18 Burst results for "Aisha Harris"

"aisha harris" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:11 min | Last month

"aisha harris" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"News I'm Elsa Chang And I'm Ari Shapiro The new HBO comedy special from Gerard Carmichael has a title that's a spoiler And the show is all about secrets I've been trying to be very honest Because my whole life was shrouded in secrets And I figured the only route I haven't tried was the truth So I'm saying everything Here's everything He tells us that jerod actually isn't his first name But he waits until the last moment to tell us what it is The title of the special raw faniel Aisha Harris is one of the hosts of NPR's pop culture happy hour and she's here to talk about this new side of the well-known comedian Hey ayesha Hey Ari There were moments watching this show that I thought if this were not in a comedy club would people be laughing I mean he covers some really dark topics some personal struggles the content is not sort of obvious funny ha ha joke material Yeah Well I mean a lot of comedians are probably argue that you can make comedy out of anything But you're right this is different It feels different It feels almost like a therapy session like a completely airing of dirty laundry because he's talking about his family and the fact that many men in his family have cheated and had multiple families that their partners did not know about He talks about his name obviously And of course the big thing that everyone has been sort of grasping onto out of this is the fact that he comes out for the first time publicly as gay It was something that he had hinted at in a previous HBO special that he did a few years ago that he had had sexual relations with men but he didn't elaborate on that or actually come out So this is all new and it's all it feels very very different from other things He talked about the fact that he's still struggling with it that his mother is not okay with it The tone is also really different from other comedy specials Like there are times the audience just asks a question or makes a suggestion and he responds in what feels like a very genuine way or after the moment he reveals that he's gay the audience applauds and he has what feels like this really authentic reaction It means a lot It means a lot And I'm accepting the love but I really appreciate the love Are you sure what struck you about this Well it's clear he's still working through this This is as much as it was a sort of it's a filmed performance at stage He's still processing this as we watch him perform this And I love the back and forth of it because some could argue this is oh those are plants Those are people who were asked to ask those questions ahead of time but it doesn't feel like that to me It feels like a natural outgrowth of what happens especially in black spaces where if you get comfortable enough with whoever is performing you will verbally react It's a common response It has a very religious feel almost like you're in a church in a way So I just loved an aspect of it You've interviewed him before you followed his career closely You described yourself as a huge fan of his sitcom the Carmichael show What's going to stand out to you from this special Well I think for me it is that level of trust that he just seems to have with this audience at this point The fact that he got to the point where he felt comfortable enough sharing this with an audience and sharing this with the world I think it'll be really interesting to see where he goes from here and how comfortable he feels talking about how his family has reacted and he is again he is talking about his family in ways that people don't usually do Outside of therapy Outside of therapy And so I will be very curious to see where it goes but I just feel so happy for him and I think this is such a great moment for art for comedy and for the LGBTQ community Aisha Harris is one of the hosts of NPR's pop culture happy hour podcast talking with us about the Gerard Carmichael special on HBO called Rafael Thanks ayesha Thank you Two months after its release the video game elden ring is still the talk of the gaming world And a lot of the talk is about how incredibly.

Gerard Carmichael Elsa Chang Ari Shapiro Aisha Harris Hey ayesha jerod HBO NPR Ari Carmichael Rafael Thanks ayesha elden ring
"aisha harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:22 min | 2 months ago

"aisha harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Those resources and don't have that power So the argument just looking at this from another vantage point the argument that yeas supporters have made like you saw this in comments posted to that disturbing video we mentioned earlier for that single easy is that this is art and therefore it's all performance art and therefore it's off limits to critique on other than artistic terms Now this is something that here's Trevor Noah again from that monologue He spoke about this I do understand that art can be therapy but I also understand that therapy can be therapy And what's weird about the situation is Kanye West has told us that he struggles with his mental health So I get it You want to have artist therapy But here's what's weird that Kanye doesn't understand is like what we're seeing it makes you uncomfortable with Kanye we don't know how to feel We don't know how to worry And I think Kanye doesn't seem to understand that he goes well leave me to create my art Yeah but Kanye you told us you have problems Now when we worry about that you say we shouldn't worry because it's not problems or it is problems which is it Here he said a lot there So engaging both the question of Kanye has disclosed and others close to him have disclosed that he does have mental health issues But other people have mental health issues and don't harass people right So gosh I really I just have to throw it back to you and say what do you think Because I'm really I'm kind of wondering does the audience have some role in this And if so what is it Yeah I mean the thing about it is that Kanye from the beginning of his career has made himself part of the art He is not Banksy He's not like a performance artist who you only know who he is based on his voice You don't know his personality That's not him And if you listen to the lyrics and easy a lot of those lyrics are actually reflecting things that he said on social media and in interviews he mentions no more counseling I don't negotiate with therapists He's been open about not taking the medications that he's been prescribed And so when that's happening and it's all coming together in the art you can't just say you have to separate the art from the artists Because it's playing out right in front of us Ayesha Harris is a host of NPR's pop culture happy hour and she's currently at work in the book of essays titled wannabe figuring out a life through pop culture Aisha Harris thank you so much for talking with us about this Thank you It was a pleasure.

