well I think that's a very good question and not idea that balance between ordering chaos US patterns and asymmetry for me is very much at the core of a body of work like this here you find the soundscape sounded light is the the upstairs pieces is titled Inside Out Literally Funds Kind of landscape of abstract light pulses of light and Chroma come moving through the space you hear these sounds patterns of sound the almost kind of hearkens back to early minimalist music of Terry Riley or Steve Reich the samples but at the same time there's something I think within the exhibition which is Causley breaking that catching you off guard you fall into a hypnosis but then something comes out of the corner of your eye or something comes from behind you and I was really interested in that idea really creating almost a set where the viewer is a performer in the viewer gets pulled into it and they find that there are eventually occupying the stage and the film was kind of the film of the mind is that movement in the periphery that disconcerting quality that may be makes us wake up evaluate our surroundings again do we need that at the most women I think that you know a lot of ways I know this word is very cliche but I do disruption is very essential in many ways and what I mean by that is I think if we look at our day to day we look at our week or month or year it's almost impossible to remember certain passages of time there so banal driving in the taxi being on the Highway AIDS sitting down for coffee again and again and again I think a lot of ways when we look back on our personal history it's it's these that's of disruption that we record that we actually reached back and we pull those periods of time or those situations and they have meaning we assign meaning to them background like wallpaper and for me that's a huge addressed that were disruption has obviously been popularized and then kind of vilified by facebook can the ethos well Silicon Valley in general not an area an industry that's really complicating our relationship at the screen and with the web wasn't that long ago that people the artists were thinking about internet this hyper Utopian space so-called postings now was really wide it was really optimistic and is kind of changing now how is that come to inform your relationship with the digital and the way that you want to reflect on it for your well it's interesting question there is a simultaneous installation. We're creating London right now and the title of it is new era inside one eighty strand at a show called transformer a new era as a work which I created where I found myself asking that question that question is there humanity at the source of technology is an inventor a single person for some of the objects that we can't live without and in that situation I found myself literally literally sitting out a Cafe I looked up at every single human I saw was wiping their phones speaking on their phone or messages and I thought how do we arrive at this place and I I said almost kind of personal reflection I said is someone responsible for that it's like where did it come from and I myself done researching the history of the cell phone and that led me back to this man named Martin Cooper who in nineteen seventy three invented the cell phone and then made the first called history and over the process of creating art work we got to know each other we spent time by film these conversations with them and eventually built a piece which is not a documentary it's very much kind of Holy Tori landscape is kind of a space between the president and what could be the future and I found myself really interested in this question this idea of technology and its role and is it an extension of us or does it kind of move beyond US too we reach a point where it dictates our moves it controls our patterns or are we always control and able to break free which I don't quite think so right now I think making new era was a very interesting journey and I think you were talking earlier about what is the role of an artwork can it ask questions can empower the viewer without work I really wanted that I wanted the viewer to kind of walk inside the space and start questioning their own condition reflecting on their landscape and using artwork almost as a tool to kind of put a wedge in this reality that we're surrounded by in this particular we've really gene artists and groups step beyond the questioning even beyond the criticism into a sort of activism wearing candidate standing down at the A seem to me to be a kind of cornerstone something that will resonate in the future when we're dealing with these kind of scary forces that on entirely a harmful like phones like people's attachment to them you know this has been documented and things like the great hack its potential influence on the US election sown you ever tempted to I suppose become an activist yourself would you still kind of want to be a PA and exist in an environment where you may be offering a different car myspace reflection than direct action I suppose well that's a it's a difficult question at a complex one I think in many ways the act of making art is a active activism you know I think you're expressing yourself you're putting forth an idea or concept you're proposing something that is open to disagreement and I think that action lia powerful society right now if you look at the kind of the homogenize capital structure that we live in we need hear voices of individuals and we all need to be heard think that's kind of one side of the coin perhaps other side of the coin that I find personally as the work I make is really for me largely driven by questions is what's up some questions and some of these are incredibly personal things that kind of eat it you over time and eventually they kind of calcified solidify into the form of some kind of artwork some kind of sculpture object but at the same time I've found that recently in the last several years more and more doing collaborations with ecological groups this is what existed before we did something two months ago and it was called new horizon it was a one hundred foot flying neared sculpture and with this project it wasn't what the museum wasn't through a gallery it was the world's oldest land conservation group the world's oldest land trust called trustees and they shepherd one hundred hundred fifty different locations across East Coast and it was interesting to me to have a dialogue with them about creating an artwork and for them I think they this is something that for me that was quite provocative they said we have all this allowed from sprawling Sandina Martha's vineyard due to a deep forest but people don't really know how to see it they don't really know how to interact with it they see it as kind of anonymous almost a forest is a forest green as green how do we activate that how do we turn that into a starting point to see again to suddenly open your eyes does it have a moment where everything is unique in real and it's not mundane ed their answer for that in one way was to work with artists to create artworks artworks that would perhaps bring you into the landscape in a different way and this is what we found both with is with plastic pollution with all these topics they become so kind of generic after wild they're hard to personalise their difficult humid is you know and I think in that situation with the underwater pavilions we've created three sculptures under the Pacific Ocean you literally had wimmer to I've into and this is bizarre and foreign for some people uncomfortable proposition two Dada wetsuit in December and she see these objects in the distance you approach them you swim through them around them and you find yourself suddenly in this landscape that is completely democratic that's school of Jerem Baldy swim by you could care less if you're a human that dark object in the distance could care less and to me that project was so evasions which are going to enhance reality I found that being fifty feet under the ocean surface was more shattering my reality then I could have imagined that's fascinating proposition I mean even just to go back to the idea of the artist is a kind of vision and telecaster between organizations between escapes and between people do you think that that's something that seems like a future positive future you wear a recipient of the frontier uprise the first recipient of it precisely because of the way that you engage with potential futures I wanted to ask whether now is quite complex I take time to be doing that. This sort of initiative seems to present quite hopeful view on how artists and their audiences and third parties can kind of symbiotically move fluid it's a fascinating revolutionary time to be alive and a species have never come across a crossroads like this in human history you know the rate of acceleration sets connectivity the idea flow in terms of cultures where does that leave art where's that leave art making on one hand you know perhaps for someone to sit down into a watercolour is a defiant act to suddenly turned off and to draw and on the other end of the spectrum perhaps you could say where can I go from here and I can't really answer that but I can answer that a little bit for art should move wider it should be outside of only a capitalist structure it should not only be in museums and galleries it should Be on the streets in the error in the ocean in the forest I it should be everywhere and anywhere should be material and immaterial and I think if we really embrace that idea that art is liquid form that can just transform an exist on any frequency I think we have more possibilities for communication Aw thank you doug asking anyone in London shoes.

