35 Burst results for "Aisha Roscoe"

4 victims of California office shooting identified, as suspect charged with murder

BBC World Service

05:12 min | 2 weeks ago

4 victims of California office shooting identified, as suspect charged with murder

"Sir Chang and I'm Audie Cornish. This hour. We'll look at how faith communities approach pandemic lockdown differently. One day, we're gonna look back. And this is just gonna be a story that we tell what kind of story do you want to tell? Also one of President Biden's campaign promises was to overhaul the criminal justice system, and advocates say they are waiting for some real action now. Absolutely anxious form or change to come from this administration on criminal justice reform and how the Biden administration hopes to reverse systemic racism that's been baked into America's infrastructure. Now the news Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. Veteran Capitol police officer is dead and an unidentified suspect was also killed after police say the individual rammed his car into the officers, then into a barricade outside the U. S capital today. We say the suspect was shot and killed after emerging from the vehicle, brandishing a knife and moving towards police. It all happened here. The Russell Senate office building just after one p.m. today still not clear what was behind the incident, though it comes on the heels of the January six attack on U. S Capitol by supporters of former President Donald Trump that also claimed the life of the Capitol police officer. U. S Capitol police officer who died today has been identified as William Billy Evans, an 18 year veteran of the force. A second Capitol police officer was injured. Have the Minneapolis Police Department homicide division testified today. Kneeling on the neck of a suspect who was handcuffed amounts to top tier deadly force and it should have stopped. Lieutenant Richard Zimmerman, a long time officer on the force testified today and travel Derrick Show Vin the actions by the former officers saying they were totally unnecessary putting your neon and neck For that amount of pot that amount of time. Is just Uncalled for. I saw no reason why The officers felt they were in danger if that's what they felt showing faces, murder and manslaughter charges in the death of George Floyd last year, prosecutors say corrected police video shows Trovan, who was white, kneeling on the black man's neck for more than nine minutes. Man has been charged with the murder and attempted murder in the Wednesday attacking a Southern California office building that left four people dead, including a nine year old boy. The Orange County district attorney's office is 44 year old Harmony, a dob galaxy. Gonzalez was charged with the attempted murder of two police officers after shooting at them when they reached the scene. Police say Gaxiola knew the adult victims. It's not clear what the motive was behind the attack. President Biden says the latest jobs report shows the U. S economy bouncing back, But he said the country still has a long way to go towards recovering from the pandemic. NPR's Asia, Roscoe reports employers added 916,000 jobs in March. That was the biggest game in jobs since last August. President Biden says the economy is doing better because of rapid growth of covert 19 vaccinations and government aid. He warned. That is too soon. For Americans to return to life is normal. So I ask I plead with you. Don't give back the progress. We've also fought so hard to achieve. Need to finish this job. Every American to buckle down and keep their guard up. This home stretch bite and also pushed for Congress to take up his $2 trillion infrastructure plan. But some Republicans have opposed the proposal, which would raise taxes on corporations. Aisha Roscoe NPR news U. S. Financial Markets are closed today for good Friday. This is NPR from W. H E News in Atlanta. Good afternoon. I'm Jim Burress. Right now we have clear skies 55 degrees. It's 504 Major League Baseball says this July's All Star game will not take place in the Atlanta area following the signing of a bill that makes sweeping changes to Georgia voting laws. Meal. Moffett reports. Baseball was set to hold its Midsummer Classic and truest Park on July 13th, but Friday announced it would be relocating the game. A Republican backed bill signed into law March 25th has received substantial pushback from voting rights groups and corporations. Measure overhauls many of the state's election laws, including restricting the use of absentee ballot, Dropbox is adding I d requirements for vote by mail and giving lawmakers more control over the state's election board. In a statement, Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred said moving the game was the best way to show the MLB supports voting rights and fair access to the ballot box. Mio Moffett W. ABC News The Cobb County says it's rental assistance program was the target of a cyber attack. Stephanie Stokes has more The county's program offered $21 million to help tenants who are behind on rent demand was so strong earlier this year that the cab closed applications after little more than a week. Now, the county says it's email for receiving those applications may have been compromised. I found out within five minutes and disabled the email. The county says it also disconnected the affected server. It's unclear how much information was compromised. An investigation is underway. The cab was one of several counties around Georgia who received federal rental assistance funding.

President Biden Capitol Police Sir Chang Audie Cornish Biden Administration Npr News Jack Spear Veteran Capitol Police Russell Senate William Billy Evans Minneapolis Police Department Lieutenant Richard Zimmerman Derrick Show Vin George Floyd U. Orange County District Attorne Gaxiola Donald Trump NPR
On International Women's Day, Biden Signs Gender Equity Measures

Here & Now

02:28 min | Last month

On International Women's Day, Biden Signs Gender Equity Measures

"Is marking the occasion as only a president can with more executive orders. His signature will set up a new White House counsel on gender policy. And roll back a controversial Trump administration rule that protected students accused of sexual assault. We're joined now by NPR, White House correspondent Aisha Roscoe and I shall want we start with this order on sexual violence in schools when we need to know. This order basically directs the Department of Education to look at our into conduct a review of all of its policies and regulations to make sure that an educational environment is free from discrimination on the basis of sex and also free from discrimination in the form of sexual harassment, including sexual violence. On discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. So basically, it's a review to make sure that all of his policies are aligned with this order. And as I understand it, it goes back to the former education secretary Betsy the boss. She and the Trump administration believed that people who were accused of sexual violence deserve more rights in an academic setting. And Democrats, of course, opposed that from the beginning. Does this order just revert the legal standard back to what it was during the Obama administration. So this executive order clearly seems aimed at undoing that policy from the Trump administration. But what it basically does is it directs Education Secretary McGill Cardona to suspend or revise any agency actions that are at odds with the new order from the White House. So it basically puts it in The education Secretaries court for him to look at the policies and to decide what to do. But it seems clearly aimed at eventually getting rid of that order from the Trump administration. Okay, more to come on that issue, I'm sure now another bite in order is establishing a White House Gender Policy Council. What will that do? Exactly? So this council will focus on ensuring equity for women and girls on diverticular Lee women and girls of color. This is a revamped version of former President Obama's White House counsel on women and girls. The name was changed to reflect that all genders can face discrimination, but it's basically a way of looking at equity when it comes to women. Well. President Biden, on

Trump Administration White House Aisha Roscoe Obama Administration NPR Mcgill Cardona Department Of Education Education Secretaries Court Betsy White House Gender Policy Coun President Obama President Biden
Biden's Minimum-Wage Proposal: When Would It Reach $15 an Hour?

Weekend Edition Saturday

01:01 min | 2 months ago

Biden's Minimum-Wage Proposal: When Would It Reach $15 an Hour?

"Democrats in Congress are advancing President Biden's $1.9 Trillion covert relief package without Republicans. Planning to use a procedure known as budget reconciliation to pass it with a simple majority. Still, MPR's Asia. Roscoe reports President Biden's plan to boost the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour. Is not now appear likely to get done. President Biden says his proposal to raise the minimum wage will likely not survive in the Senate. He told CBS Evening News with Norah O'Donnell that he still believes that Congress should vote on an increase to be phased in overtime. I'm prepared as prez United States on a separate negotiation on minimum wage toe work my way up from it what it is now by then also said he's not willing to negotiate on the amount of the $1400. Let's check included in the aid package. But he said he is willing to impose tighter limits on who receives the direct payments based on income. Aisha Roscoe NPR news

President Biden Norah O'donnell Congress MPR Roscoe Evening News Asia CBS Senate United States Aisha Roscoe Npr News
US National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan to review US-Taliban agreement

Snap Judgment

00:58 sec | 3 months ago

US National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan to review US-Taliban agreement

"Says he'll review the agreement reached between the Trump administration and the Taliban in Afghanistan last year. NPR's Aisha Roscoe reports. Biden's national security advisor, has already spoken with his Afghan counterpart. According to the National Security Council, Jake Sullivan toe Afghan officials that the U. S remains committed to achieving a permanent cease fire. Sullivan said the Biden administration will look into whether the Taliban are abiding by their commitments to cut ties with terrorists and reduce violence. As President Donald Trump reduced the number of U. S troops stationed in Afghanistan to 2500, Biden's nominee for Secretary of state. Tony Blinken, told Congress at his confirmation hearing that by them wants to bring US forces home. But he also wants to make sure that gains against terrorism and writes for girls and women are not threatened. I saw Roscoe NPR news, the White House.

Trump Administration Aisha Roscoe Jake Sullivan Taliban Biden Administration Biden Afghanistan U. National Security Council NPR Tony Blinken Sullivan Donald Trump Congress United States Roscoe Npr White House
US National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan to review US-Taliban agreement

NPR News Now

03:52 min | 3 months ago

US National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan to review US-Taliban agreement

"President biden says he'll review the agreement reached between the trump administration and the taliban in afghanistan last year. Npr's showed roscoe reports biden's national security advisor has already spoken with his afghan counterpart according to the national security council. Jake sullivan toll. Afghan officials that the us remains committed to achieving a permanent ceasefire sullivan said the biden administration will look into whether the taliban are at biding by their commitments to cut ties with terrorists and reduce violence as president. Donald trump reduce the number of us troops stationed in afghanistan to two thousand five hundred bide his nominee for secretary of state. Tony blinken told congress at his confirmation hearing that biden wants to bring us forces home but he also wants to make sure that gains against terrorism and rights for girls and women are not threatened. Aisha roscoe npr news. The white house there continues to be a major gulf between how many covid nineteen vaccine dozes have been delivered to states and the number of people who actually got vaccinated the cdc reports only about fifty percent. The available shots have been given so far as wellstone reports. It's a confusing national picture with governors in some states like west. Virginia georgia new york clamoring for more supplies and many who oversee vaccine distribution say. They still don't know week to week exactly what they'll beginning. Meanwhile more than half of states have now opened a vaccine eligibility to people over sixty five. Jennifer nozoe is at johns hopkins university. Ryan have to shift at least in part away from this sort of slow stepwise work of trying to schedule a high priority individuals to more of a mass vaccination approach a recent national survey finds more than half of americans don't know exactly when or where they'll get vaccinated for npr news. I'm wellstone. Us corona virus infections have now surpassed twenty four million eight hundred thousand more than four hundred. Fourteen thousand people have died. This is npr. Pope francis has issued a warning on the danger of misinformation just days after he was the subject of a fake news report. Npr silvio pohjola reports. The pope praise journalists but also warned. News can be manipulated in his message for the catholic churches world. Communications day francis said the risk of misinformation being spread on social media is evident to everyone and manipulation of us and images is often prompted by sheer narcissism. He did not mention a false report that went viral earlier. This month that he had been arrested by italian police. Francis expressed words of gratitude for journalists who often risk their lives to report on the hardships endured by persecuted minorities in various parts of the world. But he added. Investigative reporting is often replaced by a tendentious narrative created in newsrooms and he urged journalists to hit the streets and verify situations firsthand. Super bowl jolie. Npr news rome. One of the best known television interviewers. Larry king has died. The peabody award winner is being remembered for interviewing literally thousands of people celebrities presidents philosophers literary figures even criminals over more than sixty years. He had said he was always engrossed in the conversation. Always listening to the answer. I'm always learning so. I guess i'm better every day at learning. Larry king died at a hospital in los angeles. This is npr.