Kanye Trevor Noah Kanye West Ayesha Harris NPR Aisha Harris
"aisha harris" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

02:52 min | 2 months ago

"aisha harris" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"West Philadelphia. I love that they mix that up with switch. Right? And this is a decade after the show's last season, right? It's like if I asked you guys to sing the theme from smallville right now, you know? Like, you can't do that. I think the fresh prince theme song stands out because you could literally be out in public and guaranteed someone would join in with you. It's an electric song. I just love that theme song because it's a really cool way of teasing like Will Smith the once famed it rapper and introducing Will Smith the budding Hollywood actor and it's just like this really great moment of bridging who we know him to be with who he's gonna be and it's just so great and like not to keep using the word iconic, but the reason that The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air theme song is so iconic is that I was in a club for a white sorority bid party or something once in college. And it came on in the club and I was like, done, why is this here? Two, why does everyone know the words? I too have heard it in a club setting a party setting. Yes. It's wild. That's iconic to me. It's just great. Maybe I'm forgetting something. But I think it's the last truly, truly great theme song. And it's just great. And also the quote unquote missing versus that we're only in the first episode or two are also great. They are great. Yeah. Well, we want to know what you think about The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air and the theme song. And you can find this at Facebook dot com slash PCH and on Twitter at PCH. And that brings us to the end of our show. Letitia Harris, JC Howard. Thank you for being here and talking about the fresh prince. Thank you. Thank you so much, ayesha. This episode was produced by Kansas Lim from elwood and Mike Katz, and edited by Jessica Reid. Hello, come in provides a music you are bobbing your head to right now. And thank you for listening to pop culture happy hour from NPR. I'm Aisha Harris and we'll see you all tomorrow when we'll be discussing the TV show Bel Air. What's up people? I'm Emma joy. This week on everyone and their mom, we talk with comedian and wait wait panelist Josh gondelman about the queen's new passion for the kitchen and celebrity chef Roy Choi stops by with advice for my grandma. Listen to everyone and their mom in the wait wait don't tell me feed every Wednesday from NPR. Hey Friends, Linda Holmes here. I'd love it if you subscribed to pop culture happy hour plus. You'll get a sponsor free listen and this is key. You'll be supporting our show. Subscribe now at plus dot NPR dot org slash happy hour..

Will Smith The Fresh Prince of Bel West Philadelphia Letitia Harris JC Howard Kansas Lim Mike Katz Jessica Reid Hollywood Aisha Harris Bel Emma joy ayesha elwood Josh gondelman Roy Choi Facebook Twitter NPR Linda Holmes
"aisha harris" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

05:15 min | 3 months ago

"aisha harris" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"In our current era chock full of headline making scammers and Adobe is one of the splashiest. Several years ago, she posed as an heiress and conned a whole bunch of wealthy people out of their money before ultimately spending time in prison. And now her schemes have been dramatized in inventing Anna, a Netflix miniseries created by Shonda Rhimes. The show is inspired by a viral New York magazine article, but is Anna's story as fascinating on the screen as it was on the page. I'm Aisha Harris, and today we're talking about inventing Anna and pop culture happy hour from NPR. Joining us is Kristin miner, she is the co host of the podcast movie therapy with rafer and Kristen. She's also the co author of how to be fine. Welcome back Kristen, so happy to be back to talk about this scammer. Yes. Also joining us is Jeffrey masters. He's the host of the podcast LGBTQ and a that's Q&A with an ampersand. Welcome back Jeffrey. Hey, thank you. So the Netflix miniseries inventing Aaron was created by Shonda Rhimes. Julia Garner plays an adelphi, a Russian born German in her mid 20s who claims to be an heiress while palling around with some of Manhattan's wealthy and powerful. She is definitely none heiress and her real last name is Serbian. Anna komski plays in Kent, a reporter at Manhattan magazine who becomes obsessed with reporting on the story of delvis widespread fraud. The character of Vivian is a stand in for real life journalist Jessica pressler, who's 2018 article on Delphi for New York mag, went viral and inspired this series. Now, as Vivian tracks down the story, she interviews and learns about many of the elite figures who found themselves in Anna's web of deceit. The main ones are a group of women who once made up Anna's inner circle of one time girlfriends. There's Neff, a hotel concierge played by Alexis Floyd, Rachel, a Vanity Fair editor played by Katie Lowes and Casey, a personal trainer played by Laverne Cox. Vivian also finds herself working closely with Anna's defense attorney Todd, who is played by Aryan moyet. The show bounces around a lot across continents and time periods and covers everything from Anna's childhood prior to coming to the states up food to the trial and her conviction. The real-life Anna was convicted on multiple charges in 2019, including grand larceny and she spent 19 months in prison. She was released in early 2021 for good behavior, but just weeks later, ice targeted her for overstaying her Visa. And as of this month, she remains in custody awaiting deportation back to Germany. So there's a lot going on in this show over the course of 9 episodes. Jeffrey, what did you think of inventing Anna? Yeah, you know, I think it's fun and it's enjoyable. My big question going to this was that like scammer is such a colloquial term nowadays. And so I didn't know much about her and I didn't know, you know, did she order expensive bottles of wine and like enforcement to pick up the tab, or is something more nefarious? And so when we got to the extent of her fraud, I thought it was wildly impressive, which she almost pulled off. It was impressive in the worst possible way. So I thought that was fun to see. Yeah, yeah. The show does do a good job of sort of showing many times, I think, probably many more times immediate to see all the ways in which she bounces around from different hotels and ran up all these bills until they finally kicked her out and then she'd be done to the next and she would often claim that she was waiting for her father to wire her money.

Anna Shonda Rhimes Aisha Harris Kristin miner Vivian Jeffrey masters Netflix Kristen Julia Garner Anna komski Manhattan magazine Jessica pressler rafer New York magazine Alexis Floyd Katie Lowes Laverne Cox Aryan moyet Jeffrey adelphi
"aisha harris" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