London president doug one hundred foot fifty feet two months one hand
"aitken" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

12:45 min | 1 year ago

"aitken" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"Justify room on board of both how long was believe at the top of the charts for I feel like it was twelve weeks or something ridiculous in the ages he broke so many records and again he was kind of a re ah trying to trying to understand the impression that it would make if I had never heard it before if I was listening to it with fresh ears so to speak w that's the whole sort of conundrum his life and set the record straight so to speak from his perspective before wrote the history of his life right literally right in history wrote himself into the into the story it's also the story that's just pretty much the story I mean not on the far individuals have a star is born you have you know the success story but even then it's it's it it comes at a price and there's also a there's a dip in that arc or there's there's there's an end to that that that story there's a there's a rise and fall with him the rise was very very short-lived and it was somewhat it was it was never really arise it was a it was a sense of possibility and it got an manage to like you know brush up against things that were that would come to be very important later on and canonized like his brushes with with famous people like Frank Zappa and rolling stones in all these All these things that basically the recordings with all these people he also reminds me of people that I know lots of artists. La He's the story of of of lots of people who don't really have a story and so that that part I relate to a lot and breath and I I'd like to include myself among those as well because I don't feel like any in any way shape or form it'd be remembered or anything like that I don't think that I have a legacy per se I think it's a it's a very just I have a mildly successful career doing what I like so having a big chunk of your back catalog reissues Byron could label and you know that generating significant interest that doesn't give you a sense of having a legacy that has pretty firm foundations you still feel psychologically vulnerable spies of that I would feel psychologically vulnerable if I were to be reliant on that as being that I that I thought was fixed or like you know that it was like I mean it's not it's it's it's no more it's no more it's flimsy just as much as it ever was in fact it's more flimsy because I'm not does our past is the things that I already did the have nothing to do with the future they had nothing to do with where I'm going I don't want to rest on my laurels into this is a resting on my laurels if I ever was resting on him it's even like the recent record or anything like that but either way I mean I'm proud of what I did I don't go to to music to sort of to get my son the value you know you I don't even really go it's it's not even artistic pursuits that really define me anymore I mean I I kind of I have a different into the different metric for what brings fulfillment to me in my life. I don't know if that makes we'll symmetric is it is a tool or is it anything to do with work at this point a little bit maybe a lot lot lot less I would say for me it's time I'm it's free time it's it's what I'm interested in pursuing that and it's I think it has more to do with the this let's do with me it's more to do with with my relationship with others so it's kind of a personal thing as a private thing but it's a it's definitely not definitely not about me being fulfilled so much as you know me me me have certain having something of something to something to share with others and something that I feel like I'm easy to please in my own life I've set the bar pretty low thing so it's a lot less ego driven I guess even this all this time in front of a microphone is it's actually disturbs me I don't I don't need to to derive a sense of completion or satisfaction from any of these things this is shading thanks to Area Rosenberg Aka Ariel pink cans of course to Henry Sheridan as well you can find details of Mexican summer's area archives spreads excess Arial Dash Pink Dot Com you're listening to the monocle weekly on Monaco Twenty Four.

Frank Zappa Byron Monaco Twenty Four Rosenberg Henry Sheridan twelve weeks
"aitken" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