President Biden Trump Administration Jake Sullivan Biden Administration Biden Tony Blinken Taliban Aisha Roscoe Npr News Afghanistan Wellstone Jennifer Nozoe National Security Council Roscoe Donald Trump NPR Pope Francis Sullivan Silvio Pohjola
Anthony Fauci: I feel 'liberated' now Donald Trump has gone, says US Covid adviser

NPR News Now

01:01 min | 3 months ago

Anthony Fauci: I feel 'liberated' now Donald Trump has gone, says US Covid adviser

"Expert says the rise. In new cases of gerona virus may be hitting a plateau but dr anthony fauci warns the public to remain vigilant and to take precautions. Npr's i usua- rosco has more on faculties remarks. Since president biden on his administration's national strategy for combating the pandemic avenue is now president. Biden's chief medical adviser. He says the previous administration had some good ideas for boosting. Vaccinations biden's team can build on. But he acknowledged that at times he'd felt constrained by the trump white house. I can tell you. I take no pleasure at all in being in a situation of contradicting the president so it was really something that you didn't feel that you could actually say something and there wouldn't be any repercussions trump criticize dr fauci publicly and eventually sidelined him. The nation's top expert in infectious diseases says he now feels more liberated to speak on the science behind. The pandemic aisha roscoe. npr

Dr Anthony Fauci President Biden Rosco NPR Biden Dr Fauci White House Aisha Roscoe
Biden to sign Day 1 orders to reverse Trump immigration policies

Morning Edition

01:14 min | 3 months ago

Biden to sign Day 1 orders to reverse Trump immigration policies

"NPR News on Corvo Coleman. President elect Joe Biden is poised to sign 17 executive orders today after he takes the oath of office. The orders will address the Corona virus pandemic, the stuttering U. S economy, climate change and Racial justice initiatives. These actions range from rejoining the Paris climate accords to revoking President Trump's order, excluding undocumented migrants from the 2020 senses. Biden will take the oath of office six hours from now, as the nation's 46th president. NPR's Windsor Johnston has more. Biden and Vice President elect Kamila Harris will take the oath of office on the West side of the U. S Capitol building at noon today. Vice President Mike Pence, will attend the inauguration along with former presidents Barack Obama, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Washington This morning, Biden and Vice President elect Kamila Harris will attend Mass at ST Matthew's Cathedral in Washington, D. C. They'll be joined by congressional leaders, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. And House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. President Trump will leave the White House before Biden is sworn into office. NPR's Aisha Roscoe reports he will skip Biden's inauguration.

Npr News Corvo Coleman President Elect Joe Biden Windsor Johnston President Trump Vice President Elect Kamila Ha Biden U. Vice President Mike Pence NPR Paris St Matthew's Cathedral D. C. Bill Clinton Washington George W. Bush Majority Leader Mitch Mcconnel Barack Obama House Speaker Nancy Pelosi
"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:09 min | 5 months ago

"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KCRW

"This set of different recorders. And that was the first thing I did was just sitting down, closing my eyes and just recording myself playing the bass recorder for three days. It's all coming up. First. This news update. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Windsor Johnston. President Trump has fire Defense Secretary Mark Esper. It's the latest staff shakeup within the Trump administration since Election Day. NPR's Aisha Roscoe reports, Trump has yet to concede and is pledging to continue lawsuits challenging the outcome. Resident. Trump says that Mark Esper will be replaced by the director of the National Counter Terrorism Center Christopher Miller. Trump said in a tweet that Esper had been terminated, though he didn't provide any explanation for his removal. Esper is the highest profile departure from the administration in recent days. But at least three other agency hits have been removed or demoted since the election, including the chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. What Trump has refused to concede his campaign has offered no evidence that would overturn the thousands of votes necessary across multiple states for him to claim a second term. Aisha Roscoe NPR NEWS. The number of Corona virus infections has her past 10 million in the United States, another sobering milestone as the number of cases continues to rise across the nation. And also comes amid word a real progress in the race for a vaccine pharmaceutical giant Pfizer today announced that its experimental vaccine appears to be 90% effective in preventing cove in 19. Speaking in Wilmington, Delaware today, President elect Joe Biden praised the news but warned that the pandemic is far from over. It's clear that this vaccine even if approved I'll not be widely available for many months yet to come. Challenge before us right now. Is still immense and growing. Although we're not in office, yet. I'm just laying out what we expect to do, and hope can be done. Some of it between now and the time were sworn in fight and also announced the formation of a Corona virus advisory board. Immigration is expected to be at the top of Biden's agenda when he takes office in January. NPR's Joel Roads reports, the former vice president is almost certain to reverse some of President Trump's policies. President elect Biden is expected to quickly end the travel ban on immigrants from majority Muslim countries and extend protections for Dr recipients. But other changes could take months or years to unwind. President Trump's administration has taken more than 400 executive actions. Slashing the flow of legal immigrants to a fraction of what it was when he took office. President elect Biden has promised to quickly send a bill to Congress that would create a pathway to citizenship for the estimated 11 million immigrants living in the country illegally. But that bill has little chance of becoming law if Republicans retain control of the Senate. Well Rose. NPR news On Wall Street. The Dow was up 1277 points. This is NPR news in Washington. Celebrations across a Europe erupted after the U. S presidential election was called for Democrats Joe Biden on Saturday NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports, many Parisians are expressing optimism for a return to the close transatlantic relationship. Parisians Posses Tr says he's come out to the mini Statue of Liberty on the Sand River to pay tribute to democracy. People consider our relationship with America. Very important, he says. We hope it will be even better under President Biden. Western Europeans are eager to renew close ties with the U. S. After four years of strain under the Donald Trump presidency, but transatlantic relations expert mode, Kosar says things won't be the same European leaders. They think that going back to the old days and the old international liberal older as it was before Trump it's an illusion, says Europe. Gained independence in the last four years and is ready to assert its own political, economic and military priorities. Eleanor Beardsley NPR News PARIS, Portugal and Hungary are the latest European countries to re impose curfews amid fresh outbreaks of the Corona virus. The latest restrictions went into effect in Portugal today. A curfew will start in Hungary Tuesday at midnight. Public health officials across Europe continue to report a surge of new infections. France, Belgium and the Czech Republic are seeing a spike in the number of cases. Infections are also on the rise in the United Kingdom. Stocks continue to trade higher on Wall Street At this hour, the Dow is up 1271 points. This is NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include UMA Ah Cloud based phone service for small businesses with an automated virtual receptionist and mobility features to run their businesses from anywhere..

President Trump President Biden NPR President Secretary Mark Esper Donald Trump Europe Trump Aisha Roscoe Washington Eleanor Beardsley vice president United States Windsor Johnston United Kingdom Pfizer
"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:23 min | 5 months ago

"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In the Trump administration since Election Day. NPR's Aisha Roscoe reports, Trump has yet to concede and is pledging to continue lawsuits challenging the outcome. President Trump says that Mark Esper will be replaced by the director of the National Counter Terrorism Center Christopher Miller. Trump said in a tweet that Esper had been terminated, though he didn't provide any explanation for his removal. Esper is the highest profile departure from the administration in recent days. But at least three other agency hits have been removed or demoted since the election, including the chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. What Trump has refused to concede his campaign has offered no evidence that would overturn the thousands of votes necessary across multiple states for him to claim a second term. Aisha Roscoe NPR NEWS. The number of Corona virus infections has surpassed 10 million in the United States. Another sobering milestone as the number of cases continues to rise across the nation and also comes amid word of real progress in the race for a vaccine pharmaceutical giant Pfizer today announced that its experimental vaccine appears to be 90% effective in preventing Coben 19. Speaking in Wilmington, Delaware today, President elect Joe Biden praised the news but warned that the pandemic is far from over. It's clear that this vaccine even if approved I'll not be widely available for many months yet to come. Challenge before us right now. Is still immense and growing. No, We're not in office yet. I'm just laying out what we expect to do, and hope can be done. Some of it between now and the time were sworn in fight and also announced the formation of a Corona virus advisory board. Immigration is expected to be at the top of Biden's agenda when he takes office in January. NPR's Joel Roads reports, the former vice president is almost certain to reverse some of President Trump's policies. President elect Biden is expected to quickly end the travel ban on immigrants for majority Muslim countries and extend protections for DACA recipients. But other changes could take months or years to unwind. President Trump's administration has taken more than 400 executive actions, slashing the flow of legal immigrants to a fraction of what it was when he took office. President elect Biden has promised to quickly send the bill to Congress that would create a pathway to citizenship for the estimated 11 million immigrants living in the country illegally. But that bill has little chance of becoming law if Republicans retain control of the Senate. Well Rose. NPR news on Wall Street, the Dow was up 1277 points. This is NPR news in Washington. Live from Kait VD News on Brian Watch in Oakland. There has been a sharp increase in Covad 19 cases in Santa Clara County in recent days, health officials say. Close to 360 cases were reported yesterday. That is the second highest number of cases in a day since mid July. The county says the number of hospitalizations on Sunday increased by close to 10%. Health officials say they're concerned the trend will continue as cooler weather brings more people inside for some activities. County says it plans to increase enforcement efforts to crack down on businesses that flout Covad 19 prevention rules. The head of one of the East Bay's largest school district's is stepping down. The superintendent of West Contra Costa Unified is leaving the district at the end of his contract in June. He says he wants to make way for new leadership after four new members were elected to the board sees Julia McAvoy Reports Superintendent Matthew Duffy took over the district five years ago and has been able to improve teacher retention increased graduation rates. And we'll leave the district with 35 million and reserves, but he was nearly fired last year after an unforeseen accounting hit, pushed the district to have to make deep cuts and increased class sizes. Duffy says the pressures of running a district during a pandemic may give pause to his successor. So I do think it'll push people to think about how much they want Teo and can take on Duffy says the challenges that lie ahead include digging in on race and equity issues important to the community. I'm Julia.

