20 Episode results for "Air Patrol"

30: Warrior Kid Podcast. Ask Uncle Jake with Solomon Schmidt

Warrior Kid Podcast

00:00 sec | 11 months ago

30: Warrior Kid Podcast. Ask Uncle Jake with Solomon Schmidt

"This is warrior kid. PODCAST number thirty. Ask Uncle Jake and this podcast is based on the three way of the warrior. Kid Books the first one wimpy to warrior the navy seal way the second one marks mission and now a third one which is called where there's a will and the books are about young mark who faces a lot of the problems that kids everywhere face but mark gets help solving those problems from his uncle. Jake who was a navy seal and who stays with mark in the summertime. Now this podcast is usually for kids to hear some more lessons from Uncle Jake and also get the chance to ask Uncle Jake some questions but today we have a guest on the podcast by the name of Solomon Schmidt. Now Solomon then Schmidt is still a kid but he's an author he's sixteen years old he's already written five books and all the books are history books he also plays piano and is a member of the Civil Air Patrol. Pretty good track. He's got going right now. Solomon Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me on. It's very good to meet you you too so all of the books that you've written our history books. What made you start to get interested in history? Well my mom has been reading to me from the time. I was really young For as long as I can remember she was putting books in my hands. And she's the one who taught me how to read and write and I guess there never really was a time when I wasn't has an interest in history I can remember specific children's book. It was an overview the statue liberty and how it was built was brought to America. There was a little picture book for eight eight nine year olds. But that's that's the first American history book I can clearly remember. I remember from that. I was really interesting. That titanic for the longest time so. We're not a lot of books on that. I watched the nineteen fifties sixties version of it. And like you said I just can't remember a time when I wasn't interested in history and it it spiraled into getting interested in specific topics like World War Two which I was on for the longest time Winston Churchill all the battles and generals and civil war American Revolution Revolution usually military history so what fascinates me the most. But I can't remember a time when I haven't been learning about it and intrigued to learn more on read more and study more. Know if I've heard correctly is there some connection to your family in the military and specifically Pearl Harbor. Yeah my great grandma who turned ninety eight just a couple of weeks ago he was actually at Pearl. Harbor was attacked. Is One of only a few survivors left he was. He was removed from the main area of attack. He was getting his ammunition. Inspected in officer ran into the tent. And he said grab your guns. We're at war. And he said by the time everything was got everything was pulled out and gun ready for the attack to to fight against the Japanese planes. The first wave was gone and around. He he told me that he didn't have a big part in actually fighting against the Japanese. But it's it's always something that has stayed with him and he still villas memories of being there and a fighting the Japanese in the Pacific he drove trucks around. That was his job he i. I'm not sure if he was ever actually in like battles where he shot people but he he served in the war for four years and I really think think that's something that I can look back on and that's a tidy history right there in my own family. You know one of the few people that's actually survivor. Pearl Harbor is my great Grandpa by bombs. GRANDPA and he's he's just a great guy he's He's still plays his harmonica nursing homes. You know he's almost a century old but I I just I love people who have continued to keep the legacy alive by teaching people about history by carrying about our country and knowing knowing that patriotism and a love of country especially when you're serving in the military is is so important and he did have that and he loves America and Pearl Pearl Harbor. I think is something that has always stayed with him. He's usually pretty quiet when I talk about his military service or when I want to ask him about that but Pearl Harbor is something. He opened opened up to me more. I think because it's something that I said He. He wasn't like in the main part of the attack but he was definitely impacted by it. Yet will the military is a giant into organization and the Mount of people that are actually on the frontlines. Fighting is usually very very small much smaller than what people think. But in order to get those troops on the front lines to actually be able to fight there is a massive amount of logistics. What does the logistics means? It means that people need food. The people need fuel. The people need ammunition for their weapons. They need medical supplies. There's all these things that the soldiers that are on the front lines need and so your great-grandfather you said. Greg Great-grandfather for data admit is his name. And he played the role that he played for in serving. His country was to deliver those logistics in the front lines and even though he might not feel or you might think oh he. He wasn't fighting on the front lines. Trust me as a front as a guy that was on the front lines. If you don't have those back back logistics behind you to support you. You're not going to be able to make anything anything happened. So that's why whenever somebody tells me that they served no matter what capacity they served in the military. I always thank them for their service because they were doing what their country needed him into. New -solutely yeah. So you transitioned at some point from reading about history into writing about history. How old were you you when you wrote your first book I started writing it when I was twelve and I had been struggling for a little while to kind of wonder you know? What should I do what? What should my thing be? I started by making a board game called politics power and it was a little makeshift game. Made the book. The board game politic power. I started that I think when I was eleven. That's interesting and I started putting it together just so you know when I was eleven my friends and I were throwing mud at each. Yeah I think you're you're already progressed a little bit further than me. Okay so you make the board game politics power. Yes so I mean it just had it was Kinda like monopoly. It had a board exactly like a go position. And you know you sent to jail you commit a an illegal act in in politics but it had all these pieces and I. I've got everything but of course then it comes down to actually okay. But how do you finish and actually make it a board game so struggling to not to do that and I came down to the basement one day to my dad's workbench and we started talking and he said you know Sama. What do you really love? And I said well history debt and he said well. Why don't she writes history book for Kids Your Age and other time? I think it was eleven when that happened. And I was intrigued by the idea. And we know this man who's written over over a hundred bucks and he gave me a piece of advice. He said well actually told my dad. He said never do a project if somebody else has already done and done it very well focus on. You're just wasting your time so my dad told me okay. I'm glad for you. You should do this but be sure there isn't anything already out there like it so I did my research. I looked around around and couldn't find anything in the format or for the audience targeting about US history. And I knew that's what I wanted to do. And I finished D- I worked on it for several months. Finishing the sections and I can remember one time we run vacation in the Adirondack Mountains in New York. I remember. That's where I wrote the Cuban missile crisis. This is on the way. Remember that but certain things stay in my memory from all different points of writing the books Yeah that's how. US History Bites game to be now how you kind of breezed over the fact that in a few months you finish the book now as you know I've written a bunch of books as well and it's not easy to write a book and I always tell people people the books don't write themselves you actually have to get. You actually have to do the work. What was there any particular thing that you did to to ensure that you got your project done? Well I can remember with. I don't specifically remember with us. History Bites I remember that my goal was because at the time. I didn't think I was going to be writing any other one so my goal was just okay. I just want to read this book so I didn't have a specific time. I think no of course the research process is a completely different process and takes by itself. I think I left myself six months to actually write the thirty sections and I I can remember clear with my last books though With my most recent books I would. I would figure out what day of what month I needed to be done by and I'd figure figure out. How many sections I would need to do in order to achieve that goal and how I would need to break it up and I'd get it done and it really just came to a matter of each day I'd go okay whether I have a headache or not whether I feel like it or not? I have to get this section done today. I have to get this part of research done. I have to read about Gandhi today. And that's what I need to do and kind of like you talk about your books. I went to bed feeling great and I woke up the next morning feeling ready to go onto whatever was next one of the things things that I talk about when it comes to my writing process is I write a thousand words a day when I when I'm writing a book. I read a thousand words every a single day. It takes me about forty five minutes to an hour to get that done and what it does is a couple big benefits to it. We'll number one. You're slowly chipping away at this big giant project. And if you try if you woke up today and you said I'm going to write a hundred thousand words today. That would be very intimidating. And I don't recommend doing that. And if you wake up and you say look I'm GonNa find forty five minutes today. I'm GonNa find an hour and I'm going to do what I'm supposed to do. Which is hammer out these thousand words? What's good about it? That's that's good. You Get don little bits at a time. Which is it's easier you ever heard that expression about eating an elephant? How do you eat an elephant? One limited time. What one bite at a time right one bite at a time? That's all you can do. You can't eat that you can't stop that whole elephant in your mouth. Not that I advise Edna elephants but if you were to have to eat an element elephant you'd want to do a little bit at a time so the thing is that you're taking little bites of your project the other thing that's good about writing every day in my opinion is if I skip three days Of writing when I open back when I opened a computer backup to start writing again. I forgot what the last thing I wrote was. Now I have to go back and spend twenty minutes or thirty minutes or maybe even forty five minutes to an hour reading what I wrote to get myself back up to where I can start writing again. I have to redeploy my brain and that redeployment time takes time. So that's why I always recommend you. You take that and you you do every single day and what's good the reason I'm spending a little bit of time talking about this is that this applies to really anything really anything that you you WanNa get good at. Whether it's you WanNa get good. I play guitar. I know you play piano. You don't want to try and save up for a month worth of practice at piano and say oh well going to do is just one weekend. I'm going to practice eighty nine hours. You know. I don't even know if that's mathematically possible but you don't WanNa do that you will. It's much much better and and it's better for your skill to practice that instrument every single day. If it's a sport you want to get good at. If you want to get good at dribbling a basketball don't just say okay. Well one week before basketball. Ask Ball season. I'm just going to dribble a basketball a lot for for eighteen hours a day. That's not how you get good at it. You get good at it by doing little bits at a time but you do it really consistent consistently every single day. That's how you get good. How are you at piano? I'd probably put myself admitted mid intermediate maybe and. How often do you practice Every day Monday to Friday and Saturday just kind of if I need a break during the day or just I know I have something I wanNA play. I WANNA get done. I might sit down and play for a little while but beyond one of those things where I finished my practicing time and then than any other time I played during the days just wanting to sit down and play because sometimes you know and I know this helps some people with music. A- as almost a De stressor they use it Canada so nice when I am having a lot and I need to just start thinking cleared but something well play a piano piece and just think through what I need to do and then go back downstairs and keep working so throughout the day. I'll come back and play it. Yeah and that's the same thing I played guitar and it definitely is one of the most relaxing things as I do even though it's hard but just playing get definitely as a good. It's a good way to relax the last thing I'll say about this and that you mentioned was you got got you in your head and maybe even perhaps on paper you wrote down. Hey here's my goal. Here's where I want to achieve it by and then from that you worked backwards to figure out the steps you need to take same thing. You can actually take that technique and apply it to just about anything anything that you want to get done any kind of a project any skill you WANNA get. You WanNa make the basketball team. Here's what you gotTa do to give yourself the best chance for making the basketball team. You Wanna be able to play a certain piano piece. Okay this this is how many hours of practice it's GonNa take. Here's how I'm going to set it up. I WANNA learn this Guitar Solo. Here's what it's going to take for me to get there and I'm going to chip away at it every day. Those are are great techniques to use to kind of tackle any project that you might have out there right now. Something else that you're on the path of is you're a member of the Civil Air Patrol. Tell us a little bit about the Civil Air Patrol for folks. That don't have any idea what it is. So so civil. Air Patrols and auxiliary of the airforce were not actually members of the military. Although sometimes I've known cadets who have walked into you know like McDonald's and they'll get free free pop because people say thank you This is civil air ritual. We meet once a week and Friday nights and we get together and we learn leadership. We learned drill aerospace emergency emergency services. We do classes we do. PT Once a month and we get together and we teach classes and they're different ranks. Who can promote you start as an cadet a basic and you can promote the program all the way up to cadet colonel which takes years to doing a lot of work you can promote? I think it's every fifty six days he's and you know they're like eight requirements. You have to have you have to pass nearest based test leadership test fitness test and a few other things but I go once a night on on once a week on Friday night to Niagara. I live near Niagara Falls so I go to Niagara Composite Squadron. We meet from seven to ten and I I have the position in my squadron of training. NCO I see so my job is I have three training officers under me. My job is to approve classes for the schedule and send them to be scheduled so if if classes are done they go through me I look over them and then send them to the person who takes care of actually getting a date for them at a time than I report back and have my officers trying to figure out who's interested in doing a classes. What program can we develop? And actually we're GONNA BE STARTING A program on your book extreme ownership very soon. So that's coming up Nice Nice. How does the Civil Air Patrol actually get employed so it's a volunteer organization station? It's it it usually comes people telling their friends people go into school and saying hey you should come and visit you visit for three weeks and then you can actually signed paperwork and become become a member of the squadron and but yeah it's it's a volunteer organization and sometimes people who want crack down hard on the cadets. have to your mind that hey you know. This isn't the military people aren't paid to. They can leave if they don't like to be here. If you're not making it more of a I guess a welcoming environment so but the function auctioned they can actually serve. Because sometimes I civil air patrol gets called to perform functions to help out in certain situations. Can you give an example of what situations the Civil Air Patrol might get called out a assistant. I know they were called out after nine eleven. They were called become an assist but they also do other missions. Like if there's an aircraft down they've been sent up to to find the the people were lost unfortunately Sometimes they're sent for Border Patrol in airplanes means and besides that the a lot of the inner workings of cap isn't my area of expertise. But I I know people telling stories. And there's there's plaques about my squadron of stories of cadets who have gone out and become heroes through the missions. They've accomplished now do you. Are you looking at this current. We're in kind of. I don't want to call it a hobby but it's an interest right now of being in the Civil Air Patrol. Are you thinking that this might lead to some kind of a future for you inside the Military right now for for the longest time I wanted to be an officer in the Air Force on. I'm not sure if the military is something I want to go into But the the great thing about cap is we called his. It prepares you for life teaching leadership principles. Like you have an all your books that don't just apply to people who are in the military even though those are some of the best situations to use them in the things you learn in cap and being over people and interacting with people and what works and what doesn't in leadership actually getting to apply that in real life Each week is such a benefit and people have stories where they went on to business business and other things and they could remember lessons they learned from cap and and of course there are a lot of people we have that. Go right into the air force. We have to cadets who are leaving soon to go into will the army and I think the the the navy okay So yeah some people use it as a stepping stone to go to the military. Now if you're Y you're sixteen years old so you'll finish your high score gonNa try and go to college. What do you think your your post high school education? Asian is GonNa look like so right now. I'm looking into going into a program with State University of New York looking to go for my bachelor's degree in history through them that's not a big surprise right history and then from there. I'm I'm looking at a few colleges right now. Not sure what because it's so far down the road still to get actually a masters and PhD in history. And then what do you what do you want to do with that masters in in history and even a PhD in history which is how many years of school for for the kids out there that here that what does that mean. PhD In history but says it's about seven years of working college and then it ends with a dissertation which is which could be as as long as I've heard of some dissertations that are nine hundred pages long where you have to write a research project based on on a subject. That's related to what you've been studying and that's your final assignment. Signed and what would you want to do with that. PhD In history. Besides no a bunch of stuff. Well I wanNA teach at the college level and be be a professor and help the next generation learn history because it's another great way to teach it Not just through books but the Nice thing about of course you know being a college professors. They're encouraged to keep writing. And that's something I wanNA do. I always want to keep writing on the side for sure. I don't think it's something I wanna make my career like in just being an author But it's definitely something. WanNa keep up because I think the topics I write about are important for kids at a very a young age to learn because I mean I don't think you can learn history to young. It's just it's one of those subjects where it's so important because you're always going to be needing that knowledge through your life and your there's always more to learn about history. That's what always amazes me. I've met historians who've been studying history for fifty sixty years and they still have so much that they don't know even though they own seven thousand books and they can tell me about so many different places and there are still areas that you know they they either don't know a lot about or they still have the things to learn books to read because there's so so many books you know one of the things that I love about history and I think that our art education system can miss this which means I think our school system can miss this a little bit is that would you look at history. You see the if you look hard enough and sometimes you don't even have to look that hard. Everything that we learned is connected everything that we learn when you learn up a poem in English. Well guess what that poem was written by someone who is living through a certain time period who experienced certain things in that time period. When you you learn a scientific fact well there's somebody that learned or discovered that scientific fact who is in a certain time period of the world who experienced Orient Certain things in that time period who lived in a certain culture during a certain time? No matter what you learn if you learn to play piano well there's someone that created the first piano and someone that put together notes and someone that figured out how to organize those notes into a song and all those things can be traced through history so no matter what. You're learning no matter what subject you're learning. Every subject can be tied together through the same thread of history. And that's why I think history is a great basis to learn from because I think and I know it's totally true for me. I learn better when I see the connections between different things and I've found that when I taught my own kids it was much easier to teach them when I could tie what they were learning to other things they had learned. And that's why I think history is a great thing that ties really every thing together that we learn that's true and I've heard people say that it's the most important subject and I mean practically of course math is so important knowing basic math But I think history history. I think there is something that argument of history being the most born in. What you said makes a Lotta Sense? How often do you read? Well a lot of my reading comes for researching for books. I have some pastime books I read but I try to keep a good amount. I tried to certain amount of the day a portion to reading so that I I keep getting done what I need to because otherwise it just I if I put it off and say I'm GonNa do later in the day a lot of times it gets to dinner and it's not done so so I was an English major. You're in college and there was a one semester where I made a really bad decision and that decision was to take five English classes houses. At one time I know college is a long way away for a lot of kids that are listening to this but I recommend you do not take five having classes at one time. And here's why I got assigned real. We had to read books. When you're studying English? You have to read books. I had to read so many books that I would spend eight ten or twelve hours on Saturday and Sunday for an entire semester which is four months long of just reading and it actually hurt my eyes. My eyes would hurt so try not to have to read that much but one of the things that I also say about reading is reading is is the at the top of the pyramid in terms of how to become smarter right how to become smarter. The best way to become smarter is to read and the best way to become the next best thing is to start writing. And so you're doing both those this things right now so we hope you're getting pretty smart at this point Solomon and there's a lot of people that know a lot more than I do. Well that's that's a good humble attitude to the have and they're certainly always more to learn but speaking of your books I've got. I've got one of your books right here. This book is called. US Presidential History Bites and it talks about the president's the presence of the United States of America and of course because it starts about talks about the presence of the United States of America it starts with the first president president of the United States of America. Who's I think my favorite president a guy by the name of George Washington Real Quick Little section that you wrote George? Washington was born in Westmoreland County. Virginia in seventeen thirty to his parents were Augustine and Mary. Washington George had seven siblings as two older brothers and five younger brothers and sisters when his older brother Lawrence joined the English navy. George wanted the joint to how ever his mother would not let him because he was only eleven years old George grew up and became a surveyor survey or someone that that goes out and serve as the land and figures out where property lines are. Then you continue on here. As a survey surveyor. He took many exciting journeys including one in which he was almost captured by native Americans during this time the English and the French so this is before America even existed. During this time the English and French controlled land in America. Each country wanted to take land from the other so they could have more power this to start a war in seventeen fifty six called the French and Indian war. George fought for the English. Who eventually won? That might come as a surprise to some people that he was actually fighting for the British English and he continues on here another section after the French and Indian War England England made the American colonists pay a lot of money in taxes. The English did this because they had spent almost all of their money during the war and were hoping to gain some move it back by over taxing the colonists and the colonists were the people that had come to American. We're living here. This made the colonists angry and they wanted America to become an independent country separate from England. This led to a war between the colonists and the English called the American Revolution also known as the war for independence or the Revolutionary War. The colonists chose George Washington to lead the American continental army and he was a brave general during the war eventually America one and became its own country after the war. Mr Washington helped to form America's new government. He was very popular with many Americans and in seventeen eighty eight he was elected as is the first United States president and he was inaugurated in New York City which was the capital of America at that time. So there's just a little introduction. That's the first President President Washington and in. That's the First Section of this book. US presidential history in History Bites And you call it history bites because there's little sections of history in these you breakdown in Nice simple format so kids. What age groups would you say these? These books are written for. Well the Tar. The primary audience is elementary to early middle school. But the really for anyone if all ages that wants to learn history They've had adults tell me that they enjoy them. Grandparents but yet targeted target audience is probably ages five to ten awesome. And they're also good. I know that they can be read. I know I've read this one in particular to my daughter so it's a good book to read to kids and I think that's great. I think that's a great introduction George Washington like I said I think it's a good introduction to your books and if People Wanna get your books or they want to hear from you. What's the best way to do that? My website is history bites dot com. You can order the books. There's also way to contact me on the website and then do you have. Don't you have a youtube channel. I do it's called. It's called History Bites I have videos uploaded that go along with. US History Bites News presidential history. He Bites But lately I've been doing a lot more videos with with green screen and special effects on different famous people from world history and I've also got some interviews coming up to what kind of special effects are you putting on this green screen. I won't talk in lasers explosions. What are we talking about well? The what's really nice by the green screen green is I can be anywhere. I'm talking about if I want to be on top of Mount Everest. I can be on top on Everest if I'm talking about Mother Teresa I can have mother Theresa right behind me on the screen and I think it's a great way to catch people's attention to keep them watching the video and it's it's another way to learn history awesome all right well. I think that's all we have time for for this warrior. Kid podcast and if you WANNA get one of the warrior kid books you can get all the warrior kid. Books looks at Warrior Kid Dot Com once again. If you WANNA get the history bites books you can get those at history bites dot com. You can also get them on Amazon right. Yes and you can also get a book called Mikey and the dragons from Amazon and if you WanNa wore your t shirt or Ju Jitsu rash guard you can get them from Jaakko store dot com and if you are training Jujitsu and you needed Jujitsu g you can get one of those for kids at origin main dot com. You can also get something called warrior kid mock which is a drink that makes you stronger and healthier. It's got protein in it and it tastes delicious and also if you WANNA warrior kid picture for your wall you can get that from flipside canvas dot dot com and that's it so thanks to Solomon for coming on. I appreciate it. Thanks your reading the books and and remember what Solomon has learned and that is that you can learn a lot from history and you can also accomplish a lot by setting goals and then working every day towards those goals. Even if you're a kid now go out there and train hard study hard work hard get after it and be a warrior kid.

US America Civil Air Patrol Solomon Schmidt basketball officer George Washington Uncle Jake Pearl Harbor Pearl Harbor Washington George Winston Churchill mark Adirondack Mountains Mount Everest president
549 Civil Air Patrol