14:11 min | 1 year ago

"aitken" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"Welcome to the MONOCLE weekly on Monaco twenty four with me Augusta match Larry and Marcus Hippie on today's broker we'll be heading to the big apple with Autism Doug Aitken we'll be meeting film curator Hyun Jin to delve into the history of Korean cinema in advance of the London Korean Film Festival that's coming up plus Monaco's own for no I will stop at checkout will be looking ahead to next week's news and we'll have some music that's still to come on the Monica Weekly monocle twenty fool Well Augustine we haven't done this before have we we have marcus how exciting six minutes of interesting stories and discussions ahead was looking forward to the most probably my interview with Doug Aitken I just we've got an excellent excellent report from Henry Re Sheridan regular listeners might remember him as sometime produce a now commentator from New York who doesn't have what monocle Emma Henry I do remember Henry rather well it said that we lost him for New York but I guess that's the way life goes on a more positive note it's being quite an accent weekend materials I know that you've been insuring your culture haven't here I went to see a couple of exhibitions including one by William Blake who are fans and poetry fans might remember his iconic tiger tiger poem standing out among the verses of England Really with pictures of the devil and how what I noticed though they're very small marcus it's quite difficult to engage with an exhibition of very very small pictures one example of Wednesday's actually does Massa we'll all go see him what I've been I've been really inspired by the Australian shift goes up with some days Josh Neyland he's from Sydney he's released on repairing the whole fish there's been a lot of talk about nose-to-tail cooking how you students waste any bits anonymous when preparing food and you can apply approach to fish as well so I interviewed Shaush we'll be hearing that interview later on the menu but this afternoon I thought I would go and buy a whole fish and then prepare something nice from the guts bones sent is something I've never done before because I'm not a great chef in the end Amora for me nice to meet man a Sunday Scheffer exactly what she likes to comfort dinner in the evening very much I'd like to eat some scales and fin that's the deal continue with what's happening in the next seven days though let's do it let's look ahead to next week who's here to do it with us Monaco San Fernando welcome hello will you invite me for dinner as well by the way you have to ask Marcus about that because quite picky with what you eat I am but I never tasted your cooking so I'm curious now even though I would avoid the bring in the guts not completely defeats the whole purpose I can get to your own fish fillet for this evening but what's happening in the upcoming seven days what's in the news agenda well my first story actually happens today today's the believe in election and the interesting story here is because evermore is trying for his fourth term but that's the first time that I think he really has a competitor which has columnists so lot of people into the election might go for a run off in the Samba and even morale is an interesting case because even though he's a left-wing President I mean he always had very good relationships with the Business unity's is being a fairly popular president even though believe it remains like the poorest country in South America they improved so much when it comes to GDP less poverty but there are trouble ahead I think he didn't dealt very well with recent forest fires in the country people start criticizing him and even people from laughed are saying you know what he undermined democracy little bit because he's trying for his fourth term that's what a lot exactly so it wasn't just only Brazil that was having a hard time with the forest fires many many other countries to believe terrible terrible fires I mean there's been such a devastation to nature you know certain indigenous communities as well as quite as sad story and perhaps could be the downfall of evermore is difficult predicting because the election is today maybe we're going to have a key result because as they said the election for a runoff interesting there's definitely a lot to watch coming out of Latin America at the moment isn't that fate what have you got next we'll stay in the Americas were more to the North Tomorrow the twenty first of October is the Canadian election is interesting by the way Canadians vote on Mondays I think the first country that come across the vote someone may many others see us interesting you always Sundays in Brazil Sundays as well I guess they do things differently and always hates on a Sunday why just I want to be uh-huh meeting a big steaming bowl of fish guts you want to have your excuse to escape job for a couple of hours and vote number going but again Canadian it is difficult to predict but you know I think just intruder will kind of hang on as the leader but definitely with not clear majority as he had less time but I think the thing is I was talking to Daniel or Canadian colleague in the parliament will be more fragmented this time he might have to do a coalition which is not a new thing in Canadian politics and the leader of the opposition of course just had a few scandals with the oil pipe there's been quite a lot of controversy as well but the leader of the Conservative Party apparently is quite adults I am not very inspiring so let's see the green policies apparently will do well we'll have to wait and see but my prediction is that just intruder who remain prime minister by smaller margin the last time well I'm wondering if there's anything happening in the next seven days that's not election related Fernando Dairies One and actually it's tomorrow is also if you're not interested in the Canadian elections. Why don't you come to the Ocho arena here in London we've me what's happening there share will be performed to go I am going to go and she's a legend there are few legends today in the music world she's a legend and never seen him I'll be there is the here we go again tour you know the song that we play for my segment here Fernando she did re record that song and she will perform it because I did check the set list before I've got so many share related memories one of them being when I was very young and I went on this booze cruise from Helsinki to Stockholm and there was a disco on board that boat and the detail would only play d and remixes soft the sheriff's on believe I think we'd better just knocked that anecdote on the head this is a family show marcus we don't WanNa know where that's going to end up going story surgeons for share I think she was about fifty at the time even though we don't talk about age when he comes to share she doesn't have a timeless your favorite Song Oh God be the shoop shoop song it's a classic it's easy it's just I got you babe as surrogates I chose to yeah that's fine there's not with sunny too yeah that on the show is this sold out probably I hope so a show that we can join the fight thanks so much for joining us to take a look at next week you're listening the monocle weekly you at home in a moment we'll be hearing from the cult art rock Ariel Pink don't go away In two thousand four the record label port tracks put out an album called the doldrums by Ariel Pink's haunted graffiti for most people it was that first encounter with the warped and prolific musical imagination of areas doc which would go on to have a huge influence on indie music buzz pink who was born area Rosenberg had been recording music ceaselessly since nine hundred ninety six hundred songs some of which made it onto self released cassette tapes and CDs now the Brooklyn Label Mexican summer is putting out reissues of the Ariel Pink albums that Rosenbaum recorded and released in obscurity between ninety nine thousand nine hundred thousand four Monaco's inimitable Henry Sheridan met him the Mexican Summer Studios in New York staying I remember reading a quote from you you said that something which really is shaped musical sensibility is your earliest memories of music that were formed kind of the early eighties and it just struck me the says is much of a gap between now and the periods in which you made those early records as ever is between that period and the early eighties old in having you know sort of like a come to awaken into my current self more or less around twenty years ago and having it basically spent twenty years as a twenty year old and then having you know W- When I was twenty years old being so kind of aware of where I was at five years old and having that informed my creative impetus and all that kind of stuff and then having my twenty year old self now sort of dictating my current path and yeah I felt a lot about that in so many different ways I still try not to mythologies importance of any of that stuff between I think ninety nine hundred nineteen thousand full you record in extraordinary amount of music I think one figure that I've read is over two hundred cassettes worth is that figure anchor number one and number two why well I mean I think it's more than that why I feel like in hindsight it was all very much a case of my sort of wanting to be acknowledged and to be heard and to be seen instead like that into I think there was a sort of burning desire that was at the root of all that you know in a need for love to once you get that off the flame summer simmers down you really can actually breathe for for violent now that I do career doing it it it has taken a stick it on a different dimension and perhaps it's not as much of a diagnostic enterprise I only due to do it all the time to sort of to stake my claim in in in the universe I really feel quite sated in my personal life in might myself as far as that's concerned me no I feel I feel knowledge tonight I don't feel a burning desperate urge to tomorrow every single moment of my life with some sort of artistic stamp if those early recordings kind diary of not only your life at the time but also the development of your artistic method neurotic process basically diary of you learning to record make music when you go back and listen to those early recordings now is it like reading an old diary oh how you imagine that would be me I don't listen back to the songs very much anymore because I know them inside out so it's they've always been been ingrained in my mic consciousness unlike a diary for instance it's not like you know I just abandoned these things and then just came back thirty years later in rhythm for the first time these things are like there headed in me whether I like it or not but listening back to them yeah I mean it's there's a slightly alien quality to it I mean I'm definitely don't know how I did them half the time although unlike diaries the process of making it is one of the endlessly listening back to these things I mean the each song is a trip into yourself you know you go you go back in you listen to what you recorded previously in the new basically you know we expose yourself to it over and over again you familiarize yourself with you you stack new a new thing on top of it and then you listen to that you see so the whole excessive just like listening back a million times to something in the goal being that when I'm done with a song for instance I mean I you know I'd I'd want to somehow swiped my memory of it clean but somehow somehow listen to it as if I've never heard it at all and see dedicated Bob Jameson the title refers to Bob Jameson who was a singer songwriter who looked for a moment in the sixties like he was going to become a star and then for various reasons didn't and basically many many years later resurfaced on on the Internet with the blog I'm basically re re wrote the history of of.