President Trump Joe Biden President Mark Esper NPR Aisha Roscoe Santa Clara County Superintendent Matthew Duffy Brian Watch vice president United States National Counter Terrorism Cen Pfizer Christopher Miller Senate director chairman of the Federal Energy
President Trump Yet To Concede To Joe Biden, Promising Legal Fight

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:52 sec | 5 months ago

President Trump Yet To Concede To Joe Biden, Promising Legal Fight

"Conceding that he lost his reelection bid, vowing to continue on with legal challenges in multiple states. NPR's Aisha Roscoe reports The Trump campaign has not offered any evidence to back up claims of voter fraud. Associated Press and other news outlets have called the president to raise for Joe Biden. Based on official vote count showing by then winning key states. But President Trump says the election is far from over and that he will not rest in to the American people have an honest vote count. While the Trump campaign is filed lawsuits, none of them have detailed accusations of widespread malfeasance or any route to invalidate the vote is necessary for Trump to win. Trump spent the day at his golf course in Virginia, sending tweets. Some Republican lawmakers have said that Trump has a right to pursue legal cases. But if he fails, he should accept the outcome. Nice. Roscoe. NPR news. President elect

Aisha Roscoe President Trump NPR Joe Biden Associated Press Donald Trump Virginia Golf Roscoe
"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 5 months ago

"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Defend the Constitution of the United States of America Returns show Biden with a large lead in the Electoral College, Trump has not conceded. For NPR News. I'm Heath cruising. The heads of three government agencies were fired or demoted. Suddenly over the past week, NPR's Aisha Roscoe has more. The head of the National Nuclear Security Administration, Lisa Gordon Haggerty, abruptly resigned. Gordon Haggerty was the first woman to oversee the agency in charge of the nuclear stock power. Danny Glick, deputy administrator of the U. S Agency for International Development, has also left her position and no Chatterjee, chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, was demoted. He will remain a commissioner but will no longer be the chair. Chatterjee is a former aide to Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell. The Trump administration has had unusually high turnover and agencies with many political positions field by acting officials. Aisha Roscoe NPR news You're listening to NPR news. Although President Trump has yet to concede some of the closest allies of the US have offered congratulations to the next president, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said the U. S. Germany friendship is irreplaceable. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau mention climate change as a share priority. Biden has said he'll rejoin the Paris climate accord that Trump has rejected. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi singled out vice president elect Camilla Harris in his congratulatory tweet powers. His mother had emigrated from India. The United Arab Emirates has announced major plans to loosen some of the country strict Islamic laws. NPR's Ruth Sherlock reports, the says it will now allow unmarried couples to live together loosened restrictions on alcohol and criminalised so called honor killings the murder of a family member for behavior that is perceived a shameful A new laws, which local media say are to take immediate effect comes the Emirates seeks to boost its images, a Westernized destination for tourists and foreign businesses. The US rulers are also trying to adapt to a rapidly changing social landscape. Foreigners outnumber citizens 9 to 1 in the the new Lord is not loosened practices that have frequently landed foreigners and locals in jail, such as acts of homosexuality on public displays of affection. Reese Sherlock. NPR NEWS Beirut Voting is underway in Myanmar more than 90 parties are competing for seats in the lower and upload palaces of parliament. The party of leader Aung Sung said she is widely expected to win a second term. I'm Nora Rahm.

NPR News Trump NPR Lisa Gordon Haggerty Aisha Roscoe United States commissioner United Arab Emirates Biden Trump administration Prime Minister Narendra Modi National Nuclear Security Admi Reese Sherlock Aung Sung president Nora Rahm Prime Minister Mitch McConnell Justin Trudeau
"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:50 min | 5 months ago

"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The house, But as November 3rd becomes November 4th the 2020 election is far from over. Please stay with us. All right, let's bring in NPR. White House correspondent Aisha Roscoe now Hey, Aisha. Hello. All right, so we're still seeing all the important battleground states not called yet. What are you hearing from Republicans about their thoughts So far is everyone's just waiting and waiting and possibly looking for tow, waiting for days after this. Well, Republicans are projecting some confidence. You know, obviously, this night has not gone or has gone in a way that that the campaign is happy with s O far. Obviously, we're still waiting for calls in swings in key swing states. But they're looking at. You know the numbers in Florida and Ohio and they feel like they have been able to do well, even though polls were showing, you know, hire a tie or things being closer, right? I mean, the fact that we still don't know what the results are in so many of the battleground states. I mean, can you describe how that is actually good news for the Trump campaign because It's felt like even the president went into tonight, almost sounding like he was managing expectations, saying things about how embarrassing it would be to lose to Biden. So what does the fact that we're all still waiting mean in terms of good news for the Trump campaign? It means that you know, this isn't some blue. This is is not looking like a blue wave at this point. You know, this is not, you know, solidly wrapped up tonight. We knew and had been, you know, saying that it was totally possible that this could go into you know, more days and that everything might not be known tonight. But the fact that things unknown tonight shows that that President Trump You know, even though he did have a narrow path, all you need is one path right? And so far, no path has been ruled out from him from for him, You know, based on a piece calls? Well, let's talk about in particular for big battleground states. I'm talking about Pennsylvania, Wisconsin. Michigan and Arizona. Remind us why, especially in Pennsylvania, Wisconsin in Michigan. We could be looking at a very long wait. What is it? That happens in those particular states? That means that votes are going to take a longer time to get counted? Because they're waiting to count those critical mail in votes and those you know, mail in votes could you know there's a huge partisan split? On DH. There's a thought that you know by then could do much, much better in the mail in votes in those states and creating this sort of you know what they called a red mirage. Where if you count the votes on Election Day, it would look like President Trump had done really well. But then when you bring in the mail in votes that could change the story, and that could change the direction. And so that is. You know why those states air looking differently and why we look like we have to wait right, especially in states like Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Michigan. They didn't start counting those male and votes. Until at least election day. Where at least the day before Election Day. I want to ask about the Corona virus because there was so much polling in the days leading up to this election that showed widespread disapproval. Over the way this administration has handled the pandemic. Is it still too early to say that the pandemic ultimately didn't drive away a lot of Trump's support? What would you say? I would say that it's still too early. We still have a ways to go to see how you know what what impact the pandemic actually had on the vote. But what we do see is how deeply partisan this country remains. And how entrenched the political differences are so that you know, even with all that has happened. You know, When you look at Ohio President Trump was up 8% you know A and that hasn't called yet. But if it were to be around that range that's around the rain. She won Ohio and 2016. So with everything that has happened Voters still ended up in in the same place, and so so that sort of thing does bring into question, But I think we have a large country and we still have a ways to go to see the real impact. I'm curious Asia. You've been a political reporter for quite some time now. Did you see any distinct differences with the way President Trump campaigned in 2020? Compared to the way he campaigned in 2016? Or was he essentially running the same race? In many ways he was running the same race. But he was there was a different set of grievances. His politics or his political appeal has always been about grievance. But the grievances that he was talking about in 2020 were Ah, lot of it works sort of his personal grievances. You know, he was upset about the Russia investigation. And, you know, upset about media coverage and upset about, you know, so there was a lot of focus on that said about the way he's been, you know, covered when it comes to the Corona virus, So it was a lot about him. But he was also making the case that he was able to get a lot done before the pandemic and that he could do it again. And that if you you know that he was willing That he had what was needed for the country to try to feel the economy back up again that he would make America great again on DH that so he was making that argument and also still kind of running as an outsider, even though he is president right well, given that he was running in many ways a very similar race to the one he ran in 2016. Did you get the sense that there was any substantive attempt on the Trump campaign's part to expand the president space this time around? There was outreach to black voters to Latino over voters. And I'm sure that they would argue that that that outreach especially to Latino voters has has paid off. You know, so far, you know, they did put out this platinum plan for for Black America where they would, you know, tell us about the war. What was that about what they said that they would have more investment in black businesses that they would, you know, look at things like, you know, making Juneteenth a federal holiday on and that they would, you know, look at policing and things of that nature. But the big part of it was economic that they would try to create. You know millions of jobs for black Americans, and that they would invest more in black owned businesses. And so that was there a pitch too. Black voters. But it was also about, you know, really knocking down Joe Biden and making the argument that he's been around for 47 years that he has not delivered for black people, and therefore he does not deserve your vote. It was really less of an appeal about voting for trap and more of an appeal against Joe Biden. That is NPR's Asia, Roscoe. Thank you. Thank you. Let's go back to NPR. Senior political Editor Domenico Montanaro. Domenico, Are you having deja vu yet? Sorry all over again. Yeah, I Yeah, I wasn't sure Everybody would recognize that reference to make a New Yorker I didn't want to be. I didn't want to be too sectarian about it. But, you know, I mean, I preached patients earlier in the evening, and I think that that's a thing that we have to continue to preach because You know, given the.