Airplane Geeks Podcast

1:34:27 hr | 1 year ago

549 Civil Air Patrol

"This is the airplane. Geeks podcast or aim is to educate and inform. You explore and expand your passion for aviation in dinner taniwha little along the way this episode. We talk about the civil air patrol the role of noncommissioned officers in aviation and the v twenty two Osprey in the news. The last Doolittle raider passes the race to recover a Japanese f thirty five a special operations command needs a light attack aircraft the streto launch completes. Its first flight the AMA sensor on the opium three zero two. In an American Airlines flight hits a sign also a positive airline story of the week. Delta reduces seat recline and SM aviation orders. Sixty all electric airplanes all that and more coming up right now. Welcome to the airplane. Geeks podcast this episode five hundred forty nine of the show where we talk aviation. I max flight in joining me is I David Vanderhoek. He's our aviation historian. Hey, david. Hey, max long time. No talk. It's like twenty four hours in like, I actually saw you in person. Not sure how that happened. But looking forward to a good show tonight, lots of stuff to talk about and ospreys pretty cool thing, I think so and to help us talk about ospreys and other other flying devices we have of course, max trescott host of aviation. News talk podcast. He's an expert on the Cirrus aircraft. And he's also the two thousand eight see if I of the year. Do max max flight, hey, you sound like you're at home for change guy. No, it's been it's been over two weeks. Just got home from sun and fun yesterday. And it ended a week ago. Well, I think I think flying the way I got home to California's a little faster than the way you got home driving. Yeah. I I had a few stops along the way to visit family. But by the time, I got back home last night. I had just shy of three thousand miles headed to the car. Nice road trip. Also with us. This time is our main man mica, Mike how you doing? I'm doing great. Hello from the great northeast up here in the USA. And I've got to say I'm sorry that your home because the highlight of my last week's was you guys at sun and fun. Oh, it was a blast. Let me tell you. I guess we did already. Yeah. Fantastic event. We've got some more recordings from sun and fund coming up not this episode, but sometime soon up to sort through all of those having just returned home, and we'll do that in the near future. Well, let me introduce our guest. This episode is our Mondo carry on. He's an enlisted aircrew on the bell Boeing v twenty two Osprey. He's also a commercial pilot civil air patrol mission pilot in Reno air race team member in that. Name sounds familiar. Well, you've probably heard or Mondo co hosting on the plane talking UK podcast or Mondo welcome to airplane. Geeks guys. It is absolutely my pleasure to be here on the airplane. Geeks. And I feel like I'm in the presence of podcasting royalty. We're we're just a couple of guys with Mike. I think you sing old. Is that right? Yeah. I've been feeling old lately. Royal pains in the what did he say? Well, that's that's all implied. But I'm actually joining you guys. I have to correct you. I was a former enlisted aircrew member since I just retired last week from the US air force up for about twenty one years. You know, the the latest plain talking UK episode dropped into my podcast app today in I thought I saw something about a retirement there. So that that's pretty exciting. Are you retired from everything who are you going to be moving on to some new things? Well, you know, the I could've gone on and served for another ten years, and it would have been my pleasure. However when you look at the industry right now, the commercial aviation industry and in general aviation the need for instructors at it was almost too good to pass up. So I think it was just kind of time to pass on the baton to some of the young guys and come join you guys and civilian aviation to rate. All right. Well, we're going to talk about the civil air. Patrol with you, also the the Osprey, you know, I saw my first flying Osprey at sun and fun when it passed over me by me, the camping area when it arrived, and you know, Haifa's so transfixed since I had never seen one of these things flying that didn't even reach for my camera. But. I wish I had because it was a pretty spectacular sight. But I did get a shot of it on static display couple of days later. So in fact, we'll put we'll put that in the show notes maybe for everybody to look at. And we'll be talking about that coming up soon. Great for starters, the aviation news from the past week is everyone ready ready from the west mainly ready and ready from Charlotte kick it. I story. This comes from K, FOX TV dot com. Richard Cole last World War, Two Doolittle raider dies in Texas. Lieutenant Colonel Richard dick Cole died at age one hundred three and he's the last of the two little raiders. Of course, the the Doolittle raiders flu that I guess you'd call it a daring attack on Japan during World War Two. It was just a few months. I guess after Pearl Harbor. David wasn't wasn't the intent of that mission to drop incendiary bombs on Japan more of a morale booster and to send a message to well to the whole world. Interestingly enough, we're recording this on the fifteenth of April and the anniversary is just three days away on the. Eighteenth of April. Now, I can give you the morale answer or I could give you the real historical answer. The morale answer was yes, it was the ability to show that the Japanese home islands were still. Impr- we're not impervious to attack by the United States forces after the Pearl Harbor decimation in December seventh however, one of the one of the side aspects of the Doolittle rate, and then we should talk about Lieutenant Cole. Was from historical aspect was it pulled it pulled back the Japanese four, oh she's back to the homeland because that attack and specifically the attack that while it did little damage on toke Tokyo did show that the United States could attack from long range that required that the Japanese decision to bring back much of their forces back to the home island for self defense. Which made made island hopping later much easier to do because they were not pushing the forces out shortly after we have midway, and that's turning point where Japanese do not dominate Pacific anymore. The United States moving. Moving west to island, hopping to the Philippines. Okinawa type and type and and then onto the Japanese homeland. Lieutenant Cole is the last of the best. Lieutenant Cole was the copilot to the ruptured duck, the ruptured duck was Mitchell's aircraft. Billy Mitchell was going to be the one who if he couldn't do it. He wasn't going to ask his men to do it. And in fact, Mitchell and coal and the ruptured duck or the first one off to hornet on they had the shortest deck. If you can imagine the v twenty fives were lined up on the deck, and we didn't have aircraft carriers with. All the aircraft's. We had in the hornet was one of them was a straight deck. So there was no angled deck. So that you park the aircraft and where you were parked in line was how much runway you had. So Lieutenant Cole and Billy Mitchell were the ones to do the shortest takeoff revved up the aircraft release the breaks down the Hornets deck, and and took off keep in mind that the worn it did not launch the aircraft in a time that they wanted to. They were actually sponsored spotted by a Japanese fishing trawler that they believed after they attacked and destroyed it, but they believed had already notified the home. When that the attack was coming. So the choice was either to turn back or to launch the aircraft and the aircraft were supposed to fly directly over Japan into. Then friendly Soviet territory. Most of the made it some of them became prisoners of war. But Lieutenant Cole went on to like Mitchell went on were recovered and went back to states, and then served out the war one of the traditions that came after the end of the war was there was a scotch and it at the air force museum and every year they would get together on April eighteenth. And celebrate how successful the mission was an all of the Doolittle raiders got together. Well, a couple years ago when it was down to three they decided not to hold his era Mony anymore and Lieutenant coal at one hundred and three was the last one and finally turned his Cup over which. The city of Tucson sponsored those cups and gave the Doolittle raiders 1896 bottle of the poll. The brandy the soap E eighteen eighteen ninety six because that was the year that do little was born and that bottle and that display is the US air force museum, and it will no longer be be drunk from or or seeing Dave he wasn't Jimmy doolittle's co-pilot. He was doing co-pilot pilot. You said Mitchell if I've been saying Mitchell the whole time. Yes, you did. Oh my God. I'm sorry. All right. That's all right. Corrected here. Yeah. Jimmy, do those aircraft. They flew, folks. Not. And I'm just losing my mind. Okay. I'm going to shut up and go crawl into a hole the rest of the evening. Your emails to Mike at the US. Well, if you want to see there's a actually not so bad film that tells the story pretty well. It's called thirty seconds over Tokyo came out in nineteen forty four stars Spencer, Tracy, and I'd recommend you take a look at it to get the whole story. And actually, I actually was the twenty five Mitchell at the Pearl Harbor museum that I saw back in February actually is the splayed on an aircraft carrier deck and is labeled the ruptured duck. Likewise, the b twenty five also be twenty five also at the air force museum is Doolittle raider. So okay, I'm going to start now. All right. Oh, I'm really sorry. I'm humiliated. I'm going away. Now by. No, not at all. You know, when when we started talking about some of your guys questions to me. I'm sure you're going to fact, check me. So you get you get one hundred percent pass go. Couple of days ago, when I was visiting my mother, she hands me this clipping from the Washington Post. In. It's it's actually a bitchy wary for for coal. But anyway, it there's a there's a paragraph in here. It says as they reached Japan the tenant Cole said he saw beachgoers waving. And there's a quote from him. It was kind of like flying in Miami. He told the Dayton daily news. So those kind of a humorous humorous aspect to it. So, but yeah, so the last the last of the little raiders now history. So, you know, we we carry that tradition forward to or at least a memory forward honoring these guys who I mean, this was a one way mission which is. Normally missions you like to to have a return home, but this was kind of sketchy mission, but you know, the I think in in wartime in the the motivations for doing this where greater than the the individuals involved. But it was quite a feat. And max there is one other thing that's going to be the legacy for the Doolittle raiders. Yeah. And that is our new stealth bomber at the beach one has been named the raider in honor of the Doolittle. Oh, I didn't pick up on that. All right. Very cool. Very well. We have another military story. This is from the sun dot co dot UK race to find Japan's f thirty five stealth jet that crashed into see before China or Russia can steal top secret tech. Maybe the longest headline will run across today, but Japanese f thirty five eight. Fighter was lost about eighty miles east of the coasts of Japan. I guess as as we record this some of the wreckage has been found, I think the fate of the pilot is still still unknown. I think the pilot is still missing is that right? David. Have you heard anything more recent on the last time, I heard it was still considered missing in action? Yeah. So I guess this was a training mission in the the notion here is that if China or if Russia finds the wreckage I than that would be a great intelligence opportunity for them. So I guess what we have right now is a lot lot of surface and underwater vehicles to their or headed they're looking for the wreckage David wha-, what would the Russians or the Chinese? Be able to learn that would be important if they were able to recover and get away with the f thirty five the sensor, suite. I mean, the not necessarily the stealth. But the thirty five as far as an electronic capable aircraft. And all of the sensors that make it the force multiplier that the F thirty five is the ability to network with other aircraft, etc. That's all built into the airframe. And those kind of those kind of sensors and sweet and electric technology would be where the Chinese and the Russians would want it to they could learn to defeat it. So it's not the first time we've had an aircraft. Go go down, and we've sent lots and lots of aircraft and subs and recovery vehicles out to try to find it because we've done it with their fourteen we've done it with F fifteens. But over time any piece of any piece of damage that they recover. That our our foes recover or could be used against the aircraft to diminish it. And we already know that the f thirty five quite a few plans of it fell into Chinese hands. So them being able to having the plans, and then seeing the technology up close, even if it's damaged you can reverse engineer it, so it's it could be a devastating loss to the program and to the aircraft's capabilities if it's recovered by people who don't want to see the aircraft the another website that will probably list the drive talks about how it's possible that they have already spotted where it is. But haven't released it because they don't want people to know, but they expect it's down roughly a mile and don't think it's really particularly going to be easily recoverable with with the current submarine technology that we have in terms of naval submarines. They may be a couple that can can get down there. But it's it's below crush depth of many of them. And what the other thing that I found interesting. This is one of the Mitsubishi assembled the f thirty five as it was made in Japan and from our parts and assembly enough supervising very closely. But it's it's a pretty scary thing to think that it might be recovered from by a couple of other nations. Yeah. Yeah. There's also a little bit of information about the pilot forty one years old. He's called inexperienced pilot about thirty two hundred flying hours about sixty in the f thirty five A, of course, that smaller number because the f thirty five eight hasn't been in Japan for for too long and his Mike said this is kind of a freshly built one. Yeah. I was going to pretty much saying exactly what Mike which is. It's interesting because this is Jeff. Knees assembled one, but as far as other countries, recovering this Misawa air base, where the aircraft to cough from is essentially a US base. Also. So we we've got a an abundance of US forces in the area. So I saw one of the articles or as a p eight Poseidon that's flying. We've got fifteen in that area. We've got a various rescue aircraft. So if they know where or at least the general area, I'm sure it will be an international area. But but the US will probably saturate the area to prevent that or any pieces from from going to the wrong people. They even have YouTube in the sky looking for it. Apparently, it has some sensors that may be able to help detect it. According to some of the websites I've seen and keep in mind that the reason why the Russians and the North Koreans and the Chinese. As one access to it is this is a weapon system that's being pervasive in the Pacific region. It's deployed now in Japan. Australia Singapore, looking at purchasing it, South Korea is looking at purchasing it. So you can understand that this is a very important aircraft to that region from a a international perspective. So the foes of those countries in our Pacific alliance who are Quiring the aircraft would want to get it. So they because they view it as threat in that area, especially China. All right. One more military story in mica found this one. This is so calm commander says special ops needs light attack aircraft. That's so special operations command and Armando you were associated with with that when you were overseas, weren't you? That's right. Actually, I spent most of my career in special operations command in one way or another and you have the four services, plus the coastguard, which are essentially force providers. And the way we like to say, if you if you look at any of the fact sheets as we man train and equip, and then so come is kind of a unique entity in that it is an operational command. So it takes forces from each of the services and employs them together for very unique roles and. Yeah. That's so does that happen. Very frequently. I mean, are are these special roles something that happens frequently or is sort of an occasional thing and just not familiar with with so calm now. Yes. A lot of people aren't actually because it's probably one of the smaller commands, so you know, I had to look up the numbers myself on the so-called public affairs website and overall the entire command is about seventy thousand people which is actually not very big and one some of the unique things that so com. Does you know, so we we know of the big conflicts in in the Middle East and the potential conflicts in the Pacific and and over in Europe. But there's a lot of partnership that goes along with that. So when you're talking about humanitarian assistance when you're talking about training of foreign. Pilots or even ground crews or operations guys anything that is at doesn't fall meet -ly under a conventional doctrine kinda gets picked up by so calm. And it's not all sure it is what you see in the movies and the video games. But, but you know, ninety percent of it is is really just building relationships with partner nations. And getting them to be almost to our level where where they can defend themselves, but the four weaken get a big conventional force in there. So what is the need for a light attack aircraft? And we know what they're looking at. And as well as the purpose. Why this is one of these great examples where you look back in history and David can chime in on. You wanna fight over this? What are you what you wanna take it? I'll I'll say by two cents, but David jump in one hundred percent in modern day. It's about a almost commercially available cost effective solution. And it's about training, the partner nations. Right. So we can operate and we've got I won't say we have unlimited budget. But but we've got a much more robust defense budget than many of these other nations when we're trying to either provide them with with some airplanes, it needs to be something that they can sustain. So you're talking about maintenance costs. You're talking about parts cost parts of AOL ability durability of an airplane. You know, it takes a lot of manpower to get an f thirty five to fly. But when you're talking about a super Tucano, or there was a company just here North Carolina called I o max, I believe they were taking a crop duster. I think it was an eighteen eighty two or something like that. Yeah. And turning it into a light attack armed reconnaissance aircraft or the cost maybe two thousand dollars an hour to operate as opposed to fifteen thousand dollars. But but I'll let David takeover because we've we've been doing light attack commercial aircraft since probably since World War Two right low intensity conflict. If we go back to post Korean war where we started fighting proxy wars. Let's go with Vietnam. We wanted to build up to South Vietnam air force. But we wanted to give them the ability to fly aircraft that they could operate the South Vietnam air force was not able to operate things like f four phantoms or various other things. So what we came up with was counter insurgency aircraft coin aircraft the greatest. Example, and one that has come back from from doom is the Lovie ten Bronco which was a light attack aircraft easily maintained forward operable. Another good example was the Cessna. Yes. You heard that? Right. Cessna eight thirty seven Dragonfly which could act like a trainer, and as well as an attack aircraft, very low maintenance very easy to fly being able to provide for their control as well. As late attack the role that these aircraft would provide would be a lot of what our marine and army do which they're their helicopters patches, and whiskey or zebra Zulu cobras currently the six Texan to which is our current primary trainer. Beechcraft? Has uploaded it with some Ford aircraft as well as the MBA or to con-, oh, which the United States is actually purchased for Afghanistan, and they're using that as their primary primary aircraft as well. As the Takaona they're using as for the Iraqi or force. However, the Iraqi forces a little more sophisticated we've given sixteen vs and Lord knows we gave them some C one thirties off of my fathers ramp. So these are all not necessarily not necessarily aircraft that the United States wants to fly. And unfortunately with the crash last year of the super Tucano the program of quietly went away, but Mike, unfortunately, one of the reasons why I don't talk about this program is it's as bad as a tanker program. Won't go away. Won't go away keeps popping up. But like I said, it's designed to support our allies. We want to be able to give people the ability to provide their own self defense and build up structures. So that they can support the US if an event occurs. They we need to come into play. So those kind of those kind of aircraft trying to find the right one, but it's kind of hard to tell congress. We want to spend millions of dollars on an aircraft that we're never going to buy one of the greatest aircraft that came out of this was the five tiger to or the five a which was designed for the counterinsurgency role. And we've got no money out of him. Because we just bought a punch more from Switzerland to act as adversaries their forty year old airframes, but it's a challenge because we're trying to provide an economic reason for allies like Iraq and Afghanistan to support their forces. And a lot of African countries we wanna build up our infrastructure there to support them. So they have but we don't want to you just can't. To provide a developing nation. You can't provide them F16.'s. You can't provide. I mean, we're not talking at thirty five we're talking like F16.'s and some of the nation's now are Quiring first generation of sixteenth from the seventies. So we want to be able to support be able support that if the structure, so that's what the low insurgency low cost aircraft Amado that I hit it. All. Yeah. Absolutely. So max, t do you have any idea where you're going to be able to strap that Browning m fifty m two fifty caliber machine gun vision yet? No, no. I was waiting till. We start talking about the town. I know that's the other topic that. Love to talk about here. You know, the only thing I'll add to to what David was saying is it has very little to do with the partner nations pilot capacity when when you become a fighter pilot in attack pilot or an air force pilot and these nations these are the country's best of the best. They're often chosen by Hyatt, the highest levels of government to become pilots. So it is it is very much when when we go to train these files when we send US pilots to go train in these aircraft. The you're you are training the best of the best for for those countries. And. That's a sort of a misconception that I've heard about this program as well. They can't handle an f sixteen they can't handle fifteen or something. Well, will they can't handle it from from financial and maintenance standpoint, but but the pilots are amazing pilots that I've personally worked with their pilots and aircrews and ground crews and also Afghanstan it was it was using these type of aircraft that we trained the Afghan first Afghan woman pilot, so. It's a way to leverage leverage developing countries. And and like like Mondo said, it's not so much piloting skills. You're right. They're the best of the best, but you have to be able to develop some sort of infrastructure for a combat aircraft. And these are good way to start that we can leverage our support our support for them. So that their best in the best. And interestingly enough, it's usually out of the air force's. And this goes back to my degree that sometimes the best of the best become our allies later in life as diplomats and presidents or in Jordan's case kings and using VA shin as a way of building cultural, and and inter lapping technologies as well as synergies that the best of the best are trained. But you know, what? Like Yamamoto, the dovetails who are first conversation like Yamamoto learned here in the United States. He learned what the United States was capable of. And he learned about the freedoms. And he learned about aspects of how you used to unfortunately against us in that case. But, but this is a way to leverage our democratic Bill thoughts, and and ideas and to be realistic and to support these growing economies in growing nations to get them out of developing status to move them up in the world. All right. Let's let's move away from military aviation. Thank God in talking about something big like really big like really really big as in the straddle in max, trescott, we see that that aircraft made its first flight it did and other spectacular about this aircraft. It is no the one with the longest wingspan apparently of any aircraft wingspan is three hundred and eighty five feet long. So quite a bit more than the length of a football field. It's not the longest aircraft around, but it's very distinctive design. Just a backup was designed by by Christoph to Paul Allen company. Of course, Paul just passed away earlier this year, I believe and he was able to spend a lot of money on his program here after he passed away they scaled back a little bit in terms of their plans. But right now, it looks like they're gonna use this monstrous airplane too. Lift rockets up to perhaps about thirty five thousand feet and launched them from there and just to come to describe this looks like it's a twin fuselage with two fuselages separated by considerable distance a fairly unique airport to all the taxi are gonna be extremely large. They've got a custom hanger for this which is cut out because not only is the wing really long, but you have twin tails is well, which took up fairly high. And then it's got a total of six seven, forty seven engines three on each side outside of the two fuselage's. So it made its first flight in the past week. There's video vailable of that. And it looks pretty spectacular. I guess it holds the promise of lowering the cost of launching satellites in the space. You know, what I love about this aircraft? The most is that when you look at it as you can't haven't seen a picture of it yet. You just imagine an aunt and off to twenty-five that mated with a f eighty two twin Mustang. And you get this aircraft. Yeah. They flew this for two and a half hours over the Mojave desert up to seventeen thousand feet altitude for this for this test hundred eighty nine miles an hour speed. And I think most comments after first flight seemed to be nothing but positive maybe that's the case. Always I don't know. But same here, apparently, the the aircraft performed well, the straddle launch performed well, it was it was I think it was built by scaled composites. And I mean, those people know composites, and they know interesting aircraft designs, but Maxine I mean, you mentioned the the distance between the two fuselages. And I think that's so that they can suspend whatever vehicle or rockets, or whatever they are. Taking up to two to in order to to launch and give it quite a capacity. I think as I recall seeing has like five hundred thousand or maybe fifty five or maybe five hundred fifty thousand pound payload capacity, the separation between those two fuselages. I mean, it just looks kind of fragile in a way, you know, what I mean, it's pretty strong looks like it's what that has got to be close to eighty feet between the two fuselage. I was thinking about the earlier discussion here. Do you think? This might David be good ground attack vehicle all organs. We get up on that thing. Yeah. If you want a sitting target. Well. Yeah. No. I mean, it's just amazing. The amount of lift capability has originally believe it or not this is not a new idea. Would you believe this aircraft is pretty much based on a design on the original? What was going to be the space shuttle transporter, which was to C fives mated together with the center section engine Louis, but that was where the space shuttle was going to hang that was the original before they went with seven four seven, and then we can always go back to World War, Two Germany, and this kind of concept of having a long range aircraft with a nother aircraft slum between in between. It was one way that the Germans were planning to attack New York, which was going to have midway over the Atlantic. Ville larger aircraft was going to separate the smaller bomber and the smaller bomber was going to attack New York. Interesting. All right. Well, we've got a bunch of other stories in we're we're kinda using up our time. So we may have some more stories for you look at in the show notes. But let's touch quickly on a couple of other stories one is on the Ethiopian flight three oh to crash and there there's a report out there. I guess this comes from Aviation Week guy Norris in aviation daily, which is behind the pay wall. But there are some indications that maybe the angle of attack indicator was actually broken off, you know, the airframe just at or just after takeoff. And that might be the source of the aronie ass- information passed onto the system. So that's that's kind of interesting twist. It looks like it kicked in the kicked in immediately. After the flaps, that's. One of the three conditions required for the to kick in. And then it went into its series of pitch down which eventually ended up with you're headed straight down to the ground. And you know, I've been I've been wondering why all this focus on the m part of this system. When it seems like the issue is is with the angle of attack indicators there's not enough. We're looking at it seems like we're looking at, you know, the the response of the cast to some kind of a defect or some kind of an issue with the angle of attack indicators wire, why are we hearing more about a focus on the angle of attack indicators? And then the course what we see. And this one is sort of the ultimate, you know instance, of that where maybe the the indicators actually broken off the article goes on to say that the pilots turned off m Cass and then turn it back on because they couldn't hand fly at based on the pressures having built up to greatly on the on the well on the. On the tail section, and they just had no control over it. So they turned it back on. So it looks like I mean, we're speculating here. We just gotta have to wait until we get all the all the details of this investigation. But what did happen earlier this week as a show was released that both south west and American have delayed. They're bringing the seven thirty seven max it back into service until August. Now when when we spoke with Colonel, Jeff it was it was April the end of April, and then it was moved to June. And now they're talking about August. So it looks like there's more and more happening with this. It's an active story is it makes me think of Carl Sagan. When I see this going on as in how much this is going to cost Boeing, which is billions and billions, I think before this is all done. Yes, for sure. All right. Let's see just quickly mex- T as American Airlines flight three hundred from JFK bound for Los Angeles. It had to return after hitting a sign. How does how does an airplane hit the either the airplanes in the wrong place or the signs in the wrong place? No, I would agree with you. And I think most likely the airplane is in the wrong place. This is really quite surprising. When you look at most airports signing, it's usually pretty low close to the ground. So it's hard to imagine side being high enough to to hit a engine or hit a wing or anything like that. So I think this aircraft must have been quite a bit to the left or right of the centerline when it was taking off because it wasn't in the air for more than a half hour before they came back down again with what was described as a a bite missing from one of the wings. Again, we're speaking with are Mondo carry on. Let's let's talk about the civil air patrol are Mondo when I was at sun and fun because I was hanging out with the with Nikki for some of the time while she was volunteering. I got to to sort of watch the civil air patrol cadets in operation as they were providing ramp services safety crowd control things like that for for the show, but your involvement in the civil air patrol your interest kind of started at a pretty young age. Didn't it did that was actually one of those cadets that you saw? And if you can imagine being fourteen years old and getting the chance to go on the other side of the crowd safety line, you know in your marshalling airplanes and probably one of the one of the biggest events for our cadets. Is oskoui. So anybody that goes up to Oscar you'll see? Hundreds of cadets and the the thought of being fourteen fifteen sixteen years old, and you're marshalling in a c forty seven or your marshalling in or wing walking a beat twenty nine or just a fleet of p fifty one's. But at that age, really, you're just as wild by those airplanes as you are by bonanza. So it's just a great organization, and I'm actually really glad that you got to see those cadets sort of in their element. Because that's that's what it's about. It's it's getting them and their interest generated in aviation, and they really were they really were a great bunch of boys and girls both. I think they were it was a pretty good cross section a lot of diversity in the cadet population that I saw anyway in they they had this sort of confidence in wave conducting themselves that. That is impressive for someone. So young. It was interesting. They they did have some scheduled periods of free time. Well, I say free time what that meant was they had to go as a group, and they were to go off into the the areas where there were vendors and displays and things like that. So they they asked the cadets where do they wanna go, and they the almost unanimous desire was to go over to where the US army and the air force had flight simulators setup they want to go. You know, do some flight sitting. Yeah, that's one unique thing about our cadet program. Just as much as the adult senior members. We call them is that it's not tied to a school. It's not tied to a particular communities. So so one thing that we get a little bit different than than junior ROTC. You're the boy scouts or the girl scouts is that you get to to see kids from all walks of life. So if you take sort of any generic city in the US and take these kids some are coming from well to do families, and you put them with underprivileged kids that are getting a chance to get exposed to aviation and really all of the stem subjects and the subject matter that civil patrol has an in its cut syllabus it that's super unique because it's an interaction for those kids kids because they can be as old as eighteen for the cats. And it's internet an interaction that they may not get through their school, or in some of those school affiliated extracurricular activities in how the how do the kids learn about solar patrol? I mean, what's the, you know, sort of the marketing or the recruitment process. How does that work? Well, we we like to say where we are own best kept secret. So this is this is my twenty fifth year in civil air patrol. And I've come in did two different squadrons that keep in mind, we're we're all in tears. There are very few people that are paid into in the civil air patrol, and we can talk about those in a minute. But they are everywhere we have sixty thousand I think we're up to sixty one thousand total members seven thousand of those are our aircrew about two thousand pilots and about thirty four thousand are. Emergency responders. So where we get the exposures usually through either community events airshows warrant. During times of need. And that includes. Usually disaster events so civil air patrol both the cadets and mostly the senior members on the on the air crews responded to hurricanes Michael Huracan Florence. And if you go back to Katrina, if you even go back to nine eleven one of the very first aircraft that was allowed to take back off and fly in New York airspace was a civil air patrol says, no one eighty two they needed pictures and they needed him quick. So a lot of our missions at the time were for FEMA which later when when did the -partment of homeland security was established. They said, wait a minute. We we've got five hundred sixty airplanes in sixty thousand volunteers and the average cost for flight hours one hundred sixty five dollars. So why would we not take that take that on? So over my twenty five years, it's the organization as a whole. Has really really professionalized and gotten itself out there. And that's that's how we're we're out there sort of marketing and recruiting and trying to get into the schools, but it's usually through community events. Do you know the deep deep history of how the civil air patrol was started. I think we're all trained to at least learned the basics, and I will probably defer to David a little bit. But. But but similar as far as I understand it was established about a week before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. So it would it goes all the way back to nineteen forty one. And it was civilian pilots and aircrews because a an aircrew is a pilot and observer scanner. It was these these people that were in the in the United States, and they had airplanes, and they had access to planes sort of if you go back in in US history. And you talk about the civil defence force was all volunteers all community-based. And these folks just said we're gonna take that. And then we're gonna add aviation and airplanes to it and bay started flying coastal patrols, and we'll work to we've been talking about the cadets. But if if you're a pilot pilot, for example, there's there's a role for you in the civil air patrol, of course. Absolutely. So at my peak, so while I was active duty military. I was flying over two hundred hours year for the civil air patrol and not that it's about money because it's about community service. But I paid for point eight. I think it was in two thousand sixteen I flew two hundred twenty hours, and I paid for point eight of it. So it's a great way to build build hours in what is now considered technologically advanced aircraft. So I was flying in New Mexico. Turbo. Two sixes glass. Cockpit. G one thousand equipped says no one eighty two's. And even the older says, no one seventy two's where quipped with. Secure radios radios that we could talk to firefighters first responders with. So it was it was great flying bet somebody else's paying for. But usually when I say that I say, it's not a flying club res-. You certainly have to do your part. But but the flying is good, and it can be actually quite challenging. So if if someone who's a pilot or looking to build some hours in maybe, you know, personally provide this kind of service to others to the community and so forth. What type of a time commitment does it usually entail? So that's kind of up to the member. If you wanted to come in and just fly takes a couple of months to get used to air force flying or air force style flying flying somebody else's airplane. And and you're playing it for various Pacific purpose. So it takes a couple of months just to get used to the flying and sort of in return, you may take on a role in your local community organization or community. What we call a unit or a squadron where you may be an operations officer communications officer or go out and work with the cadets and train them on on those things that we were just talking about aerospace education. So really it's anywhere from a couple of hours a week to you know, I think at my high point as as a unit commander, I was probably working ten fifteen hours a week on civil patrol. So I'm onto you know, you give a little. A bit of your your bio a little bit of personal history. You started off in the civil air patrol. And you're now just a recently retired senior Master Sergeant from special operations command. Tell us how that happened in where you went and how that how that all took place. Well, yeah. So the civil air patrol sort of gave me that. That military enthusiasm. We're going to call it that I'm matched up with a family of aviation. My dad was an airline pilot, my brothers and airline pilot. So to came together, I said, well, I'll join the airforce I was a terrible student in high school was not ready to go to college. So I enlisted, and I said that this is a terrible idea for anybody. That's gonna go talk to recruiter. But I just said I want anything that's flying. Never tell a recruiter just put me in whatever you want. But I went right into the air force and became in it and enlisted aircrew what's kind of now, we don't call them about anymore, but it's kind of sensor operator. And and I've had a couple of different jobs in the air force. And man, I'm doing a lot of difference to today, but here, but enlisted aircrew is such an important part of the air force in when you going going back to our our story about the tenant. Colonel cole. The Doolittle raider that passed before him was staff sergeant Richard Thatcher who passed in two thousand six and I believe he was a gunner. So even on those those Doolittle raiders, you had a pilot navigator. But then the rest of the airplane was enlisted you had an engineer gunner radio operator waist, gunner tailgunner all those fields are enlisted aircrew career field. So I kind of navigated the majority of those through my twenty one years a Mondo. That's what I was going to. I got until I got my medical one thirty one thirty loadmaster wasn't going to be officer. But I was going to be flying. You know what? And the rivalry shall always continue as to which end of the of the airplane is the business, right? So. You know? And I think that's something our listeners would like to maybe no more about because when you think about going into the service that you think about aviation, you automatically think officer and a pilot. But there are a lot of aviation. We can really be flying a lot of different flying jobs within the services that that don't require you to become an officer. And you can go in is listed and maintain your you're listening and being NCO or below somewhat. If you can talk a little bit more about that. Both you and David. Yeah. So currently the air force has a few enlisted career fields and and or sorry air career fields. And so that includes your inflight refueling. So you're boom operators, although you know, now, we have the Casey forty six that that that's all automated. Your flight engineers that have been around your load masters airborne mission systems. We have flight attendants. We have gunners we have a airborne intelligence operators. And then what kind of I navigated and ended up being was a special mission aviator, which is sort of a catch all and it's funny as was reading about those little raiders, the gunner was the engineer on a b twenty five, and that's sort of what what we ended up becoming. They're like you guys can become load load gun. John years. So that that's the the big career fields in the aircrew that are flying. But but now, we have the remotely piloted aircraft. So we're just in the first few years of enlisted pilots again in the air force and let David talk about that. But we just had the first couple of classes of enlisted pilots that are now flying the ARCHE for Global Hawk. But we've had enlisted pilots all the way back to pretty much World War Two. There's quite a few will too in the army or court that were enlisted pilot. But yet. Mike. You're right there. There are a lot of careers. I knew at a very early age. I think it was probably fourth grade when I got spectacles on my face that I was never going to be a jet fighter pilot. And as I got older, I decided I really wasn't ready for college. But and I talked to a recruiter, and I was going to do what I wanted to do which was hanging out the back seat of the cargo bay of C one thirty and be loadmaster. I get the fly. I get to be listed. And in fact, the United States army still you can be enlisted officer and fly helicopters, and you do not necessarily need to be an officer. So there's a lot of careers out there that don't involve getting your officership now. One of my good friends who was part of the girl the night went and after being a enlisted personnel went back to officer school, and then went on to fly aircraft as an officer. So. There are there are many paths to getting in the sky, especially in the military. Just like there is generally aviation. So you just got to set your goals and do it. Yeah. And that's that's that's a great sort of marrying of different loves is that that. Enlisted aviation career gave me the opportunity to do my education. I'm by no means a recruiter. I'm probably a terrible recruiter. But but I was able to complete my schooling. So I ended up getting an associate's degree in a bachelors and a masters paid for by by the military, which sort of led into me getting really big into civil air patrol and then general aviation, and then so I ended up using my Montgomery GI Bill, and then later my post nine eleven GI Bill to do all of my flight training all the way up through commercial multi engine instrument. So it was a great avenue, and then I succeeded through my flight training because already had you know, you're talking a thousand two thousand hours as aircrew. So so some especially some things like Ariel decision or not decision making. You know, you've already got that ingrained in you. So. You're very conservative general aviation and commercial and business pilot. I wanna talk a little bit about the spree. Can we talk about the spray little bit? Sure. So for for those listeners that may not be aware. This is the tilt rotor too. Big turbo. Prop the rolls. Royce engines, I think right one on each wing with a with his bets with this huge propeller that takes off vertically. And then the the the cells the engines rotate for forward flight, it's it's interesting. You know, it it's kind of ungainly looking airplane. It seems like kind of a crazy way to to the fly round. But it does offer some kind of unique capabilities that not too many other airplanes have. Yeah. You know, what's unique about this is I last year was at the aero expo in Friedrichshafen and predicts heaven is the home of door near craft and Dornier. Way back in the fifties. The sixties was trying to develop exactly this. They're trying to do it with jet engines. And if you if you look at the aircraft in I couldn't tell you that the the model number the name of it, but the aircraft that sits in front of the museum the Dornier aircraft museum in predicts oven looks like a jet powered CV twenty two Osprey. So. It is not a new concept by any means. Is it true that the there's a shaft that connects the two engines so that if one engine goes out the remaining engine can power both rotors? Yeah. That's correct. What if you if you see these at an air show, and you see it start up first of all you usually see a huge plume of white smoke because the oil has pooled. So when we start up one engine both propellers will start turning at the same time. And that's all a shaft that that connects all of that. But really if you think about it. It's just a Chinook sideways. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Hadn't thought of it that way, thank you during their built on while part of it is built on the same line in my beloved lead beloved Ridley Boeing factory. It's it's not surpri. But Maxine thing you need to think of is it's probably one of the most advanced helicopters ever. And my favorite thing. Osprey does is it folds, and if you've ever seen it go through its motions folding up it becomes a very tight piece of kit for craft carriers to the wings fold in is that what they do actually the whole wing turns ninety degrees. So the engines full down, the propellers fullback, and then the and then they wing fold parallel with few slosh. Oh, I didn't know that. Yeah. In that documentary transformers, I think yeah. Yeah. No, it's pretty cool. You can you can watch some YouTube videos of the of the Osprey folding up, what's fun pack. Knight used to take this airplane to airshows and is inches. Just a few inches too tall to fit into a c five or c seventeen even folded up. So so folded up if it's great on a boat, but it does not fit into any current airplane. Yeah. So what's really amazing is the link development to for this program? They were working on this. When I was in college in the Philadelphia area, the late seventy so I remember being close to Ridley park, then and we started working out in the late seventies. I just looked it up here. They said by two thousand eight twenty seven billion had been spent on the program in another twenty seven billion was required to complete the plant production numbers. So, yeah, it's incredibly complicated. Took I would guess at least twenty five years before this thing was deployed this head just incredibly long development cycle, and it grew. Well, and it was it had a lot of flaws to begin with. But it also grew out of the failed, rainy and hostage recovery. Eagle claw. It was the direct result of that. They needed an aircraft that could fly quickly and be able to take off in in land in a small space. And if you recall back, then during this development, they were David said they were a lot of flaws, and it was one of those programs. Everybody wanted to kill saying it was never gonna get anywhere. They was sixty minutes shows on it and all sorts of things. But it just shows how we can develop and grow in turn an aircraft into you know, that may look like it's flawed into something that's going to be an amazing project in a rear air useful aircraft. I wanted to ask you what did you do on the spree? What was what was your role? So the enlisted aircrew so Osprey generally flies with a crew for and that's a pilot and co-pilot. And then to enlisted aircrew the aircrew can be sitting in the engineer seat, and you're doing sort of a traditional flight engineer role or you can be in the back doing a almost traditional loadmaster role. So you're able to sort of take care of the passengers take care of the cargo if you're doing a a resupply drop or something like that you're in loadmaster mode, and then just in the past years, we put a the air force, but a fifty caliber machine gun on the back and the engineer in the back takes care of the fifty Cal which is the only armament on that on that airplanes purely defensive weapon. So so, yeah, it's the two pilots and then and then you're to enlist guys sort of do everything else. Did you ever get to fire the fifty caliber? Oh, yeah. Absolutely. Is that as much fun as it seems like it might be? Yeah. Yeah. It really is the that's all I'll say about that in my last assignment, I was overseas, and the environmental rules are very different over there. So what you had to make sure that you didn't that you didn't hit any wildlife or that you didn't start any wildfires or you know, we had to couple clearing passes really unique. But it's it really is everything in the airplanes, a just really fun and really unique Michigan, but Mondo there you go you're going you're harking back to your World War Two days firing fifty caliber out of a side door or rear going which would be the same weapon that you would be in a b twenty five or b seventeen just a plain old fifty Cal hanging out the back. Yeah. There's nothing fancy about. It was iron sights. And and to take that even further your especially the guys over in Europe. They're finding out of old be seventeen year fields. So. So when you're talking about some of the historical airfields like Duxford, RAF Sculthorpe RAF Mildenhall, our lake, and he these were these were basis that that we now read about in books where just being there and being in the air force officer in this being aircrew, it just gives you this. I don't know this sense of pride, and I'm probably getting a little philosophical, but but a lot of times, you know, you have the sort of top gun moment when you're walking out to their plan. And you're like man, the people that have come before me and taking these same steps is just amazing. Well, before we push on her Mondo, what does the future hold for you? You've just relocated from Europe back to the United States. What's ahead for for you, flying wise? Well, my my love of flying for twenty years. I was sort of in the back looking up at the at the front end guys and saying man, I really need to be up there. So, you know, having the opportunity to get all those pilot ratings. I I will one hundred percent just go into the industry. And I think a lot of my friends that have retired before me just make sure you take some time off. So I think this summer I'm going to work on my CFI. I may reach out to you Mexi. But get get my CFI and do some local instruction build up some hours get used to US flying again. And then kind of follow that path maybe into the regionals and the airlines here and ensured odor. Very good Miller Mondo, it's great having you on on airplane. Geeks. And we joy listening to you on plain talking UK, you'll have to get caught up with the the episodes. It's just out. I think that's where when you sort of announced your your retirement guys give you a hard time for that. Not really I did my retirement ceremony or my my retirement celebration at a brewery, though, there you go. So there was a couple of bats beer, and captain Jeff from AP came down and couple of airline pilots that were listeners. But then also sort of as you guys know, this podcasting community is is pretty amazing. So I had actually had listeners have become friends come to the retirement of celebration. So it was actually pretty cool is cool. All right or Mondo. Do you have any social media presence someplace that you'd like to pass along to her listeners case they'd like to follow you? Well, you can you can always reach me at the PTA UK so Armando at plain-talking UK dot com or on Twitter or website, just Google Corvus aviation. That's CORBA US. And that's something that I'm a couple of friends, and I are trying to start up just to have some kind of organization to do flight instruction with. So those are those are two places. All right. Great. Thanks so much. Thank you guys. What's up with the geeks? Max west you have something force. I do the seven three seven maxa courses been a major topic of discussion here and elsewhere. And I decided to take a slightly different look at it this week on aviation news talk. And so what I wanted to figure out was what were some of the key lessons. That pilots could take away from that not Boeing seven thirty seven pilots, but everyday pilots, and you know, Cessna one seventy two or whatever they may be. So just encourage folks to check out this week's episode be one oh five on aviation. News talk on the eight lessons pilots can learn from the Boeing seven three seven mex- crashes. I like that idea a lot. I'd like that a lot is the episode released as we record this. Or will it be by the time this comes out? Oh, yeah. Absolutely. Okay. So we'll have link that in the show notes, certainly in Mike how about you. Well, you know as we record this. As of today when recording this. It's exactly two months from innovations in flight, and I've been making plans for innovations in flight today. I made my hotel reservations for New Jersey where I'll stop halfway, and I just found out last week that my good friend, my friend, Eric my crept brother who I think couple you guys met when we came out. It's Berg together. He decided he's going to join me and come down with me this year. And so I'll be picking him up in in rhinebeck, New York and maybe on the way back on invincible the finally stop at the aero Drome. Nice. Very nice. And then there was one of the thing. I wanted to say if there's time for it. And that is at you know, there's this listener we have in Kenya. And he knows who he is. He sent me I wanted to do this last time, but we just ran out of time. He sent me one of the most amazing emails that I have ever received. It was really really touching and we corresponded back and forth. And I just wanted to give him a shout-out and thank him so much for taking the time to to write us because we all saw that Email. It was it was very special. All right. David. Do you have anything forced this week? Leave you out. I met you yesterday. We had lunch. It was great. And now Mike is convincing me, Mike. We're not really going to earn Space Museum this year hate to tell you. Well, okay. That. I I d- the follow up with the staff this week. So yes, we will be there. Cancel my reservation. No, you, you know, it's bad when they come hunting. You. Why haven't we heard from you, David? So I got that Email the other day. So I knew the follow up on that. So I guess the only other thing I would say is if we have any French listeners. I'm my heart goes out anybody in Paris. Of the cathedral today as we record. This. Notre Dame has been an important part of my life. It's been so my thoughts go out to any of the Catholics like myself out there who feel the loss or more point any of the Parisians who are devastated and anybody who knows such an iconic building to have lost and how much we've actually saved. Luckily is a good thing. So I'll leave it at that. Yeah. I was kinda crushed. When I saw that headline, but we do have a positive airline story of the week, courtesy of Mr. trescott. So it's always kind of fun. When you read a story that's a little bit different. And this is a little bit different. It's all about a flight attendant who reached out to to give a helping hand where she obviously didn't need to do that. So this was on Southwest Airlines. And there was a mother on board with her little nineteen month old who had done pretty well on the first leg of the journey. But on the second leg of the flight, she got incredibly fussy so flight to came over and said, hey, can I help out in picked up the young toddler and carried her down the aisle as she was doing her duties closing the overhead bins for carry on luggage and things like that. So somebody videotape this, and you know, word spread on social media. And I think it was good feelings all the way around for everybody. I saw that video. And this this little baby is blowing kisses to the passengers. This is there walking, you know, as the flight attendants carrying the the baby down the aisle, which is like terminally cute. But yeah, that's, you know, for you new parents out there, you got, you know, screaming kids or kids are getting out of control, especially really young ones. The way you handle that he's you distract them. Just give them something completely different to focus on and quite often. They'll just clam up right away. It's like throwing a switch. And I think this flight attendant understood that concept and gave gave this little baby. Some something completely different to focus on and problem solve so. Yeah, it was who was a good move for the rest of us writing in the back. The way we handle it is we put your plugs. In the flight starts. Right. Right. Okay. Some listener mail from our friend, Patrick he sent a link to an item delta enters the seat recline wars. And this is from the Salt Lake Tribune. Delta Airlines says they're going to reduce the amount that seats recline on a three twenty. They're gonna do that by about two inches. They're going to reduce the the recline in first class from five point four inches to three point five inches and in comfort plus and coach that's going to shrink from four inch recline to two inches of recline. Now, the note that the a-3 twenties are primarily used on short flights, two hours or less. So it's it's kind of focused on that. And they say that this this change is in response to customer compl-. Plaints that people that liked to work on the plane such as business travelers have laptops on trae tables. He and if you've ever tried that and the passenger in front of you goes into full recline. It can be can be quite a situation. So that's why they're that's why they're doing this. I'll be really interested to see what the reaction is from the non business travelers that don't they'll get any benefit out of this other than well, they just don't get the recline as much. So it's interesting to watch how many of you guys actually recline when you're on a plane flying some place if you're not going along long distance, I generally, don't or just put a little maybe an inch into it. If it's a, you know, if it's a short flight, I it just doesn't I don't know. I think some people do the full reclined because they can not so much because they need to. I don't know. What do you guys? I I rarely do. And whenever I do before. I do I turn around. And I say, do you mind if I recline my seat, and I do that every single time. But it's rare when I recline at all. I was going to say that we're I recline. But I do so slowly thinking somehow being more polite. Yes. Yes. I agree. I don't it as much as I used to. But I agree. I always go very very slowly tell you my pet peeve is the people behind me who figure that the easiest way to get up on their chair is to grab the back of my seat in wrench their way up and out in over. And it's like don't people get it. I mean, you really disturbing person, and it's not that much more difficult to push you up with your own armrest. And I generally think that these people just for yourself. David. I usually do. Being these six foot for member of his organization who's also disabled. I ask first before he grabs a seat. But no one has ever asked me lie. Sly? I I'm polite, but I need all the leverage I can get to get out of a seat, especially if I've been at it for two hours, and that's fine. But yeah, like, you say as long as you ask or as long as you, you know, and let the person know. But yeah, I've I've had this exactly what max has had happened to him. Where is that of the blue all of a sudden year, you know, your seat back is jerked backwards with no, no advance notice. And that's that's kinda rude. The other thing that I've done and I've only used once as I bought a gadget called knee defenders gadget. You put on your your tray. You put your trade down. You put them on the tray. They lock it in. So the person in front of you cannot recline at all. They've been very controversial. I thought those got banned it. Yeah. Yeah. But it's a good way to start a fight. So not not recommended Patrick also sent us link a YouTube video, SpaceX nails triple booster landing. This is very very cool in in my opinion. The recent SpaceX falcon heavy that launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida that this the heavy has well the the booster like the regular falcon. But the head they have. In addition. It has an addition to boosters on either side of it. So you've got three boosters and all three came back, and basically stuck the landing to to at the space center and then the center the center booster. Landed on, you know, one of those that that barge that autonomous bar. I guess they call it. So this really really spectacular. Thanks that in the update today on what happened to that center. Core out on the barge. No, heavy seas eight to ten feet, you wanna guess oh did fall over they lost it. Yeah. Well, at least they landed. That's incredible. Also, another Email Patrick sent us an item Norway aviation firm orders sixty all electric airplanes drops operation costs eighty percent. This is aviation in Norway. It says that they specialize in recruitment and training for the aviation industry in the the ordered sixty of these electric planes from by aerospace big order for electric training. I think we're gonna see more and more electric, especially in the training arena. Yes. They announced civil orders last week at aero twenty nine in fluke, soften, the Germany. They're now up to about three hundred orders total so pretty impressive. Yeah. So I guess really worked on developing those extra long extension courts. Yeah. It's all in the initial real. These us Siemens propulsion system. The Motors only fifty seven pounds ninety kilowatt peak rating continuous power rating of up to seventy kilowatts which is according to this article ninety four horsepower or the equivalent of ninety four horsepower. And this is the e flyer to so the the operational costs of these things are are lower the plane itself costs about thirty five or three hundred and fifty thousand per plane, but it's the operating costs that are spectacular in comparison. They say that it costs a hundred ten dollars an hour to operate a conventional training plane, but these all electric planes only cost twenty dollars an hour. So that's a more than a or less than one fifth the cost pretty dramatic. You know, there's one aspect that. I had never thought of somebody. Brought it up to me. Over the weekend normally in an aircraft as you fly long you consume fuel and the aircraft later in lighter and lighter, which makes it more efficient here as you consume electronics ity her plane doesn't get lighter in let your so that's that's one negative in the equation for electrics. But I'm excited. I think they're going to be awesome for the training market in particular. Because a lot of our flights short and people are cost sensitive. So that's gonna help right. We heard from Mark Newton. And he sent a this is a YouTube video. I was just I think recently released. Yes, it came out from Mark Felton productions published just a few weeks ago, April fifth twenty nineteen. This is RAF. Hunter pilot goes rogue over London nineteen sixty eight and we we have this RIF pilot in Davie, he flew his hawker hunter jet. I think. He was trying to make a political statement or something. Yeah. Actually, the time. It was a major controversy because it was the fiftieth anniversary of the Royal airforce and parliament Al didn't want anything to do to celebrate it. So he went on a private air toward a celebrate the Oreo fiftieth and one of the adventures he did was he flew a hawker hundred under tower bridge now for all of those Americans. And you know, who you are who think that bridge is London bridge. That's not that is tower bridge. London bridge is further upstream and is much less exciting. And if you really wanna look at it, you should go see the brick by brick restoration in Arizona. But but yes, he he was court martialed asked leave the air force, but years later. He was pardoned and rewarded for his endeavour? To celebrate the RAF and to celebrate what at the time economics and. The government didn't want due to rationing excetera. So I did my fact checking so I read it. But yeah, it was definitely a hawker hunter flown under tower bridge and one quick correction there London bridge that was not a replica that was the old London bridge. They took all ten thousand tons of it and moved into lake havasu city. And isn't that what I said the restoration brick by brick? Oh, I thought you said replica my apologies. No. That's okay. I there was a really bad television story back in the eighties that involves a murder mystery around that bridge and the bridge was haunted. And inevitably the result was when they moved to bridge. They took the bridge with Mack the knife with it. So he started committing murders in Arizona instead of. Right. So so that's why I that's the way. I know that that some guy bought the bridge and built it BIC by brick again back our Zona. Yes. Shark. There you go. In our friend. Peter Johnson notes that this the story this buzzing parliament and flying through tower bridge is documented in a book by Richard Pike's? It's called hunter boys, which is not just a book about this this event about a lot more. But he says it's a great a great read worth taking a look at. He then finally we heard from Jonathan baron Jonathan from shark ERO dot com. Of course, he and he said long a video, and this is a video that his fifteen year old daughter Camille, produced it's called the physics of how a plane flies. It's a little three minute instructional video that she came up with to describe how how a plane fly. So we'll put we'll put that in the show notes as well. I think the barons are turning into I guess have been quite a interesting flying family between the Jonathan and the shark and his his son and the the project that he's been working on in now daughter Camille, so congratulations all them in design said, we'll have that video in the show notes. Take a look. All right. Let's wrap this one up. Thanks. For listening to the airplane. Geeks podcast, you can find us at airplane. Geeks dot com show notes for this episode at airplane. Geeks dot com slash five four nine and are Mondo. Thanks for coming on the show. How do we do compared to the plane talking UK guys? Well, you know, every podcast has its its uniqueness. And it's it's niche, and I love being with you guys. I love getting into some of the technical aspects of of the stories, and you guys do really great job, and I will continue to be a subscriber analysts ner as I have been for a long time. Thanks, thanks for coming on a good luck. In your you know in your endeavors flying and transitioning from military to commercial, good luck with your new home. Get some furniture in there. So. Yeah. Maybe some egged cartons damp out the sound. All right. So let's tell everybody where they can they can find us and we'll start with David Vanderhoek David where folks find you online. Well, of course, you can be really geeky and you can join join our group at slack by sending us a request for an invite at Dickey's at airplane. Geeks dot com. We want you to join the conversation there that way you can you can you could talk about airplanes all week long twenty four seven three sixty five besides just us, and we all have a good time there. But of course, you can find me on Twitter DM Vanderhoek, it can find me on Lincoln if you can spell Vanderhoek and last, but not least you can find me on Friday mornings with that guy. My best friend in pike casting. Mr. you av digest himself max flight. Dear okay. Max trescott where do we find you online will when I'm not at Sunan fund with Maxine I filled online at the usual places Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, just look for max trescott. And if you wanna shoot me an Email, go out to aviation news, talk dot com, click on contact at the top of the page, and you can shoot me an Email. And of course, you can also check out the podcast there as well. Great and Mike where do we find you online? Well, I'm always hanging out, and that's lack group and boy. They're bunch of slackers air. But really a lot of fun. You can get me on Twitter. I main fly that's main like the state M. I N E fly. I'm at main fly on Twitter. And if you wanna send an Email, it's mica M, I C H mica at airplane. Geeks dot com. He and Raimondo you get to tell us again where folks can follow you that saw Armando at plain talking UK dot com, or I'll put a plug in all be at Oshkosh and the Reno air races to anybody wants to meet up just shoot me an Email or find me on those previously mentioned getting we'll link up. So are you going to be at Reno as a spectator or something else? No thorough. I'll be part of the bad dingo air race team. And and we play Lance legacy. We moved up last year from Lancer three sixty up to Lancer legacy. So we'll be in the sport class out there. Reno Duke it out with everybody else. All those glass airs and Lancers. Wow. The renew. Erases that's on my bucket list. That's one of the events that I I need to attend at some point max, it's a long drive. I know well, I just did three thousand miles on. I was around trip round trip drive but video by airplane ticket. What a novel idea. Yeah. I should support the airlines that about any of that you can find me on linked in just look from x flight stated said at the digest dot com with him every week in once a month with Mary Kirby at PECS X, podcast dot com. That's PAX E X podcasts dot com. If you wanna semi Email, you can write to me at Mex flight at airplane. Geeks dot com. Our outdraw is by Bruno Massoni, you can find more of his compositions that incorporate aviation sounds Bruno miss sewn dot com. So the join us again next week as we talk aviation on the airplane. Geeks podcast, fiery buddy, keep the blue side that keep them flying. Thank carry out. And thanks for listening. Okay. Max, I don't know who put the picture in the show notes. But we can we can we honor the airforce guy in not put a marine helicopter in picture. Sorry different. I was I was ready to address it. But not needed. That's the one that I that. That's the one that I saw sun and fun. Envy. Twenty two. It's a Marine One guy was in the air force. Dude, you need to get a CV twenty two big. I didn't take that picture of you know, in in typical fashion between the air force and the marines. Ours are much much Gucci. And cleaner. And you're in all fairness for this. Geek, yours should be MVP twenty twos. And there should be CV twenty twos. Right. I just read an article that they're trying to use their to replace their helicopter fleet. And we're are should beat and end the it's a like multi-role your multi-mission. But do you know why they gave you the why the marines didn't want it here? This is this is dorky fee. Twenty two trivia, I don't the navy decided that they were good that people were going to get confused between CV twenty two meaning the Osprey and CV twenty two meaning the tactical air carrier otherwise known as the Franklin. I could see that. Yeah. Right in the nineteen nineties became up with this. So and now the navy their carrier onboard ones will be C M v twenty two Bs. Well, did anybody scroll up and see max tease little comment and the picture he posted about the crash on Long Island yesterday. That's the best thing is shown oats right now took beating me talk about it must have been a navy pilot. Third wire. Oh my gosh. What's remarkable? Is you look at that picture that airplane is going to fly again? I mean, what should have been by all rights fatal crash that everybody destroyed the airplane. That plane is highly repairable. I mean, the upper right wing looks a little wrinkled there. But you know, maybe the left-wing is you know, in in the front grille of that car. I can't tell but is. Could be repaired. So max, are you are you endorsing just go for the power lines? No, I just go for the parachute. But this guy obviously didn't do that. So. Looks like a story that you want to be covering on aviation. News talk Mexico's a guy took off and in whether he probably shouldn't have been flying in. And he he ran out of gas. I mean, he he shot four proteins, and then couldn't get the Kennedy and ran out of gas. I wanted to talk about it. Took off from Niagara fall. So I probably already flown probably two and a half hours easily forgot to log island. I'm sure the weather was much better to Niagara Falls. By looked it up here. It was half mile visibility at that airport, and it was a quarter mile visibility. At actually, I think it was a quarter at both of them and say that way for about ten hours. So you really do to go somewhere else. Dave on the way up from from Maryland, I stopped it in Philadelphia had lunch with David. That was such a great picture. Really? David the smile on your face was just dazzling here. Yeah. Yeah. It was good. So. Yeah. I told David I said, you know, I plan on meeting him for lunch on the way up for him. Just to you know, pick a place that I could punch into the GPS. And it's a really nice place. This is a place that actually it's really close to where David Houston live. And it's you know, it's on the water there. And they you know, you can eat inside you can eat outside at the bar. You can get tables. It's a nice place. Yeah. And max got the full David experience because everybody there knows my name. I know I know it's like walking into cheers or something. You know? The owner comes by Sisley, David, you know, the waitresses are all looking at David like who is this guy. So did you have affiliated stake? I mean, you're in Philly. No, fish and chips. What I can't believe it. I didn't take him to achieve steak place. I took them to a good restaurant. My mouth watered when you said, she's sick stink. Yeah. You achieve steak fan. Well, I spent five years in Philly. I should hope so.