05:35 min | 8 months ago

"aisha harris" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Her home. Studio in. california is aisha harris. Hey hey linda. It would have been so much fun for all of us to get to hang out in toronto. Hopefully we will do that some day. We did not get to do it this year. Instead we were all remote here is what you need to know. A lot of the biggest movies of this festival in terms of anticipation right. You're dune let's say for example. We're not made available for people who were attending the festival remotely right. There can be a lot of reasons that happens. They want people to wait and review it when it comes out. They fear piracy but we did discover as we talked what we'd seen that we had seen some things we wanted to tell you about. Some of which you might be hearing about for the first time i show you and i both saw a documentary about the best selling instrumental musician of all time. Tell the people what it's called kitty g. Well actually the documentaries called listening to kenny g. And if you don't like kenny g you maybe don't want to watch this doc of or at least you think that because i have very strong feelings about kenny g. that tend toward the not my bag category but the interesting thing about this film which was directed by penny lane is that she's more interested in not just you know his life. We don't get too much about his his background. We hear a bit about how he became a musician. But it's more about interrogating why some people love him and why some people despise him and then he is the worst thing to ever happen to jazz music and to me. That central question is what makes it worth watching. Even if you have to endure hearing those terrible g songs that we all had to listen to the nine hundred ninety s amazing. I was watching this. That i was thinking like. I don't even know how much kenny. Gee i know. And all of a sudden they start playing like done. And i'm like oh my gosh i remember this and like i agree with you. I think it's fascinating. They've got a bunch of like jazz critics and the jazz critics. i think. Do not all always come off. Well either. Like very strange. There's a good discussion of the appropriation elements of his music. I just think it's fascinating. Yeah he's if anything he seems very affable and totally cool with the fact that people don't like him so that at least makes him. You know okay in my book. He is a character of a very particular kind. That is for sure and you actually saw another much. More directly. Jazz related documentary. Yes so while listening to kenny. G. was asking. The question is the subject actually jazz. There was also another documentary called. Oscar peterson black and white directed by barry -average. That didn't even have to ask that question. It was like yes. Oscar peterson world renowned pianist to pretty much every jazz. Great legend who was able to work with him or who looked up to him but call him one of the best of all time..

kenny g aisha harris kitty g linda penny lane toronto california kenny Oscar peterson black Oscar peterson barry white
"aisha harris" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

04:43 min | 8 months ago

"aisha harris" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"Aisha harris also with us as npr. Tv critic. eric. Dagens welcome back eric. What up what up. How's it going. It's going well. It's great to have you so we have talked on this show about brooklyn nine nine. We even didn't episode on it back in two thousand fifteen and we've been delighted to see it renewed and revived as it's wended. Its way through eight seasons last month. That kicked off a final ten episode season which ends with the last two episodes airing thursday night. Now this season follows along gap the last episode of season seven aired in april of twenty twenty one month before the murder of george floyd and the reckoning that followed included a national conversation about depictions of police and tv and movies. And this show certainly could not have moved forward or finished. Its run without acknowledging the world around it brooklyn nine nine. Final season has its characters. Reckoning that new landscape in different ways rosa diaz has left the force to investigate bad cops while other characters are reassessing and smaller and subtler ways. Charles boyle is leaning into virtuous signaling amy santiago and captain holt are pushing for department wide reforms jake. Peralta is taking responsibility for his own missteps as a cop not to mention trying to maintain work life balance now that he and amy have a new baby now. We thought that now would be a good time to check in with brooklyn nine nine as it's winding down so i i'm going to start with you. How did you feel about brooklyn nine nine in the past. And how do you feel about it. Now that you're watching these new episodes so i've been watching it since the very beginning i while i i've always been a huge andy sandberg fan and it started off kind of being about him. He was kind of the central character. Even though it's always been an ensemble show. He was sort of the entry way. Point to the rest of the brooklyn nine nine and i enjoy that and i also think this is the type of show that because it started out out. The gate with a very diverse cast to blackhawks. You have to latina cops..

Aisha harris brooklyn george floyd eric rosa diaz Charles boyle amy santiago captain holt npr Peralta andy sandberg jake amy blackhawks
"aisha harris" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

01:47 min | 11 months ago

"aisha harris" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Truths like which is the best Beyonce album. It's B day. I'm right. Any who in this time of Division what better common denominator? What greater uniter than the fast and the furious? Never thought about the wild missions we've been on. We've taken out planes, trains tanks. I'm not going to think about the submarine. Hey, man, we got cars to mark our most patriotic holiday and the release of the latest film in this franchise. This week. We're bringing you a very special episode from our friends over at NPR's pop culture. Happy hour. They had me on recently for two episodes in the guest chair. We're gonna play one for you. Now we look back on the entire fast in the furious franchise history. And what that movie series Impact has been since the first one debuted two decades ago. I know two decades ago, All right, here is my chat with the folks over at NPR's pop culture. Happy hour, all about the greatest film franchise of all time. The fast and the furious 20 years ago, the fast and the furious debuted as a scruffy car culture movie, and it was a hit. It was followed by two Sequels that didn't quite satisfies, they regrouped, and since then it's become the blockbuster machine. Some love it. Some hate it. Some love to hate it something to love it. When you do this much business for this many years, it's hard not to have an impact and to feel the impact of everything else that's going on in film. I'm Aisha Harris. And I'm Linda Holmes. And today we're talking about the 1000 furious franchises, Legacy and impact on pop culture. Happy Hour from NPR Here with me and Asia is Sam Sanders, the host of NPR's. It's been a minute..

Aisha Harris Linda Holmes Sam Sanders NPR two decades ago This week two Sequels 20 years ago two episodes today Impact fast and the furious Beyonce first one one 1000 furious Asia
"aisha harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"aisha harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You have to be a nice person. In addition to be nice looking Mr Price. Because if you're not a nice person, like bird is like I am you end up being a loser. So apparently the reason she left now. Finally, she was mad that CBS was moving her show and her programs to make a room. For Drew Barrymore's much less successful daytime talk show. It's all about true, Barry Boy that I loved you very more too, though. Have you watched the show her shot? No, I have not. I guess I don't. I guess I don't love her enough. Not as much as Judge studio. I guess. No one puts Judge Judy in a corner. Judy. Judy. Judy. Goodbye. We're done. On that note. Bob Mondello, NPR film critic Aisha Harris, one of the hosts of NPR's pop culture, Happy Hour podcast. Thank you both for being here for being such good sports. I look forward talking with you both soon about movies and stuff again. I'll wait. But before I go, I have to say officially It has been tabulated. I You sure you want? Yeah. Yeah. Don't sound so excited. Well, you know, I had some help from from Sam. Okay? It's all good. Next time you guys will do even better. Thank you. Both for being here and happy Movie summer. This was a joy. Thank you coming up. What's it like to be the only black woman in the office? And then what's it like? When another black woman shows up? The Kia Delilah Harris new novel is all about that. It's called the other black girl..