president Trump Pennsylvania Joe Biden Ohio Michigan NPR Wisconsin Aisha Roscoe Asia White House correspondent Domenico Montanaro Black America Florida political Editor Russia
Trump 'symptom-free for over 24 hours', doctor says

All Things Considered

00:53 sec | 6 months ago

Trump 'symptom-free for over 24 hours', doctor says

"House physician Sean Conley says President Donald Trump has been fever free for more than four days. NPR's Asia, Roscoe reports trumps doctor also says his vital signs remain stable and in the normal range. In his latest update on President Trump's health, Dr Shannon Conley said in the memo that Trump has been symptom free for more than 24 hours. Trump was hospitalized last week after testing positive for the Corona virus. He received supplemental accident on at least two occasions after contracting the virus, but kindly, said Trump is not needed any oxygen since his initial hospitalization. The White House has provided only short written. Updates from Trump's doctor over the past two days, currently has not provided information on the state of Trump's lungs, or the last time you tested negative for the Corona virus and other relevant details about Trump's care. Aisha Roscoe NPR news

President Donald Trump Aisha Roscoe Sean Conley Dr Shannon Conley NPR President Trump White House Fever Asia
White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany tests positive for COVID

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

01:18 min | 7 months ago

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany tests positive for COVID

"Is tweeting that he thinks he'll be out of the hospital tonight, but we have yet to hear confirmation of that from doctors at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Where Trump was admitted only this past Friday for covert 19 yesterday, Trump raised A fresh wave of concern when he greeted supporters outside the hospital from inside a black SUV. The windows were up. Secret Service agents inside were messed but very close to him. Meanwhile, more people within Trump's orbit are testing positive for Corona virus, among them, White House Press secretary Kayleigh Mcenany. She confirmed that used today. Here's NPR's Aisha Roscoe. White House press secretary Kayleigh Mcenany says she's not experiencing any symptoms. She said in a statement that she had tested negative in the past few days but received a positive result this morning. She said that she has not been in close contact with any members of the press. But Mcenany did briefly speak with reporters outside on Friday and again on Sunday, both times without a mask. A number of close aides to Trump have announced they have the virus. White House communications director Elissa Farrah is defending the administration. She says that top White House officials are deemed essential workers and must stay on the job unless they get sick. I saw Roscoe NPR news now

Kayleigh Mcenany Donald Trump White House White House Press Walter Reed National Military Roscoe Npr Aisha Roscoe Elissa Farrah Press Secretary NPR Secretary Director
White House: Trump Wasn't Lying About Coronavirus, He Was "Expressing Calm"

Morning Edition

00:50 sec | 7 months ago

White House: Trump Wasn't Lying About Coronavirus, He Was "Expressing Calm"

"President Trump in light of a forthcoming book by journalist Bob Woodward as NPR's Aisha Roscoe reports, the book contends Trump deliberately downplayed the seriousness of the Corona virus at the outset of the pandemic. In an interview with Bob Woodward Back in March, President Trump said he wanted to quote play it down when it came to the danger of the Corona virus. Trump said at the time he liked to play down the virus because he did not want to create a panic. Trump sat down with Woodward for more than a dozen on the record interviews that were recorded with his permission. During this time publicly, Trump was casting doubt on the significance of the Corona virus and repeatedly comparing it to the flu. White House press secretary Kayleigh Mcenany defended Trump's response to the virus. She said he was trying to convey calm to the American people. Aisha Roscoe.

President Trump Bob Woodward Aisha Roscoe Kayleigh Mcenany NPR Press Secretary White House
White House seeks to clarify Trump remarks on voting twice

All Things Considered

00:56 sec | 8 months ago

White House seeks to clarify Trump remarks on voting twice

"Is encouraging voters who send in absentee ballots to also show up at the polls on election day to make sure their vote is counted. NPR's Aisha Roscoe reports. Trump's comments have raised concerns that he's encouraging folks to vote twice, which is illegal. President Trump says that people should mail in their balances early as possible. He tweeted that voters should then visit their polling place and see if their vote has been counted. If it hasn't. Then he's there. People should vote in person. Trump's tweet seemed to be aimed at clarifying comments he made while visiting North Carolina they had. Trump said that voters ship male and ballots and then attempt to vote at the polls. He said. If their system is is good as they say it is, then people won't be able to vote more than once intentionally. Voting twice is against the law. The White House has said that Trump's comments were being taken out of context. Aisha Roscoe NPR NEWS

President Trump Aisha Roscoe NPR White House North Carolina
"aisha roscoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:48 min | 8 months ago

"aisha roscoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The RNC has been relocated twice as President Trump attempted to hold as normal convention as possible during the pandemic. Today, he visited the original host city Charlotte, North Carolina, where a few 100 Republican delegates gathered to make his nomination for a second term. Official. We didn't do this for any other reason other than respect for the state of North Carolina, because we said we wanted to hold our convention in North Carolina, and I think you're gonna remember that, frankly, on November 3rd NPR. White House reporter Aisha Roscoe is going to be covering the convention all this week. Hey there, Asia Hello. You know, I want to start here. The president's campaign has been criticizing Democrats for their convention last week, saying they painted this very grim picture of America and that this week Republicans will have a more positive message. Is that what we heard from the president today? Not really. It was not the uplifting, optimistic message that the campaign promise. Trump's remarks today really felt like a rally with Trump talking mostly off the cuff for nearly an hour and really going into a lot of grievances. He was complaining about mail in voting, continuing to say a lot of things about that method of voting. That is not true. Andi was already creek critiquing the media coverage of the convention, saying its not getting enough attention on TV. Hey, did talk about wanting to make sure that he visited North Carolina and person even though they couldn't have their really big gathering there. He tried to draw a distinction between him and biting on that. Because Biden didn't travel to Milwaukee, where the Democratic convention was supposed to be hailed. But this speech today is really just one of several that Trump will be making this week and his form looks acceptance speech will be on Thursday, and that will likely be much more script. It was he talking about the Corona virus about the pandemic, because, as we've already said, but has overshadowed this convention, it overshadowed the Democrats last week, the whole campaign. What's he having to say about that? He's arguing that much of the country is doing well in the economy is rapidly recovering. There are really questions about how fast the economy will improve, and currently there are still millions out of work and struggling right now. But Trump repeated some of his accusations today that there are Democratic lawmakers who are intentionally holding back their economy. Here's more of what he had to say. On November for you know these Democrat governors they love shut down until after the elections, though, because they want to make our numbers look as bad as possible. There is no evidence for that. But Trump has continued to personalize the corona virus response and make it all about what he perceives is others doing to him. He's also seized on a comment from Joe Biden. That he would that Biden would shut down the economy if health officials advise him to do so. Ultimately, though, Trump is defending his administration's handling of the Corona virus, and he says he plans to talk more about that in death on Thursday. Speaking of talking about things more in depth. Are we likely to hear more this week about his plans his proposals what? What his second term agenda would be. The campaign did put out a list of goals for the second term, including a goal of creating Tim in your jobs in 10 months, there will be a lot of talk about law and order cracking down on crime. People coming into the country illegally. But in many ways argument bulls down to the campaign's argument that Trump held helped build a great economy before the Corona virus and he'll do it again on quick preview. I you should before I let you go. What are we going to see tonight? First Big night of the convention? That more traditional speeches than we saw the Democrats. Former U N Ambassador Nikki Haley's supposed to speak as well as Donald Trump Jr in South Carolina Senator Tim Scott. All right. NPR's I You sure, Roscoe. Thank you. Thank you. We have two bits of news now about the Corona virus. The first is from Hong Kong, where researchers have documented a case of re infection with the virus, and we also have more on the latest therapy for the disease that is blood plasma from people who have recovered. Joining us to talk about this is NPR science correspondent Richard Harris. Hi, Richard. Sorry first, Let's talk about this patient who has been infected twice. What is the story there? Well, the case involves a 33 year old man who got sick with covert 19 back in March. He had a sore throat fever, headache and cough lasted three days, and he tested positive for the Corona virus. How long after his symptoms resolved. He took a trip to Europe. When you return to Hong Kong in July, he was tested at the airport and they found he was infected again. Scientists at the University of Hong Kong analyze the virus and determined that this second infection had been caused by a different strain of the virus. Okay, so this was not a recurrence of his original infection, but a second infection. What are the broader implications of that? Yeah, it is a little unsettling to think that an infection doesn't protect you indefinitely from a second infection, But that's actually not that surprising. One way to look at this is that his immune system was primed and ready toward off a second infection in this case and had no symptoms the second time around, which is a sign that the immune system did what it was supposed to do. And remember, this is a single case report. So we have no idea if this was a fluke, or if it's something we should expect to see more of in the future. Okay, Somethingto watch there. Let's also talk about the blood product that the FDA has just authorized to treat covert 19 Tell us more about this plasma treatment. Well. People who have recently had covered 19 condone it. Blood plasma, which includes antibodies that target the corona virus, Tens of thousands of people have been given this material called convalescent plasma as an experimental treatment..