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What is the Civil Air Patrol?

Stuff You Should Know

48:28 min | 1 year ago

What is the Civil Air Patrol?

"Today's episode is brought to you by IBM. What kind of tech company does the world need today? One that applies smart technologies at scale with purpose and expertise, not just for some, but for all with a blockchain and quantum technology. We're developing smart scalable technologies that help businesses work better together. Let's expect more from technology. Let's put smart to work. Visit IBM dot com slash smart. To learn more stuff. You should know tour two thousand nineteen starting in Chicago July twenty fourth yet. And then Toronto the next night, we're going to be at the Harris theater, and then the Danforth, and you can go get tickets get him. Get him now because they are going fast. That's right, then August twenty ninth in Boston at the Wilbur August, thirtieth in Portland, Maine, the state theatre. Yep. The plaza live in Orlando on October ninth, the civic theatre in New Orleans on October tenth, and then our beloved bell house, in Brooklyn, New York, October twenty three twenty four and twenty five. Yep. Head on over. S Y, S K live dot com has everything you need. And we will see you guys live in person. Welcome to step, you should know a production of iheartradio's, how stuff works. Hey, welcome to the podcast. I'm Josh Clark. And there's Charles Chuck Bryant, there's Jerry over there. And we're flying high. What were this for this episode of stuff, you should know? Civil air patrol. I I've got a different version of it. Okay. Civil air patrol till here. Civil air patrol. Oh, do you remember. I used to put that in your head. I yeah. It's like the good old days when used to earworm me. I think that's the greatest earworm of all. It's pretty good in my head now. Civil hair. I like that. So we're talking about the civil air patrol and we're going to just say what it is right. Out of the gate. Okay. Go ahead. Let's talk first about what eight breakfast. Okay. Bacon. No, I didn't eat breakfast. Civil air patrol is a nonprofit group. That's a civilian group of well of plane enthusiasts, but are much more than that. They are they have sort of eight quasi-military hierarchy, they are under the control of the US air force, and what they do a lot these days is things like search and rescue. We talked a little bit about them insert in our sorrow episodes. Yep. But they have a very cool kind of rich and colorful, colorful history. And I'm trying to get John Roderick of the indie rock band. The long winters my pal in from the podcast while he does a lot of podcasts, which one should we say, friendly fire? Sure his war movie podcast. He was a member of the civil air patrol. And I texted him and said, you know, I'd love to get a quote from you and your experience. And he says, heck, yeah. And then he never sent anything. So if it comes in will read it if not just know that John was a teenage member of the civil air patrol nice which you still can be. Yeah. You definitely still can't be it still around. There's, there's from what I saw something like sixty thousand strong today. Not bad. No. Not bad at all. And I get the impression it's a little bit like the eagle scouts of the air for, like, brendor under eighteen people. Yeah, the cadet program it sounded very much, like, sort of boy scouts meets ROTC. Yeah, because there's a lot of emphasis on, like public servants and being like an upstanding person. And you know, just just not stealing things I think there's a big emphasis on that. Yeah. But also, you get the feeling. There's a little bit of, like you want to go in the air force, right, son. Right. Well, I think that is kind of either. If it's not a stated part of it if it's. It's still a definite function of the civil air patrols. It's it feeds into the actual air force cadet program, and you can actually benefit from being in the civil air patrol, if you do plan to go into the air force. Apparently, you can enter the air force at a higher pay grade, if you have worked up to a certain rank in the civil air patrol. So if you're interested in being a good citizen, if you like to fly if you want to be in the air force, you could do a lot worse than joining the civil air patrol, tell you that if you wanna be a part of what they say is about one hundred saves a year. Yeah. Out in the wilderness. Or if you just want to be a part of an organization that had a very cool origin, which will talk about right now. Okay. Let's early on in aviation history and like the nineteen twenties, and thirties, still in its infancy, but it was big enough to where people could like own a plane. And they could buy their own personal plane, and get there pilot's license, which is that's really fast. If you think about I mean brothers, flew Kitty Hawk in one thousand nine hundred eight. Yeah, I mean, a couple of decades later, people are like I want to own a plane and fly, it, that's how everybody talk that mid Atlantic accent, and it's right. Hey, chuck. By the way, I wanted to shout out what I have come to think is one of the top three facts of stuff, you should know of all time that the Brits, originally sounded like Americans and the Brits lost their American accent, rather than the other way around. Is that drew? Yeah. Don't you remember in our accent when podcasts? And today when did they sound like Americans in start up to about the twenties or thirties? And then the BBC came along on the radio, and they made a conscious decision to sound like Oxford types, who had basically affected an accent in order to separate themselves in sound classier. So you're saying what the BBC adopt, if there was audio recording from nineteen ten then a guy from central London would sound like me right now. Basically. Yeah. So they're getting it wrong, and all those movies too, then, yes, but these are also the same movies where like Nazi sound like British people on the BBC. So it's all kinds of messed up. All right. I love that. You just bring out a random fact from an old show is the fact of stuff, you should know all time history. But let's go back in time. What's happened the way back machine and go back to the great war? The second World War, okay? When there were people in this country that loved their flying civilians, and they saw the beginning of the war in the late nineteen thirties, when Europe European fascist basically said nine no more civilian flying. It's all shutdown. Yeah. And so the aviators over here civilian aviators were like whoa. That's not cool. We like flying planes. Maybe we should get organized. And see if we can actually advance you to the military as civilians, because that was back when all Americans wanted to pitch in a little bit to help out the war effort. Right. Is there is the one guy in particular guy named Gill Robb Wilson, but he was not the only one there's another dude named Milton night. And both are credited with founding, basically civilian air force auxiliary program, right to say, hey military, we're not. Military. It's cool. But there's other stuff we can do to help you guys out. And let's also not forget that if we can use our collective clout to popularize flying in aviation, and just get more Americans interested in showing that, that, hey, you can actually learn to fly come hang out with us, we'll show you how will will be generating a pool of pre trained pilots who can transfer over to the military. If the US ends up going into World War, Two, yeah. Almost like a reserve unit. Even though it is not that now it's an auxiliary unit, which means it, it's, it's an auxiliary. It's on the side. It's in addition to it's not it's not like a reserve unit that can be called up to active duty military like the reserves. It's a civilian volunteer force. Right. So Gill Robb Wilson was working on this and kind of concurrently. There were some some. State based aviation groups for civilian civil civil defense units that were kinda cropping up here and they on the east coast. And so he kind of saw the writing on the wall and wanted to make things official. So he developed a plan in nineteen forty one for the civil air patrol. Got support very importantly, got support from gentlemen name Fierro LaGuardia. You don't put any mustard on LaGuardia now. It's just a credit airport. Okay. Actually, I like LaGuardia. It's six coming along, but yeah, still kinda crazy it. It's fine. None of the New York airports are great. Let's have you. Have you ever seen the, the pictures of the abandoned, TWA, terminal at LaGuardia Ohno from like the jet age the sixties? Awesome. It's amazing. It's like a time capsule frozen in time. And I think they converted it into a hotel recently. But, like go somebody did a really good photo spread like back in two thousand twelve or whatever just look up TWA terminal. Maybe it's JFK and not Liguori. I think it is JFK either way it's still worth checking out. I'll check it out. Okay. So laguardia. He was the director of the office of civilian defense at the time. He of course airport was named after him. He was mayor of New York City at one point, he was an aviator World, War One. So it was really a big deal to get him. On board. And they designed their little logo, which is a blue circle with a propeller three propellers in a white triangle. Yeah. And initially they were handled by because this was pre air force before the, the air force was officially established after World War, Two it was part of the US army air corps. Right. Was the US army air corps, which I think we, we made that distinction in the Teske airman. Yes. So remember correctly. So everyone kind of gets on board and LA Guardia signs the civil air corps, as it was known originally into existence on December first nineteen forty one and as you will note that date, very relevant because just six days later is when the attack on Pearl Harbor happened, and all of a sudden, we could use this help. Yeah. And I mean remember this is like a surprise attack by the Japanese on Pearl Harbor. So it was pretty prescient of Gill Robb Wilson in Fiorello LaGuardia to, to get this thing organized. And. Together because. Yeah. Within a week. There were like, okay we probably can use you guys. Yeah. The problem is that the air corps initially was, like, what are we going to do with these like these civilians? You know, super gung ho civilians, too. I imagine. Right, exactly. Which, which is like even worse to have to deal with in, like, as regular old civilians who don't know what they're doing. Yeah. In some cases, it turned out that it was actually the civil air patrol was really helpful because one of the really overlooked things about World War, Two is that German, u boats. You know, like a variation of a submarine, but they just couldn't stay under quite as long. Yeah. They did little dives, they wreaked absolute havoc on the United States coasts, during World War. Two basically within a month of Pearl Harbor four to six weeks after Pearl Harbor the first US freighter the city of. Atlanta was sunk by a u boat off the coast of North Carolina. And that was the first of I think three hundred and ninety seven ships that were either sunk or damaged by u boats in six months off the coast of America. Yes. So this point, the civil air patrol has one wing is what they call it per state have no idea how many states there were, I think it was forty eight just kidding in each one of those wings was divided into squadrons, and they were operating out of civilian airports, mostly, but then in nineteen forty two they were they started opening up some dedicated civil air patrol bases in certain states around the country. So all of a sudden, there are in nineteen forty to forty thousand people enrolled in the civil patrol. Yeah. And these German, u boats are doing damage off the coast, and all of a sudden they were like, well, listen. We weren't sure quite what to do with you guys. You've been. Helping us out. You've been delivering some things and even some personnel at times, and munitions. But we think what you know, we don't have the resources in our, what will soon be called the air force to just patrol up and down the east coast all the time. So that's where you're gonna really be valuable to us. And that was really the first big kind of important use of the civil air patrol in World War. Two. Yeah. And it was affected too. Because with you boats part of the doctrine of, of u boat warfare. Subcommander nece. Was that if you saw a plane overhead you, dove sure to get away from that plane because they were very vulnerable from an aerial attack. So just seeing a civil air patrol plane overhead meant that the sub had to break off from pursuit of whatever tanker, freighter troop transport. It was about to sink. Yeah. And dive in innovate that plane just even unarmed civil air patrol plane because they didn't know they're unarmed at the time. I don't exactly. So this actually started working out pretty well, but there's one incident in particular off the coast of a right at Cape Canaveral from what I understand you boat got caught on a sandbar man, and was just laying there exposed trying to get free for about thirty minutes in a civil air patrol plane was circling. It had spotted it had called in for reinforcements. I think for an aerial strike from the air corps. For the sitting duck of U-boat and before the airstrike. Could get there to blow the u boat up. It got it self free and made it to scapegoat away. And this was enough of the frustrating enough event magin that pilot was, I want a bomb so bad. Well in very short order, the air, the air corps commander, hap- was his name. Henry hap Arnold hap. Arnold say give them those bombs in the civil air patrol, not in any way, a military organization. A civilian auxiliary group was given depth charges embalm to drop on u boats from that point on for the rest of World War, Two, he s so here's the deal with that. They, they had to bomb from very, very high up. They had to use improvised bomb sites because, you know this, they didn't just have this stuff lying around, and they needed this stuff for the real. I was about say the real planes for the military, right? So they weren't like, here's the best bomb. Mm sites. We have. So there's really no like. I think the civil air patrol probably likes to claim that they actually bombed u boats, but there, aren't any official on record bombings. That were carried out by civil air patrol that, like sank, u boats. Right. You talked to Germany was like, nah, never happened didn't affect us. They said nine civil air patrol is like no. It's more like ya. Right. So the, it is indisputable particular one sub that some civil air patrol guys dropped depth charges over in New Jersey. And they said a geyser of oil and water erupted from the water, which would indicate that they had sunk this, this U-boat like you're saying the Germans don't have any records, anything like that. Okay. So no. Or they probably didn't at the very least, though. They did harass the German, u boats. Sure. And whether it was directly because of civil air patrol patrols over the coastline. Or not by July about six months after the first attack German, u boats, like pulled off of American coastal waters, and stop the tacking. So it probably wasn't entirely coincidence. It probably wasn't entirely because of the civil air patrol, but it they almost certainly played a prominent role in Germany's discontinuation of their sub attacks in American waters. Yes. Oh, here's what we'll do. We'll do a stat cliffhanger. Okay. We'll take a little break and come back with a little bit of statistical evidence to support your claims her read for this. Hey everybody, I wanna talk to you about your website that doesn't look good. And this hard to program because squarespace, does it better. Yeah. They do squarespace is this amazing magical tool that you can just basically go to sleep, and all of a sudden, you have a website to do whatever you want with. You can use it to sell stuff. You can use it to tell your world about all the great thoughts. You have. And now squarespace also offers E mail campaign so you can take your business. Embryo it up. Yeah. We use squarespace ourself are very popular. S Y, S K, live website, keeps track of all of our comings and goings on Oliver live shows, and it's always a joy to go in there and update, the squarespace site because it's so easy, and it always looks so great. And it makes me feel smarter than I am. Yeah. They offer customizable, layouts, powerful, editing mobile editing, not just for your website, but also for Email campaigns too. So go check it out. Go to squarespace dot com slash stuff today. So just go to squarespace dot com slash stuff today for a free trial. When you're ready to launch everyone use the offer code stuff to save ten percent on your first purchase of a website or domain squarespace. Just go check it out. All right. So you said they made a difference and the numbers kind of back it up. First of all, they were only supposed to do this for ninety days. Well, they kind of got the real plan together for the military. They ended up doing this coastal patrol for eighteen months. So that alone kind of says it was working. Yeah. Or at the very least they weren't quick enough to get there. The real plan going. Right. But here's the stats one hundred seventy three sub spotted and ostensibly radioed in, you know, they weren't just spotted and then forgotten about right there. Like, I don't feel like. Eighty two depth charge bomb attacks against those subs in pretty impressive pretty impressive. And again, let's say they're not actually bombing them out of the water. It's got to be disconcerting to have civilians up there, dropping bombs on you. Sure. It's like the north avenue irregulars but. They, you know there were minds out there. They've found seventeen floating mines and rescued three hundred sixty three people and ninety one ships that had trouble reported which I don't think we mentioned like. America likes to think that, like, oh well, yeah the fighting didn't happen over here in the United States. But if you lived on the east coast, like on the water chances, are, you might have pulled a service person out of the water from one of these bombings. Yeah. Like it happened. There were people in the water that needed rescue and the civil air patrol was there. I read an account of a family that lived on the coast of Hatteras apparently Cape. Hatteras the waters off Hatteras called torpedo, junction house happened. So frequently, but they like their, the, the windows would rattle in your house when a torpedo struck like a tanker something, you know, eight miles away off the coast. You just do not get raised with that in history. This is not talked about, but it, it was a pretty big for six months. It was a big problem for the United States. Yeah. And this was there was a lot of bravery involved because these little planes, they were stretching these pilots and their experience in these planes and their mechanical capabilities to the upmost degree to fly these things that far offshore to do these patrols, and they still did it. They flew five hundred about five hundred thousand hours during the war combined, and they were not getting rich doing it. They're reimbursed for fuel, but they were paid eight dollars a day, which even back then was not a lot of money. Now, I calculates about one hundred twenty five dollars today. Let's not bad actually come to think of it. If you're not doing anything else, take it dropping bombs on Nazis. It's kind of fun and getting a hundred and twenty five bucks for it right. And then the thirty pilots of civil and this. Civil air patrol died flying in accidents. And that's in addition to the ones in the coastal patrol. That's just total twenty-six on the actual coastal patrol the died. I thought it was like sixty five now, this is twenty six deaths and okay. Lost ninety planes. Gotcha. So like this is a really big deal. I mean like it was it was saying, like you, you, and you, you know, you, you the guy who owns the TV repair shop, and you the guy who owns the barbershop next door getting these planes and start dropping bombs on these Ugo. Yeah, that was a big deal that to do two civilians, and in two thousand fourteen Obama posthumously in a lot of cases awarded the, the medal of honor the highest citizen honor that anybody in the US can get to everyone who was in the civil air patrol during World War Two all two hundred thousand people and you know what fun fact you're gonna love what. That Barbour dropped his scissors and ran out of the barbershop to go get in his plane halfway through a haircut. And that's how the mullet was born. Was it Floyd? It was Griffith was the first one with the mullet. In a bet. You didn't know that the mullet was born in the mid nineteen forties. I suspected as much business in the front bore in the rear right? Man, Wayne was the first mall created. You know, I remember. Very, very distinctly the first time I heard that term. Okay. I was onset of TV commercial and this was many, many years after the mullet. But when I was in high school, it wasn't called a mullet, it was just sort of kind of the cool hairstyle for a little while. Right. It's called the burnout but I remember when I heard them the mullet I was onset. And one of my friends said, I said, who is this guy who's Lee? And he said he, I don't know why they stuck with me. He said he is that wedge of grossness over there with the mullet head. I can see this sticking with us. Pretty Lena's who is poorly. What else did the civil air patrol do though? They did some other weird things. Yeah. The, the thing during World War Two that they're definitely remembered for was the, the, the bombing sorties in spotting you boats. But they did plenty of other stuff basically they did anything the air cord needed of them. Yeah. Which is things like we need to get this commander from, you know, Saint Louis to Louisiana. Can you give them a ride Saint Louis to Baton Rouge? They did that, like pretty much constantly ferried supplies around. They ferried people around that was a huge part of the war for here at home by the here's a cool thing that they did that also sounds frightening. They would tow. What's called target gliders for anti aircraft guns. So you're playing you're in your little. Single engine plane, your civilian, you were pulling behind you a glider that big guns on the ground are taking target practice at. Yeah, hopefully they've really long tow-line wonder how long that could be though. I don't know. But it almost seems mean spirited that assignment who did that fall to you guys? Drove the, the driving range, golf ball pickup Volkswagen. They. Yeah. He'd be prepared for that kind of thing xactly who did it. I'll bet. You're right. So that was a huge one apparently an equal amount to the danger of being shot out of the sky accidentally in that assignment was also excellently looking into the searchlights that they use in these training exercises. Because at least one pilot was blinded by them and crashed from being, I guess disoriented afterward. Here's one final mission in Texas. The civil air patrol was charged with culling the wolf poppy. Relation. So apparently, it re- you know, would reduce pressure on the cattle herds that these wolves were killing and they needed this, this beef to feed soldiers and citizens. So they said, get up there and your planes and start shooting at wolf's. Yeah. Net I when I was reading that I thought they were saying they needed the wolf meat to feed the troops. I was like. Then I understood what it was saying. Oh. Be. Yeah. They would shoot the, the wolves with handguns out of their planes and try, I think it said wolf's instead of wolves wolfs for so so World War, Two comes and goes civil patrol proves. It's metal and the army air corps is dissolved. And basically turned into the air force air force came after World War Two, and it was from what you're saying, kind of a bit of, like hot potato afterward to wear. No one really wanted the civil air patrol. Right. It sounds like it because one of these a law that was basically passed HR fifty seven forty four, which is really significant to you. If you're in the civil air patrol, it basically said, Nope. The, the civil air patrols and going anywhere. We're going to establish its its existence underlaw. But we are never ever going to arm them again. That's just not going to happen. Let's just not speak of this anymore. Pretended never happen, but no one's ever going to drop a bomb again with the civil air patrol. And so it doesn't seem like they were particularly sought after but they ended up falling under the, the command of the air force after it was established and bounced around a little way, a few places within the air force. And then finally landed in the air combat division. Yeah. You know, postwar. They really really made their name and continue to make their name with search and rescue. If you're lost in the woods or if there are natural disasters or big weather events. Then the civil air patrol is likely to be involved. There was a big earthquake in Alaska, in nineteen sixty four where the, the Alaskan civil air patrol and this was where Rodrick was in the civil air patrol in Alaska. Yes. Where he's from. But this was sixty four so he would have been just a little kid, then sure if not even alive, yet, actually. So I don't think he was in that one. He may have just been gleam, but their civil air patrols hangar in planes were all destroyed, so volunteers. You know, got it together, got eleven private planes, started flying supplies in there and these were good. You know, these are good pilots and these aircraft did things that military aircraft couldn't do a lot of times. Well, that's where that's where they're the role of the civil air patrol and search and rescue really kind of. Came a became obvious, almost out of the gate because they were doing search Inara rescues during World War Two as well. The just the fact that their planes weren't fighter jets was a huge advantage for them in search and rescue, because you want to fly lower you wanna fly slower when you're looking for somebody. So the fact that you have these this group of, you know, tens of thousands of civilians, who are either flying flight instructors learning to fly have their own planes partially funded by, by tax payers for even more planes. That's a really great resource to be able to tap into when something happens in disaster strikes. And you want to look for people, you just say, hey, can you guys go search for, you know, these people were go fly around this flood plain. See if there's anybody on any rooftops and then radio it in that was a huge role in probably the most prominent role that civil air patrol still holds today. In search and rescue. Yeah. And they didn't. You know, they don't just fly around and radio at down. They certainly do that. They are very active and in all manner an all parts of the search they are, you know, many of them cross train. And like horseback riding and cross country, skiing cross fit cross, of course. So they, you know, they can kind of then kind of do it all. Now they have these what's called cell phone forensic teams. And they can analyze cell phone tower Ping's and topa maps, and it's become a much more sophisticated sort of search and rescue largely because of the civil air patrol. Right. But ironically, some of the stuff that some of the talents and expertise they've developed in the search and rescue area like have nothing to do with planes. And so they might assistant a search and rescue without ever taking the air in some cases but they still had their cool uniform. Sure. And they still March when they're told to, to take a break. All right. We're gonna take another break. And talk about a little bit more about the evolution of the AP. Everyone. Everyone be quiet miandi. We're about to talk to you about them. They are made from a naturally soft breathable fiber, that's three times softer than cotton. It's like swimming in a pool of cotton candy but no stickiness just softness. Yeah. I mean it's really like you can feel the difference on your body parts the second you put these things on. They are so soft. And the thing that bugs me about most underwear is that waistband like, you know, this thing really snaps back. Right. It really fits you where you need to be fitted. Exactly. But it hugs you is what you're talking about. It software needs to be soft, and then hugs away where it needs to hug, and that's reason enough, quite frankly, to get me undies. Right. So don't listen us. Check it out for yourself. If you're a first-time purchaser me undies, we'll give you fifty. Eighteen percent off and free shipping and not only that my friend but they have a one hundred percent satisfaction guarantee. So start the year off, right and flip your underwear drawer. Give fifteen percent off the most comfortable undies, you'll ever put on just go to me, undies dot com slash stuff. That's M E undies dot com slash stuff. So, like I said, Chuck, they were shuffled around after World War Two and then they're still under in, you know, kind of linked to the air force, but they are definitely civilian like all civilian. You can't get into the air force, and they do have this kind of quasi-military structure. They have ranks and things like that. But the ranks that they have are strictly limited to the civil air patrol like, if you become I think the highest you can become the civil air patrols, the Major General that would not translate over to the air force like you wouldn't be able to move to air force and be like, I'm a Major General, they'd be like. Let's, let's reset things shall we up the latrine private? Right. But like I said, if you start a work, your way up in the civil air patrol, you can transfer over to the air force with some credit like it's not like it's just a complete waste of time. If you wanted to go into the airforce, but in nineteen seventy five they got their first non-military commander for civilian commander. And that really kind of set the tone from what I understand, for this kind of division between the military air force and the civilian volunteers civil air patrol. They've that really kind of forever divided that lines and you guys can have your ranks in your guys March all you want and each other Surin salute, but your civilian in an auxiliary. Yeah. And like you said there under the air force still and ironically, the specific division of the air force there under the direction of now as the air combat command. Right. Even though they cannot be used in combat. You're not gonna get paid even eight dollars a day anymore. It is full volunteer at this point. In fact, you have to pay dues membership dues every year and you have to pay for your own uniform. And if you really wanna go large, you can buy fake epaulets and metals and. Really? I mean, I'm sure you can you probably get made fun of her yellow, whatever, but sounds like making fun of civil air patrol or said, I'm certainly not because I they definitely are great. And the idea and the whole purposes is pretty great. But I from reading about like, you know, people who had been in it, and some of their when they were asked online like, what did you what was your experience? I get the impression that there is a an element of blow hardness among some people in the civil air patrol, whereas summer there to learn to fly in for the love of flying and or because they do want to go into the air force. There are people there who might abuse their rank or status in the civil air patrol that you schmucks their schmucks, there for from what I understand here there, although it doesn't seem to be systematically monks everywhere. So, like I said at the beginning, they are nonprofit and there are a few people get paid a salary. Obviously, when you get to the administration, the national level, you have to pay some people to run this thing. The air force does pay expenses, if they are asked to perform mission, so well, plus also, if you're on a mission, and something happens to you. You're at that moment covered by the military's life insurance. So your family is, is your cared for after that in very point actually the members do pay for some planes for some equipment. Some fuel hangar space, maintenance, stuff like that right now there are about five hundred thirty single engine planes in the civil air patrol in the United States. A lot of these are those, and I'm getting more and more into planes lately. The more we've talked about these planes. You're getting so old. I must be because I looked at a Cessna one seventy two and I was like I mean, does that seat? How much does that cost really? Like. Wow. Well, no, I can't afford to buy plane. That's that. But I'm saying like having that thought you've. Oh, sure threshold. Like there's, you know, planes or cool. Let's go to a museum to see a plane how much would it? For me to buy this plane and fly at myself. That's the transition in the transition to is the thoughts of, like, you know, when, when Emily and I are retired and ruby live somewhere. Sure would be nice to just hop in the Cessna and fly out and see her sure that is like the oldest of old man. Doc. Yeah. But then I saw there like two hundred thousand dollars. So I was like, okay, maybe not. You, you're like, maybe I can buy one of them houses with the fly up, driveways, like John Travolta. Yeah. I mean dude, he has his own passenger airliner. Yeah. It's crazy. Well, he's also rather wealthy. That's true. So there are more than four thousand planes, though, used in any given year. So I guess that's the official fleet that the civil air patrol runs is that five hundred thirty five thirty. Right. But if you are a member of the civil air patrol and you have your own plane, they'll be like can you bring your playing along? We need to use it for the search and rescue. Right. And they don't just do Sar stuff. They work also with the forest service and the DA. They look out for forest fires that conducts land surveys. They started to do more and more flies over farms in Kentucky. If you know what I'm saying to see what they're growing. Yeah. Yeah, they started in one thousand nine hundred eighty five I think the customs and border patrol said, hey, how would you guys like to look for marijuana plants to prevent? Oh on cigarettes from being smoked by choice. They were all over that. And yeah, they jumped on I read an article this is this is so civil air patrol the idea of like getting to to prevent drugs from hitting the streets. They the I guess the whoever was interviewed. I didn't catch it was. But in official at the civil air patrol I in the higher up in the, the national organization, Major General probably said something like they, they helped get a billion dollars worth of, of drugs. Sure, which is, of course, like the manufacturer's suggested retail price. Of drugs off of the street in two thousand seventeen and that they, they were on track to hit about the same number in two thousand eighteen that's it's a lot of marijuana cigarettes. Yeah. I can't help probably shouldn't even just say this. I gotta here, we can edit it outlaid. Who was the stand, your ground guy in Florida? Oh. Oh man. George zimmerman. Yeah. Some of this sounds a little bit like that. Like, hey, I'm not a copper in the military. But right, I'm gonna play like I am on a bus truck dealers. Well, that actually made me wonder do they do they patrol the southern border? I think for I couldn't see anything that said they did. Well, it's said they did they patrolled the southern border in World War, Two looking for saboteurs entering that's trigger. I'm like, well, wait a minute that, plus, you know, bussing you know, pot growers. They do they look for people crossing the border illegally, and I didn't see anything about them being used for that, that might off book use, it could be. Yeah. They don't report that, but it was hilarious. The, the guy interviewed maybe the Major General, who is talking about how they got a billion they helped with getting a billion dollars of drugs off the streets. Right. They were saying, we don't talk about the very much. We don't really press releases because we don't want. To basically step on the DA's operations or anything like that. But trust us, that's how much we get off the streets. It was pretty cute. They also work in just general aerospace, and flying education and advocacy. Now, they do lectures and seminars. They put together training manuals online just trying to advance aviation, and the knowledge and love of aviation and took I also saw in another article some other stuff that they do just pretty interesting. That is much more tied to the military. So you remember there under like the combat division. Yeah. Well the combat division puts them to, to pretty good use. Sometimes like if you are flying a drone under FAA regulations that drone has to be escorted by human plane over over regular airspace. Non-military airspace. And so to get out of the United States. Zone usually s to fly over non military airspace. And so one of the things that the civilian air patrol does is they escort drones, which means that, that's something that the military doesn't have to do. And for just one base with the drone escorts, they provided this commander figured that they saved the military something like four hundred grand a year by doing this gratis, basically, they also survey, military training routes. So they basically fly over the, the routes that test pilots are gonna fly to make sure that somebody isn't put up power lines since the last time they used them. They they simulate flyers that have accidentally entered restricted airspace, for intercept training, which has got to be kind of neat. And they're, they're actually learning to fly drones themselves now too, which is probably a pretty intimate and skill. If you're somebody going into the air force these days, I think it's a door doorbell that they saved the military four hundred thousand dollars a year. Well, it was just one base, too. But. Yeah. He he, he had enough self awareness that he was saying, like, I think he called it budget dust. Sure. He said, you know, it's still count Stallone that half a million bucks is budget dust. Yeah, it is. Then they had their cadet program. We mentioned earlier about cadet. This is if you are under the age of eighteen you can still be in their cadet program. Once you're over eighteen you, you don't have to do this until you're twenty one but you can at eighteen turn into a what's called a senior, which I thought it was interesting that could be like nineteen. Right. I can actually found out why. Because that seems kind of weird doesn't it what they're called seniors? Well, that so if you enter and you're over eighteen you have to be a your have to be considered a senior. Yeah. But if you enter the civilian air patrol before you're eighteen you can wait to become a senior till, you're twenty one and the reason. Why is because you get hammered when you get that rank you right? He's just keep putting it off. It's called delayed gratification. You can get your training to get your pilot's license of through the civilian air patrol for basically, like half price of what you'd pay a flight school. And it was it's such a great deal that flight schools. Complain does the government. And so this is unfair competition. So there's a rule with the civilian air patrol, the if you enter the civilian air patrol over the age of eighteen you are automatically considered a senior, and you do not qualify for instruction to get your pilot's license. If you start before then and you start getting your pilots license, you can delay being considered a senior till you're twenty one so you have an extra couple years to complete your training to get your pilot's license at half price. That's the reason why you can delay being a senior until you're twenty one. Hey sounds like quite a deal. Yeah, it is half price, everybody loves half price. And you know, like we mentioned earlier just to kind of put a cap on it, the, the cadets it is a bit like boy, scou-. Outs meets ROTC. They get to actually get in planes like if you know if you're a kid, if you got to be twelve years old. But if you are interested in flying and getting your license or going into the air force, you, can you can train, and you can get yourself up in the ranking system through the years, and you can get seat time and planes. Yep. And get flying experience learn to fly drones. It's a big. Yeah. So I think it's like a pretty cool program for kids to get into. Yeah. And if drug dealers just make you so, man. You can't even see straight. That's another thing you can do. That's right. Get rid of them. You got anything else? Got nothing else. John Ryan, never responded. Okay. I'm just going to go with his one statement, which was I'm a proud veteran of the civil patrol. Well, thanks for almost nothing. John rod rate story, if you want to know more about the civil air patrol. Well then go joined the civil air patrol in. And since I said that everybody, it's time for listener, ma'am. This is from a fellow Toledo in Josh. Yes. He got some Spanish teacher in second language, acquisition. Nerd and recent episode he has mentioned that you're not fluent in the second language until you dream in that language. Chuck, I remember I said, I had heard that before as romantic and poetic is the sounds, it's totally made up, which is what I heard also later in the episode you mentioned that someone who learned a second language as an adult will never reach the fluency of a native speaker, this is true, sort of it depends on your definition of fluency, though, speakers of English as a second language, who had been in an English speaking country for years, even decades will still have an accent make mistakes and word order or have trouble with vocabulary. In the end, I argue that fluency is overrated, and what we should focus on his proficiency being hyper focused on becoming quote fluent in quote, leads people to be paralyzed, when speaking, and they'll spend years studying language, but never be confident in their abilities to ever use it. Side note, even though this dream thing is a myth, totally still, celebrate with my students when they come in and tell me about having dreams in Spanish, even if it's not true. It's still fun. When kids feel confident and lead them to believe it is looking forward to future podcast. Guys, Lisa in Toledo, Ohio. Hi, Josh, go rockets. Highly sa- go rockets, and go mud hens and go falcons. What are the rockets Toledo rockets, the university of Toledo? Okay. Yeah. Because, you know, Toledo so well known for its space program. I don't know why they're called the rockets now that I think about it. I'm ashamed. Who knows? Well, thanks a lot, Lisa. And if you wanna be cool, like Lisa or like me and say, you're from Toledo, whether you are not it's fine. We probably won't check up on it. You can get in touch with us, mere Yad ways you can go onto our website stuff, you should know dot com and check out our social links or you can send us an Email to stuff podcast at I heart radio dot com. Stuff you should know is a production of heart radios. How stuff works for more podcasts, my heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hey, everybody. We know you love. Chelsea handler. You've seen her on the stage on TV on her Netflix series. You've read her books and now you can hear her every week under very first podcast with us called life will be the death of me. Yeah. Chelsea, handler's life will be the death of me is made in partnership with iheartradio, which means it's going to be boss, and it features interviews, between her and her inner circle of friends, which is pretty substantial people like actress, Connie Britton, comedian, Sarah Silverman, journalist Jake tapper, Sean, Hayes from willing, grace, you know. Mucketty mucks exactly tune into life will be the death of me with Chelsea handler. A brand new iheartradio. Original podcast, you can listen and subscribe at apple podcasts, or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