Aisha Harris Bob Mondello CBS Drew Barrymore Sam NPR both Both Happy Hour one Price Judy Barry Boy Delilah Harris Kia Judge
"aisha harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"aisha harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And I think that There is a chance to address them. The fact that they're in real life. At least there's a good 12 13 years between India and John David Washington. Okay, What do we do about that? How do we talk about the way in which men who are who date younger women, especially younger women who are vulnerable like Maria's. What does that mean? And the film never really interrogates that. In any meaningful way. Instead, we get as broken John have talked about the fact that we have her in skimpy clothing. We have her in the bathtub. We have her. You know all these states of undress, while John David Washington's character is just all over the place, yelling screaming at her. And there's not. She's not giving. She's not being given the same thing that he is getting. Well, the one a audience remains a bit split on the film, Bree emailed. I love this film. I saw it there. It's true artistic lens, a snapshot of a very dysfunctional relationship. I appreciated its uniqueness. I'm really tired of the same old movies. And Daryn tweets. I'm a director and watch the movie with my girlfriend. I was quenching in the first five minutes because the conversation was familiar and narcissistic, like most directors are, But this is a gratuitous, self indulgent vehicle for Sam, not the audience. We know you can Right, Sam, please stop. Well, before we wrap up. I just want to hear what movies you all are looking forward to in the next few months. Brooke, I'll come to you first. Um Movies that I'm looking forward to. I will say You know what? I don't think that 40 year old Virgin got its Do you know that is the black and white movie. I wish that we were spending all this time talking about on Netflix. I wish that the genius of Ryan can on Tic Tac was parroting. You know that movie like there's so much there that so that's still so fresh and just did that get the attention that it should have gotten on Netflix s O. Perhaps this awards season, There's still time for it to be More signed. But please, if you have not seen it go back on Bull that up on Netflix. It is a fantastic romance. It's a true emotionally true experience of a four for over 40 black woman in New York and dealing with a lot of the same issues of criticism. I want to make sure you get we make art. I want to get John and Asian here real quickly. John, your your film. Opening February 19th Nomad land. I thought it was one of the best movies of last year. Definitely worth checking out my usual. What about you? John stole my pig. Also Nomad land highly recommended. It's great. All right, well, maybe we'll have a conversation about one of those films in the coming months. That was Aisha Harris, a co host of NPR's pop culture. Happy Hour, also with us John Horn, the host of the frame at KPCC.

John David Washington John Maria Netflix Sam John Horn Daryn tweets India Aisha Harris Bree NPR New York director Tic Tac Brooke Ryan
"aisha harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"aisha harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To frame it through a political lens when in reality, it's a It's a film about a girl trying to get clean now the sort of obstacles Because she's a black woman. I mean, Yeah, right. I mean, that's reality, too. But it's not a film about race 01 of five small shame It's about guilt and how that is inescapable, and it annoys me. So many of these journalists can help with the Flex that college education Malcolm, you have a college education. Well. Two days ago, Sam Levinson was interviewed by NPR's Morning edition and said this about Malcolm's anger with the critics. I think his struggle as an artist and as a filmmaker is to not be defined or boxed in, and I think that that's a universal struggle that a lot of artists feel, but what's particular To what he's feeling is how predominantly white critics Critique his work through the lens of his identity that he's a black filmmaker that this is a black story. But simultaneously failed toe look at their own work and critique their own work through the lens of identity. I'm really curious to hear from from all three of you what you think about so much time being spent in the film, specifically attacking critics and criticism. Your people who critique films John I think that argument is 1000% disingenuous. I'm gonna come back to one quick thing about, you know, white director directing black characters. I think the real problem here is a man directing a woman. There is more fabric and John David Washington's tie than there is in Sand Te'o's entire outfit in this film, and they way he shoots her is kind of leering. One of the conceits of this film is that you can't judge and everything we've done. Up to this point on this conversation is by Sam Levinson's definitions and the film's definitions unacceptable. You cannot judge the artist's intention by his or her work. Just what it looks like What it's it's aesthetics are and to do that differently eyes to violate some sort of trust that intentions are off limits. That's not about art, but about politics and psychology. So Character. Malcolm would argue that the entire conversation that we're having Is unacceptable and impermissible, and I want to come back to the review that Katie Walsh wrote about assassination nation. I don't know her, but I I do know her, but I'm not friends with her. Here's what she wrote in his. She's writing about scenes of graphic sexual violence. He and cinematographer Marcel Rev who shot this film who established a leering gaze to regulate the girls, new bio bods. Take much delight and ringing every sexy moment out of attacking young women. Shooting scenes of violence that are good, too, is fortuitously pornographic. This is common in the horror genre, but this goes above and beyond. And the difference is that Famous hard director Dario Gento never ended his films with a boneheaded lecture about feminism. So what Sam is saying in this film and his attacks on criticism is the criticism is it is Is Wrong and it's impermissible that you can't judge me based on the story I'm telling, which is just absurd. Of course you can. And that's how you read art. That's how you read books. That's how you read plays. That's how you read news coverage. You look at the story and then try to figure out the intentions because that is the context that makes it meaningful. Break your thought. I 100% agree. And I definitely think that Levinson here is trying to basically head off any criticism of you know himself on. Um, you know about black characters on but about what it must be like for black filmmaker. Um, you know, I think I absolutely agree with the just the sexist like lens through which we season data throughout this whole movie on guy. I think he knew that as well. Especially coming from Katie Walsh is critique of assassination nation and the way that he films women On DSA SoHo. You know you have the day at the latter half of this movie. Um, you know, she's she's walking around, You know, her breasts are visible through her tank top. It's very kind of skimpy outfit that she's wearing, You know, to bed. Um, and Malcolm is saying Well, if I just put the camera on you right now, you know em. I objectifying you. Well, it depends on the way that the camera is, you know, framed and the way the shot is framed, and the way that it's framed, is looking up her body in this van Very voyeuristic way and it is objectifying. I mean, I do think there are you know fantastic directors who are able to Showcase, even nudity even more so than house and a was dressed in this film. But you know, nudity and sex scenes and everything else in a way that does not feel objectifying but feels like there's a sort of, you know celebration of who these characters are, as they're interacting in the closing clothing that they're wearing. That's just not the case here. And instead of actually dealing with that criticism again and changing the way that he frames a shot of India and an outfit like she was wearing, you know, he just wanted to shoot her the way that he wanted to shoot her. And then shut down any criticism of it before you even got out of the movie. I'm Jenn White. You're listening to one, eh? Talking about the Netflix film Malcolm and Marie with Brooke Obi and a World Award winning film critic and author, also with US. Aisha Harris, a co host of NPR's pop culture, Happy Hour, and John Horn, the host of the frame at KPCC and the Podcast Hollywood. The sequel. We're also hearing from You, Gregory Emails. I think the critics are overlooking the strength of Marie's response every single time to Malcolm's attacks. She never misses an insult, Slight or threat, and Taylor emailed. What struck me right away is how the structure of the argument was so reminiscent of what I grew up listening to between my mother and father. 50 to 60 years ago. For those in the audience like me, we could relate for a lot of other people who clearly did not grow up in such an argument it if environment no doubt the movie was exasperated as hell or even repellent. Are you sure? What do you think about Greg's email there? That Marie's responses to Malcolm's attacks. You are being overlooked in our conversation. I think that with Marie, those responses are clearly a sort of An example of her being on the defensive at all times. You can have those records and you can have those remarks and the sort of undercutting of Malcolm, but I don't think they really undercut them because by the end of the film, they just kind of gone up and down and up and down without any real gradation and in the way in which they interact with each other. You know, One of my biggest problems with this film is that I think that One of the reasons we like watching these types of movies, or at least are drawn to these types of movies, even if they are sort of emotional to get through is that they reveal something about the dynamic that's interesting or that's you know, surprising and revealing, and I could tell her this is going within the 1st 10 15 minutes of it, and You know her being this sort of the syrup character who will just re toward these things. That doesn't diminish the fact that she is still much younger than Malcolm. And even though they addressed that at one point in the film, they never really interrogated..