President Trump North Carolina Joe Biden Hong Kong Aisha Roscoe Donald Trump Jr Senator Tim Scott Charlotte Richard Harris president RNC NPR University of Hong Kong Official White House reporter Nikki Haley
"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:55 min | 8 months ago

"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Thing? If if I can help save the world from problems, I'm willing to do it. Some followers of this conspiracy theory had been linked to serious crimes, and last year the FBI caught it a potential domestic terrorism threat. Aisha Roscoe. NPR NEWS Major League Baseball's Cincinnati rents have suspended team broadcaster Thom Brennaman for using an anti gay slur. As Greg Declan reports. This occurred during a televised game between the Reds and the Kansas City Royals. Thom Brennaman was broadcasting from a Cincinnati studio while the Reds played a doubleheader on the road against the Kansas City Royals. Brennaman was caught using the slur is the broadcast was transitioning from a commercial in the opening games, seventh inning. In the second game of the twin, Bill Brennaman apologized and said quote. I don't know if I'll be putting on this headset again. The Reds in a statement after the games of the organization, Is devastated by the horrific, homophobic remark. The Reds added that they'll be addressing their broadcasting team in the coming days. For NPR news. I'm Greg. Declan, you're listening to NPR news. California Governor Gavin Newsom has declared a state of emergency state has been hit with about 11,000 Lightning strikes this week, triggering hundreds of fires. The mammoth L and you lightning complex fire north of San Francisco only started Monday, but it has burned nearly 200 square miles. The S C U complex fire in Central California. As charged more than 150 Square Miles. The U. S. Says it will suspend to extradition related agreements with Hong Kong officials cite Hong Kong's loss of autonomy to China as Beijing Titans control NPR's Emily Fang reports. This comes after China imposed on national security law on Hong Kong. The State Department said it was suspending to bilateral agreements with Hong Kong that allowed the US to surrender fugitives or transfer criminals to Hong Kong. A State Department spokesperson said the decision came after the U. S determined Hong Kong was not meaningful autonomous anymore from mainland China. Germany, the United Kingdom, New Zealand and Australia are some of the countries that have already suspended similar agreements. Earlier US legislation had already revoked Hong Kong special trade status to bring it in line with how the US treats made in China. Emily Fang NPR NEWS Beijing Russian opposition leader, Alexey Navalny has been hospitalized in Siberia after suddenly falling sick. His supporters believe he may have been poisoned of only is in intensive care and on a ventilator. He is a longtime political opponent of Russian President Vladimir Putin. Valerie was attacked three years ago when someone threw disinfectant into his face, damaging one of his eyes. In Corvo Coleman. NPR.

Hong Kong Reds NPR Thom Brennaman China Greg Declan Kansas City Royals Alexey Navalny Emily Fang US Cincinnati Aisha Roscoe FBI State Department Governor Gavin Newsom Vladimir Putin Corvo Coleman California
"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:42 min | 9 months ago

"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KCRW

"From NPR news. I'm Barbara Klein. President. Trump says he'll issue a Siri's of executive orders if agreement cannot be reached with Congress to fund another round of pandemic relief. NPR's Tamara Keith reports, Trump said he could use executive action to extend a moratorium on evictions, continue enhanced unemployment payments and suspend college loan repayments. And he said he'd like to sign in order to pursue an idea. Both Democrats and Republicans in Congress have rejected. What we're talking about is deferring the payroll tax. For A period of months till the end of the year, and I could extend it at a certain period. Hopefully, I will be here to do the job. That was an explicit reference to his reelection, payroll taxes, fund, Medicare and Social Security and deferring payments would mean those taxes would just have to be repaid later. Tamara Keith NPR news The White House says Trump will hold a news conference at 3 30 this afternoon. Eastern time Congress has essentially gone home. With less than three months before the presidential election. The US intelligence community has issued an official statement warning China, Russia and Iran are all trying to influence voters, opinions and the outcome. NPR's Aisha Roscoe has details. The intelligence community has concluded that China is trying to hurt President Trump's reelection bid, while Russia is disparaging Democratic candidate Joe Biden. Officials say that Iran has focused on undermining US democratic institutions by spreading disinformation on line. U. S Counter intelligence director William Evan Nina said in a statement that it was unlikely that adversaries would be able to manipulate voting results at a large scale. Aisha Roscoe NPR news Last night, President Trump said he disagrees that Russia wants him reelected, saying no one has been tougher on Moscow. He says he agrees China does not want him back in office. Venezuela's attorney general says to former US Special service soldiers have been sentenced to prison for 20 years, NPR's Philip Reeves reports The two are accused of plotting to capture and overthrow President Nicolas Maduro. The news was announced on Twitter by Maduro's attorney general. The Tweet says former Green Berets Luke Denman and Arun Berry have been found guilty of terrorism, conspiracy and arms trafficking. The two were captured in May when Venezuelan security services intercepted an armed group. Who landed in Venezuela by boat from Colombia. Most were former Venezuelan soldiers had deserted. Maduro says the raid was a plot to topple him orchestrated by the Trump administration on the man the U. S recognizes as Venezuela's legitimate president, Opposition leader One Guido Both the U. S. Government and Guido deny involvement. This is NPR. Foreign ministers from the Middle East in Europe have arrived in Lebanon in a show of solidarity after Tuesday's massive explosions in Beirut. At least 158 people were killed. The White House says. The US is sending food, water and medical assistance. Investigators in southern India are reviewing the design of the runway where an airliner crash landed last night, killing at least 18 people. NPR's Lauren Frayer reports The plane went down after dark in monsoon rains. Survivors say the Air India Express flight suede violently in heavy rain as it approached the hilltop runway in cozy coat. A town in southern India is Carol Estate. The aircraft skidded off the runway and nose dived into a gorge cracking into to another flight narrowly avoided a similar tragedy a year ago. The runway meets United Nations requirements but is shorter than most. While regular commercial flights to and from India are suspended in the pandemic. This was part of a government program to repatriate Indian stranded a broad. The plane was coming from Dubai, where millions of Indians live in work. Some of the passengers were coming home after losing their jobs. Their Lauren Frayer NPR news In the Indian Ocean. Mauritius has declared a state of environmental emergency, a ship that ran aground last month is now spilling tons of oil into environmentally sensitive waters home to several unique species. The Japanese own ship was carrying nearly 4000 tons of fuel. I'm Barbara Klein. NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations..

NPR President Trump President Nicolas Maduro Tamara Keith NPR Congress Venezuela China Barbara Klein Aisha Roscoe India US President Lauren Frayer executive Iran Tamara Keith Russia White House
White House blames 'rogue intelligence officers' for leaking Russian bounty claims

All Things Considered

00:55 sec | 10 months ago

White House blames 'rogue intelligence officers' for leaking Russian bounty claims

"The White House says leaked information about potential Russian bounties targeting U. S troops will make it harder to gather intelligence in the future. NPR's Aisha Roscoe reports The White House has been briefing members of Congress about thes disputed allegations revealed through news reports. White House press secretary Kayleigh Mcenany says the least to the media will make it more difficult to substantiate the claims. She accused quote rogue intelligence officers of leaking the information. To the anonymous sources who leaked classified information. You should know this. You may seek to undermine our president, but in fact you undermine our country's safety and our country's security. The White House has said President Trump was never briefed on claims that Russia might have paid bounties to the Taliban to attack U. S forces because the intelligence was on verified. McEnaney would not say whether the information was included in the president's daily

White House Kayleigh Mcenany President Trump Aisha Roscoe Taliban NPR Press Secretary Congress Russia
Trump changes tune on accepting info from foreign countries

Q

00:53 sec | 2 years ago

Trump changes tune on accepting info from foreign countries

"President Trump appears to be backpedaling on his previous statement that he might not learn alert. Authorities of a foreign power were to offer him damaging information on a political opponent. If here's I shall Roscoe reports Trump now says under certain circumstances. He would report such an incident. President Trump says he would still be open to viewing information provided by another government. But Trump says he would notify law enforcement, if you determined that it was quote, incorrect or badly. Stated, of course you have to look at it. Because if you don't look at it, you're not gonna know of its bad, how to know of it's bad. But of course you give it to the FBI or reported to the attorney general or somebody like that trust face criticism. Even from some Republicans for his previous remarks Democrats have introduced legislation that would require campaigns to report any offers of foreign assistance, Aisha, Roscoe, NPR news, the

President Trump Roscoe FBI NPR Aisha Attorney
"aisha roscoe" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:45 min | 2 years ago