US US army air corps official commander squarespace Charles Chuck Bryant Gill Robb Wilson iheartradio ROTC Josh Clark army air corps IBM New York Chicago BBC Major General Toronto John Roderick America
Major Mike Fassi, CAP

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

00:00 sec | 2 months ago

Major Mike Fassi, CAP

"This is mornings with Kale, and northern Colorado's voice thirteen, ten KFI K. Very special event to support our veterans just right around the Corner Eight, Oh eight now thirteen ten Kfi a thirteen, ten KFI F. A. dot com northern Colorado's voice mornings with Gail live and local via the collision specialist studios. It's golf tournament at Ptarmigan on September fourteenth, and it is to support the folds of honor scholarship program, for those who made the ultimate sacrifice in serving our nation or those that were left disabled providing scholarship money to their children. Ben Coordinator. There's like. After, US Air Force Auxiliary. Major. Thank you so much for taking the time and thank you for your service your ongoing service to this nation. My pleasure. Thanks for having kill. You Bat. So I love supporting folds of honor such a great organization. So tell us a little bit about the upcoming golf tournament. This is the Patriot Day tournament September fourteenth at Ptarmigan Country Club. Well, the tournament was originally scheduled on Memorial Day, which is when nationwide foles of honor has their tournaments all over the country. But because of the virus week, we had to make some adjustments and the organization decided to go ahead and and have the scholarship or have the to the golf tournament because the scholarships are still needed and we have never had one specifically to benefit foles of honor northern, Colorado. They had one cheer at Cherry Creek. They've had them at at the little country club down south in Colorado, springs but we've never had one up here. So having met Colonel Dan Rooney in January Foot and say no. So this is our first time to have a full fledged tournament specifically for Foles of honor we're looking forward to it. And for anyone that might not be familiar with this just amazing organization pulls her tell us a little bit more about it and particularly the scholarship program. Well there's two to really good stories We we my wife and I had a chance to meet Colonel Dan Rooney who is still an F sixteen fighter pilot out of the Oklahoma National Guard as. Well and he was at our meeting and he reminded me a lot of a a friend of of northern Colorado for many years a gentleman by the name of colonel stand cast and when Colonel Pest issue to do something nobody could turn it down and pretty much the same way with Colonel Dan Rooney He he also is a professional golfer and PGA pro, and also as I said, an F sixteen driver so it was a great opportunity to he. He saw it in two thousand seven to combine both of his skills and development start the organization fulls of honor and we just were fortunate enough to have met him Last year, and then be able to carry this on up in northern Colorado. So both of a great organization last year in two thousand, nineteen, we provided over four, thousand, five, hundred 's college scholarships for. Children of veterans that have been killed or wounded in action Twenty, four, thousand, five, hundred of those so far since two thousand seven and the organization we we made a conscious decision to have it in in September because. These folks that have made the ultimate sacrifice. Don't stop because of a virus and we as a Patriot I think we were were we're having this conversation because patriots. Were turning it into patriotism printing patriotism into action and this golf tournaments the way to do it. So. Give us all the details what we need to know for anyone that wants to participate and support folds of honor and just such a great cause. So it's the Patriot Day Golf Tournament at Ptarmigan Country Club September fourteenth at twenty twenty. What do we need to know right? It's GONNA be a we're GONNA we're going to start getting together because of the virus were limited to seventy two golfers at each each each flight. So WE'RE GONNA. Do if we have to do we're going to do we have an afternoon flight schedule one thirty shocked then start best ball scramble but if. We have enough folks sign up and and one participate charming in his assurance that we can have a flight in the morning because of the cove were allowed only one golfer part. So we have to make sure that everybody's safe and comfortable in this environment, and this is an opportunity to do it. Get Out some fun for a great cause. So we start at one thirty shotgun start best ball scramble will have obviously, it's going to be a very patriotic day. We've had a lot of local sponsors step up We still could use a lot more sponsors our goal is to provide. at least three scholarships here you'll have an opportunity to hear from Jason Hallett, who is a marine and lives here in Windsor his wins will be beneficiaries of it because he's a triple amputee and you'll be able to meet, Jason you'll be able to get a real feel for from. Full of honor for the program because we'll have a a speaker that is currently receiving the The scholarship crumples of honor what it's meant to them Again, the easiest way to to to find out get more information is to go to. They PTARMIGAN. Twenty twenty. Dot Golf genius, DOT COM golf genius has been a great sponsor and supporter for US along with number of other major sponsors. I don't know if you're familiar with the sponsorship, but we've got budweiser writing quick trip the PGA as a major sponsor along with coca-cola. Some great local sponsors too. If you'd like to be a low rate sponsor we've we've certainly could use all the help we could get. To register sponsor or donate all you have to go to Patriot's Day ptarmigan twenty twenty dot gov genius dot com correct. Yes and you'll be able to pick and choose what you'd like to do remember I think the most important thing gail is that we're honoring the service people for their sacrifice by educating their legacy and that's that's that's what we gotta remember regardless of what's going on in your life. If you can't be there if you're not comfortable being there, you can certainly donate you can certainly be a sponsor are registered playing. We Love we love for you to participate here in northern. Colorado. Nature Mike Posse Colorado Air Patrol public affairs public. Information Officer US Air Force OUT ZOE and event coordinator up the Patriot a golf tournament. At Target Country, club September fourteenth at twenty twenty to support folds honor in terms of educating our legacy. Thank you so much for once again, your service, your ongoing service and for being such a great patriot. Thank you. We're look forward to meeting a lot of folks from northern Colorado with tournament he'll say. Absolutely it's sixteen now thirteen ten KFI K.

Colorado twenty twenty Colonel Dan Rooney Ptarmigan Country Club US golf US Air Force Auxiliary Kfi Ptarmigan Country Club Gail PGA Ben Coordinator Dot Golf Cherry Creek Colorado Air Patrol Kale Oklahoma National Guard Jason Hallett F. A.
555 Marzari Goes Skydiving