Malcolm Sam Levinson Katie Walsh Marie NPR director John David Washington John I Marcel Rev Netflix Sand Te'o Greg Jenn White Dario Gento World Award Gregory Emails India Taylor Aisha Harris
"aisha harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"aisha harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I give it, you know points for pulling off her production that was, you know. Created, filmed and edited and produced during the pandemic. I reduced points for its miss misogyny and misanthropy and I reduced points for its attack on On criticism and the whole concept of criticism. I mean, there's a there's a adage that I try, I try to follow. I think other people should follow about relationships and marriage, and that is keep your fights clean and your sex dirty and they violate that rule. They hurtful things that are said by Malcolm to Marie. Um, and that you know that they are that this is what transpires in this relationship. It is painful to watch. But it's also to me unacceptable that the things that are so hurtful and painful. That they reflect and I don't know. You could say it's the character you could say it's the director. There's a there's a misanthropy and misogyny there. That is just beyond comprehension, and I find it You know, it's discount Edward Albee. It's not nearly as good as Virginia Woolf. And it's really kind of difficult to watch and not difficult to watch, because it's emotionally challenging, but also but because it's Damage You're watching people behave in the worst possible way without any kind of real redemption. Are you sure? Was there anything about the movie you liked? Um, that's a good question. I honestly would have to disagree with a lot of people who say that's India was great in this. I feel like she was really hammered in hampered by this script, and I think she's normally a great talent. And despite my feelings about euphoria, the other the show that she's done with Sam Levis and previous previously and for which she won an Emmy. I think she's great in that, despite the fact that I also think that show is not very good, but but I do think that And I was so hammered by the script and I would have loved to see her like Brooke said, tackle something a little bit more up to her talents. If I had to say one thing that I appreciate about the movie, I think there is one moment where This is where it gets Super Meta, where Marie puts on a song by Dionne Warwick. That is the post this sort of there's no words spoken. She's just kind of using the song to communicate in her body language to communicate how she's feeling about Malcolm in that moment. And I really just thought that was a great moment, in part because there was no dialogue. Tioga feel really stiff in and overwrought and she just did a great job with her body language. And and John David Washington, too, and that scene for the rest of the phone. I feel like John David Washington is just kind of going. Totally ham and and just it's it's too much it Z doubt up way too much work. What about for you anything you liked in the film? I thought it was beautifully shot. I really enjoyed the cinematography definitely points for that on Do you know I don't really It is an achievement to have made the first film and in the pandemic but also It's a pandemic. Perhaps everybody should have been staying home and wearing a mask and waiting for you know for things to be able to safely open up. And then perhaps this script could have had several drafts on bypasses at it. So I don't necessarily want to give him props for that, but great gowns, beautiful givens. I'm Jenn White. You're listening to one, eh? That was an Aretha Franklin reference for y'all who missed it. We're talking to Brooke. Oh be an award winning film critic and author also with us. Aisha Harris, a co host of NPR's pop culture, Happy Hour, and John Horn, the host of the frame at of the frame at KPCC and the Podcast Hollywood the sequel. We're also hearing from You A Cap T Tweet. India was the great mostly because she did fairly well with a bad script. Over all, the film felt like a force to statement from a director who either doesn't know what he wants to say or doesn't have anything to say. So I use you again. This was written and directed by Sam Levis. Levinson, who also directs HBO series Euphoria. A Sam Levinson is White and the son of acclaimed film director Barry Levinson. Yeah. How did you feel about his creation of the Malcolm character? This this black filmmaker? You know, I feel like a lot of what Malcolm says is factually true. Um, you know, at one point, Malcolm is talking about how he doesn't want to be. Hide down to only speaking of about black issues in this film. He doesn't like the way critics are always just comparing him to someone like very Jenkins or Spike Lee and how that's sort of a lazy form of criticism. That's true. That happens a lot in criticism and people like a vegetarian, a have had publicly said, You know, I'm tired of being interviewed and only talking about the message that my movies are supposed to communicate and not about the craft of my work. What about the technical aspects on about the art? This is all true, but the way in which it's communicated within knock a memory for me, makes it feel not emotionally true. And, you know, I think there have been many better examples of Specifically black artists wrestling with this idea of what it's like to be a black artist and filmmaker, the 40 year old version by Rod A Blank, which was released a few months ago and is also Netflix movie that happens to be shot in black and white. I think there's a really good job of wrestling with, you know, commercialization and how far how much to appease white white criticism and white producers and that's not happening here. And I think part of it is Sam Levinson doesn't have As as Marie says, At one point, he doesn't have the graphic. As t have this conversation. Vanessa e mailed this movie was so difficult to watch..