Doug Aitken Marcus Hippie London Korean Film Festival Hyun Jin apple London Larry twenty years seven days twenty year thirty years six minutes five years
Trump prepares for 'productive' talks with Xi on trade war

Morning Edition

05:24 min | 2 years ago

Trump prepares for 'productive' talks with Xi on trade war

"President trump is at the g. twenty summit in soccer japan this week and on saturday he'll have a crucial meeting with china's president xi jinping those trying to negotiate a truce on trade after this trade war that stretched on for about a year with me now is clear williams in april he stepped down as deputy director at the national economic council there he was the lead trade negotiator for the u._s. at summits including the g twenty he's now a partner at the law firm aitken gump thanks for coming in thank you all right so let's get people up to speed this week treasury secretary steven mnuchin said the u._s. was quote ninety percent of the way there on reaching a deal with china we have certainly heard that before you were the guy who did these deals is this meeting at the twenty actually likely to close a deal i don't think it's going to close a deal i think the most likely outcome that you're gonna have is that the leaders are gonna agree to restart talks to try to get back to where they were in may before things broke down and probably for some indefinite period of time to agree to refrain from further escalation but i do want to stress that is far from a done deal and it's really going to depend on how these leaders interact with each other in the meeting that they've got tomorrow okay that's really interesting because president trump has said if deal can't be reached he's going to put more tariffs on your saying what might happen is he just holds off on that i think if the meeting goes well that he's going to be willing to hold off however if the meeting goes poorly i think he's made clear that he would be willing to further escalate this and ten percent tariff is what he signaled and is the threat of tariffs likely to be weighing on president she's mind as they go into this meeting he thinking yeah absolutely i think that the u._s. has done here is they've tried to create leverage with china the problems that president trump is raising with president xi for technology transfer i._p. theft these are things that the u._s. has been concerned about for a long time and the problem had been that we had had negotiated these issues with china and then china didn't follow through and so president trump's view is that we need to define a way to have additional leverage over china and he's done it with these tariffs now i think what you're seeing is that president xi is under a lot of pressure china's economy isn't doing as well as it has been in past years the tariffs have contributed to that and so that is going to be weighing on his mind and i think that creates an incentive for china to try to find a way to get out of the situation despite china's economic worries and they are real the wall street journal reporting that china's gonna come to this meeting with a specific set of preconditions for a deal they want an end to this policy implemented by the trump administration which bans american companies from selling technology to the chinese firm way do you think this administration is likely to negotiate on hallway well i mentioned before that i think what is going to be determinative here in terms of whether we restart negotiations or whether we have an escalation is going to be how those conditions are presented how the leaders interact with each other i think if president she comes into the meeting and says absolutely unequivocally the u._s. needs to drop tariffs it needs to fix walkway and it needs to do all these other things i think that's going to be a bad situation if on the other hand president she says these are my priorities can you help me out here can you show me some flexibility i think you could have a productive meeting and then with with wow way in particular that is a tricky issue and the administration has been clear that why is national security threat and that action needs to be taken to prevent while away from being part of the u._s. network now whether or not there's flexibility in terms of doing business with the company at all that may be a different question i think you you theoretically at least can distinguish saying they can't be part of our networks from they can't build cellphones in china and we're not going to give them any components for their cell phones those are different things in my mind the journal also reports that the chinese will likely ask the u._s. to drop the tariffs it's implemented so far that liquid happen not in the short term what the united states has said and they've been clear is that china in the past hasn't followed through on commitments it made we need some sort of tool to check their implementation and that's what the tariffs are going to be used for so an immediate term dropping the tariffs i don't see that maybe if after some period of time china does follow through our commitments that's where we'll go this meeting comes at a time when more and more american businesses are talking a against the existing tariffs on china they're saying these are really hurting us and especially including about the proposal to to impose even more this week n._p._r. talk to a florida businessman named mark morgan he runs a company that makes smartphone accessories and he was telling us that the trade war with china has forced him to actually lay off workers meet me play that we're down to six employees now we were at eleven and then just could not support the payroll in the overhead expenses i mean there is really a lot at stake here and i wonder can the president of ford politically economically to hit china with tariffs again right well i'll be the first to acknowledge that there is an impact of tariffs on the u._s. economy but what the president is doing here is he's trying to create a long term situation where the unfair practices that china's engaging in that hurt those very same businesses and workers aren't going to aren't allowed to go on anymore and really the question is are we in a position economically to be able to sustain the short term pain in order to have long term gain of a more fair trading situation