"aisha roscoe" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish. And I'm Ari Shapiro. President Trump traveled to Texas today to keep making his case for a barrier on the southern border. His trip comes with Republicans and Democrats no closer to an agreement to end the partial government shutdown now in its twentieth day, and it's affected. Our even being felt at sixteen hundred Pennsylvania Avenue. Thank you for calling the Whitehouse comment line due to the lack of appropriations funding from congress federal government shutdown. That's the message you get if you call the White House switchboard with no end in sight federal workers will officially miss their first paycheck on Friday and Trump is warning Democrats to negotiate with him or he will try to build the barrier without Congress's approval. NPR's Aisha Roscoe covers the White House and is here in the studio with us. Hi, Asia, I'm tempted to ask what the state of play is on negotiations. But are there even is happening at this point? They're happy some negotiations, but things are really where they have been for the past few days or maybe even. Where they've been since the start of the shutdown. Basically, there seems to be no real movement towards some type of compromise right now. Vice President Mike Pence talked to reporters today, and he said at this point the White House is not open to a big deal that would exchange some concessions on the so-called dreamers for money for a wall or barrier. And he also shot down the Democrats plans to open parts of the government while lawmakers continue to debate how to handle border security pin said the White House will not agree to sign off on any bills and kind of a piecemeal fashion. There was little burst of activity with for publican Senator Lindsey Graham, he was trying to put together a bipartisan compromise and Graham was in some talks with leadership today, but those talks quickly fell apart. And now Graham is urging Trump to use his emergency powers to build. The wall 'em with that the Senate is adjourned for the week. So barring something extraorde. Inari happening. This shutdown is going to drag into next week and on Saturday will be the longest shutdown ever. And President Trump took his message to the border today to mcallen, Texas. What did he say there what he was really trying to drive home? This idea that there is a crisis at the border and that a barrier is necessary to deal with it. He had a round table where he had family members who had loved ones killed by someone in the country illegally talking, and he really pushed back against the Democrats arguments that this is manufactured emergency. What is manufactured is the use of the word manufactured, it's manufactured by them every single of the negatives. But then not winning because it's it's common sense. So at his roundtable, Trump had these firearms and bags of what looked like drugs and money. They were on display in front of him. I guess this was seemingly to represent the contraband that's being seized at the border. But it's worth noting that out that government figures show that most of the heroin that comes across the border into the US actually comes through legal ports of entry and not through parts of the border without barriers just in our last minute. What about the possibility of declaring a national emergency and building the wall that way without congressional support. So we don't really have a timeline on when that decision will be made. But it's still on the table and Trump is making clear that this is the path he intends to take if he can't cut a deal with congress. It would cause his legal and political firestorm. But Trump seems kind of you this or may seem to view this as a way for him to agree to reopen the government, and then he could still. Tell his base that we're fighting for this wall. He actually said it will be surprising if he doesn't if he doesn't declare a national emergency. If there's no compromise NPR's Aisha Roscoe. Thanks. Thank you. This is the week that many government workers will miss their first paycheck, and as the shutdown has gone on. We've been hearing from a lot of them who say they are living paycheck to paycheck for some the promise of back pay doesn't solve the problem of paying your phone Bill or your mortgage or putting dinner on the table for your family today. We wanted to better understand why so many people live paycheck to paycheck in America. So we've called on at least gold of the Economic Policy Institute. She studies wages, poverty and inequality. Welcome to the program. Thank you so much. So for economists what's the definition of living paycheck to paycheck? It's a great question. I would say there's not a uniform understanding among economists. But one thing I would say is that there's a Federal Reserve study that asked families whether or not they could cover an unexpected expense of four hundred dollars. So if all of a sudden, you had to pay four hundred dollars would you have enough money to be able to cover that and four in ten adults if faced with an unexpected expense of four hundred dollars for either not able to cover it or had cover it by selling something or borrowing money such as putting it on a credit card. So I think the idea that they don't have enough money to cover that that is pretty widespread that suggests about forty percent of Americans have that problem, we've been hearing from a lot of federal workers who are worried about missing a paycheck, and you know, some of these people have good jobs fulltime work, long term employment. Can you be middle class or even wealthy and still live paycheck to paycheck? Yes. Absolutely. We know it costs a lot to get by across this country. When you figuring things like housing costs food medical care, maybe childcare transportation, an everyday there are families that go without. But if you don't have that paycheck that shock it could be a paycheck. It could be a health shock could be a large car repair. Any of those things can lead to total financial destabilization for many workers. In their families. And we're not just talking about poor families. These are middle class families that could be destabilized by not having that paycheck. But you have the president adding the strength of the US economy, right? The unemployment rate has been a historic low. Why are so many people still running out of money every month? Well, it's really harder to save the economy today because most workers haven't seen significant increases in their pay to be able to increase their standard of living giving them any sort of cushion to save. So yes, it's true. We have seen the economy improve. And the statistics that I said it before those are better than they were at the depths of the great recession, then some more people have jobs, and that's all great more people returned to labor force, but we have seen stagnation and pay. We have seen that workers. They need both parents to support a family, right? That those are longer term trends because we have seen stagnation and worker pay and in family incomes, so without additional resources to draw on families often to have to resort to sub optimal solution such as payday lending or going without recommended. Medical treatment or leaving school that a degree but racking up lots of debt. So these are lots of problems that middle class families face today. What's interesting about this is here, we are all these years after the economic meltdown and that conversation about people needing to save and create a financial cushion. But you're saying it's actually harder to do that. Even if more Americans wanted to or tried. Yes. Absolutely. Because people's pay is just barely enough to make ends meet and for many people, it's not enough to make ends meet. And so being able to afford childcare there's been a lot information about you know, how expensive it is for many families. So that one expense can really make or break. What it takes, you know, put food on the table. So I think that there are a lot of things that are happening to families today. They're being stretched incredibly thin and losing this paycheck for these federal workers. Not just the federal workers. Also, the federal contractors federal contractors that are out of work because the partial government shutdown won't be getting that back pay. So it's not even a question of putting off getting that money. It's a question of. Never getting it in the first place. At least gold is a senior economist with the Economic Policy Institute..

President Trump Senator Lindsey Graham NPR Aisha Roscoe White House Texas Economic Policy Institute president Congress US Audie Cornish Ari Shapiro Federal Reserve congress Senate Vice President mcallen Mike Pence
"aisha roscoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"aisha roscoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR news in Washington, I'm korva Coleman. The Senate has overwhelmingly passed a criminal Justice overhaul. Bill NPR's Aisha Roscoe says it had bipartisan support and the backing of President Trump it would reduce sentences for certain drug crimes, including ending automatic life sentences under this three strike penalty. It would also allow prisoners who were sentence before congress lowered the disparity between crack cocaine and powder cocaine to petition the court to change their sentence based on the updated law, so basically making a law that passed several years ago retroactive, and it would also provide a centers for prisoners to participate in training and rehabilitation programs that would help prepare them for life after incarceration NPR's Aisha Roscoe, President Trump and congress needs to agree on a government spending Bill or the government will partially shut down this weekend. Democrats and some Republicans oppose the. Residents demand for a border wall. Trump it previously said he'd be willing to provoke us shutdown to force the issue, but seems to have softened on the issue. A new report suggests North Korea may be using scientific research to circumvent sanctions NPR's Jeff Brumfield says North Korea could be getting technology that it's not supposed to have the report shared exclusively. With NPR looks at over thirteen hundred scientific papers with North Korean authors. It finds topics related to missiles and nuclear technologies that North Korea is not supposed to have access to many of the collaborations are with Chinese universities. Josh Pollock with the Middlebury institute of international. Studies is one of the report's authors. This is in part. How the North Korean SCO about beating sanctions? But some scientists who work in North Korea warned that there's also a lot of legitimate research going on there to combat disease, for example, any crackdown. They say we'll have to be done carefully..

North Korea NPR President Trump Aisha Roscoe Bill NPR crack cocaine congress korva Coleman Senate Washington Jeff Brumfield Josh Pollock Middlebury institute of intern
"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KCRW

"Hitter who supports the president's goals. Also, British Prime Minister Theresa may faces a no confidence vote today. And if she loses she's out also this hour, the military works to identify unknown dead from the Korean war. It is Wednesday December twelfth eighteen years ago today in two thousand the supreme court ruled in Bush versus gore deciding disputed election in favor of George W Bush. Here's the news. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm korva Coleman. President Trump and democratic leaders in congress appear to be at a stalemate over funding for a wall at the southern US border house leader, Nancy Pelosi and Senate leader Chuck Schumer met Trump at the White House yesterday, and it did not go. Well, NPR's Aisha Roscoe says disagreement over funding the wall could imperil a government spending Bill needed to avoid a partial government shutdown the president wants five billion dollars for the border wall. Democrats don't want to give him money for an actual physical wall. They wanna give money for border security in in general, and they're offering much less money than what he's asked for the urge the president to accept current spending levels or about one point three billion dollars a year NPR's Aisha Roscoe during yesterday's meeting. Trump said he wanted to accept responsibility for a potential shutdown because he wants funding for the wall. Trump's former lawyer Michael Cohen is back in court today as NPR's Ryan Lucas. Reports Cohen will appear in federal court in New York City for sentencing Cohen has pleaded guilty to financial crimes campaign finance violations and line to congress his lawyers have asked for leniency saying Cohen has cooperated with authorities including special counsel Robert Muller's Russia investigation. Cones attorneys asked for no prison time. Prosecutors in New York on the other hand are asking that Colin be given substantial time behind bars they acknowledged that he has provided information useful to Muller's inquiry. But they say Coen's crimes were serious that he was motivated by greed, and that he deceived people and institutions for years the decision on how much time if any Cohen spends in prison will be made by judge William Pauley, Ryan, Lucas NPR news, Washington, lawyers for Trump's former national security adviser, Michael Flynn are asking a judge now for no prison time on his conviction for lying to the FBI. Federal prosecutors have also asked for little or no time citing Flint's substantial cooperation with them UK, Prime Minister, Theresa may. Faces a no-confidence vote today from members of her political party in parliament NPR's. Frank Langfitt reports from London may says changing leaders won't solve the fraught Brexit process at least forty eight members of parliament in May's conservative party called for the boat which begins early evening, London time Mason, switching leaders would only create more problems for the United Kingdom and her party a change of leadership in the conservative party. Now,.

President Trump NPR president Michael Cohen Theresa Aisha Roscoe US Bill Prime Minister conservative party George W Bush Lucas NPR Robert Muller Ryan Lucas London Coen Chuck Schumer Nancy Pelosi
GOP Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith Faces Tough Runoff Election After Public Hanging Comments

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

GOP Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith Faces Tough Runoff Election After Public Hanging Comments

"In a runoff against former US agriculture secretary, Mike Espy after neither candidate got more than fifty percent of the vote on election day in a now viral video heights. Myth compliment supporter by saying she would attend a public hanging with him in response to criticism. The Mississippi Republicans said it was a, quote, exaggerated expression. Trump has endorsed Hyde. Smith on Twitter, saying she loves Mississippi and the USA Aisha Roscoe NPR news, Washington. And you're listening to NPR support for NPR comes from the Walton family foundation were opportunity takes root more information is available at Walton family foundation dot ORG.