Malcolm Sam Levinson Marie director Sam Levis Brooke India John David Washington Edward Albee Barry Levinson Virginia Woolf Jenn White Aretha Franklin Emmy Dionne Warwick Netflix Vanessa e HBO Rod Aisha Harris
"aisha harris" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"aisha harris" Discussed on KPCC

"And I think that There is a chance to address them. The fact that they're in real life. At least there is a good 12 13 years between India and John David Washington. Okay, What do we do about that? How do we talk about the way in which men who are who date younger women, especially younger women who are vulnerable like Maria's. What does that mean? And the film never really interrogates that. In any meaningful way. Instead, we get as Brooke and John have talked about the fact that we have her in skimpy clothing. We have her in the bathtub. We have her. You know, in all these states of undress, while John David Washington's character is just all over the place, yelling screaming at her. And there's not. She's not giving. She's not being given the same thing that he is getting. Well, the one a audience remains a bit split on the film, Bree emailed. I love this film. I saw it through its true artistic lens, a snapshot of a very dysfunctional relationship. I appreciated its uniqueness. I'm really tired of the same old movies and Darren Tweets. I'm a director and watch the movie with my girlfriend. I was cringing in the first five minutes because the conversation was familiar and narcissistic, like most directors are, But this is a gratuitous, self indulgent vehicle for Sam, not the audience. We know you can Right, Sam. Please stop. Well, before we wrap up. I just want to hear what movies you all are looking forward to in the next few months. Brooke, I'll come to you first. Um Movies that I'm looking forward to. I will say You know what? I don't think that 40 year old Virgin got its Do you know that is the black and white movie. I wish that we were spending all this time talking about on Netflix. I wish that the genius of Ryan can on Tic Tac was parroting. You know that movie like there's so much there that so, um, that's still so fresh and just did not get the attention that it should. Have gotten on Netflix s O. Perhaps this awards season. There's still time for to get more shine. But please, if you have not seen it go back on Bull that up on Netflix. It is a fantastic romance. It's a true emotionally true experience of a four for over 40 black woman in New York and dealing with a lot of the same Issues of criticism. I want to make sure you get we make art. I want to get John and Asian here real quickly. John, your your film. Opening February 19th Nomad land. I thought it was one of the best movies of last year. Definitely worth checking out. I usually What about you? John stole my pick. Also Nomad land highly recommended. It's great. All right, well, maybe we'll have a conversation about one of those films in the coming months. That was Aisha Harris, the co host of NPR's pop culture. Happy Hour, also with us John Horn, the host of the frame at KPCC and the Podcast Hollywood, the sequel and Brooke Obi and award winning film critic and author. Thanks to you off Today's producers were Amanda Williams, Katy Kline and are managing producer Page Osbourne. This program comes to you from W. A. M u part of American University in Washington. Distributed by NPR. I'm.

Brooke Obi John John David Washington Netflix John Horn NPR Sam India Maria Darren Tweets Aisha Harris Amanda Williams Bree Washington American University Tic Tac New York director Ryan Page Osbourne
"aisha harris" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"aisha harris" Discussed on KPCC

"Was right about not starting that conversation, and a lot of critics might agreed. Too many of them have a lot of bones to pick with this movie. This month's one a movie club will hopefully be a little bit less combative than the movie itself. So let's get into it with Aisha Harris, a co host for NPR's pop culture, Happy Hour. I usually welcome back Thank you for having me also with us John Horn. He hosts the frame and the podcast Hollywood. The sequel, both from KPCC John. It's always great to have you My pleasure to and Brooke Obi and award winning film critic and author Brooke Welcome back. Thank you so much for having me. John just just build out the plot of the movie and the characters a little bit more for us. Well, what it's about is about a couple that's having an epic fight, and it's prompted by the character played by John David Washington Malcolm He's a filmmaker who has finally made what he thanks and what might be actually a good movie. He has done a big premiere. He hasn't thanked. His girlfriend, Marie, played by Zendaya for her contribution to the film for Venus, partner for inspiring the story for actually borrowing some of her life to tell it and she come home after the premiere, and she's bothered by this light. And that that slight blows up into this epic fight where I don't know. Every possible kind of insult is exchanged on they just go at each other for 90, plus minutes. I won't say how it ends. It's kind of implausible, but it's about a couple fighting in the worst possible ways, and Malcolm is talking about art and how people should interpret art. On bears. Ah, there's a really bad attack on L, a Times film critic. But that's just the tip of the iceberg, I guess. Well, this is a little snippet of what people can expect during the movie. This is a clip of Malcolm eating a bowl of Mac and cheese that Marie made for him. And he's belittling her for being upset about his failure to thank her at his movie premiere, You know, Marie. You are genuinely Unstable..