Donald Trump Soccer Japan China President Trump Ninety Percent Ten Percent
Researchers discover anomaly under moon's largest crater that's 5 times larger than Hawaii's Big Island

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:26 min | 2 years ago

Researchers discover anomaly under moon's largest crater that's 5 times larger than Hawaii's Big Island

"This is kind of weird mysterious large mass was discovered on the moon. Nobody knows what it is. Or from whence? It came oboe large mass of unknown. Material has been discovered on the largest crater on the moon and scientists just don't know what it is. It was. Published April in April study in the journal geophysical research letters, which I never miss an episode. Did you get the shoe phone? Yes, the toaster oven both. When you order the I did researchers believe the mask could contain metal from an asteroid that crashed into the moon, which resulted in the aforementioned, crater known as the lunar south pole Aitken basin. Sure. Right that place. That's what I call it all the time. You see the see the lunar south pole up there, the Aitken basin Imos, pointing out to people. Yeah, there's something up there. We just don't know what it is. Imagine taking a pile of metal five times, larger than the big island of Hawaii, and burying it underground. That's roughly how much unexpected mass they detected. Roughly fifteen hundred and fifty miles in diameter, the lunar south pole stretches across about one fourth of the moon. The moon so Comference is roughly eleven thousand

Aitken Basin Imos Aitken Basin Geophysical Research Hawaii Comference
"aitken" Discussed on Get Real -w- Caroline Hobby

Get Real -w- Caroline Hobby

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"aitken" Discussed on Get Real -w- Caroline Hobby

"She naturally isn't comfortable with but she's learned embrace it because she has such a message. She has such a message that she wants to share with the world to how they make their marriage work. Why they love therapy how Thomas retinue instantly that he was going to adopt willow gray with her. It is the most incredible episode. So y'all get excited for Lauren Aitken's and her journey. It's so beautiful. Here is. Hello. Hello. Hello. Hello. I'm here with Lauryn Atkins aching. Yeah. I can't make everybody says different. There's no D no, no D, not some. What if people call you what are the names that you get mixed up? Oh, they're good. They're really good. So I didn't think about this when I was creating Instagram, it's like. Lar lar all the time. People who've grown up with me, my husband, our family. They call me lar. And so when I was creating a name, I think Lauren, I don't know. I don't know why picked lar- but I was just like lar and then with my last name aching. It looked like Laura, if you were to put. Underscore sup with underscore between those lar- underscore Aitken's, but people still see it in some how they still think money was Lara. And then they don't realize that Thomas Rhett SR, last name is Aken. Because he's got that double night. Your devil. So they are last name is Rhett. So a lot of people go. Romar read, and I'm like, oh, gosh. And then our girls have kinda hard names to because will there aren't a ton of willows love that, but alot people always think her name is willow and then gray isn't a super common name, but my brother's name was Grayson. So that's kind of how he came up with the gray. But people think it's grace, so she gets called willow, grace willow grace and then ADA, also not a common name and James is a boy name. And so they think that she is Eva, Jane. So y'all just wanna. Interesting. Okay, next. Maybe we're going to go with the most generic e center remember he. Then he. So I don't know. We'll see. But yeah, we've got we've got trouble with our names, but you're just Lauren. There's, there's no double name for, you know, no double name. Okay. Okay. So you're stories kind of amazing, you're one of the few, like, unicorns of the city 'cause you're from Nashville. That's right. What is it like being an actual national native because so many people are transplants. Yeah. And Thomas is a native to right? Well, he moved here when he was like a toddler a little bitty. So basically. Yeah. So this is all he remembers but he lived here has his dad, dad Rhett Akins. Oh, he's saying that's not house. And that's my guess, Keith that ain't my truck that match. Okay. I was gonna sing it, but a promise you don't want to. So I was gonna let you take I love. He was one of my nineties country. Nice the best. He still is good. He's songwriter of the year. You know. I mean he's just done that a few times and been he's got like twenty nine number ones, or something crazy as a song writer. He's gosh. He's insane. And how cool though now that Thomas has grown up and become a singer and six. And now they get right together together. Have that is that been really sweet? It's so sweet. It's really cool to watch them bond over something that I just can't even relate to. So they have a relationship. I mean, I'm sure there are lots of dads and sons they get to work together. But there's something about the music industry that is just magic to and then seeing them do that. Together is is really cool. And he's actually on tour with Thomas Rhett this year. He's opening for him. So. What's their dynamic together? I mean, they're, they're like, the ultimate father son duo. I mean when they get on stage together, they just play off of each other, and they're both like such natural entertainers and their brilliant, and their writing, and how they talk with crowd, and it's really, it's really cool to watch..