Walton Family Foundation Mike Espy NPR Mississippi Donald Trump United States Aisha Roscoe Secretary Twitter Smith Hyde Washington Fifty Percent
"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:38 min | 2 years ago

"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro, and Mary Louise Kelley the fight to confirm Brett Cavanaugh to the supreme court could be over soon as the Senate prepares for a procedural vote tomorrow and possible final vote on Saturday. All today. Senators have been taking turns viewing one copy of the FBI report its latest investigation into Cavanaugh following allegations of sexual assault against the nominee. Democrats have criticized the investigation as incomplete and rushed Republicans, including Susan Collins, Jeff flake, who could decide Kavanagh's fate have described it as thorough. We're joined now by Senator Patty Murray democrat of Washington has said she'll vote no on cavenaugh. Welcome back to all things considered. Well, nice to talk to you. I understand you've seen the report can you? Give us your reaction. Well, I was really frustrated and disappointed by the report that we were given clearly the FBI was told to very narrow the scope of people that they talked to. I can't tell you. What is in the report, but I can tell you that it credible number of people that both Dr Ford, and Mr. Miras gave to the FBI that could corroborate their stories were not interviewed. You say you said the FBI was clearly told to narrow the report the White House and Republicans in the Senate have said the FBI was given no restrictions when I know from the B is that they are when they are told to be allowed to be very thorough following leads wherever they are to take them to conclusions. And from what I saw today in the narrow scope that they've given that that could not have been accomplished, particularly because we know that the names of people that those MS Ramirez, and Dr Ford gave them we're not followed up. Nor were number of tips that came into the FBI. So Republicans have said today that there is nothing in the report. Corroborating the allegation against a gal allegations against cavenaugh sounds as though you're saying true. But only because they didn't look for them. Well, I mean, that's part of it. And what we do know about situations like this where someone is a victim of sexual assault that they often do not tell anybody in the room. I've talked to so many people who say it is absolutely no surprise, Dr Ford didn't tell anybody at the time. In fact, she told us that how traumatized she wasn't. It wasn't really until years later where she told the therapist or her husband and guitar about it. I've had so many women tell me their stories in the airport in the grocery store over the last week or so that that's exactly what happened to them. And I think those have to be credible and understood that if you want to get a correct response and understand the full story you. Can't just ask someone who was in a house at the time. I know there's been a lot of frustration on both sides of the aisle about how this has been handled. Elsewhere in the program, we spoke with Senator Mike rounds of South Dakota. And here's part of what he said, the Senate is supposed to be advise and consent. And in this particular case, they're strong feeling here that Republicans are that Democrats simply decided this was going to be a search and destroy mission from day one. So there's a Republican accusing Democrats of a search and destroy mission against judge Cavanaugh. How do you respond? Well, first of all, let's remember that we are doing a job interview for someone who's going to be on the supreme court for a very long time who will have an impact on generations to come. This is a lifetime appointment. So when you do a job interview of someone like that a lot of things matter and this woman, doctor Ford didn't come forward. Just at the end. She actually did what we expect citizens to do which is to call their member of congress as she said her civic duty because she felt she had some information about Brett cavenaugh that she felt we should know when we were doing this job interview. Well, then do you think Democrats made a mistake by sitting on this for months, I think that Senator Feinstein was really trying to do what Dr Ford had requested when she first call which is to protect your identity, and as we can see over the last week. I think we can all understand why she had that concern knowing what happened to her knowing that she came here shared this really hard to tell story and then at the end of the day, if it's swept under the rug not believe not being allowed to do what? Dr Ford asked us to do a complete investigation on she's going to go home and go what was this worse worth? And I will tell you. What worries me is that other women will feel? Same democratic Senator Patty Murray of Washington. Thank you for joining us today. President Trump says there's more at stake in this battle than just the fate of his supreme court nominee. He tweeted today that quote due process, fairness and common sense are now on trial that is recently browse NPR's. Michelle Roscoe reports on what Trump has said in past about the rights of the accused if Brett Cavanaugh is denied a seat on the supreme court. President Trump argues that it will be a sign that men in America will be punished on the basis of accusations. That have not been proven that. He says is not the American way. Always I heard you're innocent until proven guilty. I've heard this for so long, and it's such a beautiful phrase. In this case, you're guilty. Until proven innocent. I think that is a very very dangerous standard for our country. But Trump has an always defended due process take for example, the case of the central park five in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine five black and Latino teenagers were arrested for the brutal rape of a woman jogging in central park. Trump took out a full page ad calling for the reinstatement of the death penalty long before the five were convicted of the crime. They were exonerated years later and receive multimillion dollar settlement with New York Trump card the settlement a disgrace one of the central park five use of Salaam toll MSNBC in two thousand sixteen that Trump should apologize for his actions. Do I feel like we will ever get it? I think if I held my breath and wait to give us an apology. I would probably pass out in turn blue in the face Jonathan Turley a law professor at George Washington. University says however inappropriate it was one thing for Trump to issue these sorts of judgments as a private citizen. But now he's president when he speaks. Way as president. He is the one person who heads the executive branch that's a vastly different situation from central park. Five Turley says it's troubling that President Trump has continued to assign guilt to people who have not been tried for a crime. She get special treatment under the Justice. Sixteen election as long over but Trump still presides over rowdy rallies where crowds call for Hillary Clinton to be jailed and Clinton isn't the only one Trump has also accused former FBI director James Comey and other current and former officials of committing crimes related to the Russia investigation. The president's still seems to view himself as an outsider Turley says he doesn't view himself as an active player in the investigation. So I think the way that he justifies this in his mind is that he's really not influencing the investigation that he can speak about it. Like anyone else when it comes to due process? Trump seems sympathetic to supporters but harder on those who've used as opponents Clark Neily. A criminal Justice expert with the Cato Institute says the president should defend the law. No matter what. And he's failed to do that he's consistently failed to do that. Unless it's in the service of people or objects. Does that he personally, you know, cares about and support? I asked the White House. If Trump only supports due process for certain people, White House press secretary, Sarah Sanders rejected that idea he is simply stating the fact that we are a country of law and order we are a country that still believes that you're innocent until proven guilty. And we wanna see that process go through in its entirety. Ultimately, whether Cavanaugh is on the supreme court is a political question not illegal one. So the role due process plays will be up to the senators Aisha Roscoe NPR news a little over fifty years ago. Senator Robert F Kennedy gave a victory speech in the ballroom of the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles. He had just won the state's democratic presidential primary as Kennedy left the hotel through its kitchen shots rang out..

President Trump FBI Brett Cavanaugh doctor Ford supreme court Trump Senator Patty Murray Senate president Jonathan Turley NPR assault Senator Robert F Kennedy Ari Shapiro Susan Collins Senator Feinstein Senator Aisha Roscoe NPR Jeff flake
"aisha roscoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"aisha roscoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Treatment under the Justice department. Sixteen election is allowing over but Trump still presides over rowdy, rallies were crowds. Call for Hillary Clinton to be jailed and Clinton isn't the only one Trump has also accused former FBI director James Comey and other current and former officials of committing crimes related to the Russian investigation. The president's still seems to view himself as an outsider Turley says he doesn't view himself as an active player in the investigation. So I think the way that he justifies this in his mind is that he's really not influencing the investigation that he can speak about it. Like anyone else when it comes to due process? Trump seems sympathetic to supporters but harder on those of us as opponents Clark Neily. A criminal Justice expert with the Cato Institute says the president should defend the law. No matter what. And he's failed to do that he's consistently failed to do that. Unless it's in the service of people or objectives that he. Personally, cares about and supports. I asked the White House. If Trump only supports due process for certain people, White House press secretary, Sarah Sanders rejected that idea he is simply stating the fact that we are a country of law and order we are a country that still believes that you're innocent until proven guilty. And we wanna see that process go through in its entirety. Ultimately, whether Cavanaugh is on the supreme court is a political question not illegal one. So the role due process plays will be up to the senators Aisha Roscoe NPR news a little over fifty years ago. Senator Robert F Kennedy gave a victory speech in the ballroom of the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles. He had just won the state's democratic presidential primary as Kennedy left the hotel through its kitchen shots rang out..

Trump James Comey Senator Robert F Kennedy Hillary Clinton Justice department president Ambassador Hotel Aisha Roscoe NPR White House Cato Institute Clark Neily Los Angeles FBI Cavanaugh Sarah Sanders press secretary director fifty years Turley
"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"What he says is this portrait of coming in the report makes clear that he was such a bad guy that he had such bad things that the president was not only within his rights as chief executive to fire komi but they call me was a bad man who broke the law and he was doing the nation a favor as the president has said by getting rid of him in the white house view that means it wasn't obstruction of justice one other issue we wanna get to which the president talked about this morning in this wide ranging prevail i he addressed the separation of families at the us mexico border which has been getting a lot of attention in recent days let's listen to what the president had to say here is the president is it's your name to separate children from their families but that's the democrats student is that true the president keeps blaming democrats here at the white house does keep blaming democrats but this is a trump administration policy they they decided to go with his policy of zero tolerance and so that is what has led to the separation of children from their families at the border now they're saying that they're doing that to follow the law but this is this is a policy choice that they have made and so that so going for what they're saying is if they if congress wants us to change the democrats and they would need republicans as well would need to come up with some type of fix some type of solution that includes border security the wall it's cetera there more honest moments administration officials have said we are being harsh here because we want to deter other people from coming but repeatedly the same administration falls back on this idea that we're helpless and we're just we're just following the law even though they're doing it differently than other administration right now there are a couple of bills in congress that are designed to fix this perhaps alright npr national security editor phil ewing with us in the studio also npr white house reporter aisha roscoe thanks to you both thank you plato on the next science friday we discussed the rise and fall of the dinosaurs with paleontologist steve bruce almighty from the heyday of the.

president chief executive us white house congress steve bruce mexico editor phil ewing reporter aisha roscoe
"aisha roscoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"aisha roscoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Live from npr news in culver city california i'm dwayne brown japan's prime minister met with president trump at the white house again today less than a week before trump's historic summit with north korea's leader japanese prime minister shinzo obey urged his american counterpart to stick to a hard line when he meets on tuesday with kim jong un after trump recently appeared to back away from his maximum pressure campaign npr's aisha roscoe says japan is concerned most about a potential missile strike from pyongyang japan wants to make sure that when president trump is looking to make a deal with kim that he's not forgetting about shortrange missiles or more conventional weapons that north korea could have that could threaten japan npr's aisha roscoe trump told reporters today he believes he's well prepared for a sit down with kim adding he doesn't believe he needs much preparation for the summit saying it's about attitude and a willingness to get things done a un special investigators urging the president to bring up human rights issues with his north korean counterpart next week lisa shlein in geneva reports the un expert does not believe such a discussion will undermine the summit you an expert thomas o'hare says human rights security and peace are interlinked and for the summit to be successful the us must not shy away from confronting kim jong un with worsening human rights situation in his country unless human rights is not addressed in the negotiation of the denuclearization of the korean peninsula i think that will not allow for sustainable agreement ohio says human rights issues were not addressed during previous negotiations aimed at stopping north korea from developing nuclear weapons he says neither of these negotiations were successful for npr news i'm lisa shlein in geneva stocks finished mixed on wall street today you're listening to.