John David Washington Malcolm Marie John Aisha Harris John Horn Brooke Obi NPR Zendaya Times partner
"aisha harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"aisha harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"W. N. Y. C is supported by Amazon studios, presenting one night in Miami from director Regina King and writer Kim Powers inspired by true events that took place on one legendary night in 1964 awards eligible available on Prime video. Thistles W N. Y C. 93.9 FM and HD New York. This'll is all of it from W. N Y. C. I'm Alison Stewart. We're kicking off our new series called Watch Party this weekend. We watch the hit period drama from Shonda Rhimes Richardson today. Aisha Harris, co host of NPR's pop culture. Happy Hour, joins us to discuss and we want to hear your thoughts about the show. Call us now at 6464357280. Then we'll speak with one of the directors of Bridget in Julie Ann Robinson joins us to discuss your work on the Syriza, including directing the pilot and serving as an executive producer. Later, comedian and talk show host Amber Ruffin stops by to talk about her new book, You'll never believe what happened to Lacey. Crazy stories about racism co authored with her sister, Lacey. Lamar. We'll get to all of it. I'm Alison Stewart and I will meet you on the other side of the news. Live.

Alison Stewart Lacey Shonda Rhimes Richardson Regina King Aisha Harris New York Kim Powers Amber Ruffin Amazon studios W. N. Y. C Julie Ann Robinson Miami director NPR writer Lamar executive producer Bridget Syriza
"aisha harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"aisha harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We're gonna pick a show. Everybody will watch it over the weekend and then discuss so everybody. Your assignment of the next few days is to watch the period drama that is anything but conventional. Richardson, NPR called it quote Woody, sexy, absorbing fund that might just keep you up late. Salome should tell it. A contributing were critic at large for The New York Times will be here tomorrow to preview Shonda Rhimes, Britain and then we'll all watch it over the weekend, and on Monday, we'll reconvene and dive into the hit series and take your calls with Aisha Harris from NPR's pop culture. Happy Hour. Everybody bridge. URGENT. Also coming up next week, Comedian and talk show host Amber Ruffin will come by to talk about her new book. You'll never believe what happened to Lacey. Crazy stories about racism co authored with her sister, Lacey, Lamar, and we will take your calls. That is what is in store for the future. But as we do every moment every day we invite you to be present. In this moment as we kick off our our with our daily 62nd meditation called I need a minute. And all of this uncertainty. We want to encourage you to take one minute for yourself to quiet your mind, Block out the noise and breathe. Here's w. N. Y. C is meditation leader. The rain, Maddox. Find a comfortable seat. Don't close your eyes. Relax your body from the crown of your head to the tips of your toes. Letting everything just.

NPR Lacey Lamar Shonda Rhimes Amber Ruffin Aisha Harris Salome Richardson Maddox Woody The New York Times Britain w. N. Y. C
"aisha harris" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"aisha harris" Discussed on KCRW

"8 51. This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm Tanya mostly, and I'm Rachel Martin. A lot of us are looking for an escape right now, Right? And even though it's tough to get on a plane, you can get into a time machine called Netflix and get transported to a completely different world called Bridget in Show takes place in 18 hundreds era England They're all these amazing costumes that come with a period drama. There is mystery and manipulation. And there is romance My friends there is so much romance. And viewers are way into this so much so that Netflix says the show is one of its most successful Syriza ever. And in its first month, roughly 63 million households are expected to fix their gaze on Daphne and the Duke and all the other characters who we've this story together. But this is not just a fun romp through romantic travails. The show says something important about race and whose stories are told and how so to talk about all this. We've brought together. Aisha Harris, pop culture critic and co host of NPR's pop culture, Happy Hour, as well as NPR. TV critic Eric Deggans. Hey, you guys Thanks for being here. Hey, Rachel. Thank you. Thanks for having us Okay, So Eric Asia we've got romance and we've got Shonda Rhimes, who is very good at entertainment. What's not to love about this show? Well, I know Eric is not a huge romance person and I'm not either, but I do think that Shonda Rhimes Is one of the biggest names in television. People are going to be naturally curious about this. The show is created by Crispin Jason, who is basically a Shonda Rhimes protege, has worked on previous show shows of hers like Grease Anatomy scandal, And so even though she is not the actual career of the show, she has all of her like DNA's flowing through through it. And I think that it's just kind of perfect to see this gossip Girl type of show set in Regency era London with lots of nudity and romance. It's like it's just the perfect combination and something that she wouldn't necessarily be able to do on network TV. Okay, So I have to say I am romance challenge that is raising. But romance seems to be an underserved community on television. You know, Aisha and I were trying to think of The Syrians that might be available to people besides Bridgeton, and we came up with like Outlander on stars and shows on the heart. My chance, So you know there's not a lot out there, and I think it's also a signal to the industry that this is an underserved community, and maybe they ought to be creating more shows to speak to them. So Shauna Rhymes has really made a name for herself for being a creative genius, but also for really prioritizing diversity in her casting, and I mean, we see this in British in right and a lot of people have talked about how it's really significant. It's important to see black people included in this show among British aristocracy. But sure you have both said that shows take on race is absolutely more complex than that. Can you talk a little bit about how you see it? Sure. So. So when you look at virgin Tin you see a several key characters, including members of the aristocracy are people of color. They're not white. But there also seems to be this unacknowledged hierarchy to the people of color. A lot of the key characters and people have the most status. Light skin black people, arguably the show's biggest villain. The Duke of Hastings, Abusive father is one of the darkest actors on the show. And the show seems ambivalent about race, You know, While ah lot of the characters don't talk about race that much and seemed to act as if race doesn't matter. There is this moment where the dick of Hastings, who's Who's the You know, most eligible bachelor in this in this era, he's a person of color. He's talking to the woman who raised him. Her name is Lady Danbury. She's a woman of color as well. And their discussion kind of explains why we're seeing black. People in the aristocracy in this world. Let's check it out way would two separate societies.