Lauren Aitken Thomas Rhett Rhett Akins Thomas Keith Thomas Rhett SR ADA James Instagram Lauryn Atkins Grayson gray Nashville Eva Laura Lara Aken writer
Scottish citys sustainability drive, means tackling toxic legacy first

UN News

05:34 min | 2 years ago

Scottish citys sustainability drive, means tackling toxic legacy first

"This is Matt wells at your news with more than half the world's population. Now living in urban areas is increasingly understood that cities can drive sustainable development. But that's not so easy in places where heavy industry has left a toxic legacy. That developers are willing to pay to clean up as Glasgow. Cancel leader. Susan Aitken told Daniel Johnson from your news. It's an economic commission for Europe or you NEC event in Geneva. She explained that despite the massive challenge the benefits could be enormous. Since the Scottish city has more spare land within its borders than any other major urban area in the United Kingdom in Glasgow. We are integrating hosing bringing together all sorts of different tenures. Whether that's social rented housing private rented or call ownership or people on their own homes, and our aim is to build new places and communities new housing developments whereby they're tenured blind is what we we are aiming for so no one knows no one can tell by. The quality of your home. Whether you rent your home air, whether your social event, whether you own your home, so people live next each other in exactly the same standard and quality of home, regardless of whether the owner or rented, one of the things that I thought was interesting you were talking about Glasgow building ghettoized communities of social housing. But now that's changing massively in terms of the sustainability in terms of the look of the house, the aesthetic and the efficiency, and that's what you're hoping is going to bring everyone into the sustainability drive. Yes, that's how we build we believe resilient unsustainable communities law school still suffers enormously. We have many people who live in poverty, and he'll have enormous challenges in their lives who we have enormous health inequalities in our city that we will not change that by having the poodle people and the people who suffer from the worst hails pushed out to the edge of the city all living together without the social supports that can be in place by having that mixed community without. The economy that's generated through different types of people from different backgrounds coming together, and creating that more dynamic local economic circumstance. These was will then help to support social Justice unimproved lives for everyone. The sounds like a wonderful place Glasgow, but presumably it's not that easy which particular challenges. Are you facing terms of developers? You don't wish to let go of property that they have that's a big problem in the UK also former industrial land, how you dealing with those particular challenges or biggest challenges form an industrial London Glasgow, which is contaminated. We have more vacant and dare licked wand than any other city in the UK and the poodle people live closest to the worst wand. So that is an enormous challenge. Some of the contaminated Lund will cost us hundreds of millions of pounds to decontaminate. What's it contaminated with all sorts of industrial pollutants chromium is one of them. But video others is very expensive business. And that's not something that the private sector wants to take on that. Something that has to be laid by the public sector. So we're using our city deal money to decontaminate quite a chunk of land nowhere near all of it. But significant amounts. We have a development company, which we share with the Scottish government and our national enterprise agencies, Scottish enterprise and also evening local authority, cold CLYDE gateway which has decontaminated significant amounts of land in the east end of the city, which is the worst affected on turned that into developable Lund whether for hosing or for Morvern industrial uses because we are very much creating jobs as well as building homes. So we are tackling it in every way that we can bought is a long slow process is going to take as many years before we can bring all vegan and derelict land back into productive use because of the legacy that we face as a post industrial city, and maybe you could tell me bit more about the types of housing that you hoping to build in terms of sustainability and their competivity with regard to. Other private development houses. What does it that's going to give your sustainable housing the edge? Well, we won't build all types of housing in Glasgow. I always see there isn't a type of hosing neat that doesn't exist in Glasgow. Therefore that isn't immortal of delivery for hosing that we won't try built to rain is a new model in the city, a new type of private rented sector filled to rent rent. Ta so am almost like kind of I was in corpse in the American style. So they're private development, therefore, perhaps more millennial more mobile workforce who are looking to buy just no. But the want high-quality rented homes, but with social spaces as well sheared space within the buildings. So that's a new model in a new market for the city, but what we are leading with an particularly on. Our social rented homes is invited mantle sustainability on fuel efficiency, we have significant amounts of fuel poverty in Glasgow. And so what we want is for the poodles people to be moved supported in being able to heat their homes at which they ended up helps to support their health and better lives for them. So we're using passive house models. We're using technology to help people monitor their spanned on fuel anything that we have available to us. We're testing and trying to make our homes as environmentally sustainable as possible. But also. Seasonable in terms of people's life cycle. So that they can be homes that people live in right through their lives as they get older. The homes are adoptable to support people as the age on perhaps need more support.

Glasgow United Kingdom London Glasgow Matt Wells Europe Scottish Government Geneva Lund Susan Aitken Morvern Industrial Daniel Johnson
"aitken" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"aitken" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Aitken's no Ryan Griffin for the Texans. They're going to try to get the ball out quick to avoid that Jacksonville. Susceptible to tighten especially as Pete will tell you some of those crossers misdirections, maybe dishonor, Watson and Aitken's. They get moving in the right direction. With those receivers going the other way, you get a couple of big day. Speaking of Jacksonville, they had a trade on Friday to help bolster the running back. Yeah. Well, you know, Carlos heights, some new real estate at least temporarily for the Browns Carlos shy of the Jaguars. It's a fifth round pick as we reported and talked about before with Leonard fournette our that hamstring injury. And then TJ Yeldan having his injury issues. What does this do for the running back group? And what does this do for the Jaguars? That's not gonna be ready for at least a couple of weeks, which we've pretty much expected. It also means Yeltsin's banged up and playing through something awful and unrestricted free agent after the season. So they can let him walk and keep Carlos hot. I think that has something to do with that as well. And you get a draft pick back Yeldan. So it looks like, you know, you might trade a fifth and get a fourth back 'cause back or something like that. So it's not a big deal for the future for the now, they say hide might be up today. And we haven't seen the inactive. But if he is it'd be interesting to be a very limited package for him. I would expect a lot of Yeldan obviously today. But I think you've heighten, you know, get a couple of runs in their learn how to go, right? Learn how to go left and learn one blitz. Pick up that I think he can get some snaps. So take us three weeks from now, what's the breakdown is that healthy for nets at coming off their bye week for it's for.