Airplane Geeks Podcast

1:37:33 hr | 1 year ago

555 Marzari Goes Skydiving

"This is the airplane, geeks podcast. Our aim is to educate and inform. You explore and expand your passion for aviation in entertainment, a little along the way this episode. We have part one of airplane, geeks reporter at large launchpad Mazari is report of his parachute jump in. We have the video to prove it. Our main man mica talks with bunk in Diana. Chase about the spur week farm pancake breakfast and flight coming up in Maine, July fourth twenty nineteen a proud Papa talks with a new civil air patrol cadet in moron. Cryogenic hydrogen fuel cells for electric airplanes in the news and speaking of hydrogen, and EV tall with claimed four hundred mile range, the CBS interview with Boeing's CEO, a report on a sump made during seven three seven max design and certification in a rather strange story about trapping flight attendants on the plane all that and more coming up right now. Welcome to the airplane, geeks podcast, this episode five hundred fifty five of the show where we talk aviation. I Mex flight. Joining me is I max trescott. He's host of aviation news talk podcast. He's the two thousand eight CFI the year. And he's an expert on learning to fly purchase a Cirrus aircraft. He mex-. A lomax. How're you doing fact? I'm wondering where are you doing it? You mentioned before the tier in hotel room, where where are we hearing you from today? That's right. I'm hold up in Baltimore. I'm here for the F. A US symposium, little three day affair, this is day. One is just completed I, I think, I'll have some observations for this podcast when it's done, and I'll certainly have some for the U A V digest David Vanderhoek, our aviation historian in and co host of let me introduce you and say Hello. Hello. Now can I go home now? No, no. You had to show, but I think you and I'll be talking about the FAA US symposium this week in, in some detail you attended last year. And boy, you just raved about it, and I'm, I'm having a great experience here this year. It's definitely intense. So we're I'm looking forward to hear your thoughts on on on everything and see how things have changed or may not have changed over the time that we've been there. Yeah. That'd be a good conversation to see how the, the issues have changed in the last twelve months. How the attitudes have changed in all of that. When it comes to unmanned aviation. So. But it's been very good so far and have two more days to go. So we'll look forward to talking about that in the future. But we've got some aviation news to talk about from the past week. Are you guys ready? Ready from the west ready? For stop from new atlas dot com sky. Hydrogen-powered E V tall air taxi boasts enormous for hundred mile range. Well, we've been talking about, I d- Rogen fuel cells a lot lately, both here that the av digest, that's for sure. But we have here you've been talking. Can't get away from it. And we've got we've got this conversation. And we've got another another one coming up later in the show. But this is at no Alec technologies. It's a L A K, A apostrophe. I why do they need the apostrophe? I mean, really, I don't know it made its feel kind of tradition because it's a traditional letter in Hawaiian, but this is a massive Massachusetts space company. But then word is Hawaiian. Yeah. Do you know what it means in Hawaiian wrong now you're asking difficult questions? All right. Well, somebody only spent one week in Hawaii. I know how to spell the words, I don't know how to say him and I don't know how to translate them. All right. Well someone listening, please tell us what the what the, the translation of that word is. But this is yet another electric vertical takeoff and landing air, taxi company, there in the news now, they say that the sky. And that's. S K. A continuing the cuteness of their naming here. They say that it will hold five passengers including a pilot for up to four hours of flight time in four hundred miles in how can they go for four hundred miles. Well, there we go hydrogen fuel cell. Again, power comes from from that fuel-cell. So he you know, he you know, they're so many EV tall slash air-taxis slash personal. Transportation slash gigantic. Multi-culture companies out there. I, I don't know David. What do you make of all this activity? This is kind of a well it's a new kind of aviation. Coming up here. I wouldn't call it vaporware but it is kind of everybody thinks they've got a shot at doing it. It's kinda like democratic candidates for the twenty twenty election. We just get lots and lots of people, especially somebody might. Eventually, we'll get lots and lots of companies and will finally figured out. But what makes us more of a serious game? It's not just the start off with vaporware its Airbus and Boeing and embryo air and Lockheed Martin and bell. Yeah. Bells here offers so. I don't know if it's if you but it's, it's a hell of elect closer to flying cars since us kids that had would the Jetsons. But it's. It's sort of that. I guess. And I'll defer to my younger compatriot. Supersonic transport in the late sixties everybody wanted in the game. It didn't happen besides the concord and the two have in Russia, but. Everybody wanted it you know. And. It kind of flows with, with, with the increase in US activity. But it's an interesting. It's an interesting thing because it's just a lot of people taking it seriously. And there's a lot of people throwing money at it. You know, and in case of Boeing Airbus. They're throwing at it in multiple directions. They're not. They're not hedging their bets. They're, they're got three or four companies working on the same thing, autonomously, excuse pine, and it seems like that's where we're going. It's like supersonic transport. Everybody wants to slice of the pie doesn't want to be late to the party. But I don't think everybody does where party is yet. Well, and it was not that different from the, the V L, Jay's the very light jets when they were going to be so many of them flying that they would darken the sky with dentists. So I think we often have predictions that these markets are going to be huge. And then, of course when you got one hundred companies all trying to divide for portion of the market, ninety five of them are gone. And then you're left with, with five kind of reminds me back in nineteen eighty four when I was working for the test and measurement portion of Hewlett Packard replace. President Bill Terry at one point spoken. He said that in the prior year. There had been a hundred different companies trying to take leadership in the destroyed industry. All of them were shooting. The goal for all of them was twenty five percent market share. And you can't have a hundred companies, you know, attaining twenty five percent market share. The good news is we sold a heck of a lot of tested with all his companies as they were ramping up. Bad news is most of the were eventually gone that exactly, I think what's going to happen. In this market as well. But it'd be really interesting to see who succeeds and what design is going to succeed. Yes. Yes. In this particular case, it, it seems that there's a sole investor behind this, and they've been working on this for four four years, so feels like under some degree of secrecy. But it's kind of interesting to think about where the funding comes for these efforts. I mean, David you talking about the, the major air framers and other large corporations investing in it. We see other much smaller companies trying to develop solutions here and this one example again of, of just a sole investor. That's behind behind this company. But David, we have a recent example, don't we have what can happen when there's a you know, a sole investor the spark behind the company the motivation behind. The company, he and then that flame goes out and sort of things begin to to end. We have an example of that recently. Don't we? While it was really good transition. Very huge monumental stratospheric. Back in the end of world. War, two, a very large, h eight engined aircraft flown by a. Mad. But brilliant. Entrepreneur engineer by name, Howard Hughes, flew, an aircraft call the h four Hercules. For everybody else in this podcast. Notice truths. Says that because we were kidding him about the nobody calls spruce goose to Hercules, a Hercules, except for David but. Anyway, I happen to know my history, I know. But. Last month that record of that aircraft having the largest wingspan in being the origin, aircraft fly was broken by Paul, Allen's. Straddle on well on Friday at the end of the month, rumors came out that straddle while we talked about this earlier that. Shortly after Paul Al died the rocket portions of straddle lawns that we're going to put the satellites and people in orbit excetera our being faced out. Well, the aircraft is flown, and now sits proudly and a hangar and straddling, the company is going away and possibly just being dissolved. Another mammoth project triggered by one man. You know what happens when that person dies or gives up? Paul Allen, didn't get to see it fly, which is kind of fortunate but. What was that street, noise out here right now? But keep going. So sadly, straddle on has gone. We'll have to follow it. It's been rumored. It's not quite official yet, but unfortunate, but. Flu, but it's gonna go down in history as favor where. All right. Well, you know, we can move onto our our next story. This comes from eo PA. And this is the. Hate to use the word but the death of something else aviation related that I'm not. No, I'm sort of sad to see it go, but airplane, geeks reporter at large launch pad Missouri has a report for us. Last week. Red bull Guillaume Baha announced that the red bull heiresses will not continue after the twenty nine thousand nine season, the twenty nine hundred season will only have three remaining races the championship final races will be held in Kazakhstan. Russia, June, fifteenth and sixteen lake Baltin Hungaria July thirteen fourteen and chew by Japan. September seventh and ace the race began in two thousand three with a break in two thousand eleven two thousand twelve in two thousand thirteen all the stats details. You'll be able to read it Wikipedia flying magazine av web. I'll be sorry to see the red bull areas end. I've seen several of the racists, the first being in Leipzig Deutschland in the last being the championship held in Dallas for the twenty eighteen season. Everyone was a great event red bull aviation red bull air races. And the pilots themselves have been friends of this podcast going way back to twenty thirteen where Redman reedmen flight operations banner. Chief pilot for readily aviation gave us an exclusive behind the scenes tour of hangers seven and eight and red bull aviation facilities in Salzburg Austria, see episode two eighty red bull air. Racers like the late Hanis arch. Patrick Davidson Martin Shonka, Kirby Chan Lewis and friend of the podcast, Michael Julian have always taken their time for us. It was not just the racers here at the geeks that we've done interviews with the air gate, man. Mister who controls the pylons gave us a great interview. And then we asked for a behind the scenes technical interview, and the director of red bull air races Jim D'amoto was made available to us. You can go back and listen to those interviews and episode five three three the part you may not have seen. If you've never gone to red bull air race was a level of professionalism, and the polish that these events had the seriousness of staff the professionalism of the staff. The commitment to the event and the venues, I have only seen equal to inform ULA once which of course, are multi million dollar events. But the red bull air race had the same equipment, the same F I officials and conducted themselves as, if this was a multimillion dollar a vent to our international listeners, try and get to one of these races note. The Japan race is always the most attended event in the red bull air race calendar and is a huge event. I personally will miss the red bull air. Racers, and I think aviation is going to miss the excitement. I mourn for the loss. Thanks launchpad. Yeah. This is kind of sad. And you know, I had wanted to attend one of the races in another example of you. If you wait too long, you might you know, you might miss out. And I thought I had heard someone at one point in time mentioned that attendance for these races was not huge. You know, not on the scale of other kinds of events, sponsored by red Buller on the scale of some of the more traditional airshows. I don't know never been to one but it looks to me. Like perhaps this was just kind of a dollar and cents are y valuation. The company may have just looked at it and said, you know, this cost a lot may not be attracting the level of attention that we had hoped, certainly, I think it has a huge following among pilots, but maybe that was it. And maybe it just didn't have enough following among the general public. I don't know. You know, a sponsor may come along that will cause us to be resurrected or maybe that along with some kind of a redesign of the of the approach to make it more commercially successful or to, you know, increase the size of the audiences. I don't know. We'll see. I mean they did. He did take a couple of years off in the past, and then. Came back, maybe it'll happen again. But maybe not we'll have to see. All right. Hey, our, our friend Brian sent it in articles from SF gate dot com. What Boeing's CEO said on CBS this morning. And it was a CBS interview Boeing CEO. Dennis Muilenburg was interviewed on, on the television, and he apologized for the crashes. They tried to, you know, illicit an apology from him and in and he did pretty pretty straightforwardly. I guess, so I, I don't know that, that completely repairs the cleaner, the reputation that, that Boeing has after the seven three seven max issues, but I don't know. It's it's a step. Yeah. I think they need to take a whole lot of steps. And that's just one of many, the whole affair is very unfortunate. But yes, it's always great when you see leaders of companies step up to the plate. And, you know, admit their shortcomings, I think that goes a long ways toward getting some credibility back. Yes. The article here says, I'll quote read from this Boeing in the FAA continue efforts to implement a software fix that corrects the fatal flaws in the seven three seven maxes, new M, cast technology. And I think I raise this before, but I don't really view this as a software fix the corrects the fatal flaws. I mean, there are a series of, of issues here, I think, and he's just the ones that we know about. I mean, we see that angle of attack indicators seem to be not the most reliable sensor in the world, either, they're susceptible to bird strikes, or other damage. They're apparently very fragile sensors, and so they can get accidentally broken in some way or another. I mean that's part of this. I think there's the issue. You of varying levels of pilot skill and does an air framer designed for the lowest global common denominator or or something else. There's the issue of single point of failure on a critical system. I mean, these are all things that me anyway, this software, quote, fix doesn't address any of those. I don't know what do you think max, you look at this whole, I think it's got to be a lot more than just a software fix. We had a story here sometime in the last week or two in which they were estimating. That would be approximately one hundred fifty hours. I don't remember the exact number, but it was somewhere in that ballpark to put each aircraft back in the sky software. Fix doesn't take one hundred fifty hours. Yeah. The software you uploaded. Yeah. You look at it maybe an hour or two. This clearly has to be some, some hardware fixes as well. But I think this transitions into. The article in the New York Times that I found a day or two and it looks to me like the time has come out with a lot of articles on the seven three seven. So I think they've put a large number of people on this story because we continue to see stories come out from them. And that was really intrigued by the, the history that they came out with, and I it helped to explain think some of the things that you and I were initially just dismayed by such as, you know, single points of failure turns out there didn't used to be just a single piece of hardware. The in fact, there were multiple sensors, and it wasn't just a oh, as but it was also accelerometers as well. So in the early days of the m caste system, it was intended to be a solution to really just one problem, and it relied both on the accelerometer as well as the attack indicator. But apparently there came a time where one of the test pilots felt that the stall response was not quite what it should be when you do a recovery from Saul and seven thirty. Seven and he proposed that the m casts be expanded in terms of what kinds of capabilities that would address. In fact, they said the expanded the cast to address a full range of stall type situations. So now instead of it being a solution for one, extremely, rare event, it became a solution for a much more common event in order to get that to work. They had to stop using the excel Rommedahl, apparently, and they did kick back to just using a single AOL and yet, this apparently was in a according to the article, and the people, they interviewed something that was unknown to firstly everybody that they talked about. So someone somewhere made a decision some point to just go ahead and use only a single sensor, when they decided to expand the range of situations that was going to be used for. And so. Books both at FAA folks at Boeing alike. All said after this came out the crashes, they were all shocked. They had no idea that the hardware and the system had been changed that way, everybody was pretty much under the assumption that there were multiple sensors involved in that there wasn't this single point of failure that we've been talking about since day one. So it was kind of an interesting chronology to see how this gradually creeped in expanded, and got adjusted in a way that put this fatal flaw into the system, which, of course, is now being reworked. I think this is one of the best articles, I've read to date on the whole 737, max issue, because they're looking at it kind of holistically or from a root cause kind of standpoint they being the New York Times, I think they've done a really good job here. And it seems like it's a an example of kind of scope creep, if you will in an environment where. Job functions are development functions are highly compartmentalized. Right. So you're responsible for this aspect. You're responsible for that aspect. Somebody makes a change in, in one of those compartments maybe optimizing or doing a good thing in that compartment. But the entire the entire chain was not aware of it, apparently including the regulators. And, and so we have this disastrous result. So I don't know if that. Description of how this development proceeded is unique to this particular aircraft, the seven three seven max or if if it's employed more broadly. And if so, you know, why haven't there been problems there? I mean, that's something to look at what's different about this case is the approach total different and, and problematic, unless you have some kind of function, that looks across the entire entire process. But it also reminds me of software development because oftentimes, you will have, you know, incremental development on compartment compartmentalized development done, but there's a process by which you, you know, you evaluate the entire result as a whole more than just each particular, you know, routine or compartment. So I again, I find this very, very interesting. Thing article if if you don't go, and look at the show notes for any other purpose, I highly recommend that, you know, you guys listening go look for this, this Lincoln the show notes. The article titled is Boeing built. Yes. Boeing built deadly assumptions into seven three seven max blind to a late design change. I think it's really well done. I agree. And if. Go ahead. No yet. And if it wasn't bad enough. You know, New York Times it's opening up doors. They reported that the seven thirty seven maxes and seven thirty seven Gs now have critical landing slat. Failures guess some parts. Just read that today too. I think walking back to the hotel from from the symposium. There are apparently a couple. Well, at least one we'd slat channels are defective right from a supplier, and they are. It's not just the seven thirty seven max. It's seven thirty sevens and jeeze before the maxes. So, basically, the current seven thirty seven fleet has got going to have to have a stand down to fix the slat. So bowling is not doing well. And there's another aspect of this article that I just wanna mention Maxine with you. I think that this is probably one of the best articles. I've read in therapy, so many articles written about this, what really makes this good is that they lay out the chronology step by step over time with exactly all the different things that occurred suddenly it becomes a lot more understandable, how they got into the situation that they did. But the other aspect that they talked about in the second half of the article was that question that was raised in people's minds about why was the caste system. Not described in the peo- H, and there was a request that was put forth by the chief, technical pilot max fork, near pardon me, Mark for cnor who emailed, the FAA saying would it be okay to remove him from the pilot's manual? And apparently, the officials who were trying to determine the pilot training needs have been briefed on the original em- casts of before, and the impression at the time was that the caste system was very benign. In rarely ever kicked in, of course leader, we know that the design changed, and the became something that could kick in far more frequently Boeing wanted to limit the changes to the max vision from previous versions of the seven thirty seven. And so, basically everybody said, yeah. This makes sense. Let's just go ahead and remove this from the manual. It's not necessary. So that was just another piece of, how assumptions lead to, you know, changes that, you know, after the fact seem you know, pretty indefensible. But when you look at how the chronology occurred kinda made sense at the time, yes, this really feels like in HP, our case study in the future. Yeah. Well, why don't we ve onto another story? This is I guess, a little bit more light than than the seven three seven max issue. And this is from the Huffington Post delta, tried to trap, quote unquote, its own flight attendants on a plane messages show. Next. This is kind of I know this is funny or or worrisome or what? But it's definitely strange. Yeah, it's, it's all of those things put together, which is why it caught my attention. I thought we've got to talk about this. This is just kind of an interesting combination the circumstances. Apparently, there was a delta flight, which was leaving Atlanta going to Toronto as I recall, which had run into maintenance problems, which was causing a lengthy delay before takeoff. And there were some concerns in the flight operations center that perhaps, the flight attendants might reach their duty limits and just kind of walk off the airplane and leave, which I think is probably, you know what they're entitled to do at that point in time. And so some along the line, a message went out through a new messaging system, and it really scribe exactly what this messaging system is. But I would have to assume that it's, you know, some type of app that's easily used on phones. You know, something like, slacker messenger, some kind. Thing like that, where operations can communicate with maintenance people, and other folks, and basically hit told the maintenance people to go ahead and close the door the airplane and do not open the door. The message read flight attendants out of time, and none available employees, advise the gate agents to let maintenance do their work without opening the doors. Thank you. Well, it turns out that they may not have known but the flight attendants also had access to this new applic- just been rolled out able to see these messages that they were essentially being trapped on the airplanes that they couldn't leave. It's as the this story continue to roll out, I guess about forty five minutes later. A new message went out let said, okay if door is not closed by eleven PM flight attendants walking, we will most likely have to delay flight until morning if this happens, and then, ultimately, I guess after about three hours the. Tenets of voluntarily agreed to do the flight even though I guess it was really going to mess up their day. They're gonna end up extremely late which was going to give them an extremely short night prior to the next day flight, but nonetheless, they kind of stepped up and said, yeah, we'll do this even though we know that you were trying to trap us and force us to do you know you gotta admire them stepping up in agreeing to fly the flight, even though it looks like people were trying to coerce them in, you know, some way prior to that. So, yeah. Pretty bizarre story. Yeah. I hate the flight attendants showed kind of, I don't know good humor or dedication to the job, or, or whatever. But delta says that this is definitely not company protocol. To shut the door. But yeah, I don't know. I guess somebody was trying to do something to make the numbers good or whatever. But that's not the way you go about it. Clearly, I don't know what delta will to do to the, the poor message writer, the author of these messages. But I'm sure it will this kind of behavior won't be encouraged in the future, a little bit of retraining. I thought that for this entire story. The flight attendants came out as being the only responsible people. Thing basically, kind of said, okay, we know there's some weird babe you're going, but we're not gonna we're not gonna make a big deal about this. We'll be the adults in the room and it's you know, it's great that, you know, people sometimes do that. It's kind of, like fine, we'll put aside, you're shortcomings in your poor baby, but we're still going to do do the right thing despite of these strange circumstances. Right. So yeah, pretty pretty wild story. Oh, there was one other little piece, which was that the flight attendants were hoping that as compensation, perhaps, on the following day they would be just assigned a dead head. So they can't really get if, if they're signed a dead headline, then they're basically, you know flying, but they don't have passengers that they don't have to serve, and that would certainly be appropriate. I think for someone who had their, their nights shortened by several hours. We have a report coming up now from launchpad Missouri, he and this guy went skydiving. That's something that I've never done. I don't really have any great desire to jump out of an airplane, but launchpad went on a little tandem jump with skydive space land. And he's got a, a number of segments here to the story in what we're going to do is we're going to listen to the, the first two an introduction, and then a really interesting conversation about, what does it take to be certified to, to, to well to do tandem jumps as as the instructor. But let's listen to launch pedal introduction into his adventure. A look behind the curtain, I approached are publicist and senior editor, hey, we haven't done a story about skydiving and five hundred episodes. I have a lead on the story MAC says that's great launchpad, but you've gotta jump wait. What look max when I fly preferred to be manifested as required crew not jettison -able cargo, that's not the point launch pad. If you don't jump it won't be a credible story, says max oh, okay. Mic doesn't get assigned these kind of stories, Ono, you assign him to write on computer software while I'm going to get thrown out of an airplane. Sometimes it's just doesn't seem fair, but I guess the show must go on so off. I went to skydive space land, San Marcos, what I found was not one story, but for the first story the. Jumping experience, which is really typified. By the video, you can see in the show notes to how skydiving works and the rules and procedures for what's involved in jumping and making it safe. Three the business model and ownership of skydiving company, and four finally, what it's like to fly the jump plane overall impressions, this wasn't a small operation, they had three or four buildings. They even have an onsite Cantina. I was impressed with the professionalism, cleanliness and the open, welcoming environment of the employee and the facility itself. I can honestly say, I wasn't scared the professionals them an explanation of all the procedures calmed any worries. I had the first second of exceleron, as we exit the airplane did get my attention, but after that, there was no sense of ground, rush or acceleration. It was just at that point flying, same. When we were under the. Canopy again it was just flying and like flying. We practice a couple of stalls, we did some tight turns than we actually set up for landing as if we're an airplane doing it down win a base of final. And then flaring at the end I was pretty happy with my landing to be honest thing. Startled me the most was when I was flying right seat in the jump plane all jumpers congregate in the door just like you can see in my jump video, but this was worse. All the jumpers gathered in the door and at eighty five knots all of a sudden, the stall warning horn went off the plane started to pitch up, and we were going almost full deflection down, and yelling for the jumpers to either jump or come forward once they depart, the airplane. Hey, it was back to normal the plane instantly recovered after the last jumper had left the plane. We did a wing over pull the throttle title and pointed down at an astounding thirty five degrees. I wish I had video for the airplane ride, which was just exciting. It's jump itself. Because we ended up with that Cessna caravan safely on the ground before the last jumper touchdown because fuel is money. And after the last jumper departs the airplane, no one's paying for fuel anymore. I would like to thank Thomas Hughes, and the entire team of skydive space land, San Marcos for their gracious hospitality, and full access without which these stories would not have been possible. So let's begin. All right. Before we listen to the next next segment here of this mentioned on the, the video that launchpad mentioned. It is a terrific video, the, the guys that are really nice job on the production. It's, it's really something in this way you see large lunch launchpad in well, not so large the guy that strapped launch launchpad to him to jump in the tandem. It's just quite a site will try to get it up on YouTube. I may not be able to do that from the hotel room here. So if you go to the show notes to see the video, and it's not there yet, than just wait a few days because I'll get it when I come home. But let's listen to the next part of launchpads adventure. Hello playing gigs listeners. It's reporter at large launchpad Murray and we just complete a skydive here at skydive space land, and my co-pilot or jump master is Andrew leaf Andrew, we just completed our jump. Pretty exciting for mice perspective. Yes. From mine as well. You know, I've been jumping for eight years, and no two or the same. There's something new about them every time. Well, let's talk about that is there from your side is era, CJ, I certified jump instructor from the FAA. There is not our governing body is the United States parachute association. They're the ones that issue the licenses to skydive and the ratings as well to be an instructor. Basically, you've got your coach af which is accelerated freefall entertainment structure ratings. Okay. So you go number of jumps in certifications to get to these levels. Correct. Yes, it's based upon your experience. And obviously, there are some prerequisites to gaining any of those instructional ratings. Is there a medical, there is for the tandem rating, it does require a FA class three? Ical. Okay. But for all the, the other jumpers, there's no medical requirements from the FAA, that is correct. The only one that requires it is a tandem instructor. That's because you are a pilot in command. And someone is, you know, you're responsible for somebody else. All right. Now, if someone wants to get a skydiving license, what's the path, they take? Well, there are many paths to take to getting skydiving license. So I'm going to go with what we do here at space land, basically requires you to tandem skydives where you're attached to someone else on the second one, we give you some more things to do the way, I like to see it is that once you've done one year awareness more expanded, you know what to expect. So then we give you some tasks to do on the second one after you've completed ten level to your now, graduated to the solo program, which is called skydiver training program. And this is basically where you go through a six hour ground school. We teach you everything you need to know to make a safe. Skydive you go up with an instructor who's holding onto your harness. You do the skydive, except this time you are under the parachute by yourself and you're in control. However, we do give you a radio so that we can talk to you from the ground if we need to all right? How many jumps do you need before you're, you know out on your own? It's going to sound crazy but only twenty five. So if you put it in perspective, we do about sixty seconds of free fall, right? A home in it. Twenty five minutes of free fall and your license to skydive. All right. So it's twenty five jumps. Now, once you get your license, you can just come here and sign up to take jump, right? Absolutely. One of the things that we encourage people to do with their newly licenses Ivy Lee start looking for their own gear because who wants to rent gear. That is a bit of an investment. But so worth it. Because once you have your own gear you can come here and jump. You can go to another drop zone jump, that's really the way you're getting gain experience and move up to those other licenses that you get, you know, the basic license at twenty five jumps is called an ally scence. And then after that, you have BC D licenses and basically, with each of those licenses, it allows you to do more for instance, you need to be licensed to be able to night, jump also the requirement to get your de- license that you've made at least two night jumps. Okay. Andrew, let's talk about packing, and rigging do. What are you gonna do to Regan parachute? Well, the basic requirements as, as a student, we teach all of them how to pack a main parachute. In fact, that's one of choir to get an ally since, as well as doing some Mace basic maintenance on your gear aside, from that the reserve parachute is the one that requires an FAA certified rigor to inspect and repack being. That's your last option. If you have a malfunctioning main that one has to be packed in a very particular way. The rigors ticket is just like any airman certificate that you would get just like a pilot has one. It's a non aircrew airman certificate. Once you have that certificate you're allowed to do minor repairs of gear, and retact the reserve. Okay. Now, the tandem shoot we jumped did you pack that yourself? No, my job as instructor is unpack it. So we have a group of Packers that under the supervision of certified rigor are the ones putting the parachutes back in all right? And that's done here on location. Correct. It's done in that backpack room we've passed through it on early out to the loading area. So once we're done jumping, we bring the rig back in and lay down on the floor and usually in about ten minutes, it's back ready to go again. Okay. And the rigors are the only ones who can pack the rental shoots. I take it also for liability reasons. If somebody's renting gear day are perfectly allowed to pack, the main themselves, if they're using the rig during the day at the end of the day, though, they will leave it unpacked in have one of our Packers. Repack it once you've got your license, you can just show up here on a good day and sign up to go up on, on lifts. I'll call it exactly. Once your license you're pretty much licensed. You are licensed to, to skydive pretty much anywhere. There are restrictions with each license as well though. Okay. And is there any restriction on the aircraft you use? I'm thinking, helicopters versus hot air balloons versus the Twin Otter. We just jumped out of that's a great question. There is no restrictions balloons are funded jump out of sewer helicopters. In fact, at this point, I'll only get an balloon if I get to jump out of it all right now, since we're down this path do you make a difference with base jumping is that a whole said? Authorized is set. You know what's the school? What's the story with that stuff base? Jumping is discipline in another it self the key differences, being that you only have one parachute bass rig, and you're jumping off fixed objects. Right. So that's the difference you would never be allowed to get an airplane. Make a jump using bass rig one of the requirements by the F as that in order to jump to invest to make plans skydive is that you have to have a rig with two to parachute Senate. Okay. Well, we'll stay with the FAA and since the airplane, geeks podcast and not the cliff podcast and now to recap our jump. We exited fourteen thousand five hundred feet indicators P was right around eighty knots. But as soon as we exited the forward airspeed kind of transitions to vertical drop speed that is correct. You know, one of the interesting things that people off. Often ask come out to tandem is are they going to feel like a roller coaster ride? Do you get that stomach drop? And I and I have to remind people that know you don't actually get that because you're right. We're already moving forward at, like, eighty to ninety miles an hour ground. Speed is usually higher than that. So the acceleration from this feed to one hundred twenty that we're doing is just not that great to produce that feeling. And so people are usually relieved when I tell them that and then that's what they experienced. So, you know, I often describe it to people as it just feels like a giant wind in your face, which, you know, which is what it is. It's a very overwhelming experience. And, you know, my job is ten minutes structure is to keep someone calm excited, you know. I see this as being a peak experience of people's lives, and it brings me great joy to take someone through that journey doing this. For the first time, maybe the only time you know, could be a bucket list item or or they get the bug like I didn't want to just keep doing it. All right. Well, we stepped out at fourteen five and then. Six six five six thousand five hundred feet we opened so we free fall for sixty seconds and then how long were, we under canopy, I didn't bother to check my watch. I was too busy kind of flying. Typically, the canopy flight is Spivey, six minutes, depending on, on how quickly we're coming down. Now, obviously, you notice when we did those turns we accelerate it so lose out suit a little bit faster, when we do those kind of those diving turns. But if you're just out there doing flat turns, you can make the canopy flight last, you know, six seven minutes. Right. And when he returns, we did a couple of steep spiral turns, and just like in the airplane, you exceed sixty degrees of Bank. You start pulling to gees up to three Gs which brings us a good question. What's the canopy rated for the canopy is TESOL for five hundred actually this is not just the canopy. But the entire system is rated for five hundred pounds suspended wait. So imagine that that the entire weight of the year and United together cannot exceed five hundred pounds. And they plan on with, including the three g limit or not so much of the three g limit it. That is simply the, the weight limit that we're we've been given for it. I've not heard anything about Gino, exceeding any type of g forces, you did feel those that we were pulling which is pretty good. But that's not something that's taken into consideration. Okay. Well, let's all I've got this was real exciting. Thank you for your time. Andrew this reporter large launchpad Murray. All right. Thanks launchpad. And again, we'll have the two remaining segments of his report. Coming up next episode can't wait. But this one was really fascinating. I thought I really wasn't aware of what the requirements were for being jump instructor. All right. What's up with the geeks max trescott with the force wealth been tough week in some ways, I lost a client here about ten days ago, and it's the first time I've ever had client Dinan aircraft accident. So that's yeah. A little bit tough to deal with. It was not somebody that I talked to fly or any of their ratings. But I did use to fly with them about every three months, just so they go out and do some instrument practice reasonably high time, experienced piloted in lots of trips to Alaska and Utah, and, you know, you just wouldn't think would get into any kind of accent situation, but he had a two thousand six SR twenty two that he owned and he left MOAB Utah on a flight for Henderson, the Las Vegas left around ten thirty in the morning. And according to the flight aware track, he climbed up to fourteen thousand feet. Everything looked normal. The climb looks like he was climbing pretty steady. Five hundred feet per minute. Airspeed was pretty constant climb. He leveled out and thin for about the next ten minutes. Airspeed was constant no no issues whatsoever. But then for the following five minutes, air, speed dropped total of sixty knots over period of five minutes while he climbed in that five minute period about six hundred feet. So maybe, you know hundred hundred twenty five feet per minute, and the aircraft then pretty much dropped off of, you know, the, the screen, there was no there were no radar hits. ADS be in data gathered at least, you know, flight aware dot com below fourteen thousand feet. So it says if he was there, one moment, and then go on the next friend of mine. Who's a former research meteorologist looked at some of the charts for the time and he. Said that satellite photos, infrared, satellite showed one particular cloud in that area, that was up in the seventeen thousand feet region, and that it also peered from the cloud face chart to have super clue super cooled larger droplets in the cloud, which are, you know, the kind that are most conducive for freezing. Now, the aircraft was quipped with k s but not fee key not flight into known icing conditions and so all it had some anti-icing capability. It's certainly not the full blown capability that allows you to fly into ice, you know on purpose if you will, it's really just meant to give you enough time to escape invade the the ice. So looks like based on, you know, some other accidents that have occurred over the years that perhaps they had a tailplane stall, where instead of the wing stalling that the, the tale stalled, and that would. Makes sense because ice tends to form I on small radius type items. So think like antennas and things that are small, and certainly the thickness of the elevator is much less than the thickness of the wing. So you would expect ice would creek to faster on the tail where unfortunately you're not going to see it difference with tailplane stall versus normal stall, is that the wing provides lift an upward direction. Whereas the tail the, the elevator in the horizontal stabilizer provide a lift and a downward direction and, you know, those two kind of cancel each other out to keep the aircraft, you know, pitched properly, and if the tell stalls the nose is going to pitch down pretty sharply. And if a pilot's not expecting that they're going to end up being very fast, very quickly in a headed down toward the ground. And if they think it's traditional stall, they're going to do exactly the one thing in a traditional stall, you lower. Or the nose to increase your air speed, so that you can recover from the stall, the tailplane stalls, you need to actually pull back to, to recover which will be counted. What most people would be, you know, thinking if they encounter a stall. So obviously, there's no no, no probable cause or final report. We won't see that probably for at least a year, but there really does seem to be a lot of circumstantial evidence at this point indicate that it was an icing accident. So not surprisingly icing was the topic that we focused on last week on the Asian news talk podcast, and all I can say is in, I hope pilots, learn everything they can about icing and as part of the research for that episode. I gotta say, I learned a few things about icing that I didn't know as well. So anyway, much more to say here other than, you know, first few days are pretty tough. And you know, certainly feeling better now, headed off to the memorial and a few days. But yet, it's not it's not fun to lose somebody, you know, or you've worked with. Yeah. It's tragic mex-. What thickness of ice is enough to cause a stall like that. Good question. I don't know the professor of meteorology, Fred Rimmer from you in D, who had on the show said that one way to defined severe icing. Is that you create a quarter inch of ice or more in less than five minutes, and I've heard of people, you know, picking up a quarter inch of ice before in the Cirrus, and, you know, surviving to talk about it. So I'd have to imagine that they, they picked up more than that. I just don't know how much more the climb tells me that probably he was trying to climb above the cloud that he'd entered to escape the icing. You know, in hindsight, u-turn, probably would've made a lot more sense, if he was in an area with no icing entered in cloud, and picked up severe ice. Than probably could've made a u-turn and gotten out of it. You know, relatively soon, but I think that's a challenge. I think that going into cloud often were Optimus dick, and we will be out of it soon. It's not that big, and it's really it's kind of misleading, you know, when you come to clad, it's easy to kind of go. Okay. This looks like small cloud. Be out of it in the minute. I have found that invariably my estimates are wrong by a large margin in cloud tend to be much larger than the appear when you come up on the on the side of them. And, you know, maybe thought that climbing was going to go to work for him. I don't know whether or not he had oxygen board. I know the airplane was not a quipped with oxygen. It's possibly had a tank with him but that would probably be the reason he was at fourteen thousand because that's the maximum amount, would you can you can be at for up to thirty minutes without having to have oxygen. So once he started to pick up ice, he may have been reluctant to climb to hire out to toot knowing that he'd be violating the. Action rules. But boy, I would say that, that would definitely be time to break that rule. If you're facing, you know, severe icing. Yeah. It's very, very sad. Obviously condolences to family and his his friends as well. All right. We have a piece from our main, man, mica, and the let me set this up a little bit. This is about bunk in Diana chase, and of a true, airplane, geek life in the summer, they live in a beautiful home, right next to the Lymington Harmon airport in Lymington, Maine in the winter, they move on down to lakeland Florida, where bunk volunteers at the central Florida aerospace academy, and the Anna works with sun and fun media. Bunk Diana are also part of the original group to start the spur wink farm. Pancake breakfast. And fly in Mike has talked about. We've had a guest as well. But bunks personal hanger in Maine. It opens right up on the air have three six three b runway eleven twenty nine and in it. He has two Pitts specials, one of which in six w was built by Curtis Pitts himself. For Mary Gafni one of the world's greatest aerobatic pilots. It also in the hangar is perhaps the most beautiful piper. Cub ever seen Blunk in Diana invited mica into their home to talk a bit about this year's fly in which will take place on July fourteenth twenty nineteen. So let's listen to the conversation. It's humane man. Mike here in Lymington main with bunk. Diana, chase to people that actually started the Sperling farm, spank AAC breakfast and fly, which will be happening again. Very soon on July fourteenth. Bunka Diana, thank you so much for inviting meteor home and talked me about this great event. Well as far as the flying goals. Marylou called one day. And that's Mary Lou Sprague farm out there, Sperling, that's life in this way. And TSP if I could get a few guys together to come down and do a fly and maybe land at the airport on Fini's birthday because he just loved influence so much and at the time he wasn't flying anymore because he was starting to get pretty elderly at that. That was. So I said, well, jeez. I love to do that. How if we bring our grills and pancakes, and everything else, and we'll set up and have a vaping pancake breakfast for you right there, and win was that about how long ago I'm trying to think but it's a row ninety three to ninety four. And the reason I say that is when when he first or she, I call me for that birthday party thing I thought that was over. I thought that would be the last thing time we'd do that, and we all went home happy because we had such a great time and we made some money for our chapter on the pancake breakfast, and everything, and believe it or not next year. Finicky. It should that was so much fun last year and all my family came out and visited people that we hadn't seen for a long time, and we'll do that, again this summer, and he picked the date, and we get it again that summer, and so people who are listening, and we have listeners from all over the world. The sperm farmers in Cape May. And it's right on the coast and it's what up here in Maine, you would call a salt water farm, because it's right there on the edge of the ocean. And it's absolutely beautiful, and it also has a beautiful grass strip on it. So let's just ask us to start with the event and we'll talk about the event a little bit more July fourteenth this year Sunday and if people were to be coming to fly in how did they find that field? What is it called? Well, it's a private airstrip, and it's not on the chart, but it's cold spur farm. And we call it this flight. We host. On our poster. We put in co-ordinates to find it on your GPS when you fly in, you can call Portland tower and they know exactly where it is in what's going on, and they convicted, if you don't have any other way to find it. And if people want to find out more about it, obviously, there's the chapter one forty one Facebook page posted there so back around ninety three ninety four. The kind of had breakfast cook out there. We hit coins and, and then I think it was third time that Finn. Yes, me come down there. He said, why don't we make this fake? So so we actually started counting either. At that third point, or the fourth one. We started to count it. And we came up at twenty five years, so far. But in reality, it's been more than that few years more, but it's been made official, you know since about the mid nineties. Well, it's a fabulous that night was fortunate enough to meet you there last year. And you flew in from here. Lymington in, you fly a carbon cub if I remember. Originals the forty seven three Cup a forty seven eight hundred forty six J three. And if I remember correctly, I haven't seen it for since October, when it was a rainy day like this. But it's a beautiful golden color, isn't it? Golden yellow, it's, it's really I change the color Disley from the original color. I didn't use the color number out of the book for the cut yellow, because I guess, wanted mind to be a little bit brighter yellow few things that I did to it are not original. Somebody walking by seeing take three cubs and stuff would never realize it. But I came in Pennsylvania for the come flying. Boy, did I get a lot of cramp. But everything into I think, was just an improvement more than than a modification minor things like I put carpet on floorboard and then mix it home. It's easier to federal. Dirt and dust and sand and all that stuff. Oh, sure. Because they just had plywood, boards and sitting on the ground. There's quite a slope to that. And all the dirt rendering back in the tale of airplane. So that's one of the reasons I did, and other minor things like that always wanted to modernize a little bit. You know, and but it's a beautiful beautiful airplane and Frank from every with, with, with that color is sued it was, it was brand new, but it's a ninety four pays brand new at least it's what seven or eight years old. So how did you get involved in the in the flying? Oh, okay. I started getting involved in chapter, because we live here at the airport with the check move to in the early nineties into the spreads feel spur went to here, and we were managing the airport at the time to and Diana and I found her. Okay. Members that decided to move the EA chapter here at the coca so. Cataldo was. Formed in nineteen sixty three. So and we started having a Pinkett regular pancake breakfasts the first Sunday of every month. Also, the ninety s and so just there and I was even official member yet, but it just involved with helping put on the pancake breakfast, and we do poke around, and we had several other fly invents with that were real flying ends with skydivers and fire department and saying different things in things for the kids. Is here. Bramble's and so forth. So I that's getting involved I was right there. We live on the port to working process. The runway pretty easy to get to work on mates three. And if the. I remember in the for the Tober flying. Unfortunately, we had a little bit of rain out. It wasn't quite perfect. But bunk. You said, I'm not coming to a fly by walking, and you have for an airplane, geek, you had the most perfect home because you're paying right on the runway. You're right on the runway you took off and your beautiful. Cub went around a pattern and landed on the side of the field. Yeah. Well, as to Diana's part of this. Back in those days, we did not have many members just a handful of members and it was very hard to get the members to come and help us with things. So that's why Diana, she said, she wasn't even a member. Get. She's just came over and helped us set up in cook and so from, and so on. So. So she was a great help to help us. Get this started. Well this flying on Sunday, July fourteenth. Which also happens to be best deal day. For those of us listening in France is really actually a special fly in because we talked about you and finished Sprague, Mr. spray, who, unfortunately, left us this year. So this is the first I fly we're going to be having without him. I suspect it's going to be a really big celebration of his life, other any special plans. There are especially claims for Saturday, the thirteenth, and they're going to have the celebration of life, for him that day with his family and friends, and all the, it's not going to be right there at the airport. But it's so that's his celebration of life. And of course, we'll probably make something. And let people know what, what has happened in what's going on in that we're going to continue this thing. And on Saturday. They're going to have. Joan at downing Tobin or over. Oh, it's wonderful metal be quite quite a nice celebration. Mary Lou given a lot of to that one of the things that happened last year. And. Don't we get a chance to talk about it, Mr Spring, wasn't particularly mobile in his last years? And he was came through to see all the aircraft on his golf cart, and good friend of the show, or any eaten who flies Robinson, r twenty two helicopter out of Sanford was there. And he was just getting ready to, to leave. And he was just prepping the aircraft to take off. But Mr. Sprague saw, and he said he'd never flown in Alicarte before, or, and he said, well, we can't let that happen made an extra-special Ron helpless, sprayed. Get into the helicopter and took them for ride, and that makes it even more special because it was his first and only ride in rotary wing aircraft. And how wonderful that the biggest pancake breakfast and flying that ever had over a hundred planes that, that Finn was able to fly a helicopter for the first time it was, and it was a great thrill to him to talk about it to marry. Woodsy will be much cheaper. It's. You know, last year was the most perfect day that we could possibly have had for, for the fly in, and we can only hope that this year. It's just gorgeous. I got a little sunbird, but what's beautiful about the flying that many people don't realize it's great family event because not only is civil air patrol. There was a bunch of kids, but a lot of kids attend. And if you want to runs from eight in the morning till about two in the afternoon, and the airfield is right off a couple of beaches. So if you can bring your kids in the morning. Your horner. Yeah. Hit the beach in the afternoon. It's a perfect all day event. If you wanted to drive in, and obviously, if you wanna fly in boy, what a gorgeous cited is your is almost every this morning fog. And sometimes we just give very early in the morning because of that, but it blows out. And then we have days like last year, and we've had a lot of days look that believe it or not just been so looking absolutely beautiful bunk. Dan, thank you so much for inviting to your home. And letting us let's talk a little bit about the fly in and I hope that we get maybe one hundred fifty planes. Let's see what we could do. It would be nice, but you know. The flames destroyed so fast that rate just going to run out of room. That's all I don't know what we can do about it, as far as I think way down at the far in red about where the dog lake is, we may be able to park over more double-parked them. There's put a few. So maybe we shouldn't tell the folks that, it's probably the only pancake breakfast, or you're going to get really true main maple syrup. Yes. Here by metaphor. Really? Mabel serve you. Surprises me is a lot of people will ask for the intimacy. People against it. Obviously not from up here. It's very strong because it's pure so and not quite sweet. But boy is delicious and you know, maple syrup airplanes. How much better? Thank you so much. Thanks for coming. Yes, thanks. Thanks for coming to. Visit nice to chat with you. All right. Thanks for that, Mike. One more interview, actually, this is a little bit of a different sort in this is very short came from Aaron. He and here in posted a picture in our slack, team a couple of months ago about his daughter, getting her first rank as a civil air patrol cadet, and we suggested that he well, maybe get a little interview with her we played on the podcast, so he worked on that. And he sent this along listen to this. Airplane geeks. Aaron from stick stories scotch here and today, I've got a special interview for you with cadet airman getting. She's gonna tell us so that more about why she joined civil patrol so cadet airgun first question. Why did you join sivler? I joined the civil air patrol to help people in hell acre country intervention. And did you first hear about severe? I heard about this troll three years ago when. A air show. Eight celeb- recruiting. Very good. And how long have you been in so far? Troll for about two months. And what's your favorite thing is done so far, my favorite thing that have done so far this air trolled probably v emergency services training because it helps me to repair to go on actual mission. Help search for people or missing plans. Hikers take your pick. And where are you most looking forward to, to come yet in your first year? Looking forward to training myself in the first year in Lincoln, the second year like putting all that training to good use. And what would you tell other kids and teenagers were thinking about joining civil trial? I would tell them that it's a great opportunity. To learn more about aerospace to get a better education thirteen about going into the army air force. They can give scholarships for that they can give you flight training too. So it'll help you become a better pilot. So I just strong, subjects justed in. Could also help you become a daughter of the state. You're. Are you also got the chance to have your first brand tation fli recently? How'd you like that? Well, first of scare going the air it pretty near your doesn't like once before. It was really fun. I got to fly the plane by, so we have these headphones in regards to talk to each other through radio. And we heard other radio chatter in from the airport control. It was pretty fun. Looking forward to more flights. Definitely once you get in the air, you have to go back up there. Couldn't agree with. You are on that one. All right. Thanks cadet. That's good night. Hey airplane geeks. One quick disclaimer probably put at that interview. Cadet airman getting's is, in fact, my daughter, I am very proud of her and I'm thrilled to be able to have a little interview with her. She is very much enjoying civil patrol. And if you have kids in that kind of preteen to teenage range, it's definitely something well worth checking out. She even got me to join which admittedly spent time with my daughter and get to hang around. Airplanes was a real arm twist for this airplane geek and of course, you can listen to someone who's spent a whole lot more time in the civil air patrol than I have on one of the recent airplane, geeks podcast episodes. So definitely check that out. He tells a lot better than I do. Thanks for listening Zahren from sticks stores scotch and remember till next time keep. These in the breeze. Awfully cute. You can you can find Aaron's website, sticks story scotch. It's actually sticks hyphen stories hyphen, scotch dot com. Take a look at that and really loved that interview with, with your daughter Aaron in the. Yeah. Good luck with the civil air patrol. All right. Little bit, a listener mail, we heard from Jeremy, Jeremy sent a photo to us. I don't know. This may be kind of photo that David could help us with maybe not. I don't know. Oh we've already seen the answer we have. Okay. Well, that's right. I haven't seen the answer yet. Let me say, I'll tell you what it is. Go ahead and through the story. And I'll tell you, you answer. All right. So Jeremy rights, I had the chance to visit the great Space Museum at Paris labor J airport. Absolutely wonderful airplanes prototype section. It happens to be right next to where the pairs air show will take place in three weeks. How he says, I found this covered airplane. Rather mysterious what is hiding under that canopy I thought I would send it to you, guys and see if, if you could find out what it was a secret do airplane. I doubt it, but probably something cool. So what did I did? I post this in the. Slack teams that were I did that. So you sent out an Email to co-host here. Oh. And I certainly didn't know the answer. But launchpad came back last night with an answer and a photograph he says, it's the new Boeing TX trainer. And he said these also asked Boeing for some time while he's out the show. So I guess you'll be at that show as well, good-looking airplane. And I would have to say that the only thing that's really, you know, visible in the photo, which is of an airplane underneath a white sheet, if you will cover is a little bit of a squirrel looking inlet for an engine on the side of aircraft. And yeah. Kind of looks like it matches up with this TI trainer. So I think launchpad may have have identified it so kudos to him. Yeah. Good for him. All right. Yeah. He'll be going to the pair's air show. Getting some interviews for us. We're looking forward to those. We also heard from Patrick Wiggins, he sent in a piece report airlines. Installing uncomfortable bumps in seat Bax, because it pleases him, this is this is from the onion, it's if you're not familiar with the onion some of the best humor, I think around comes from the onion, this is not a new story, but it's pretty entertaining nonetheless. So we'll have linked to that in the show notes in then Neil sent us a link here, New Zealand spends billions buying new fleet of Boeing Dreamliner longhaul jets and their New Zealand has apparently ordered eight firm Boeing seven eight seven dash ten dream liners options for twelve more. And according to the article says that these are going to replace the Air New Zealand. Triple seven dash two hundreds that they have. And interestingly, the, the dream liners, have twenty five percent better fuel burn, which, of course, is. His is significant and these planes are scheduled to rive in twenty twenty two and I got gotta say, David do you like the Air New Zealand? Livery is, is much as I do. I I've always just found this designed to be kind of spectacular. Not impressed. Give me are in trim on DC3.'s or constellations with full-size eagle heads sicko down few saw old school liveries, although of new ones, Air, New Zealand's, all black ones. Are good. But. These days, liveries are just boring. You know, watching watching all of the airline geeks. Geek out a over another white airplane. With one cheat line is just not my Cup of cake. Okay. Maybe we should do you have any artistic talent. David would you be able to sort of draw? Your ideal airplane livery, or is that something that's never gonna happen. I draw my ideal go. Look Eastern Airlines. L constellation and look at that logo from from the mid fifties. There's an ideal one or American Airlines on a D C three American Airlines Yopal, your color should be Aren JR. Okay that not red white and blue or white, it was natural metal aren't original, or or there's nothing more perfect than a Boeing seven seven with silver, white and blue globe. With the words pan. Am on it. Yeah. Those are liveries full. We got these days are just spray paint doors, you like, but I do like the hey, eight three eighty turtle as well as a as RTD to see three PO and deviate markings, but they're one of kind. They're not live freeze. Right. As one offs. Yeah. NA loves those the seem like you say, one off theme paint jobs. But yeah, I don't know. I'd like to like, the Air New Zealand. What when you get one David, let's start the airplane, geeks airline because I'm ready. Haven't lost much money yet this year. So, you know, a good way to start. Here's what his what pro. Here's something that drives me. Bonkers. Like British Airways is celebrate their history. Put has a bunch of retro jets. And everybody goes. Wow. Is in that an amazing livery. Yeah. It's like it was so good. They decided to cancel it. You know airlines don't airlines change in United's are good example of this. They change for the sake of change. You know, branding is brand. Okay. This is the market universe, right? Every so often, you get a new management in the management goes. We've gotta change the now they don't want to change over ending too far, but they don't want, but they wanna make change. So what happens is, they don't go big and go home. They go subtle in pouring. I get your logic. I mean it it's. If you could change change. I mean, if you if you feel the obligation to change your branding, and your branding is that bad, then. Change now. Otherwise, you know what? It's, it's pretty good. How do people like it? You know there's nothing better than United Airlines tulips on seven four sevens. You know. You know. And look knighted today. It's like euro white. You know, I. I don't mean to be on a rant but. I also want people to know that I do pay attention. It's not like I'm talking about something else, and it's, it's. The worst thing, the worst thing, I ever thought that southwest did was the heart, which meant so much to them on the on the side of their door. Right. When you walked by the. When you walked board the airplane, they slapped it on the bottom of the fuselage. You know. And it's like okay is that really where you want it to be on the, it's not the same? And they're like, well, you can see it up in the sky. It's like no. I mean you really you taking shirt represented something you and your fully I want us to two things together here brought up in the conversation. Here both the seventy seven and the, the three eighty. Do you recall a couple of weeks ago? We had a new story in which we talked about the three eighty and how the first two were being scrapped for parts, right? And we did get couple messages from people who called us out and said, hey, same thing happened with the, the seven eighty seven though. I think it was just the first one. Anyway, I guess they're point was that. Well, the first seven eight seven is in a museum. Now, now, maybe it was the second one but, you know, and it's the same logic that people give when. The air force is setting up an aggressor squadron with that thirty fives. And they're using pre production aircraft or low rate production aircraft to fill that squadron in. They're like, well, why can't you make them up to? Standard level. It's like it's a pre production aircraft designed for testing design for learning. It's not designed for combat and pre production airframes like eight three eighties and seven eight seven how many dream liners got grounded because the battery packs, you know, and they had already moved onto the bigger than move on from the original seventy seven's onto seventy seven nine hundred seventy seven tens. No. And that's what the airlines really wanted, so now than they were left with seven eight seven eight. So they get used for parts, you know. It's all the nature of the system, you know, it things change over time. You know, if half of these seven thirty seven max is ever. Don't ever get back in the air. Guess what folks are going to be used for part because they're more valuable as parts than they are hesitant frame sitting in the desert. That's why we have all of these desert places, you know, I it's so I sorry, boy I go off. Boy, did you set me off max graphology in? And I meant to bring tankers to. Yeah. Yeah. And maybe eight ten would work well with tankers. No, I'm just kidding. But, you know, that Dreamliner though didn't they wasn't the idea to use that for for patches. Right. When you do a carbon fiber repair. It's not like doing an aluminum repair. You know, you've, you've got a basically take an original fuselage barrel or or whatever and cut cut that out. And then use that as a patch, you can't just you just can't manufacture carbon-fiber patched to some random Cise. That's what they use that, you know, that early Dreamliner or two for. But maybe I'm remembering wrong. All right. So that's that's let's push on. I wanna talk about hydrogen fuel cells. Okay. I'm gonna go back to sleep. Right. Derry David's taking that. So, so this is from our, our listener Sam Appleseed, mid, who you may recall navigate research, senior analyst, and major car guy. So this is I found this really interesting. He says listening to the latest show. I wanted to chime in on cryogenic hydrogen. This is where we were talking about, you know, typically hydrogen used for fuel cells is in a compressed tank, and we were talking about using cryogenic hydrogen or liquid hydrogen to feed the fuel south. So Sam sells Sam says fuel cells are a great mechanism for producing electricity. On the go in an environmentally friendly way, as you mentioned a fuel cell takes in oxygen and hydrogen, which are combined, as they crossed catalyst plates, to form water electricity. There are several vehicle. This is I didn't know this. There are several vehicles now available in California that use hydrogen fuel cells, for electric propulsion, the Toyota Mirai and Honda clarity and the Hyundai neck, so, and I hadn't heard of any of those now Sam has a video that it's up on YouTube, and you'll be able to watch that right in the show notes, and this is from the new screen savers show on twit, and it's a review of the Honda clarity fuel cell vehicle with Megan Maroney, how Sam says these all use compressed hydrogen gas at seven hundred bar pressure in the past BMW has experimented with liquid hydrogen to power in internal combustion engine, and had a fleet of prototype, seven series sedans in the late two thousands now even compressed at seven hundred bar, which. Says ten thousand psi gaseous hydrogen has an energy density of about one point four kilowatt hours, per leader, liquid hydrogen has a density of two point three kilowatt hours per leader, making it better suited to advocate where long range and max fuel load is needed such as spacecraft or airplanes. So he says, so why not just use liquid h two all the time. Well, when you put gaseous h two into a high pressure tank, it stays there liquid hydrogen needs to be kept it, minus four hundred twenty three point two degrees Fahrenheit, because it is liquid it doesn't need a high pressure tank, but it needs to be heavily insulated, even with significant insulation. There is still some heat transfer in the liquid in the tank will warm up in vaporize gets to what David was talking about. I think because these cryogenic tanks are not designed for pressure, the gaseous, h two needs to be vented off. This is why BMW abandoned its experiments, could you left the car park for a week? The whole tank age, too would boil off making it impractical for car fuel. This is why everyone uses compressed gas in cars. However, Sam says an aircraft is generally not sitting idle for long periods. You fuel it up. And fly it off. So boil off is not really an issue for this application. Plus, the temperatures at thirty five to forty thousand feet altitude help reduce heat transfer the added energy density, means you need a smaller volume of fuel to travel a given distance. Although the mass is the same. And then Sam finishes for David the need to keep liquid h two so cold means that use won't simply be repurposing, the existing jet fuel tanks for these electric birds for, for max t modern H two storage systems are far more reliable and robust than a nineteen thirties gas bag. So I don't think these would be any more dangerous than an oil burning aircraft. So thanks to, to Sam for that, you, you can find salmon a lot of places online. His website is Sam dot Abbas amid dot com of like that the show notes, but you also find him on for some other other publications wheel bearings dot medium. Of course it navigate research. And if you other places so we'll have some links to Sam in the in the show, notes wanna thank him for providing that information. That really kind of fills in some questions about hydrogen fuel cells as using aircraft. Fi gratifying wanna thank him as well, too, because I think his Email was extremely well, laid out, I made it very clear. So thanks for taking the time to write that it's really learned from that I did want to mention that for a million with a Toyota Mirai. I actually looked at it back in the, the summer January timeframe, I was looking at a new car and the local Toyota dealership was saying, hey, you really need to look at this car. And we've all kinds of great incentives on it, and so on and a couple of things I found interesting one. The range was a little bit limited had a trip that I was contemplating that I might be making a regular basis that was gonna be at least Ellen from around trip basis over two hundred miles out of range of the nearest hydrogen pump. And unfortunately, that was just going to cut it a little too close and wouldn't make it if he's able for the trips I was looking to do. You do have to take a look. There was a an online. Map that gave you the locations of all the hydrogen fuel stations. And if you stay in the metro areas, plenty of them, but once you head out into the central valley of California, they're very far in few between which is why wouldn't work for something that I thought I might be doing this year on regular basis they were offering. I think as an incentive with the car, I believe it was three years worth of free fuel. Maybe it was sixty thousand miles. I can't remember but it was somewhere in that neighborhood. But then what I found out was that, once you start paying for the fuel on your own, it was relatively expensive, my recollection. I could be off on this was that the cost to fill the car was going to be somewhere around seventy five dollars for a tank, and as I recall, a tank would do a little over two hundred miles, maybe two hundred and twenty so you know, it costs per mile basis was somewhat more expensive. Of course, you'd have to factor in the first three years of a free fuel, and so on. But. Yeah. This may indeed be something that we see more and more of in the future. I think that right now the economics are such that the car companies are probably having to use a live incentives to, to move the cars, because I don't think they're quite pencilling out as being economical, some of the alternatives. But it's certainly an interesting wave for the future. Yeah, it definitely is Sam touches on the, the other cost issue and available of hydrogen for automotive use as well in that in that video that will have on the show out. So it's, it's an interesting piece. I think I think everybody will find that interesting. All right. They'll do it for this episode of the airplane, geeks podcasts, we want to thank you for listening. He and as always, you can find us at airplane, geeks dot com. Show notes for this episode at airplane, geeks dot com slash five five. That's the episode number he, and if you want to reach us via Email you can write to the geeks at airplane, geeks dot com is you can tell if you haven't figured out by now we'd love recordings from you. You can even interview your kid. The we love having that stuff. So, you know, feel feel free to send us along some recording still have to wait to bits and pieces episode. That's typically where we have a lot of them, but you don't have to wait. Let's tell folks where they can find us online. He mech stress got. We'll start with you. Well, they can find me where I usually hang out. Which is at aviation news talk dot com. That's the show that I do every week all about generally Asian. So if you're interested in aircraft that are kind of fill the, the void between commercial military pretty much everything else is generally the Asian, and it's also the place where you can click on contact at the top of the page, and send me an Email. Always love feedback for use on the show at lots of him. And also there's a tab up there where you can click on listener questions, you can actually record a question, which I will then use on the show in, you know, David there used to be a, a show that John divorce did I bet will remember this it was called cranky geeks. And I actually have cranky geek, t-shirt that again a lot. I get a lot of positive comments for a lot of laughs actually, but I don't know David, I don't think it would fit. You otherwise I would maybe suggest. Donating by cranky geeks shirt, do but in honor of this episode, but otherwise where to folks find you online. Well, I suddenly feel like I should tender my resignation. No. Sequester. Where do we find you online David? You can find me on DM Vetter of you can find me on our slack listener team. And you can you can join that by sending Email to the geeks at airplane, geeks dot com, and we'll open up the back door and let in. Or you can find me on the airplane or the airplane cakes. Or you can find on the UNLV digest on Fridays with that guy max flight talking about drones and fuel cells, or on a motive cars that fly or feel cells or a few sills or more fuel cells. Or this week this the. Or, or in this case, this week, the FAA in fuel cells. So with that, where do we find you max, you can find me on Lincoln. You can find David set it the digest dot com. Also with Mary Kirby talking about the passenger experience. It packs, X, podcast dot com. And if that isn't enough you'd like to send me an Email, you can send it to mex- flight at airplane, geeks dot com. Our out tro, is by Bruno Massoni. Find his compositions that CoR corporate incorporate aviation sounds Bruno Massoni dot com. He will ask that you all join us again next week as we talk aviation on the airplane, geeks podcast by rebutting keep the blue side up. Thanks.