president thomas o'hare un geneva dwayne brown culver city ohio lisa shlein california aisha roscoe trump pyongyang aisha roscoe npr kim jong un north korea trump
"aisha roscoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"aisha roscoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That approach can't work for everyone that there are more than ten thousand penny applications for clemency aisha roscoe npr news washington you're listening to all things considered from npr news there's been a lot of talk about the border between the united kingdom in ireland in the wake of brexit for instance the free movement of goods could be hindered after britain leaves the european union as npr's eleanor beardsley reports the impact could be far greater for the uk's border with france hundreds of trucks are idling in the northern french port of calais lining up to drive onto ferries some two million trucks a year crossed the english channel from here to dover the closest point between britain and the continent another two million make the crossing by train through the channel tunnel calais port director john mark preaches so says the collided over route is the busiest trading corridor in europe goes nowhere in europe that there is so important traffic therapy traffic that's a particularly two of the very fast grossing very fuss is just it's the speed of the crossing that so important for fresh food flowers and pharmaceutical imports it's also vital for britain's auto industry which operates on what's called a just in time inventory with components arriving at the factory just as they're needed calls are assembled the uk depr.

washington ireland european union npr eleanor beardsley uk france britain john mark europe aisha roscoe dover director
S. Korea downplays N. Korea's threats to cancel talks

NPR News Now

01:59 min | 3 years ago

S. Korea downplays N. Korea's threats to cancel talks

"Live from npr news in washington i'm barbara kline president trump says he is not planning to use the libya model in denuclearization talks with north korea as us national security adviser john bolton had suggested which apparently contributed to north korea's threat yesterday to cancel next month's summit npr's asia rasco reports the president says it's north korea's best interest to strike a deal president trump says the us continues to plan for his historic summit with north korea's kim jong un despite threats from north korea to call off the talks trump told reporters he believes that kim will be happy if they are able to work out an agreement regarding north korea's nuclear program i think we'll actually have a good relationship assuming we have the meeting assuming something comes of it and he'll get protections that will be very strong trump says the us is not looking to topple kim's regime though he's not ruling that out if talks fail he argued that a deal could benefit north korea economically by easing tough sanctions aisha roscoe npr news the white house it's been one year since robert muller took on the role of special counsel to investigate russian interference in the twenty sixteen election president trump marked the occasion today with a tweet reiterating his refrain that the probe is a witch hunt senate minority leader chuck schumer is hitting back citing several indictments and house speaker paul ryan says while the job has to be completed he's hoping an n come soon i think he should be free to do his job but i would like to see it get get wrapped of course i mean we want to see this thing come to its conclusion but again i've always said he should be free to to finish his job muller still has largely bipartisan support in congress southwest airlines says it's finished inspecting all of the fan blades in engines similar to the one that failed in mid flight last month.

Chuck Schumer Congress Paul Ryan Aisha Roscoe Kim Jong Asia Denuclearization Libya Barbara Kline Washington Special Counsel Robert Muller United States President Trump NPR John Bolton North Korea
North Carolina Teachers March on State Capital in Mass School Walkout

NPR News Now

02:02 min | 3 years ago

North Carolina Teachers March on State Capital in Mass School Walkout

"Of the oakland mayor during his public comments at the white house it is not clear what action if any the justice department will take aisha roscoe npr news the whitehouse thousands of teachers flooded the streets of raleigh north carolina today as the state legislature started its annual budget session the president of the north carolina association of educators mark jewel tells abc news teachers demanding higher pay and more funding for public schools is definitely statewide a van i think that speaks about how the school systems and educators across the state of north carolina and said they've had enough but north carolina's senate leader republican phil berger says teachers will get a pay raise next year and are spreading misinformation north carolina's the sixth state where teachers are walking out and demonstrating for more educational resources on wall street today the dow rose sixty two points this is npr construction is suspended on parts of the controversial atlantic coast pipeline the six hundred mile pipeline would run from west virginia to north carolina as sarah winter smith of member station w c v e reports a federal appeals court invalidated a key permit for the project from the fish and wildlife service the incidental take statement is a document that supposed to restrict how much endangered species can be harmed or taken throughout the course of a project attorney austin gergen who argued the case on behalf of the southern environmental law center says by using the words small percent the us fish and wildlife service failed to set clear limits for five endangered species in the pipelines pat the problem with it is not just that it's vague it's unenforceable this is like a speed limit that says please don't drive too fast and spokesperson for the pipeline projects lead energy company says it remains.

Attorney NPR Senate ABC Raleigh Aisha Roscoe Oakland North Carolina Austin Gergen Sarah Winter Smith West Virginia Phil Berger President Trump
"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"aisha roscoe" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And by the listeners of kiki we mostly sunny later today we'll have highs from the low sixties to the low eighties once again the time is now six thirty three this is morning edition from npr news i'm david greene in culver city california and i might tell martin in washington dc president trump is speaking out this morning about a payment to an adult film actress made by by his attorney michael cohen the payments stormy daniels were part of a nondisclosure agreement and the president acknowledged on twitter that michael cohen was reimbursed as part of his regular monthly retainer that is important because there've been legal concerns raised over the prospect of campaign money being used to pay daniels rudy giuliani told fox and francis morning that it was clear to him that the reimbursement had nothing to do with the campaign if we had to defend this has not being a campaign contribution i think we can do that this was for personal reasons this was the president had been hurt personally politically personally so much and and and the first lady by some of the false allegations that one more false allegations six years old i think he was trying to help the family and i for that the man is being treated like some kind of villain we're joined now by npr white house reporter aisha roscoe aisha so we've got rudy giuliani confirming that the president has made this reimbursement to michael cohen one hundred thirty thousand dollars and now the president this morning basically acknowledging as much but trying to clarify what did he say well the president said in a series of tweets that his attorney have received a monthly retainer that it did not come from the campaign and that this retainer was used to reimburse him for this nondisclosure agreement in settlement that was reached with stormy daniels so he's clarifying that the reimbursement did happen this was a big question whether mike cohen had been paid back for the one hundred and thirty two hundred and thirty thousand dollar payment and so this answers that question but this is all about as rudy giuliani knows whether or not this was a violation of campaign finance rules and we heard him in that earlier clips say hey if we ever forced to make this case we can do it we can argue.

fox aisha roscoe reporter francis washington culver city npr mike cohen attorney david greene rudy giuliani michael cohen twitter president daniels trump martin california one hundred thirty thousand do thirty thousand dollar
"aisha roscoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"aisha roscoe" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Live from npr news in washington i'm shay stevens president trump says he is cooperating with the investigation into whether his campaign had potential ties to russia npr's aisha roscoe reports that trump is also addressing speculation that he plans to fire special counsel robert muller president trump says nobody has been more transparent than he has when it comes to the russia investigation trump was asked at a press conference whether he plans to fire robert mueller or deputy attorney general rod rosenstein who oversees muller they've been saying i'm going to get rid of them for the last three months four months five months and they're still here last week the white house said the president has the power to remove muller but at the press conference trump would only say he hopes the investigation will end soon so he can focus on other matters aisha roscoe npr news the top democrat on the senate foreign relations committee says he'll oppose the nomination of cia director mike pompeo to become the next secretary of state as npr's michelle kellerman reports that could mean pompeo will not have the committee's backing when his nomination comes up for full senate vote senator robert menendez is criticizing pompeii oh for failing to disclose his recent trip to north korea even in his private meetings with lawmakers who are considering his nomination i believe our nation's top diplomat must be forthright and more critically has passed sentiments do not reflect our nation's values and are not acceptable for our nation's top diplomat i believe the american people deserve better white house adviser kellyanne conway argues at the fact that president trump sent pompeo to north korea to prepare for a possible summit is a sign of the great trustee places in conway is urging senators to back pompeo saying american diplomacy is too important for partisan politics michelle kellerman npr news the state department mom afford a rico remains without electricity following another islandwide power outage the blackout occurred after an excavator accidentally dying down to transmission line anna palacios who owns a jewelry shop in san juan says she hopes this latest in a series of challenges for the us territory his results soon we got really good training i was as least five months without electricity so i learned to live with little managed with what.

san juan trustee senate michelle kellerman director cia deputy attorney general russia robert muller special counsel aisha roscoe shay stevens us washington anna palacios kellyanne conway north korea senator robert menendez npr
Sarah Sanders blasts James Comey in White House briefing

Indivisible

01:23 min | 3 years ago

Sarah Sanders blasts James Comey in White House briefing

"The white house has lashed out against former fbi director james comey again npr's a racial roscoe reports the white house spokeswoman sarah sanders told reporters commies new memoir is critical of president trump it should not be trusted sanders says president trump is not worried about what komi has to say in his new book but that did not stop her from engaging in a lengthy tirade against the former fbi chief during a press briefing sandra's caught komi me a disgrace partisan hack and said even prominent democrats question kony's actions as fbi director one of the president's greatest achievements will go down aspiring director james caan shots will likely continue to be fired between komi and the white house as komi embarks on a press tour to promote the book in it he describes his rocky tenure in the trump administration and caused the president unethical aisha roscoe npr news the white house returning teachers at the state capital kentucky house lawmakers today voted to override the republican governors veto four hundred and eighty million dollar tax increase would help boost spending for education within thirty school districts across the state have been forced to close as thousands of teachers rallied at the capital public had governor matt bevin had vetoed the two year operating budget contains record new spending for public education funded by fifty cent increase in the cigarette tax in a six percent increase on some sales taxes on wall street today stocks closed lower the.

White House Director Sarah Sanders Donald Trump Sandra Kony President Trump Matt Bevin FBI James Comey NPR James Caan Aisha Roscoe Kentucky Eighty Million Dollar Six Percent Two Year