TJ Yeldan Carlos heights Jaguars Aitken Jacksonville Carlos Ryan Griffin Pete Leonard fournette Watson Yeltsin three weeks
Audi recalls thousands of vehicles; coolant pumps can overheat

24 Hour News

02:16 min | 3 years ago

Audi recalls thousands of vehicles; coolant pumps can overheat

"Of every purchase german automaker audis recalling hundreds of thousands of vehicles worldwide ap's rita foley reports the recall covers many different models what he says the problem with the almost four hundred thousand vehicles it's recalling the electric coolant pump aitken overheat and may cause a fire the recall covers late model q five suv's and a fives and fours from twenty thirteen through twenty sixteen a six models from twenty twelve three twenty fifteen are also being recalled there have been no reports of fires but audi says the pump can become blocked or moisture inside it can cause an electrical short dealers will replace the pumps at no cost to owners i'm rita foley the first woman to be commemorated outside of britain's parliament with a bronze statue was unveiled on tuesday with a lightness of women's rights campaign will listen force it joining those of nelson mandela abraham lincoln winston churchill force it was president of the national union of women's suffrage societies and the key campaign in the movement that secured british women over thirty the right to vote in one thousand nine hundred eighteen the statue was erected in parliament square after petition was started by feminist activist caroline creative perez who previously led a successful campaign for jane austen to be depicted on a british banknote this statue by artist gillian wearing shoes forcet holding about not proclaiming courage cools to carry jeffrey where a phrase from one of his speeches the new leader of one of germany's governing parties says she plans to join the protest against working conditions at amazon during a visit by company's ceo jeff bezos does to berlin andrea knowle's the chairwoman of the center left social democrats said she would take part in a demonstration outside publisher axel springer berlin offices bezos is being presented with an award for his visionary entrepreneurship now let's says that amazon's tax practices and working conditions aren't worthy of a prize she is seeking to boost hippocrates profile after disastrous election result last year and its decision to enter the new jim and government as.

Andrea Knowle Axel Springer Publisher Berlin CEO Germany Gillian Perez National Union Of Women Abraham Lincoln Winston Church AP Jeff Bezos Amazon Jeffrey Jane Austen Caroline President Trump Britain Audi Rita Foley
"aitken" Discussed on CodePen Radio

CodePen Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"aitken" Discussed on CodePen Radio

"In one account if you figure out of structural way to do that and let's say i drag you know the fourth thing on the to do list up to the top the first thing on the to do list that'll just you can coated up such that that will instantly happened on everybody who's looking at that todo list to happen it's a real time database so it's built to deal with features like that which has incredible so not only do you have these abilities but it's it's cooler its modernized it's the you know the way that we expect like really fancy web apps took two to line un know were say we're talking about it in terms of front end and backend skills and all that aitken candidate you could sort of look at it as a way of like a tow into back and skills if you have front end deaths skills to start with you can kinda approach one of these projects as a way to start learning more about how backend works because you know even though it's not traditional back and development as we normally think about it uh it has features of that year you like you're saying you know you're thinking vat database structures and things like that and how you're going to organize all this information that's a step in that direction absolutely that's a great way to look at it that you're you know you're using the skills you already gap a your level your secretly levelling up at the same time too yeah absolutely enemy when you can when you already how powerful front end development skills and you take the plunge and you know turn into the full stack developed her you know you're you're really you know improving your skill set your learning something new and you may find something that you're like super into you may discover a whole new world that's like this is cool stuff i had know how to do now and i want to do more of this so it's it's very energizing to see these possibilities available to people who i think you know sometimes there is a division that we have in our minds where it's like i'm a front end of or i'm a backend of it's nice because this creates canada the hybrid situation and you can just kinda flow back and forth between the two so so we've talked a little bit about database.

aitken
"aitken" Discussed on NewsRadio1620

NewsRadio1620

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"aitken" Discussed on NewsRadio1620

"In aitken's foods in chamber login all if your health food store doesn't carry it asked them to kerry memory matters by having them go over to their website in memory matters dot u s or bricker labs dot com or i just a couple other questions before brenda has to go in soda we read a welcome back let's get into this caffeine we talked about that is that something good for memory is it is it really all votes cut out to be allowed people were believing that right now sure that's a great question dr bob there's no doubt that caffeine can help with alertness um but you know it also disrupt plea and the result are really mixed on what are caffeine helped men murray are not and quebec where memory matters really comes in at a different approach it worked overtime not a quick fix it meant to really happen overall improvement in your brain how real benefits atlanta a at a deeper level and so we know that the ingredients in memory now there's called me medics it does not disrupt lee it's not a quick fix and we've shown couldn't agree that it can improve your working memory and working memory super important is what really allow argue to multitask it what let you keep track of all the information online at we're processing all the time in decline as early as our twenty in third something that really um can be helpline really uh he'd benefit from from showing improvement from that and and it's not a drug like caffeine for god's sake folks it is a drug and it has i'd effects especially when you try to come off of it all right how you jake memory matters brenda yep.