Boeing FAA instructor reporter David Vanderhoek us Andrew leaf Andrew New York Times CBS Maine CEO Cirrus aircraft Russia Baltimore Massachusetts Hawaii San Marcos
The Battle of Palmdale (Entry 104.EZ2047)

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

The Battle of Palmdale (Entry 104.EZ2047)

"This sir we are jennings and john rodrick we speak to you from our present which we can only assume as your distant past the turbulent time that was the early twenty i singer during the great cataclysm that will surely befall our civilization. We began this monumental reference of strange obscure human knowledge these recordings represent our or attempt to compile and preserve wonders esoterica that would otherwise be lost so whether you're listening from an advanced civilization or have just reinvented the technology to decrypt our transmissions. This is our legacy to you. This is our time capsule. This is the omnibus you have accessed entry. One zero four dot easy two zero four seven certificate number three one three. Oh three the battle of palmdale. You're a fan fan of war movies. I'm assuming i don't have a weekly podcast where i watch flying leather necks uh-huh with a bunch of middle aged guys so in this room. I'm the least into war movies right but i do enjoy a good war movie. I should say that my war movie podcast friendly fire does not feature a bunch of middle aged guys. I am the middle aged guy and then there's us. There's a younger youthful compared to us yeah. There's like a generation y. Guy and then there's a millennium is the youngest sky a thirty year old. We need somebody in there to to to comment on every war movie that it's problematic. You don't have the baby boomer. No there's no baby boomer and in fact one of the guy's has wives one of the other guys his baby boomer no. She said she said at one point. Aren't you the baby boomer further infuriating me because of generation x. expiration because your your what five years away from being a boomer and it's a huge gulf. No i'm ten years away from being a boomer there. No one does the baby boom end sick took. We've talked about this before the last possible case you could make i think is one thousand nine hundred sixty if you were born in nineteen sixty one. How can you possibly be a baby boomer. Okay you know what i mean. I mean john flensburg from they might be giants was born in nineteen sixty and he's a baby boomer the love i mean ovalles i like i like your benchmark is not a baby. Boomer was born in sixty or sixty one. He's not a boomer come on. We have a lot of baby boomer listeners and i. I don't mean to disparage them anymore than i normally do the u._s. Census bureau has going to sixty four. You're wrong. It's so wrong. Who are you to challenge the u._s. Census bureau on the basis of john flensburg birthday meet the we'll just just a baby boomer. I think the year nineteen sixty eight is crucial to baby baby. Boomer culture nineteen sixty eight is when the boomer generation had it's big that was the big celebration the coming out party fascinating coming out party for the summer of love of you know like vietnam the whole kit and caboodle if you were born born in sixty four four years old and really enjoying it. You're not trying to switch over from star trek to watch the news and you're like no if you were born in sixty four. The definitive moment for you right is going to be like the late seventies disco punk schism it. You're going to be what sixteen years old in nineteen eighty well. Guess what i will be the baby boomer who comes on friendly fire and you know talks about health cats cats in the navy or whatever that'll be my thing. You're gonna be the boomer yeah. You're less of a bluer than me but i'll there are hilarious <hes> kind of john mullany crescent character. I think that the i think that a lot of what defines the baby boomer generation is the the. I what i think of as the first half of the cold war right. We've talked a lot about how generation x and maybe not on the show but we've talked off line about how generation x kind of defined by the cold war four yes. I think we talked about this about every covered this but we've talked about the day after more than the people who made the day after afternoons true. That's true more than the newspapers talked about it at the time where we had thought about it more than they did. They move on to something else and we were still bedding still still eyeing the cans of spam and our parents larder going like please don't ever make me eat. That's bam. That's exactly right <hes> but our cold war was a late seventies. Eighties cold war was not a vietnam era but there was a fifties sixties cold war that was just as as i think i think the paranoid and and also maybe even more the expectation was that there was an inevitability to it. That's the hipster cold war they. They were into the cold war before it was cool. That's right they will they had all the great film strips and little animated shorts of people trying to duck and cover. We didn't how cute turtles what we did. We just had to watch their and that's the terrible thing about generation x and y. I guess maybe why were so mistaken. For boomers is that we just had we had their terrible culture that it was in reruns the most upsetting seen in the day after to my mind is where tucker the turtle you see him ducking and covering then he'd it just dies and stay little animated where the turtles killed immediately. Well you know i love the cold war. It was tell who does it was the time it was the time that you know i was. It was very formative time for me. I i had every one of those aircraft identification tation books and <hes> where where they would give little silhouettes of different airplane profiles so that you you know in the idea being that you would be a spotter for the air force or civilian spotter that was like i saw two f eighty nine criminal cats were you were in alaska. You'd see them coming over the dew line or whatever right right <hes> you could be. Our first is on the scene. Did you ever save the nation. I didn't the f eighty nine wasn't by the way but no i was in the civil air patrol however a <hes> and as a as a preteen even and as a team certainly was a cadet in the civil air patrol with the with the idea that the the civil control and i intend very much to do an episode of omnibus on the civil air patrol exclusively but it was a civilian auxiliary the air force still is and it does a lot of stuff that the air force kind of doesn't have time to do like shadowy stuff. You know a lot of killing people a a lot of search and rescue stuff right every time. A little airplane goes down. Somebody called the air force and they're like look man were busy. They've got a number. We've got a guy in a hangar so they called us patrol in this alert us they wake up an old guy in a hangar but during the that's ready to go the greasy z. oil-stained baseball cap with the brim turn indiana jones mechanic wives his hand off on a branch and fires of the biplane. I think it's funny that you and i kind. I feel like we're the same age but you are a member of civilian patrol and i was a member of the star wars fan clubs right. There is a vast gulf and and i think i ah hoof remembering yeah we we believed that during an armed conflict with the soviet union i would i would be ed pressed into service. Perhaps in the capacity of just you know being in charge of my junior high but he didn't want to be writing the bomb out right no no i. I hope i hope to be one of the few that were saying just wanted to be a marshal of some kind that's right. I'm hoping to be and it's a good goal like if there's anything going on you wanna beyond marshall. It doesn't matter whether it's a parade or martial law chosun being a martial and a non marshall right one should always be a market in the case of martial law. I i would definitely like to be a martial. I've always said that one and all the spam after i after i ran for the <hes> seattle city council in lost. I realized that my political career probably i imagined a lifetime in politics and <hes> throughout my young life and then realizing that i didn't i didn't really want to be in politics but still wanted to perform my civic duty and be in some cases in some way in a martial capacity. I realized what i needed to do was run for marshall of some small western town. You wanna tin star i do so i was like maybe i should. Maybe if i were the sheriff twist or some other i've been i've been toying with this idea for several years now. I think that'd be a good small town marshal yet. You need to be kind of the the kind of the surprisingly gentle marshall just takes everybody's guns when they ride into town wider. You're like you need to win them by the office that stranger things t._v. Show came out and i got a letter saying well. They're doing a show with you as the marshall does have a very strong john roderick energy right does in fact i. I think there was a thread on line. One of these fantastic <hes> impulses that people have that pitted me against the the stranger things marshall with like the questionnaire knuckles boxing which who would win who would win in a fight and the consensus was that he would win he would win and that even though i don't contest that i've i was a i was offended. This reminds happened to us yesterday. Which is i sent you a screen shot from a jeopardy chat group in which they were discussing who could rattle off just a record-breaking jeopardy streak and somebody said you know maybe john roderick from omnibus universe he maybe he wouldn't be like a james holzer our record breaker but he would still be a player and you immediately text back. What's and i said well. That's the tournament of champions and you and you said well. I'm very mad that they think i would just be a tournament champions player and not a record breaker. You're so angry that your name had been mood for something you may not be eligible for a he might be top ten but and it's the same with the strange thing beat up all those characters i agree that i agree that i could not probably become one of the great jeopardy champions of all time but i'm mad that the people on the internet thanks how dare say so impolite you and the things marshals should just joined win forces. I think he should be beating matthew modine. It's true it's true we should be. We should be working together. He's a piece thicker than i am. I think i think he's broader across the beam and that's that's what people are bet yeah. That's why people see him but i'm not sure and i think he may be tall also as tall. We're both gentle gentle giants. Let's just put it that way. You would never have a reason to fight. You joined us. We will join forces there would be no jurisdictional disputes between twist bend stranger things of of course set in stranger thing indiana so you guys to respect each other's serious fictions and and fight crime. I feel like i would i would i would wear my uniform better. Let's just put it that way. That's probably true. This episode of omnibus. However is not about has little to do you. I have to go back all the way that can tie in well. What's what's a bummer to me is that i gave away some of my best civil air patrol material and now i'm going to have to wait for a year and then they're going to be a bunch of people that say he already said that in in being in being kind of a war fan boy ever we all have the war cold a cold war fan boy. I became pretty well versed at a young age and like all the different kinds of airplanes because my dad was a world war autopilot. <hes> my father was a greatest generation and those were the parents of baby boomers so even though he had me late in life and i am very decidedly not a boomer. I do have boomer adjacency. If he were here today he might think of you as very boomer like well because i have older brothers and sisters who are baby booths but they're twenty years older than me. You're like the baby baby boomer. I'm the baby i'm no. Yes you put the doorstep like sweep. I'm i could have been a baby of a baby boomer but <hes> but i did. I did associate world war two with my dad so yeah well. He was in it right so so i felt like i was only one kiss away from that conflict and from <hes> from from the the the fan culture around all the armament and and <hes> and uniforms and culture of world war ten if you're going to be a fan of a war world doesn't wanna leave the best one but i noticed among my dad and his cronies who used to sit around the living room and talk about about their experiences in the war after the war. They didn't continue to be interested in the military. Necessarily you know they they reintegrated into civilian life and they didn't make a in the same way that they didn't make the transition between big band jazz and modern jazz they didn't make the transition between between being interested in the military as it existed during world war two and as it brought save the world made the world safe for democracy which is how they thought of it. I think that you just do something very intensely for two or three years in your early twenties. You're not going to be your hobby for the rest of your life. Well no but it also sets that's in stone kind of how you think about what the military is and how it works and that would that was war. Vietnam was so confounding for a lot of those guys because they they weren't used to being critical of the military. They didn't think of it that way but there was a tremendous switch in what the military was how how it worked what the technology was as we moved in that immediate post war era to what became the jet age we we were <hes> we transitioned right at the end of the war into a completely new universe as a result of technologies that were developed during the war five years after world war two was over there were no more i mean we were using all jet airplanes. There was a and the threat of intercontinental ballistic missiles. There's nukes. We're working on their nuke nuclear warheads. We're working on satellites. You know things were being launched into space. I mean it was it was a universe apart and the threats were were like incomprehensible. Relative to in nineteen forty five conception of these people would just cannot handle existential threat. I mean how are we think about it today well and and and at the time the technology is developing so fast a lot of them were took warfighting out of the realm of of things you could do with human reaction times in a way right if you're if you're in a propeller airplane. You're chasing another propeller airplane with a gun too big if but okay i'll try to pick your still good happened and we could go down to boeing field right now and say all right. What if we. I just want to make sure that one of the things that doesn't shoot out the propeller like knows to miss the propeller as it passes that they figured that out <music> thank goodness one way to do it. It's put the put. The machine guns out on the wings. I guess that's right but in another way they had this history mid-trading but so so your idea of dogfighting in a situation like that i mean propeller aircraft can go several hundred miles an hour but still if the plane in front have you turns and you turn it your your is your your reflexes can can handle things in in real time things are happening fast but you're trying to shoot another airplane down with bullets and so a bullet can bullet has limitations it fires and it's not it's not guided in any way right just kind of goes straight and if the wind is blowing it can blow the bullet but but that's all that's all taken as a given when you're in a dog fight and over the next fifty years or more gradually gets replaced by magic which is what we have today right right screen and a button gotten and a target yeah right an airplane over the horizon that you can't see and missiles and things that have their own minds and their own imaginations wins that play games with one another that that have false memories of knowing how to play the piano and have professor falcon as that transition was made to jet aircraft that were firing missiles that would move faster than human reaction times things were happening. I mean a jet fighters. There's very quickly realized that to get in close enough to use a gun against one another. I mean you would be at that point very very uncomfortably. Close to moving seven hundred dollar top gun migs scenario yeah and actually for a while of the air force took guns off of airplanes and and went to a strictly missile based style of air combat the pilots have to pull out a handgun and this and that and that worked against us for a while because there were there were lots of instances where you know you'd fire missiles and then viral guns and the british kept coming. What are you then. When are you get out of. There is what you are but what was hard for people. I guess too groggy was that these new technologies were <hes> extremely imperfect and to this day to this not every not every you know tragic wedding drone strike is a good idea like we're. We're still screwing this stuff up. We still screwing this stuff up and we we just is to use your example there. There are plenty of instances where someone from a drone <hes> someone you know some drone pilot over the desert is given the command to fire a missile and it turns out right at the end some child runs out and they realize oh my goodness it was it was a wedding not a meeting meeting of al qaeda but nothing the pilot can do nothing pilot can do well. I mean you can detonate those missiles before at a certain point. You can push a button or whatever they self done but but that's a failure of intelligence. It's a failure of surveillance. It's not those those drone missile strikes aren't the failure of the missile <hes> right but there are lots and lots of just straight up failures of the weapons and in the way that it depicted in movies and the way we think of missiles. I mean when tom cruise fires a missile the it does show situations where the missile kind of you know mrs <music> right typically that's when our hero is deployed some kind of countermeasures or some super daredevil seat of his fans flying right are here can make the missiles miss the bad guys the commies can never do that yeah and every once in a while one of the one of the good guys you know iceman or whatever fires a missile that mrs but it's only for dramatic purposes to let's let's tom cruise come in and save the day with his like uncanny eerie eerily powerful and and <hes> and scientology power missiles if only iceman had been operating satan level six remember if you say if you say the word scientology on the internet that <hes> there there are algorithms that will find that and target you person but they're not listening to podcasts are they not are they on. I'm in trouble. Maybe mark can gotten takeout place where i said scientology and put in the words lemonade stand later a unitarians. Tom cruise israel has been saying unitarian in the early days of developing developing this technology like the first rockets that were fired from airplanes were unguided. They were basically rockets howard fuller thing you shoot and they were pretty effective. If you were going to aim you're playing at the ground. If there were tanks and people running around and you had your you know your fighter bomber and you could point the nose at where are you wanted the rockets to go and then fire a bunch of them at once. This was the technology of target rich environment yeah just the i just shot one hundred missiles and and let's get out of here and it was pretty effective because people on the ground camp can't move away that fast radius. Is that what you blow up right right shoot a rocket planet yeah you're meant to. They were meant to just kind of carpet. The certain area and i and a little salvo of off of unguided rockets can devastate a football field sized area. Which is you know. Typically you get fifty people standing around. I mean that's a they wouldn't occupy an area greater than a football field. They wouldn't be a group of people at that point. They'd be fifty not random people standing and you the bright lonzo ball field football field army can come on but as an air to air weapon an unguided rocket is extremely ineffective because the other person as you as you as you described earlier the other the bad guy. Let's say the commie. They can turn their aircraft. They're probably moving to if they're not moving. How are they even up there. That's right. They're not they're not hovering. They're also moving there and they're not gonna move in conjunction with you there. You're the enemy and why should they do what you're doing. If you fire a rocket powered bullet they will almost certainly try to turn away. I sure would but i'm not a crafty commie. The idea of of these salvos salvos of rockets the idea was that they weren't very good as like a fighter plane weapon. They were meant to intercept bombers slow moving bombers so a bomber during this period a strategic bomber bomber bomber intercontinental ballistic missiles were still. We're talking about the mid fifties. They were still an un. I mean not untested entirely untested but it it wasn't really clear that you could fire an icbm from kansas and be sure that it reached its target in the a lot of slow bova stan so it's more or less like using the u._s. Post office well how much ouch that's a gut punch are so the idea was if everybody picture that nuclear warheads were going to be flying. They were gonna be flying from squadrons of bombers that were just always always aloft it was it was definitely part of the sort of strategic puzzle that you would have multiple platforms to deliver. You've really got to diversify your portfolio and submarines. Were a big part of that. They could get in close and be undetected. Undetected bombers were <hes> were detectable by radar but you could have them airborne all the time and kind kind of flying around the polar space like ready to ready to penetrate. I mean this is the the the whole plot of the movie wargames there. The bomber or doctor strange was right there waiting there kind of poised right outside of of the airspace of your of if your enemy and the russians are the soviets used a strategic bombers as a as a major component of kind of the way that they threaten the united states and so our early interceptors were were populated with these sort of rocket launching pads. Let's and the idea was that they could bomber couldn't really evade them quite like a jet fighter could and they could hit hit a bomber with a big cluster of little unguided rockets and generally be assured that they could you know that the rockets would perform their jobs. Sti it star wars. It's that's right. You can start the nukes. You can hit the bomber except you know it's it's. It's not star wars as much as it's it's buck rogers steam punk same august light a roman candle and shoot him down so by the mid fifty s a lot of these platforms that we think kind of we kind of assume that that rockets and guided rockets and strategic rockets were all technologies that where where they'd become fairly reliable by a certain point in time i mean we we it wasn't much longer that we developed up to rocket that. Could that could put men on the mura. I was just about to say we started putting probably start putting guys at the top of them. We started to put our best. Most clean cut square. Jawed guys has just sitting on one of these things. That's how confident we were. We hardly killed any of them but but we did there. Were you've seen the video of the failed. Nasa rocket test the a <hes> pretty great senator one three or four. We're not quite as good as satisfied. That's that's the best part of the rest of zero point seven all these guys at crew cuts and sunglasses watching these rockets explore all of them look good for a second and then it's literally like fifty feet but the the it's extremely hard to shoot another airplane down from an airplane. I've never done it. I've never done it either and and if you and i we're too pretty remarkably smart well-versed guys can do americans we are and we have a we have a thumbnail sketch of physics and and aero-dynamics i would lick my finger and stick it out a couple of times just to make sure the shot was was good. I've used the little <hes> testees rocket motors to not only send model rockets into the air but also did you testes how do you how would you pronounce it. I i always wondered about that and put rocket motors on your test the rocket motor manufacturer oh. It's like a hobby shop. I never had that blow blow stuff stuff up phase as a kid what we never even played with fireworks washington down testes s._t.'s oh i had a very awkward mix up a little embarrassed. Were future. Generations know that you don't know oh. No you know what it is. It's the the that test doors is at test. Stores was a the the glue yes chess stores was the paint and glued that you use to build model airplanes and s._t.'s was the rock so i can play it and if you ever combine the two if you put your stores on your s._t.'s i left holding you're right. Hey wait a minute. You get your chocolate in my peanut butter. Did you never blow things up. I hardly ever blue things out. I had friends that blue things up and i kind of look down on them. It's probably classes again. I was a pyro hill ben at a certain point in high school. We realized that and this is terrible. I'm saying this for informational purposes. Only this is not a suggestion. Has the statue of limitations expired the statue. Yes it has no no no. I'm not i'm not admitting getting any crimes but we started to try and we we were fascinated by pipebombs. We wanted to perfect pipebombs. I like you can say on that add bomber but if you say you're fascinated with it. Oh no oh you're a man of science fascinated by your scientific fascination with the pipe bomb and we realized that you could use the little solar igniters that we used in rocket model rocketry we could use those as basically the blasting caps that would set off a black powder based east pipebombs so my fascination in model rocketry continued all the way to high school although it was we're using it for for very different it applications anyway. Forget everything i just said. That's some that's some anarchists cookbook. Stuff stayed in alaska has no interest in that. I'm sure anyway i certainly as a as a air force fan boy have always imagined that tho- that all this technology air to air weapons things were more reliable than they actually were and like sort of famously the the the most <hes> there our two air to air missile types that were that were to i guess air to air missiles that were used universally universally in american jet fighter combat and we sold these missiles to our arms partners around the world. There was the sidewinder her missile which was a short range air to air combat missile that was a heat seeker so the sidewinder would would would get us the heat signature of the rocket or the i'm not rocket the jet engine exhaust of your enemy aircraft and it would zoom in on the on the exhaust. Let's say no aiming necessary. It just had a little little little change in flight to follow the yeah it'll just follow the the hottest west point but only really good for very short ranges you could fire a a sidewinder and it would just side wind ride off into hence the name ineffectually if you didn't get that air airplane pretty fast and then the companion to the sidewinder was the aim seven sparrow borough which was a terrible man for a missile well in and the aim seven sparrow was arguably a terrible missile. Is that why they h._b._o.'s it. Missile can do no harm to anyone. What's what's a nice harmless animal right like a sidewinder. That's a nickname for rattlesnake. Sure that's a snake bite at you but spero spurs your your delighted but they're ineffectual. You don't even notice them and a sparrow. Missile could go further it was it was a medium medium-range missile but it requires radar targeted and it required that the pilot of the airplane continue to point his airplane gene at the enemy airplane keeping his radar locked and then the his radar with communicating with sparrow in the sparrow would follow the the radar locked to its target but that that doesn't that's not something that a pilot can continue to do in the midst of a real hot air to air combat situation and i think a the statistics on how accurate sparrows were. I mean what their actual will sort of. Kill ratio was equivalent to real sparrows like pretty bad right it. Would i mean better than like rubber bands but like not quite as good as just just just accident think i think more pilots more enemy pilots just crashed because they didn't get their landing gear down in time then were killed by sparrows. I'm sure there's somebody listening to the show. The worked on the aim seven sparrow. That's going to send us a really angry email. It might not be angry an angry email. If you're going to anger someone. It should not be a former weapons contract somebody that has he's got a garage garage for shady stuff. He's gonna send us a letter written in chalk on the side of an aim seven sparrow. Just send your letters to ken jennings at can journey takes america <music> at how stuff works dot com so the sidewinder works. The sparrow doesn't well yeah. I mean own missiles are are unreliable bowl to to a certain extent them inside. Wonder works works for what it does. Do you have a particular example of the unreliability of any of these missiles john <hes> just the just the statistics of how many were fired in combat versus. How many actually brought down planes pretty if the if that was your success rate in parenting you would your kids would have taken away. Also you know you never think about the price of them. This'll you know they're expensive too like when my kid throws away her retainer. The first thing i think is my oh my gosh. How much was that retainer well. I think you do as a fighter pilot think of the cost of using a missile because you're not carrying that many of them and so if you a us one. It's an opportunity kind of taxpayer. I don't care about that guy. I just wanna hear way sixty million dollars for that missile that you just accidentally fired while in fact during during this period there was another kind of missile used in air combat which was called the <hes> the air two genie and the jimmy here. You're gonna love. This seems like a. It's like a kitchen. Cleaning technology genie doesn't seem like a name for a weapon well. The genie was a nuclear tipped tipped air to air missile the idea being that it was so hard to hit other airplanes that if you just put a nuke on the tip and fired it at a group of airplane you'll probably get you'll get them and <hes> the only challenge was like. Can you fire this missile and get away from it fast enough that it doesn't also show yourself down. Hopefully they were rules of engagement that would have. I mean you don't want pilots just shooting nuclear-tipped missiles plane. Oh do you not well. You're not in the air force for for a few things. That could go wrong in that scenario. I'm just a layperson but yeah and the safety measures in a lot of these missiles are that they don't arm until a certain in point they and if they don't detonate within a certain timeframe than they disarm but all of those things are not one hundred percent reliable reliable technologies the <hes> the the genie was in use in the air force for a lot longer than you would think given the fact that i never heard about this means. It probably didn't get fired much at one point well. No it was only ever fired. I think one we never actually irradiated turkey <music> or siberia but during the testing of the of the genie there was a there was a group of air force officers who volunteered volunteered to go stand out on the firing range and take their hats off and have this genie fired over their heads at twenty thousand thousand feet and detonate to demonstrate that the nuclear explosion would not hurt people on on the ground even if they weren't wearing a fedora even when they take their little air force you know <hes> like volley hat off. They weren't even where even the jewish officers took off their yarmulke. 's thurnham probably not in the air force. They're all born again christians and they and they did this these officers stood out out there and and a and a nuke went off over their heads and they measured to the rad's and no one there was not a measurable. There's has no measurable damage. That's not a test i would have. I don't have that much. Confidence is that true in general of like atmospheric nuclear detonations followed doesn't get to the ground. I i wouldn't bank on that. I think depending on the size and these were these air to air missiles. Had you know one kilotonne loads or something. They weren't like the mega they weren't like zohar bama's or anything costco-sized news but the process of testing these missiles courses is is complicated because you're even though air force officers are willing to stand out and have nukes blown up over their heads. They're not willing to get in an airplane and fly fly while their friend actually tries to shoot them down with an air missile for obvious reasons because they would die <hes> so drones were were used by both the air force and the navy as platforms to try and test. I the efficacy of this kind of stuff and we we've always used drones but drones not as has not like we use them. Now which are which are piloted basically piloted jets. It's just the pilot is sitting somewhere else. <hes> drones were were obsolete aircraft that were fitted with kind of remote control almost like a model airplane so there was some there was a kid with a little joystick. Somebody you know a pilot that had a straight line. It's not like skeet no no look set them free and so during this early era of of <hes> of missile testing ground air missiles and air-to-air missiles the the navy and the airforce used old world war two sir plus aircraft that because at the end of world war two right we had we'd manufactured manufactured so many battleships in so many airplanes and tanks and you know. What were we supposed to do with all that stuff. Should i rented some of it turns out. I mean one of the tragedies tragedies of that post war era is that they all that stuff was just destroyed on mass so much so that now there are there are only a handful handful of extant examples of some of the you know the great airplanes and and and ships of of all human human time right. I mean like i have to say that's not a problem. I've noticed i feel like i've had to go to many many old aircraft airshows in my life. Life seems like there's plenty of them like they're. They're all painted with. Some kind of snarling animal knows or swimsuit lady even ones that weren't that never had that at the time. I was painting that i think has to leave a lot of the tried. It was just a regular airplane and you were there just the painting naked women and everything in this museum and the volunteers don't like that you had your little test stores paint you can outrun a lot of those guys though it turns out well a lotta those airplanes reserve uniforms were ones that never left the united states or ones that were manufactured after the war ended. You know what like airplanes planes and boats that were in the philippines were often just sort of burned or buried where where they stood where the p. t. boat made made famous by john f. kennedy most of those boats were beach and set on fire at the end of the war there hardly any any that remain but one of the things that the air force did was keep a selection of those airplanes to wind up and set them loose and shoot him down and one of the one that they used for this task was an and i kind of gave the agape this away in a earlier in the episode was the grumman roman f six f which was extremely successful navy airplane during the war it was a carrier based plane that <hes> the did did a lot of shooting down japanese zeros and at the end of the war we had a bunch of them and some of them were used in this drone program to <hes> to provide targets for this kind of testing and in the mid fifties this was the this was the hell cat <hes> the f. six what the hell okay so. Maybe i want us to do on our new podcast where we unpopular war movies where i taught unfriendly fire. I talk about them and you go home. In one thousand nine hundred eighty six in california there were a lot of pulled military bases that were still being used for these purposes fighting the russians in by proxy from california gornja and on and on august in august on august sixteenth of nineteen fifty-six there was an event that has gone gone down in history <hes> popularly known as the battle of palmdale and it it didn't go down in history is the interesting thing it is not popularly known as the battle of palmdale it was largely largely forgotten and only only rediscovered and and resurrected as a as a focal point of interest in the two two thousand i had never heard of it before today spoilers so let me slimming sketch out what happened on that fateful day. The navy lawns launched launched an f six f as drone out over the pacific ocean to us as a target for some missile tests other planes or supposed to comer they are they surfaced air. My sense is on that day that it was a surface to air test and the navy the navy was gonna fly this out into gun range enj- that was over over the pacific ocean so there was a there was a military base called point magoo which is kind of but not it's mugu m._a._g._a. You not like the blind because that's not good name for marksmanship exercise operation magoo's is is a on the clock and point mugu is kind of in ventura county north of los angeles and south of santa barbara. It was the airport point. Mugu was the airport that was closest to ronald reagan's santa barbara ranch so it was the one if anyone still yeah air air force one would take him there and and if he was going to his ranch to like cut down his neighbors trees or whatever it was that he did up in santa barbara and but point mugu for for a lot of the second half of the twentieth century was used as a navy gun range and they had land up up land that they could use to test missiles where the missiles wouldn't presumably like hurt anybody and it also went out to the sea so on this day august sixteen they launched this f six jeff remotely piloted they had a little guy on the ground with the radio and inside the airplane was radio and you can only imagine the complex little system of you've i'm imagining a robot robots cockpit at the remote control actually works the robot so he pulls this thing i think it was some wires and some broom stick magazine easy to seem like he's snoring in bed exactly what it was got right police and a series of tubes but very shortly after takeoff because of some malfunction i mean this isn't a foolproof system. They lose contact with the airplane. The <hes> the the guy on the ground can no longer and it's either the radio on the ground or the radio in the plane. Something stopped working either way. It's they cannot no longer control this. It's gonna keep going in a straight line there. It it goes tiller runs out of fuel. You would think it would keep going in a straight line but in fact the plane started to an airplane wants to fly. It's the amazing thing about an airplane once. It's in the air a lot of times. They advise you if you if an airplane kind of goes out of control one of the first i think she tries just take your hands and feet off the controls and the airplane will naturally stabilized unless it's in some situation like a flat spin or i mean you can an airplane can go out of control where won't recover but in a lot of cases if if you're in a diver or whatever i mean you can just take your hands off and the plane will naturally assume a kind of stable level flight. Does this only work for cute planes where the the cockpit windows have eyeballs on them and the noses a propeller yeah that's right. They just wanna fly heating. The plane. Just wants to be up there. Other normal airplanes wanna crash but peter wants to fly. There was a famous episode in in the late. Sixties called the cornfield bomber where where an f. one oh six jet went out of control so out of control that the pilot ejected you did and <hes> and in the process the the force of the ejection seat and the change in the weight and dynamics of the airplane circle and opposite reaction the flight the plane itself recovered from the flat spin and began to just fly on its own the pilot lila than sitting underneath his parachute like some of his his fellow pilots like radio like you'd better get back in it. It's the equivalent of getting out of the car to check. Check your mail and watching a start to roll down the drive. No no no no you can imagine this guy's embarrassment like oh you couldn't control the airplane well a good thing and got out of it and this plane continued to fly and basically like landed itself landed a really just belly up landing in a cornfield planned not points on just wanna fly. They also wanna eat corn <hes> well. This plane landed in the dirt with its motor still running and just sat there with the jet engine on kind of slowly slowly inching its way across a cornfield and the plane was bl- mostly undamaged they fixed it and it flew wa continued to fly one of the only examples i think of that <hes> but so the this <hes> this essex which was painted bright red and yellow and was meant to be visible as target <hes> continue to fly but it you went into a kind of slow banking turns oh and went started to head back to land <hes> which you hate to see it became an enormous problem right <hes> it was a unbeknownst unbeknownst to all the people who was actually a problem. It's starting to become a wpro business now. Flying over l. three guys in a tower somewhere and so some jets were scrambled from an air force base nearby air force base who were air force pilots and they were sent to shoot this airplane down and there's a lot of competition between air force pilots and navy pilots and i'm sure that there was quite a bit of like a good natured ribbing like oh. The navy can't control their old airplane. Let's send the air force up to get it. We're speaking to a future audience from that. Rivalry is probably long dead so you can finally say and with no fear of reprisals who actually has the superior pile which i prefer yeah in your opinion well if you look at <hes> if you look at the number of astronauts that were navy pilots versus astronauts that were air force pilots <hes> there it was a preponderance of navy pilots within the eric the early astronaut corps <hes> but the air force was a was a new branch of the service that there was no oh air force prior to the end of world war two it was the army air corps up until that point and so air force was new and also air force force was <hes> strategic bomber focused <hes> the the idea is gil fighters were were mostly neighbor navy and marine pilots <hes> i mean mean air force pilots then quickly became the great the great fighter duelists of a of later years but the navy continues to be. I mean top gun is about navy pilot seeing the blue angels. They're very good at making <hes> a little lodge lozenge shape rides which then maybe turns into some kind of a star shape those are also navy pilots under the thunderbirds and you would you would assume that the air force would would would really pour money into the thunderbirds but they don't you know why because everyone just assumes a blue angels' airforce lovelier saw the blue angels some air force generals israel's like well so the air force sent up some <hes> some f eighty nine's which were a jet powered interceptor sceptre up but they didn't have any <hes> guided air missiles all they had were these rocket pods under their aircraft which were as we've discussed unguided rockets and they had one hundred each plane had one hundred and four rockets in these big circular pods that they could fire but the way they worked was they fired in clusters and so the air force got up and started sort of let me first they had to find signed this this relatively slow moving auto piloted plane just sort of flying on its own but zone wherewithal here with all due to do and then they had to shoot it down while the the challenge was as you're as you're coming up behind an airplane it presents a a pretty small target and also this plane was in a constant turn so to shoot it down from behind. I mean as soon as you shot here. Your unguided bullets rock bullets the plane in front of you would just turn on a different generation so they <hes> they adopted the tactic. They were gonna come sideways at it and shoot their rockets sort of broadside yeah the broadsided and shoot it down and so the pilots one of whom was named einstein lieutenant einstein one of whom was lieutenant hurrelmann key subordinates just adding reading writing in a nice shot einstein exactly it'd be like hey the rest of his life. He had to live this down. They fired their rockets in what was called the ripple will affect clusters of forty two rockets and then thirty four to thirty two rockets in the second cluster and then seventy seventy rockets at the end like i have not been keeping track of it's well over one hundred rockets. That's one hundred four th right or no. That's quite a bit more rockets well. Let's see how did they do that for it to thirty two oh no i'm sorry not seventy forty two thirty and thirty gotcha so it's just over one hundred rockets just over one hundred rock so lieutenant einstein fires his whole complement of rockets at this drone and mrs at one point. I think some of the rockets bounced off the so. There's more of an equipment failure little pilot well. No i think it was they didn't they didn't hit it. Directly bounce off they like skimmed off the wing or just sort of grazed the bottom and were sent a caddy womp like in star star hours at just impacted on the surface well read leader and then lieutenant perelman came in behind him and also missed with one hundred and four rockets so they sent two hundred eight unguided rockets at this relatively slow moving hell cat and missed missed entirely but as you can imagine these rockets did not disappear into thin air the hell cat was flying over <hes> over the mojave desert the antelope valley in central south central california and these rockets flew off completely willy nilly. Was anybody worried about this had anybody. The pilots aware that every time they missed the drone they might be hitting a barn. This is <hes> this is one of the questions for the ages right. The air force did not expect to miss presumably one hundred two hundred whatever time i mean these were these rockets doc. It's were most effective as ground attack weapons but i think because they were out over the largely uninhabited antelope valley and mojave havi desert. They assumed that these rockets would just sort of. I don't know what the impact harmlessly in the desert a they didn't think this this all the way through and the the the rockets did then land various places peppering the earth earth. I need to know how funny i can find this. I need to know how many civilians died like. Maybe she's just need without on every entry here so you know in the city of newhall california <hes> rockets landed in the town bounced off the ground one rocket exploded and the <hes> the shrapnel all went into a woman's kitchen and some of the shrapnel actually ended up in her kitchen cupboards but not in the woman not in the woman hogan no one died there were a couple full of guys who who had pulled their truck over to have lunch under a shady tree and a rocket hit their truck and blew up but they were just sitting there eating sandwiches. That must have been very confusing moment. Can you imagine just like having a sandwich. Do you think the guy behind immediately like started the truck and just booked out of there because who knows where the next explosions. The truck has gone the trucks. The trucks gone yeah the truck. The truck was is here. I mean it's one of those like he hates these cans you know. Could you say that again. One of the brushfires actually got a <hes>. The fire burned to within three hundred feet of something called the byrd might powder explosives company the not the yeah the p._p._c. you see who were in the process of making bombs out in the desert and this is davis. I mean what are the chances. I almost wish <hes> the burma powder factory had blown up just because what a what a much better story it would be everybody mad that there was no video. I'm sure there's no video in the end. There were no. There's no video at the time he it right. You'd have to get your your <hes> super eight home camera out and get a cartridge in their wind it up with the air force planes have had no problem well. There would have been cameras in combat aircraft but they probably hadn't been loaded with film. They i didn't have time scramble the pilots and the cameraman in the end like over a thousand acres of brushfire <hes> were started by these rockets that burns various places did considerable amount of damage in the desert and the air force pilots really had nothing than to report except <hes> to land and shrug as fires raged out of control and in the end our our heroic grummin grummin f six f the runaway drone just <hes> flew on and ended up clipping some phone wires and a <hes> cartwheeling in the desert just crashed just inflect ineffectually on its own nearby in the mojave yeah started no fires presumably and they went <music> out and repaired the repaired the phone wires and this was this was all sort of brought to light by a by a couple of guys whose hobby babi was to go out and find the wreckage of old airplanes that crashed in the desert <hes> and they heard about this story and went out and his decades as later. This is in the two thousands. Oh so at the time there were not even headlines about there were stories about it but it faded into obscurity yeah almost immediately and <hes> and they found the crash site where there was still wreckage all strewn along the ground and they could look and see in the phone wires that <hes> that or the electrical wires that they were still the splices were still visible where the plane had cut through the wires amid been repaired by by the by the lineman. It seems like what we learn here. Is that when things are spiraling out of control. You should really just sit tight sure. You should not try to help levers off. Just don't don't do anything like the plains probably just gonna. You're just going to make things worse. The plane wants to fly and that includes foods the battle of palmdale entry one of four easy two zero four seven certificate number three one three. Oh three in the omnibus <music> future links. We hope that the plague of social media so prevalent in our time has missed your century completely probably don't even have whatever appendages you would need to type status updates dates into a twitter grammar whatever you have but <hes> john and i were so devoted to d- lofty principles of the project that we made sure that updates were frequently posted at omnibus project on social media network we could think of we were <hes> individually atkin kim jennings and at john roderick on twitter and in john's case on instagram as well we were available to receive electronic traffic communication from interested fellow scholars at our email address as it was called which was the omnibus project at key mail dot com we would receive physical artifacts from time to time added some stuff off p._o. Box five five seven four four shoreline washington nine eight one five five. I have a i have a canadian mini comic. That's been sitting in my car for weeks. I don't know if ever showed you but it's in the mailbox was a canadian mini comic. You know we often have a <hes> people will send us one thing and you and i will sit and study. It and it's usually fairly obvious which of us wants it and you tend to take a lot of the printed media and leave it at my house right. Read it you look at it and then you're like it's true that i have the ultimate battle of palmdale option. If i do nothing to your house and that's great and you can be relatively tivoli assured that it will get archived in my house right if you ever like a year from now if you're like i'd like to what about that lady that send us those autobiographical self published books it gets it gets our dinner very loose sense well. I mean you're you're. You're team of archivists does not have to go into the stacks. I have a shelf of books that were written by my friends. I have a shelf and that you know that is a fairly substantial bookshelves. You have plenty of smart friends and you have written that. Has it rubbed off on you. Just steve just you alone has written an entire shell of the book and then i have a shelf of books that have been sent to me that have been endorsed. Her <unk> own autographed <hes> like to john from friend. I have now a shelf of books that people who listen to the omnibus- thus have cintas century train locomotive crashes or whatever from books that were sent to us from israel and data and the i think increasingly like that archive is taking up a corner of my library. What a valuable resource. That will be someday confusing resource. We'll put it in a time capsule along with these recordings. You probably found it when you when you dug out this golden cylinder music clocks looking cylinder. You're like their book about canadian. Locomotive crashes <hes> <hes> you could support the aims of the omnibus project financially as well a little scratch as we said do you like do you like when people called money a little scratch clams few smacker ruse a would be invaluable for for helping the project and many generous donors john on. I've been very touched by the outpouring because we're speaking into the void here. We don't know what the show mused. People we don't even know if people but apparently if if the patriot donation mechanism exists in your criminal era please navigate to it now and contribute at patriot dot dot com slash omnibus project many people who did and were enthusiastic supporters of the show can be found at the future ling's group on facebook and probably like minded separates. There are a couple of minutes. I leave it to you to are they like minded. Yes when i meet somebody great. I'm like you know what i want like minded like minded people. These think the omnibus there is no current place on the internet. I know where people who hate the omnibus congregate would we would we promote it if i think my tendency is to say like you know both outsides. We need to teach the controversy over to go to facebook dot com slash groups slash future links suck. I always say somebody who's going to start an anti future lanes. There are definitely future links who go on the site to add addenda and often criticize one one or the other of us. My favorite was the post the other day that said that they preferred one of your episodes to one of mine and i was again rightfully <music> like chuffed not just chuck displeased replied. No it wasn't disagreed. Read i of course agreed. I think they were mad. Because the episode i did had generated a lot of fan response whereas as the episode that you did was greeted with crickets quonset huts people can post photos of kwanza hat right. They really liked it. They liked the quonset hut episode because they liked to participate with photos of once. They've found the high mind so really the secret to future links. Success is just to make an episode called manhole. Cover and people are like oh boy. I see a manhole cover. I'm going to show the boys. Your episode was on some math which was the one that they can have some this for child radius. The blackhawks knows about doodles outdrew abe a barely corporeal thing that has not existed in physical form for seven years much much harder to photograph for the vampires and yetis and marlow from now. You can't take photographs though cannot take photographs alarm <hes> future links from our vantage point in your distant past. I have no idea how long our civilization survived or whether or not the books and pamphlets we put into the into the omnibus capsule so are still readable. Components certainly have some foxing they have your. I saw that forming in your lips what about that. What's it called when they make the little wormholes like. Did you know that like bookworm will literally go through and you can actually figure out which books pages are from avenue this in case of manuscript script by following the tracks of the little worm has made like vertically through the pages of the book really so if somebody has taken taking pages out or they've they've become unbound people that have swiped maps or other eliminations for one university libraries. You can actually prove which place it came from the wormholes. Well we hope job and pray that this catastrophe where worms eat all of our manuscripts never comes but if the worst comes soon this recording like all our recordings according maybe our final but at providence allows. We hope to be back with you soon for another entry yeah.