Shonda Rhimes Rachel Martin Aisha Harris Lady Danbury Duke Netflix NPR Shauna Rhymes Hastings Eric Regency era London TV critic Tanya Eric Asia Eric Deggans Crispin Jason Bridget England
Producer Shima Oliaee on Making Dolly Partons America

Inside Podcasting

06:34 min | 2 years ago

Producer Shima Oliaee on Making Dolly Partons America

"Hello and welcome to inside podcasting the show in which creators discussed their craft I'm your host Sky Pillsbury today? I speak with Shima Oli. Who together with Radio Lab Founder Jad Abu Murad produced the award winning show Dolly Parton America. And when I say award-winning, it's kind of personal for me. You see Dolly Parton. America beat out the show. You're listening to right now for the title of Discover Pods Best New podcast of two thousand nineteen. I guess I should also mention that there show just won a peabody award, and sadly inside podcasting wasn't in the running for that one. Regardless the fact that podcast I produced was in the running with a show about Dolly. Parton will always put a smile on my face when I was nine I idolized. Does I spent hours staring at her glossy album covers imagining what it would be like to be glamorous singer. And while that dream come true, it was still an incredible thrill for me to talk to Shema about this show. In case you haven't listened to the series yet. I want to play you a clip. This is from an episode called dixie disappearance in which Jad and she might take a look at some of the contradictions behind Dolly's iconic, persona. The episode centers around a wildly popular tourist event called Don. DIXIE STAMPEDE! It's a Rodeo style dinner theater, in which the civil war is acted out as quote, friendly competition. The word slavery isn't mentioned at any point during the show. In this club Shema and One through the experience of attending the event. Okay so basically! Warn you walk into the, arena. It's huge I wouldn't say it's a football field I would say it's like an Olympic size pool like with arena seats all around. It's like going to the Rodeo. Basically. It's like going to the Rodeo. It's like a ton of der- in the center of this massive oval. How many seats wasn't again? It was one thousand. Dolly Parton. And the whole conceit of this situation. Besides eating a tremendous amount of food, I mean a full chicken and pork line and some soup that has a lot of cream and a biscuit. It was a lot of food decides that. Blue quickly. find out your competition a friendly competition between neighbors. Five folks. Are. For. The whole arena is split in half on one side. You've got the north wind on the other side. And, the announcer who rides in on this horse on his steed. They just. He encourages each side to jeer at the other. Side fireworks. He asked you to kind of jeer at them. And then he goes to the South side and he tells us outside. Northern. Third. Foul smelling. Slobber all gas. Good here, way out of a wet paper bag there. Before we get started. You may hear a few names that you don't recognize. There's Aisha Harris who wrote a critical profile of the stampede after which Dolly removed the word Dixie from the events name. By the way we have put a link to that story in our show notes for this episode. There is also Dolly's nephew. Brian seaver as a kid Brian was talented break dancer, who sometimes performed onstage with Dolly he gives Shima and Jad a tour of Dolly's child home. In Tennessee's smokey mountains, Sarah's marsh is list. Who wrote a book about Dolly? Parton and University of Tennessee, Professor Lynn Sakho taught a class called Dolly Parton America, which is where the series got its name. Okay, let's jump into the interview. We kick things off with Shima revealing how she and Jad prepared for an introductory conversation with Dolly Parton. He comes up to me. This is this is actually kind of fun. He comes up to me. He has a book he like goes into the cabinet behind. My desk gets out a piece of yellow paper painted around up a tape. Sit around the outside of the book and he's like this top secret, but I needed to read this and then. I, need you to prepare me for a conversation with the person now as you know, I've already been researching and doing other things for his talk and other and other ideas that we're kind of cooking up for other series, and so he tells me it's Dolly, and you know so I read. This book is covered in yellow fluorescent paper. Which I think was unnecessary I don't. Don't think anyone cares so I read it I. Write all the questions, and are you writing questions like? Are you knowing okay? We're GONNA do this. Do you have any premise for the show yet? We're like what kinds of questions are you writing down? Just questions pop into your head as you're reading it or this was a very yeah. This is a very moment so this. This is just the introductory conversation. So I also think we just needed to have an introductory conversation you know before you even touch certain things and we were both green, which is the beauty of kind of a jazz reporting is? He's okay with like not knowing anything when he begins which I think. adds to kind of the journey. You go on when you start telling. Telling the story, so the listener is going on the same ride you on which is very, I think emotionally fulfilling so we didn't really know when we started we. We knew enough basics and I brought to him everything I found really interesting. The passages I had compelled questions. We go way went over them edited and he went to interview Dolly and he comes back. I listened to the tape. And you hear this in the third episode of the series where she's like even GonNa. Get a question in because ninety minutes goes by. After his first question, and she just does the Dalai magic

Dolly Parton Dolly Dolly Parton America Jad Abu Murad Shima Oli Peabody Award Dixie America Sky Pillsbury Founder Tennessee Football Aisha Harris Brian Seaver Stampede Professor Lynn Sakho Sarah University Of Tennessee
"aisha harris" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"aisha harris" Discussed on KCRW

"Winner is green book. Okay. So I am not going to try and translate with that. Oh, God, man. Trying to translate Bill Murray. I do know Greenberg has been criticized for its portrayal of the black concert pianists. Donald Shirley, his family says the movie doesn't reflect his story. There's been criticisms of the politics of the film Aisha Harris. Are you surprised? I'm not surprised just because I do think that this kind of plays into a lot of things we've seen in the past that voters tend to go for it has photo progressive tone to it about the way in which race can be overcome by just becoming friends with the person of another race. And I think Peter ferrelli the director his speech compounded that last night when he talked about how we all have something in common, and we should be able to get over these things. I don't think that helped his case. But I do think that that probably played into a factor of why it won the second film that did well last night was Baheen rhapsody, which is about the band Queen. It had to cut ties with its director Bryan singer before production. Ended he has been accused of sexual misconduct, and he made a statement of sorts right after the winners were announced Linda tell us what happened. Well, he had a picture of himself that he posted saying, you know, thank you for recognising me. And he's sitting in a director sheets really unusual to have the lead actor in a film, ROY Malik in this case except in award for his lead performance, and the film except for best drama picture, and nobody mentions of the director, right? And he sort of drew a line under it by making this kind of public comments share dead on a more positive note. Actress Regina king won best supporting actress for her performance in the film, if Beale street could talk and she went up on stage and made a pledge that women would make up fifty percent of her productions for the next two years. Anyone out.

Bryan singer director Donald Shirley Aisha Harris Bill Murray Regina king Greenberg Peter ferrelli ROY Malik Linda fifty percent two years