aitken brenda caffeine dr bob lee kerry murray quebec atlanta
"aitken" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"aitken" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"He became the deputy director of the research laboratory for archaeology at oxford university and much of his advances involved that much of his work involved dating objects which of course is critically important when you're dealing with archaeology archaeology so he in edward hall were instrumental in using proton free procession magnetometers to find buried remains i'm he developed with derrick while and the application of a squid in archaeology now squared stands for a super conducting quantum interference device that is essentially a cryogenic megatama there which can detect the subtlest of magnetic fields like ancic geomagnetism for example iit sensitive enough to measure field as low as i believe fivetimes 10 to the negative 18 tesla that debt is tiny the royal society said in aitken's biography it's largely through martin's enthusiasm and that of edward hall that the research laboratory for archaeology at oxford led the way in sciencebased archaeology so i love when i said when i read that they wrote sciencebased 'blabla thought you'd like that would steve so remember martin jim aitken match it him to your friends perhaps when discussing archille magnetic prospection or even flux gate magnetic grady armadores trust me grab army are legs steve i thought of that dead flux capacitors magna double it is luck skate meg norton flex gate magnetic grady arbiters it sounds they detect the drop off a magnetic fields just basically what the words are saying there but when i read that was like i'm so going to houston at us that will come up in gotha all the time i've never heard of archeology tree that before i had neither as it also targets the application of technology to archaeology is it also.

deputy director oxford university edward hall derrick oxford gotha sciencebased steve martin jim aitken houston 18 tesla
"aitken" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"aitken" Discussed on KOMO

"That level of understanding of what in the way for me being open to being influenced or for me being open to understanding what might be possible yes so when you're trying to crete influence with others i think it's this really helpful to think of the fact that you're trying to create understanding and if ukraine understanding i think you are at least half way there they may still disagree people may still disagree with the change you're asking them to make but that's it's better for them to disagree with something they understand than to simply resist because they don't understand yeah it it it's an interesting distinction at i hadn't really thought of but too much until recently is i i can intellectually resist something and and i can emotionally resumed something in the emotional resistance is the one of this really going to stop me for moving right and if you understand something aitken can start to break down that yes assistant ray ray the switch you talking about then then i'm not being changed time madam absorbing that change on adapting yeah the change then comes not from the outside but from the inside through the process of conversation that allows for you to to to claim that understanding as your own yeah so that's the influences that the quality of influences the bridge between influencing you i'm breaching my understanding it to yours in a way that lands well for you in that that that then you can own great well said henceforth the word influence when you think of that word try to think of in in terms of creating understanding creating a bridge of understanding between the un the other person that allows influenced flo more on influence you're listening to the bosch show each fall people can't wait.

aitken ray ray bosch crete ukraine
"aitken" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"aitken" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"Don't get you get your way to white applauding you look you know like you don't you're doing and plush guy by the win you won't get blown away by the way and that's exactly right i think a lot of problems until legia news reports would have in which they were gonna get flowed over by the winter they don't do away work the j sandison citizens auxiliary police were still would your your notice that a lot of these supporters dodge debris insured so forth at very dangerous i know what it explained to brave streetsign fraud uh you name it man shards of glass breaking this windows coach roy aitken hsienchou edged up flying next day you know he he tore over in we were shocked i just about uh six hours ago myself and lead with birmingham who is with me or my producer we saw guy walking along a street any had a brick uh i would you the book which was started wedged in his neck oh 20 straight bricks thought yeah i was like a piece of tile and he was just walking down the street i said a you okay didn't answer didn't say anything you just staggered down the street and they finally got him into amblin and uh this guy was during a period winter wasn't much daniel go the way you want to win the rain in any paves just staggering along they got him a amblin hook eight but what happened was later on they amblin came back and they showed me that it was a fake brick that they put you in movies or something and they had a kind of a band it goes around the next so he would pretending that he got a break in the neck anyone who's on beer something to do and shoot a movie no they weren't they were actually one of the other news crews and they were messing with me because i can't i should what about uh to flying debris apparently what about wind debris and i talk humbled of talking among themselves and then i saw them disappear the guy coming down the street with a break in his back.

roy aitken hsienchou birmingham producer daniel j sandison fraud windows six hours
"aitken" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

Rob Has a Podcast

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"aitken" Discussed on Rob Has a Podcast

"And a ryan aitken accused me of at that point being in love with hiding and i said i think their loved is very strong word i just i haven't even talk to yeah you're gonna say quite in the whole thing he kinda get pushed into that too and then and at least with after you talk that the jeff fully deal he really digs in there yeah so i don't know if us talking about which of the women was the most attractive was the reason why we lost challenge i mean i know i would've been really kept everything a little more cut down on the hashtag locker room talk then rabi we will one that challenge i don't know how that would have helped dan and ryan get over the balanced emu they regan themselves to a hyped up maybe maybe they were they were to aroused and they could that's why they couldn't crawl across the balance beam that affects your hair like the could otherwise they would have just been able to uh hug that balance beam in a cross but now they were moving over from side to side who might a question a teacher so i have to stay had jeff side on this i was for chief yeah so that was definitely a fly in moulmein so many of the guys were into uh sean and i also about how dave johnson says a shona she's wearing ski cap that's bad assets bang rang remember watching this in a middle school i dunno saccharose eating at this time on amazon premier might take me second remember exactly what was going on that i remember being big deal about it being a longer episode but i member like dave i was like like i thought he was so.

ryan aitken jeff moulmein dave johnson dan amazon dave i