navy vietnam marshall indiana palmdale alaska ken jennings Boomer united states Census bureau rockets california israel john flensburg football
THE FLY GIRL Ruth Nichols

What'sHerName

39:54 min | 1 year ago

THE FLY GIRL Ruth Nichols

"The episode is sponsored by girls can crate girls can create is a unique subscription box inspiring girls to believe they can be and do anything. How do they do it like us girls can create believes that real women make the best heroes and every month they deliver them to your doorstep. Happy new year. Katie happy new year. I've had very lovely break me too. It's been very relaxing today. I'm going to tell you about an amazing woman. She was the very first woman to attempt. A transatlantic flight was the only woman to hold simultaneous world records for speed altitude and distance cool. She was the first woman to pilot, a commercial passenger airline. Whoa. She beat Charles Lindbergh's world record time for a cross country flight to really flying across the country and thirteen hours twenty one minutes. Wow. So why isn't she as famous as Amelia Earhart? Why haven't I heard of this woman, the exactly what I said. And that's what we're here to find out today. Cool, her name is Ruth rally Nichols and her story is sad and inspiring. And fascinating and depressing. Sounds like perfect. What's her name classic? I'm Olympia Mickle. And I'm Katy Nelson. And this is what's her name fascinating. Women. You've never heard of. So, of course, one of the problems that we've talked about a lot is in women's history. You have one slot for any given category, right? Yeah. We get female aviator, and that is taken by Amelia Earhart. Right. We might get Bessie Coleman. If we want white female aviator black female ater. Yeah. But those are the only two we ever talk about. And that's ridiculous. So to learn more about Ruth rally Nichols, I talked to Keith O'Brien Kito Brian, and among one time journalist, and the author of fly girls. Your times number one bestseller us your cool. It's really incredible book to meet all these women all these incredible female aviators. I've never heard of. But he's also just a brilliant, writer, you get fully fleshed out story, and you feel like you really know these people and you understand all the context for what's going on in way, that is really unusual for sort of a pop. All. It's stunning to go back and see how the press almost exclusively, a male press wrote about these women. It made for great copy great headlines when when women made daring flights or attempted to race in the national air races at the time. But these reporters would go out of their way to sneak little belittling, comments into their stories. When a man made a daring flight or when a man one and air race both of which were extremely dangerous almost to the point of being reckless. He wasn't an aviator with a capital, a almost like a gladiator in the sky when a woman would make these daring kind of flights. Presswood call them lady birds mistresses of the sky. I mean. It's it's ridiculous. The sweethearts of the air. It's so sweet. Yeah. So cute. And sweet of them when they're breaking men's records and flying. We're record speeds. Little ladies. Plane. In Amelia herself would later, say, and I'm paraphrasing, here would kill them just to tal- pilots. In order to understand the story of Ruth Nichols. We first have to understand the story of Amelia Earhart. We tend to have forgotten everything about how she lives. Amelia Earhart didn't begin as a famous aviator flew solo cross the ocean. She began as a social worker in Boston in the spring of nineteen twenty eight who had a pilot's license. But now living in Boston as a social worker wasn't doing much flying at all. And it is here in Boston where she gets possibly one of the most lucky breaks. Anybody could have gotten at this time, she's plucked from obscurity to ride as a passenger on a plane flown by men across the ocean, Amelia herself will do. No flying. Her job is to sit behind the two men flying. The plane take notes for book. She will write for. George Putnam, Putnam publishing. If in when this plane successfully makes it across the ocean. So Amelia Earhart's rise to fame. Is she called herself a sack of potatoes, who was a passenger on a flight? Just beat a woman freezing sitting there in the back of the plane doing nothing crazy. But when they landed she's famous. When it lands off the coast of Wales in June of nineteen twenty eight Amelia Earhart has become the first woman to fly cross the ocean. What's frustrating about this entire story is that in spring, nineteen twenty eight Ruth Nichols was already an established east coast pilot with especially frustrating Ruth Nichols. Is that Ruth Nichols lives, just two miles from George Putnam, in rhino York? He very likely knew her family. You could have certainly gotten her on the phone. But the plane that had been acquired to make this flight seaplane plane was sitting in Boston Harbor. And so instead of looking around in New York, they looked around in Boston. This is really the first of many things that doesn't break and Ruth Nichols favor but two routes credit. She's not bitter or if she is bitter, she does a great job of hiding it when Amelia returns to America in the summer of nineteen twenty eight it's Ruth Nichols who's there to reach out to her, and welcome her back home, they go to lunch and Ryan New York. They are now to female aviators standing shoulder to shoulder, but it's really just the beginning of what would be a very complicated friendship and at times rivalry between. Is born in the early twentieth century on the upper east side of New York. She's the daughter of Erickson, and Edith Nichols Eric's Nichols her father descended from wealth and Staten Island and will over the course of the next couple of decades, amass a little bit of a fortune, as a Wall Street trader. Nichols understands the expectations that our parents have to. She is to grow up. Mary, mary. Well, and Mary Yang when she does all the newspapers are gonna cover it in the society pages. And it will be a big deal. In the spring of nineteen nineteen as a graduation, present her father biser, a short airplane, ride Atlantic City that kind of thing might you to us today. But this is post World War, One, the pilots have come home. There is a glut of pilots, a glut of planes. How do these pilots make money? Well, they start by barnstorming going across the country. Carnivals air rides. Airshows air Rhodia's is they were called Ruth goes Atlantic City, essentially for one of these and she, she takes short ride in an open cockpit. J N, or it was a primitive by plane was better known as Jenny. She's very afraid to make this flight. She doesn't like reading on elevators. She doesn't like roller coasters. She doesn't like heights, but she doesn't want to reveal these fears to father, so she smiles photograph and she, she climbs into the open cockpit with the pilot and. Scared to death, especially when the pilot revealed that he didn't just plan to like just fly around in the sky was going to do some flips induce macrobiotics and show off to his young teenaged passenger. And it's the prizing thing happens. By the time she reaches the ground, she would say that she fell is if in flying her soul was freed from her earthly body, and it's really in that moment. That everything changes Ruth Nichols. Well, of course that reminds me of Blanchard. Yeah. Same thing. Yeah. But that the people who you least expect to enjoy this. Yeah. Absolutely love. This is making me feel like maybe I need to become a pilot. Maybe I'm missing out on something up there. And I was gonna say, maybe I maybe I would like it. But I know that I don't but you've never flown. You never been the pilot. You've only been absent, unfortunately, what do you mean? When I was in college. One of your friends set me up with her brother all. Yeah. On a blind date. Yeah. Yeah I remember the pilot. Yeah. We went up in the air and he, he let you take over. He forced me to take over. He just took his hands off and forced me to pull the plane up and fly and I was another of that experience did not go in another date. So I flew in a plane and I didn't like it. So apparently, I am unlike currently your earthbound women. Yeah. I'm just cowardly all the way through. But such was not the case for Ruth, Rowan nNcholas. And she immediately fell in love. This was where she wanted to be all the time. But she's supposed to get married and be a society lady. Sure uses. And she goes off to Wellesley the women's against her father's will, but her parents really, really do not approve of this choice during her sophomore year. They, they just absolutely insist that she gives us up. And so she takes some time off and goes to Miami. And stays in the family's home in Miami as you do as you do. I assume that this is time meant to be spent finding a husband. Oh, okay. Instead to find a flight instructor. Yes. And secretly takes pilot lessons. And by the time she graduates from Wellesley nineteen twenty four. She graduates with her diploma and a pilot's license. I love that. She's a regular Friday Fisher, I. Yes. I think she and this is an excellent is right at the beginning of that era. The roaring twenties when the youth are rejecting the values of the older generations. Her parents want her to do what's done. And this new gen post post bore generation says, no. We are going to do the opposite of what you told us to do. Tell me she wore flapper dresses. I'm sure she did she have short hair, and she was a debutante. She did that short, Bob. Yep. Cool short. Bob with the, the flip out so the very fast. Oh, cool. I just love picturing, the moment when her parents find out that rather than doing this society rounds often Miami. She's been secretly lie. Thoroughly modern. So although you might expect it her parents are furious about this pretty quickly. They seem to come around. They weren't initially huge fans. This wasn't the life they had imagined for. But something interesting happens while Roose father didn't imagine going this way for her. He tacitly approves of it, by turning the other way. We're actively encourages it as time goes on. And that to me is pretty interesting. Eric's Nichols by all accounts was not the kind of man that you disobeyed, whether you were a son or daughter. So in my opinion, he probably could have stopped Reuss, or he could have tried in. I don't think he did that. So while he didn't approve of what his daughter was doing. He did at least allow her to go down this path. As she's beginning to enter air races. And do these really during flights? She's getting a lot of newspaper coverage, and that's what they're after anyway. Yeah. Maybe if her wedding can't be in the newspaper, right? Her daring do the next best thing. Yeah. Exactly. And her father was very close friends with teddy Roosevelt. He had been in the rough riders. Oh, wow. So a have to assume that he understands the appeal of adventure and danger and an action oriented life. Yeah. Yeah. Even if he may be didn't approve for a daughter that some core level. He has to understand this is the nineteen twenties. He has to get on board. Yeah. Any he does. The papers call her the flying debutante. Socialite. She's always referred to as a socialite, but as the Brian points out that really doesn't ring true. She didn't have a lot of money at the beginning. She starts out. Yes, she is a debutante cheeses socialite her father is in Wall Street, this is the twenties. So we know what's going to happen. Yes. So after the crash when she really starts to come into her career her parents might be emotionally, supportive, they cannot be financially support. Let's pause for just a second to thank. Our sponsor girls can create girls can create a unique subscription box inspiring girls to believe that they can be and do anything every crate features and inspiring woman and her own unique story of why she's awesome. A twenty eight page activity book. Plus everything you would need to complete tour three hands on seem activities and more. And for our listeners if you go to girls can create dot com, C R, AT dot com and use the code her name all caps. You'll get twenty percent off your first month's crate on any subscription. It's designed for kids, but honestly, I think it's fun for adults. I have had many moments of off based on these subscription box for children. Do you remember the magical joy that came when you got anything in the mail as a kid girls can create brings that joy back and includes incredible stories of real life. She rose to help the girls in your life. Learn that girls can be and do anything, check them out now at girls can create C R, E dot com. When you order, make sure you use the coupon code her name all caps so that they know we sent you. People would ride her over the years and ask for my or asked her to sponsor them, or ask her to invest in something, and she would write back and say, paraphrasing here, I don't have as much money as you think I do sorry. I can't really help. When she sets her mind to making daring flights. She can't by herself a plane. She is to get one just like anybody else does by hoping someone will let her borrow it or hoping manufacturer will give her one. Now a media Erhard is in a very different situation because she is marrying George Putnam. Oh, man who arranged for the original center across the and one of the richest men in New York. Wow. So she has all the funding she needs. And she has a marketing machine behind her. For the national women's air race nineteen twenty nine Amelia Earhart has her own plane Ruth has to beg borrow and steal to get one. She's writing letters, sending telegrams throughout the summer of nineteen twenty nine bagging manufacturers, the let her borrow plane. She finally gets one Baras one for this race. It's not a very good one. It does not go that well for. So we talked about nine hundred twenty eight and this missed opportunity. When Amelia goes across the ocean and wrist is not. In nineteen twenty nine when you're later. Ruth Nichols will compete in the first national women's air race an air derby, as they called it a transcontinental race from Santa Monica California to Cleveland, Ohio. These kind of raised very common time, men and than participating in them for a couple of years nineteen twenty nine is the first time women are allowed to compete, and they've had to fight to get there in nineteen twenty eight day begin lobbying air race officials saying that they wanted Nichols Amelia Earhart their friend and colleague, Louis state, and really leading the charge. In the mail race. Organizers are intrigued they do know there's advertising value in having women race. But they want the one in the race on their terms. They want each woman to fly accompanied by a man, and they don't want them flying over the rocky mountains, and they can't leave from California. They suggest that they leave from Nebraska or Minnesota. And fly on to Cleveland from there. Amelia earhart. Louise stayed in Ruth Nichols. They will have none of that. Those three women in particular at the time were three of the four most famous female aviators in this country and they vowed to boycott the air race. If these absurd clearly demeaning rules. Stay in place. Aries organizers? No. That that's not going to look good for them. So they strike a compromise. Each woman can fly alone and the let them fly from California, but they will force them to stop in fifteen different cities, along the way, essentially puddle jumping cross the comment. Women agree to this because they know this is the ultimate offer. They all have to take the same wrote, okay, which kind of defeats a lot of purpose of right? A race subtle those strategy. Exactly what the race organizers didn't realize is that by forcing everyone to stop at the same airfields. You guarantee a media presence in those places. Oh, yes. You've created an event. Yes. And the newspapers are completely full of this race day, cool. An instantly all of these women aviators are famous that's been following this rates in a way that they really didn't for the shorter and less predictable men's races. I love that when something you think is gonna be a bad thing. Turns out to be a good thing. These women become media darlings in that's probably the phrase that they would've used. November nineteen thirty she finally gets the break. She needs. Cincinnati, ohio. There was a, a radio broadcasting. Magnates by the name of pal Rosli, how Prazeres a Lockheed and modifies it and, and Nichols has an opportunity to meet him in the fall of nineteen thirty. She sensually cells, pal, probably the idea of letting her have us, borrow his, his Lockheed. In Crosby agrees. He could imagine his name next to hers in the newspapers as she made during flights. In quick succession now, now that Ruth Nichols finally has an opportunity. She is making fast during flights back and forth across the country, setting transcontinental speed record setting altitude records setting speed records over short distances, all in quick succession in late, nineteen thirty early nineteen thirty one. Double record breaking flight across the country, end the tax to stop at Roosevelt field. Number tips. Nineteen thirty who stepped out of the plane. But one of America's leading women flyers Ruth Nichols of Cincinnati responses. Plenty proud of the daughter who just established coast to coast record both ways and defeated Lindy's record time for Los Angeles. New York light completing that trip and just thirteen hours, one minute ago. What a plane what our record. This is the moment when she decides she's ready to start raising funds and trying to become the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. She's already broken a few of Lindbergh's records at this point. So why not set her sights on his biggest one? Here's what we've forgotten Ruth Nichols, has eclipsed Amelia undoubtedly just objectively speaking in the spring of nineteen thirty one Ruth Nichols is the most accomplished, humiliated in this country. She has a list of records to her name, and now she is going to shock the world by flying solo across the Atlantic in this Lockheed that she's borrowed from Powell. Crossley. Many prominent men, refuse to sponsor her and one well-known man, she approached about helping her manage the entire venture turns her down, even though he's already helped several aviators raise funds and, and prepare for big flights saying that he doesn't want her blood on his hands and she's livid. She knows that he would help her if she was a man. And she finally splutters out, what is my favorite insult of all time? You're, you're. Torian. And it works and he decides to help her. She knows that this flight is going to make her famous and finally prove her worth as an aviator her ability, as ater, she's got this plane that's ready. She's got book deals, lined up deals to sell footage of her flights Hollywood, and she sets off in June, nineteen thirty one to fly across the Atlantic. Anyone's ever flown to Europe knows you don't fly straight out to sea from New York or Boston, you, you follow the curvature of the earth. It's the it's the shortest route the time called the great circle route. And so she flies essentially up the coast of North America and she's going to stop to refuel, and spend the night in New Brunswick Canada than jump from there to Newfoundland spend another night, then go from Newfoundland across Europe. Ruth takes off in Brooklyn military planes, escort her up the Connecticut river valley. And as she reaches New Brunswick, she realizes there's a problem. Instead of an expansive field, wide and open. It was more like a small bowl a veritable trap. She thought dropped into a valley in the middle of the hilly, Canadian woods with the sun in her eyes photographers waiting on the ground, and darkness coming soon, Nichols decided to land. She came in fast at eighty miles an hour, half, blinded by the sun, Nichols, Mr. Marc touching down not at the start of the runway. But in the middle realizing now that she wouldn't have enough time to stop the plane Nichols hit the throttle trying to take off again. And for a moment, it looked like she would succeed with the akita's engine shrieking and its tires squealing Nichols lifted the plane off the runway just before the landing strip came to an end. She was in the air again but still so low that the plane's propeller skimmed the ground there was not enough time. There was not enough space. The Akita was heading for a rocky ledge and Nichols braced herself for the inevitable. Crash. No. Totally destroys her airplane. She is one hundred percent convinced that this airplane is going to explode because that's usually what happens. Yeah. So she scrambling to get out of the plane as fast as she can it doesn't explode, and she manages to get out. Okay. Here's all of the media. She's just crashed before she even started. Oh, jeez. And with a spirit that -solutely love, she climbs out of the plane stands in front of the media and yells wire for another plane. There's no other plane. Give her a plane. Even if there was Ruth is seriously injured, she's broken vertebrae in her back. She's very lucky not to be dead or paralyzed. It will take months to recover. But in her in her case, she didn't have a good choice, you know, right in the dark somewhere else. Right. Or land now and crash, and you have twelve seconds to come over to decide. Man, these airplanes are still mostly made out of wood. Why would an linen airplanes, really? I was stunned at how dangerous these planes are. Wow. I was picturing, a big metal thing, they're experimenting with metal planes at this point, but they're all really still far too heavy to be able to fly. Well, and, and Ruth's plane. The Akita is still a single engine would fuselage plane. She will recover and she will find investors to help her rebuild this Lockheed, and she'll take to the sky just a few months later in the fall of nineteen thirty one wearing a steel Courson still brace around her back. That's how badly she wants to keep flying. But the window of opportunity has closed and really Erhard will fly solo across the ocean about twelve months after Ruth made her attempts. Did she land at that landing strip in Newfoundland or seated? Not see had one of the world's most famous male aviators fly her playing for her up to New Brunswick and Newfoundland. And she started the flight out of the airport in Newfoundland without having to do the flight. Are you serious? I'm not throwing shade at Amelia Earhart. Right. But it's so heartbreakingly unfair. Of course, you deserve a lot of credit for that flight is extremely dangerous to fly across the ocean solo in a single engine airplane. Almost absurdly dangerous. But Amelia had advantages Ruth Nichols. Didn't it had to sting Ruth Nichols to know? She comes so close to achieving her dreams and that she had fallen short. In my opinion, Ruth Nichols really never gets over it. She would suffer for the rest of her life from aches and pains from that crash. And yet within two and a half months. She's back in a plane in instill planning to try to sell investors on around the world flight, they were incredibly brave. You know. It's what bothers me about the reductive way we handle the history of women in aviation in the time that Amelia Earhart flew, there were dozens of prominent female pilots racing planes flying across the country. Trying to set record. Each of them was brave. Each of them was bold. But in nineteen thirty eight the war starts. The air races. Stop. All of these fervor Lewis flying activities right after be directed to the war effort. She starts an organization in nineteen. Forty called relief wings relief wings is entirely female pilots anything, but that the air force might have been doing. They can now do cool. And this is a fishery the civilian arm of the air force. And so, by the end of the war, she has earned her Lieutenant Colonel ranking in the civil air patrol. Wow. That's awesome. Rhythmical struggled after the time of the air, races ended, the golden age of, of flying as it's known and certainly the peak of the air races from like nineteen twenty eight to nineteen thirty eight. A lot of female aviators in particular struggled with entrenched discrimination in sexism, as a -ccomplish inexperienced pilot as Ruth Nichols was she could not get hired at any airline at all times. Airlines is told her point blank, we can't hire you, you're a woman, and so she ends up taking work, you know, working in essentially PR office of a hospital in White Plains. She's the world record holder in everything, and no one will hire her. She can't even get a job as a flight instructor and she's miserable. She is utterly miserable. And based on her diaries, she is struggling with both physical and emotional pain, friend, and longtime rival Amelia Earhart, of course, is gone. She is in constant contact with another one of their friends and fellow flyers. From this time, it's Louise Staden, and Louise's, does what she can to help her friend, a one point rights, Ruth, Nichols, a letter, in an essentially says, in a paraphrasing here, remember how strong you are. Remember that you wanted to fly around the world where that is an armor against whatever you're fighting men. It's not enough in nineteen sixties family cannot reach Ruth Nichols at our apartment in New York City, and they find her dead in her apartment, she overdosed on, on the painkiller. She was taking time. It's a sad end, of course, to too great in promising life. It was heartbreaking for me to know how close Ruth came to achieving her dreams. She watched it all slip away. I think that's something that a lot of people understand in Ruth had it writ large. She was almost the first woman to fly solo across the ocean matching the implications of that were it not for bad luck. A poor landing. Would we know the name Amelia Earhart today? So Ruth Nichols was buried in with Lonzo Metairie in New York. That's also where Adelaide Herman is buried from one of our Powell's outs, and where basically everyone famous from New York in the twenties. Thirties is buried like many prominent cemeteries, they have a map with the famous people. Yeah. Just like in our of soda, Claudia Jones and you can go and see all the famous people's graves, many of these women were cremated seem to fit them. You know, they wanted to be cremated in scattered from plane in the sky, and so they are in the wind really. The Ruth was buried. It's a beautiful sprawling cemetery massive. So took a train up there on the morning. My book came out, and I win and I checked in at the office because you have to check in, when you go to the cemetery and explained that I was here to visit the grave of Ruth Nichols. Got out a map to help me. Find it. On this map that there are little icons for all the famous and important people that are buried there Ruth Nichols does not have an icon. She is not on the map and so using the map, Emma staffer also an app that I downloaded onto my phone. We triangulate where she was and off. I went walking about a mile through the through the cemetery and finally did find her great. With lawn. Cemetery is filled with massive mausoleums some of them were even styled at like Egyptian Crips and Ruth Nichols wasn't like that at all. It's just a simple tombstone. Like, like one day you are. I might be buried under. It has her name as the date of birth and her date of death. And then at the bottom sort of scared in the IV, there were three words it said beloved by all. And it and it just stopped me. Because she was beloved by all. All of these early female aviators were beloved by all. And. In. I do hope I do hope they will be again. Because they risked everything sacrificed so much. It's easy to, to think about all these things that Ruth Nichols came so close to achieving and to find your story heartbreaking. I don't think that's the takeaway. She was a brave bold woman who. Defied her family's expectations and defied the expectations of the time to live the life. She wanted. I think that's an inspiring story. I find it to be an inspiring story myself. Thanks to Keith O'Brien, as well as Teheran rotor, and to Cassandra McNeil, and hybrid audio for generously, allowing us to use clips from the fly girls audiobook, and thanks to our voice over actor. Matthew, michael. Thanks also to Pamela tola for sponsoring this episode on patriotic if you'd like to support more episodes of what's her name? Visit our website. What's your name podcasts dot com and click donate their rewards for donations as low as a dollar a month, and you can access all kinds of great prizes like our cross-stitch patterns are trading hearts and even get a thank you. If you drop. Thanks so much. All of our patrons. We truly couldn't do it without you. You can also follow us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook where we post lots of photos each week. If you'd like to learn more about Ruth Nichols amazing photos of pioneering women pilots in the early days of aviation, as well as links to Keith O'Brien's, wonderful book and audiobook, check out our website at what name podcasts dot com. Music for this episode was provided by Daniel Henderson is big band. Amanda, settling Wilson, the melody verse Jeremy did us Maria Jeffers and the students of the college conservatory of music at the university of Cincinnati Jeff Kuno and the new hot five our theme song was composed performed by Daniel foster Smith. What's her name is produced by Livia, Michael and Katie Nelson? And this episode was edited by Livia. Mickle.

Ruth Nichols Amelia Earhart Ruth Ruth rally Nichols Amelia New York Edith Nichols Eric Charles Lindbergh George Putnam Keith O'Brien Boston Bessie Coleman Amelia Katie Nelson Kito Brian Newfoundland Olympia Mickle instructor Katy Nelson New York City
Katie Jenkins - Home Schooled, Accountability, Languages - Dreamer Talks 009

Dreamer Talks

00:00 sec | 2 months ago

Katie Jenkins - Home Schooled, Accountability, Languages - Dreamer Talks 009

"Hello everyone. Welcome to another episode of Dreamer talks my name is abby. And I'm your host. It. Is My job on this podcast to introduce you to dreamers for many different fields and walks of life. It is important to note that we can learn many things from the people we surround ourselves with. This is why I have ventured out to interview dreamers who are willing to share their journey with us. If you guys tuned in last week, you may have noticed that I did not put an episode out apologies for that. What happened was I was moving to a new apartment and was pretty hectic. So last week's episode is now. Being, pushed to this week, which brings us to our guest today Katie. Jenkins Katie is a midwestern graphic designer turned Israeli special ops canine handler, an ex home schooler from Missouri. She is. Now on her way to learning nursing in Israel she's a of flying planes and riding motorcycles or bring the any method of going fast and the latest piece of knowledge that I only recently found out is she's a connoisseur of offer Gatos if you don't know what that is, look it up and try them anyways without further ado I. Give you guys Katie Jenkins enjoy. Hello everyone and welcome to another episode of Dreamer talks. Today I'm joined with Keady Jenkins guys. So Katie. Tell us a little bit about yourself. What you've done for the past couple of years in a brief. You know two minute thing I know it's like task to something two years in two minutes, right? Yeah. Two years two minutes. Where you're from what you've done kind of past couple of years share, and then we'll get into some questions about life. Yes. Let's do that. So I'm Katie Jenkins I'm from Missouri originally from Missouri I. moved to Israel about almost four years ago now. I made five years ago, but it didn't come until like four years ago I just got out of the army in January I served in the Canine Unit and. Am now working in security and working towards starting school nursing. In Missouri, I grew up with a very large family seven kids my parents. We were were you in the seven kids number five got Four assist no Four older. Two years links to count because when I do. I do I. DO hereby say to your brothers, two brothers and two older sisters and I with I think are still like that's off. And we were almost all of us home schooled. I myself was home schooled my whole education, which I really really enjoyed i. loved that experience I. Think it. It helps All of my siblings can develop a love for learning and a love for exploring deciding hey, this interests me this doesn't interest me I want to do this now I don't want to do this now. So. So that was that was us. We are big homeschool family in the middle of Missouri in the middle of the cornfields and line the cow pastures and whatever and Yeah, and then he moved to Israel for years ago. My parents are still in Missouri and the rest of my siblings are all around the world like not even all around America like all around the world. and. Yeah. We make all the also the next little while but at the moment, it's just me here. Wow that's really cool. Okay. So I didn't know any of this. No the home schooled. Love for learning really really interesting since I have a lot of interesting views on education system and how it I'm sure you. Yeah How was it to be totally just with siblings and friends I guess you wouldn't I guess that's a question. You get asked a lot for home school kids right? You have friends. Yeah. Yes. So We had a lot of friends. That's like the first answer is we had a lot of friends. We had friends from our neighborhood also, it's extremely extremely popular in Missouri to Home School. So we would do cops with other home schoolers. We would do plays with other home schoolers anything you would expect from your like your high school or you're a middle school experience you do class with other students. We also did like would have teacher coming into your science or we'd have another parent committee just I don't know. Something that they know from their life We classes together. and. Also, we have classes at home like it was a nice mix. That's the thing it wasn't just one style of education. but it also did mean that I was very close to my siblings I, am in the middle of four boys. So our daily schedule would look like, yeah, we did school and then we'd go out in the woods and. Back behind our house and we would like beat each other up with Wooden Swords Pretend Robin Hood Zorro whatever and just playing the woods like. Image we had a lot of time together. To be outside yeah. To just like the kid rank everyday catafalque weekend. was S awesome. Yeah. That's awesome. Yeah I think. That whole unstructured. We could definitely call it instructor. Yeah. unstructured organic. So we'll call her ganic or system. That feeling of everyday's a weekend since you're not waiting for the weekend exactly. Did you also study on weekends sometimes believed studied over the summer like it just meant that your daily schedule could be very, very relaxed because you're not like you're not rush to get everything done because you're doing it at a school year you learn twelve months out of the year and also if. You Go and you travel, we travel as a family at least once a month we have Virginia for a month and then and this month we'd go Texas for a week we go to California for a couple of days like because none of us had this really rigid schedule meant we could say, okay, we're going to do studying warring in other states or rent hold in Quebec. Yeah just meant like you had a lot of flexibility which means. Yeah very interesting. Take on education I think. If anything relates more to real life yeah. One episode I was talking with my friend Julia. And we were talking about how this this whole structure supposedly you know when you're when we're in high school or preparing for grades for SAT's and to get into university in university, you're paying university to get a good job good job and you're always and then suddenly you`re In real life and the good job, you need the resume the interview connections. And there's so much more as opposed to just that education and I feel like that. You know. Journey of self taught and kind of taking that vacation in between the middle of the year, not really scheduling it properly it was more on your parents are workweek style. Yeah. Yeah. That yeah. Tim Ferriss. Really talks about and you've had that. From a kid. Yeah. That's incredible. Wasn't even like a lifestyle choice McClellan life is realized Oh, this would be interesting sort of grow with it, which is have you ever had that conversation with your parents about it? Why they chose yeah I know exactly why they chose it. They had a weird experience with like my older sister's. High school principal. They didn't Lake I. Guess The method they were teaching and the the morals that they're also teaching in school and how they were. They felt like parents disconnected to the with their kids learning and not learning. And whether it was appropriate for them to know at all and so after one not so good incident that my mother had with a principal where he said something that my mother did not like she said, okay, I'm GonNa, take my girls home and finish their senior year in high school like at home, and then from that worked out so well that she decided to do the kids. Yeah, and I'm really what she did. That's awesome. Yeah. So it also meant to finish. Like a semester like a year early and go to medic scores and meant that you had time in the summer to. Just. Do courses that you wanted to learn could take extracurriculars all the time. It was worth it. And what are some because from the conversation we've had you've done a lot of different extracurriculars, medic scores. Flying Right. Tell, me a little bit about your. How you see something in the horizon and then you take that leap to although like where does that mentality come from what goes through your head? So I'll I'll tell you a secret. My mother actually molested me about this. So every year in December I, put together a bucket list and I don't do it because. If. I don't write it down. I won't do it like if I write it down I'll I'll do it but just kind of as a as a as a Catholic as a thing of ten things I wanna get done that year and it's fun to like check them often say like I did it. But? Mike Tasting. Different experiences is really important for life like, yes you want to find something or several things that you get really good at you spend ten years of your life not like four years of your life getting really get. I didn't but it's also a lot of fun just to say. Yeah I did this one time inexperienced it and and. My perspective of the world changes a little tiny bit like. y'All to fly and how you view. Awareness and how you view like handling machinery and how you view. US being on like everything changes a little bit right respective changes a little bit like if you learned how to. You learned woodworking you learn art you learned drama. Changes your perspective a little bit. So there's the motivation there because it's it's just fun to learn new to expand. Yeah exactly. But as far as like doing it and to say like to go on a recent something ended up at selfish kind of cool to be able to say like, yeah I want to do something and I. got it done. And it's more for yourself. You're not even allowed for the listeners. Don't post my way someplace I've gotta get all this stuff done and. It's kind of fun just to look back in your life and say like hand got to do that experience that yeah, that was a lot of fun. I would never do that. Again you know. Is there a bit of fear of you being in the future and looking back? I didn't. I didn't do enough. That's a good question also because like okay, I'm almost twenty five like in September we twenty years old and I didn't do college like most Americans kids do like at eighteen already signed up, they're already know. Doing the experience and I'm doing it you know seven years wait. Yes sometimes, and you say why my life is really different than other people maybe that's not a good thing like I didn't experience the same thing everyone else experienced. But then you have a conversation with somebody and they say Wadsworth you've got to do something different and then you like, okay you know it's it's okay like I'm glad I did a different track. But yeah, it is a little bit scary times because if you do something that everyone else does it's easy. Everyone else has a job everyone just goes to that job from nine to five. Everyone goes a school out of high school. You know what else is going everyone falls the same track, and so it's comfortable like the conversations always you know where's your next job or what are you doing now? With, with like an anticipated answer, you know what I'm talking about. When you say like I'm not following that same track I'm doing something else and it's GonNa be kind of weird and it's kind of scary because it's not not like I metaphor just came up to my head. Yeah. It's like a recipe for food. Yeah. Yeah. You're right. When you know the recipe, you know you'll get a good cake, but it's the how how did someone eventually get to that game they had. They had kind of explorer and crazy. Yeah. And add a little bit of sugar and Realis-. So I. Got It. Yeah. We can make this early deep metaphor. Yeah. There had to be some salt in it for. The a good taste. Put Salt. You have to have some bad experiences to it makes assault. It makes the cake taste year. There's anything to compare to. The negative positive. You have to compare yourself sugar. All right. That was way too. Far into that cake thing. Wow. Okay. Cool. So From. Your experience of. Talk more about the flying the we were talking about earlier in the car. Yeah I'm gonNA tell the first part of the story just 'cause it's like, yeah. Well, we talked about the car so. So I came to this country, I drafted into the army with. When I when I was in the states I didn't know Hebrew I knew the alphabet and a couple of words like Shabazz lawman. And shallow. Right. So. When you learn all your Hebron, the army that means that you're Hebrew at some some points in the service or not it's not good. Right. So like in busy training, my Hebrew was not amazing. And somebody had heard. Wow. You learn how to find the states we would love to interview with you. That would be so much fun and so I was like, yeah, lunar you. Would turn to be like a major news. Paper in Israel and so they didn't every with me in the middle of basic training with my really bad hero and I'm doing all the questions and he explained to them. Yeah. I learned how to fly in this program in the states called celebral. It's prepatory program that a lot of kids will use towards towards the Air Force and you're saying all this in humor saying all this in Hebrew like my really bad he were trying. To explain his grants ups whatever and she's all writing it down. This is all his is GonNa make a great story and then after I finished the interview, go off to a week of a field trading where you don't have your phone, you're not connected to the outside world whatever, and then I come back. You know at the end of the week, we get our phones and the same interviewer had sent me a link she'd read. What do you think of that of the interview? And I read it I'm like. Oh honey. This is this is not what I meant to say like I flew Cessnas in a program for high schoolers. You may sound like an F sixteen fighter pilot for Anti quarterback listen. So I wasn't an air force combat pilot learned how to fly on my own time through progressive liberal like you have to retrace his story. This is not like not she said, no, no no, it's okay it's okay like. It makes a good story and we'll leave it and I know you have to write something and say we have an update like it's not true story just like no no, it makes good news. So so now whenever go anywhere in Israel like oh you're the, you're the American fighter pilot I'm like. No but yeah, sure. That's how you know for. Sure. Anywhere. But. No. I did a part of the home schooling thing part of like in highschool at a lot of opportunity to learn the things was I had the chance to be in a program called civil. This is me plugging civil right now it's a great program sign your kids up. It'll be linked in the show. No, it'll be looked in the show notes. Yeah. I least go look up your local squadron. It's worth it. So I had a friend who introduced me to this program where you can go and you can learn to fly and you get introduced to like Air Force. Core. Principles and. Uniform and Like the general principle that she told me sold me was, hey, you could learn to fly an airplane was like I'm all for that. Yes. I would love to. So when I showed up I loved it and through that program I got involved in flying and I fell in love with flying hundred percent and that's how you're known as uh Yeah, exactly. I did get to twice. So I can say if I flew I, flew player myself like Cessna in twos and pepper warriors and the comanche like That was a lot of fun. and. I hope that if I go back to the states or someplace where flying maybe bit less expensive I would love to get back into it. Yeah. It's just that his Rosal let expensive for her pilots. Pilots out there I'm sure you're like like, yes, it's very expensive. A lot of money. Well. That's really cool But. Yeah. Because because your home's like because of the home experience, you have all this time to be like. Hey somebody comes up to you and says, I've got this opportunity. Would you like to try something out? You've got time to say yes. Which is I think right now we're still in the current crisis I feel like a lot of people are getting to that same. Thought that you just mentioned that you have all this time and you have to try new things. Yeah. How. Would you tell people that I guess we might be hard to explain it because you came from this mentality from when you were little. But people who were constantly in this system and are now suddenly given this time to explore new things. What would you try to tell them to? You know push them to do it while. Okay. So I, I saw something in extreme I think there was like a medium or someone says we have to stomaching foot of home school kids because now because of zoom everyone's a home school kit right. And I think that that that says something all your school at home or you're also getting to work from home now. Instead of watching Netflix. With absolutely that. But like you might be interested in signing up for a course or watching instructional videos or saying, hey, this be really cool to learn or this would be really cool to do like, Hey, I've always been interested in learning how to invest money in stocks like watch videos, gallon go and do it. I've always been interested in learning how to Cook 'cause I'm not a good cook which that's I'm I'm just speaking from personal experience I'm not really good cook and I'm getting better Thank you, Corona. Is Not a good cook some recipes I'll watch some instructional videos like principles of cooking, not just following recipe. But like what is a good chef? No, and then trying it out like how to make eggs better in the morning like what spices you can what you can do Your time when you're at home, don't just waste it on instagram enough licks. It's greet so like you know chill but also finds set some goals and see them through you know. Why I want to mention challenge like anyone who watches his podcast nozoe like anyone who listens to his podcast knows that? Has the the one hundred day what is it? So he's upset hundreds of sweat. Pick a goal pick a certain amount of time. Do you have to do it? How often you have to do it once a day once a week and then do it like why? Why not you know you get a lot done. and. Mean to that point specifically, you ask me what I'm GonNa do with a yeah on the Hundredth Day and ninety seven. Yes. Maybe by the time I post this, it'll already. Yeah. But what I plan on doing and it's probably done by now. You're listening is. To do some sort of accountability. Because me posting on instagram. There were two days where I was like damn. I really don't want I. Don't WanNa do work out. A Long Week Long Day like I worked out yesterday like these are the things that go through your mind right and you just tell yourself no I gotta do it because it's for the challenge and sometimes I would just literally do. Fifty push-ups and you know five minutes of ABS and that would be like my chiller day because compared to the other days what I was doing it was it was nothing in like you run a five K. Five K. insanity like I'd be dripping most days every I mean we're we're going to go work out after this and we're probably going to be dripping sweat day ninety, seven, ninety, seven. Yes. So it's the that goal that is set and the accountability for me is for sure there was an accountability for me that I want to accomplish this one hundred days. But I also put something external right putting it online for all my friends to route me on or even tell me like dude, you didn't post like the there's happened. No, it hasn't because I've been keeping it up right. But there's that thought in the back of my mind of if I don someone's because I, don't ever like two hundred fifty or whatever seeing daily and silently they don't see it maybe for two three days if I you know if if something that I suddenly stopped for like a week say then it would be noticeable. Because it's I'm not expecting everyone's always looking at my store. You can probably skip it or whatnot, but some of us are infamous would tell him you know, yeah, we call it out with your dead. That's exactly what I. That's my point that there's the accountability. So. I'm holding myself accountable, but I'm also somehow. subconsciously getting other people to be countable like holding me accountable. Yeah Right. And so what I plan on doing the hundred day is set up this challenge. Hopefully by the time this episode for the puck up like I said, it should already be running to do some sort of challenge for people to hold each other accountable for goals whether it be workouts or learning a new skill anything. Really. It's it's important for. Your goals in your life when you have this. Zone this vision way to think of the word, and then sometimes languages are are weird in your mind. Yeah when you have this vision of where you WanNa be it's very important to be quiet about it. But to a certain extent because there's always people that WanNa root you on and help you. and. That's the kind of Friendships. Need right now especially in corona. When we're all suddenly not being social and not hanging out all the time I'm big groups and seeing long lost friends we in our daily every now in corona, we had our routine and we had to coordinate this for two weeks in advance right right and in normal life, you could have events and we'd run into each other and we may be hang out more right and I think it's important to have these connections with. Lost Friends or people that you just want to keep in touch with. So yeah, that's actually a really good point like you could. You could use an as an opportunity to say. To somebody you haven't talked to her on time high. No, we haven't talked for a long time. Do you. WanNa be my Partner. And suddenly, you're not just talking about like what have you been doing nothing? It's corona. Do Together, and you're actually like product without even being together exactly phenomenal idea. Yeah, and IT'S You guys would like to be my accountability partner will think of an activity and we'll do together and you can find with the links below. Yeah. I'M GONNA point downwards like he can find a below. Or above depending on. On. Yet, so It's a matter of. Being a good friend is holding your friends accountable for the stuff that they WANNA do. Yeah and it's also once it doesn't happen I. Love You know this but I had done one hundred as sweat. Before this wet yeah. No. Yes and it was not successful or did he did you get to I got like forty something? That's Good. Yeah and. Then what happened? Is I started doing it in the summer right after I finished my army service. And I didn't really have a plan of was traveling. What was I going to do and ended up? Starting, started traveling I went to Turkey then Portugal than Mexico. Yeah I did a sideline nice a nice trip and the first place I went to Turkey and I was like Oh damn it. I have to post one hundred and it was already really late that day and we had been walking throughout that city for the whole day. So I was like I'll just I'll just write it down as I walk the whole like we were sweating at the end of the day so. UNAFRAID DOWN I did it. The next day I fully forgot because you're so embedded within traveling traveling's a whole different mindset and I didn't put that block of time to even work out for ten minutes and it's now you know in hindsight talking about it sounds ridiculous because ten literally you could do a could do a workout where you're dripping sweat in ten minutes if not even less. Yeah. Yeah. Easy. And I didn't I didn't set that up it takes dedication to. Block that time you also WANNA shower after to able to be. Not, just ten minutes totally get it But Yeah I, got into different mood and I kind of accepted. I was like you know what? All right I'm just GONNA stop I instead of kind of lying to myself go. This is okay hundred. Look whatever I started it and there needs to be some allowing yourself to shift. So then what did you do different between the first and second times like what what helped you succeed? There isn't a big change in my corona. I guess the the there was a huge Okay. So having that time and the continuity of. I wanted to really hold myself more accountable and even if I did start like I went I did go during this current crisis to a lot to dive with my brother. And I was about to tell me br I I told my brother Oh dove today. I'll write that down as one hundred as it's like almost that. I can't do that. I did like, I, in the back of my mind I thought no, I did this in Turkey that time. So then you did this lingo go I worked out in the parking lot of we literally slept on the beach. Yeah, I'm giving him a corona safe I. Give him a fist bump instead. So I yeah. I. WORKED OUT IN THE PARKING LOT and I've kept it going even if it's like I said just Push ups, and so it sounds like the first thing he did was you didn't compromise like the first part of Mesnier goals is saying. This is what it looks like to succeed usual step of the way like if every day it's to do a workout. I'm not going to compromise I'm not gonNA mark as something that it's not like if my goal is I want to do one hundred of Arabic. Every day is to do a certain thing and I'm not GonNa say I took a taxi with the Arabic speaking guy and we had like a two second interaction said Selah Monahan it's important to it's important to put Actual attainable. That, you can what each step checklist. Yeah, and you don't compromise your bucket list that you mentioned the exactly the bucket list the checklist I think in order to get success you have to have a yeah. Did did you also maybe like the second time around did you may be set off things that were like this council workout? Like why run or do insanity or I do at least fifty push-ups like you've had in your mind, a list of things that counted as a workout, right? So all juice do pitch of were actual hundred as sweat comes from This awesome channel Yes theory only get below also for anyone wants to check them out. What they had mentioned was starting this for for their followers and I follow them. we're starting this. Challenge and sweat can be whatever you define it. Okay and he then said for me, a sweat will be when a drop of hits the ground when I'm working out. And very clear. It's clear like you're dripping sweat. And a drop of sweat. Yeah. For for me it was okay. A drop of sweat or when you're clearly out of breath like. Working out your heart beats up and you know it wasn't just going up the stairs in an. Story building he'd be like, if I took my pulse and it's above. Right, I didn't actually set a specific thing because I actually went overboard than what it would have been like I have to get to my pulse to one thirty or whenever if that would've been it every hundred. Day It's been. You know I don't even want to check my i. I could So. Yeah. But it's definitely like with other goals with forget one hundred as white. If anything I think it's important to set those attainable mini goals you know Horse if you has check out the episode he mentioned you have. guppy goals and you have a I, forget what animals he said, but he basically described small animal bigger animal and bigger than Elvis goal and blue whale goals. And in order to get to the Blue L. goals you have to start with. which is I think. Wow. So whoever knows the application dueling lingo for learning a language? They are really good at doing that because they build a habit and they do that by having doubles every day you tell yourself, I wanted to five to thirty minutes and you can't do less and check it off like if you wanna be able to say I've checked off my day than you do a certain amount of language learning and then you have streaks snapchat right? So if if I wanted two hundred days of it. I have to do every day in order for to count towards one hundred days like. News the streak exactly yeah. Like it's the same principles that you use. For anyhow habit you want to build. So it's a matter of building that. APP You know in air quotes if anyone's on audio. For your. Life Yeah transferring that mentality of. I'M GONNA lose my streak I'M GONNA lose my Motivation. Forget streak streak is like he it sounds to You. Know Bragging Rights Kinda thing. I think it's more of a personal thing. And Holding yourself accountable and being truthful with. The goals that you really WanNa do. And Like, I mentioned before the first hundred days sweat I had this goal hundred days and the beginning. That was my goal, and then I reached a certain realization that. Life is taking shift And you can modify your goals and it's totally okay in life to modify goals and to modify. The direction that you're going to forgive yourself to exactly forgive like there is a couple of days where I was like damn it like I stop posting in whatever. But then I just enjoyed the trip and I had that mindset like now I'm traveling and I'm GonNa make the best traveling like forget this. Forget. But like kind of I forgive that. Failure or that that dropped that I did yeah, which is not always the best way to think about it. 'cause you streak. You don't have a streak anymore. Yeah. You can forgive yourself a day here and there it's yeah. If you're if you're blue, we'll goal we'll take the example of vanities. If you're blue wheel goes to say listen I want to. Study Medicine One day and I WANNA do emergency medicine. So I want my blue. We'll go to be I want to be healthy enough and strong enough to help other people, and then you break down your say that means every couple of years I wanted to look like this I want I, want to do these workouts because I want to be stronger like. Then, you can forgive yourself for a day because the the point of it is bigger than that. Motivation which means. It's also a reason to forgive yourself in. It's also reason to do it in the first place, right? Yeah. I like to your guppy too big. Well yeah that was close. Thanks close. Yeah Let's do a little shift here. Okay. What have been? Some Challenges and. shifts in goals that have defined. Your. Path. Define my path. So I really WanNa, really like the questions, related question, and of course. The challenges starting good question. So when I was in high school, I was a graphic designer. From the age of about sixteen and I was. Actually done in itself was kind of a challenge I my first clients as a sixteen year old was just a friend of a friend who their daughter was going to be an Olympic athlete and she needed business cards and I'd never done any designing before that I had like sketch some stuff in a little bit of art here and there nothing to insane. And I said Yeah. I'll make use a business cards for this athlete on some cards and she said I really liked them. I really liked to using them. You might think about doing this more people are former people and so. I just picked him into the client here. Another client and they don't have products like handed done I need a logo and never done a local before. But y'all figured out sure or the time someone said I need you to do a website and I knew nothing about coding. I, knew nothing about wordpress. Websites I, said you need to website. Sure. Let's make you website and I immediately turn to my dad said, help me do this I don't know what I just said. Yes. Do that will make it work right? Like yeah. That's that's the part of just picking up on the way. You say, yes to a challenge the new figured out afterwards right. So I was in I was on this track for about the next six years on learning and doing design graphic design was my life I loved it and. And my plan was to keep doing design after the army because I really enjoyed it, and after I got response back from design school and they said that I wasn't accepted. Oh, by the way like I, apply for design school couple months ago didn't get in. And that's okay like it's a challenge we just shifted. You just say, all right. This one didn't work. We'll find a different direction and when I was in high school, another thing that attempts to do was was empty school. So I'd already had an interest in medicine on specially emergency medicine and I thought you know what I'd really like to go towards is like emerge trauma nursing. And so instead of sitting there and saying, why don't they get in what happened trek around you say okay. So there was the next thing was the next up. So that's of the shifts. Out Challenges. Like you know, this is plenty of challenges in the past three years. Four years, let's say like moving to different country lending a different language being in the army eating army food eating tuna like there's so many challenges to pick from year TUNA CHEF anonymous tuna? Chess. Toast Chef toast. while. Join a pick like a challenge talk about. That if you're open to it. Yeah. So So I'll pick a challenge that I think a lot of people like, yeah. Especially, lone soldiers can can relate to is the whole Hebrew thing especially for those that came to this country and didn't grow up in a Jewish environment. I at all did not grow up in a Jewish environment maybe a little bit. So I didn't come with any Hebrew knowledge beforehand I got to this country. I had five months before my draft and I did open, which is like Hebrew language studies while working in a hotel. And so it was from the very base level of Hebrew five months of studying five. Trying to think of how many hours a day was. Maybe yes. Five hours a day in the morning and then going to work in Aleka Hebrew environment just picking up on the way, and then you draft during the army under the three months of our. Army language learning. Reason to level up a little bit more. But still like you're suddenly in an army environment in a language that you don't understand and you're being yelled to do things that you don't know what they want you to do but you'll just try to find a way to do it and then you end up in basic training for combat. And yet you understand mostly he wrote you don't really know what's going on. You have to just watch people figured out not everyone has done a patients for you. Some people do don't. And now when it just got Outta, my army service, I ended up as an instructor teaching in a foreign language in language that I had learned in three. into an fears about three years? And thinking back. That's a really cool thing like. It wasn't a goal that unnecessary necessarily set for myself. This is my blue L. Goal is able to speak Hebrew said I can teach, but it kind of his on where each guppy stuff was every day. You you bit more every day. You ask someone from vocabulary words every day you write an essay every day you. You. Raise your hand. You ask what does that word mean and the big idea? Was You get good enough that you can teach a foreign language So that was one of those challenges that turned out to be. Like from a challenge just something I, think gorgeous like to be able to say. I didn't speak a word and it was so so bad like also like a really bad accident everything to being. Yeah. Successfully, Talk. Language. Still really bad accent but like. Me Something meet something. Really Cool. Your thoughts across and yeah, confident. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. No, that's also one of the things that this challenge. kind of give you in return. Was I think anyone who learned how to speak Hebrew while in the army? Or in a foreign language in a foreign country, it gives you a lot of confidence, right? Yeah. I mean I can tell you. Language learning and I guess could be applied to any skill is patients. Practice in the ability to fail and just be like you know it's okay. I sounded like an idiot and is okay and you can even go back to your first language of how you originally learn it. Your baby that doesn't know anything and from. Body language and motions and your parents you know grabbing your hand and saying hand eventually understand that it's a hand. Yeah and eventually you understand the table when a microphone and all these things. It's the same thing with adults and I think when? Adults. Say. Oh Yeah it's harder for to learn a language. Kids can pick it up a lot easier. I think it's because kids that insecurity of failure. And constantly, I mean kids are always failing and then getting yelled at and it's something that you're used to as a kid. So when you're an adult and you make mistakes, there's so much more. Insecure and worried about being embarrassed like what's being barest honest. Honestly, Lake people would say, how do you not get so embarrassed speaking a second language and not saying words it that aren't right like. CARE is making full use of and lavishes love like that's fun. You're living ones is okay. You can. You can fall down and pick yourself up and do it one hundred times like that. It's okay. Now I think I mean for me Hebrew was the third third language. Oh right. Right. Spanish. Yes. Spanish. My first language, but it's also funny because in Spanish also forgot a lot or not forgot I speak at home with my family. But to the limited vocabulary of my family got I don't know how to wail in Spanish. The first language to yeah, my parents and my siblings, we all speak Spanish at home but it's mainly speaking I won't sit down and read a book in Spanish. Also I'm not a big reader I mostly do audio books. Yeah. Okay. That's cool. Yeah So. I mean I'm honestly there's the big whale goals to learn five or even six languages as a whole. Yeah and It's just taking those steps to understanding that you're GONNA fail. So many times and you're gonNA say a word that can sound with slight modification be swear word your legs do. Something else and you're trying to say that something else but you ended up telling your teacher that she's. Donkey. Did you actually this this this? This happened to somebody else somebody else. Someone. Else Story. How Mola which is the teacher Hummel la, which is a female donkey. You don't WanNa call you too. Buddy, can you can see how that can happen? But it's totally fine because you'll have that moment of. that. Moment of that mistake you. Embarrassed I'm so sorry or you. Have a really funny story afterwards to afterwards. Yeah. It's. It's a really funny story by. In retrospect when when you're that person yourself and you're the one that just called again the you understand suddenly like what you've done. It can be very embarrassing and it can be very daunting and I think. Going back to big. You know. Failures or our problems in life. What. Kind of technique do you have in your in your thought process to pick yourself up from those realizations of failure or realizations? So good question Shit I fucked up like so what what do I tell myself when I failed what's the first thing that goes through my First thing goes to my mind is at least I didn't die. no-one died right? If no one died it's okay. Can Be fixed right worst. That can happen is someone else's feelings hurt and that. If someone else's feelings get hurt. Then of course you've got grasping, you need to work with right But then we're also adults. You know we can. We can talk like the first thing that you. That I think of when I fail. Is Okay what do we need to do now to make this better? Not Not fix it not to where it used to be but take the situation and turn it into something better like. UPS accidentally called my teacher female donkey. How do we make this better? You're not going to get like you've already said it happened. So now it's GonNa be a funny story. Now you say, whoops I'm sorry hunts speak the language it happened right like. If. You fail the. First thing you do is apologize, and then you think of like okay well now. Trying to think of times that I've accidentally said things that really should not have set in Hebrew on I'm pretty sure there was plenty of them. There was this one time. Okay. One of the girls at seven. That's okay. So it's not really. Part. So we would have banana. So like I'll just illustrating Funny. So In my seven, there's and another girl that liquor lone soldiers and so. Every time they're like they're saying worthy to understand. You're like, what does that word mean and one of the girls something Blah Blah Blah but Nana and so I was like. Muslim banana and all the girls were like, why don't they looked at her like? Banana. New. Banana. muzzy banana. All banana like it was anyway number typicals like Oh banana. Because of the accident. Yeah. Yeah. She didn't under the word accent. No that. Was it. I don't think I've ever said anything that was like actually fencing Boo Goo. Google happens to Israelis. Order a Burger obviously. And it's a burger right. So I mean language. Can I mean Look with with language the mistake usually ends up being a funny story. Yeah Do. You have any anecdotes that you'd be comfortable sharing where you pick yourself up from after a failure. That might not be language something else that you you. You did that quick switch of. Know with that language metaphor that we can go on saying sorry and moving forward How did you sometimes that I fail has picked myself up. Like there was. Say What do you think about it? Let me think about a mass shooting at a guy 'cause the others plenty of time. Yeah Yeah. It's a big question. Let me think of my it happens pretty often issues usually like somebody's name to combine different aiming to like upsets you know. Your name. Men. Phillies you just pick up from. Why do you have? something. Really embarrassing. Embarrassed well, wait maybe do yet like it's just an embarrassing stories I'm fairly that it up from. There was. So I was trading like powerlifting. With a trainer Shawn Tonight today and. I was working a Lotta squats and I was on a train from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem one time and I was just riding the escalator, my name and business listen to music on my on my earphones or whatever, and the guy behind me I'm writing the leader and underneath us as you know. Half of Jerusalem a bunch of very religious people and I'm writing up close to the top and somebody taps on the shoulder. Now, turn around look at her and she's like excuse me Ma'am the back your pants is all the way torn open and I looked down and I had this like this cold sweat I looked down like from the top of my jeans to the very like underneath the backpack and it's just ripped open. Oh guys. Anyway, I was wearing a scarf. So just hasn't been around me but underneath his. Know. Religious Jerusalem is that just look a little bit up and they can see me reading up the US good at like that. Anyway. I've no idea what had happened but I texted the trainer. So the squats have been working. My pants are no longer working anywhere. Oh Wow, that is wild declawed. Embarrassing Anywhere SCARF. Yes. Thank goodness. It's actually yeah. Anyway. Wow Four. Have abandoned for certain scenario. Right. Okay. Let's go back to your graphic design or you can apply any other time in your life. When someone asks you for favor or a graphic design job for whatever timing your life? And it's something that you don't want to do or can't do or. You want to move you decide. How do you say no to people? How do I? Say No to people if this that I don't want to do or don't think I should do Oregon both. Yeah. Both The questions more coming from for for. The saying no is. Important you know you have to understand what your abilities are and all that. So what are your exactly? So that's really the question because I'll saying, no is not something very easy for me to do and I think I'm getting better at it. I'm not perfect data, but I'm getting better at saying listen this is mine. This is my line for whatever reason like I I just don't want to do this. I don't have the time for it or I don't think that's necessary for me to do right now and the first step is understanding. Why would you say no like when somebody says, would you do this for me? Or even understand why would you? Why would you know what does it? What does it benefit you? What does it benefit them? What are the risks? So my I think. If someone asked me to do something and I want to say no. Yes. It's why would I say yes or no? And and then if it's I wanna see you know it's y WanNa say us or no, and then what are the risks and benefits and weighing them I think it's very, it's a it's an important schooling. No, it's very hard and also say, no and then. Give a reason or not give reason to know when you need to when you don't need to. No I think. For me it's always been a challenge to say, no, I'm a very by nature I'm a very giving person and you want to see us. For. A favor for a friend or whatever. So yeah, it's just I figured there might be other listeners or viewers that are that are also struggling. And how to say no. When to say? No. Yeah Food for thought. All right. Do. You have anything currently than you are reading listening to or Inspired by you would recommend to me to listeners so I just finished a book by. Dick Feinman about physics I understood Abou-. Zero Point Zero, six percent of it, but it was a really interesting book because. He's he's a physics professor. That was able to take a lot of the very you know. Very difficult physics principles to explain explain them in a way that a layman can understand. I, read a book by Him and another book it's called. Cold me think. It's called. It's called. It's called like he's got under different that I'm thinking is all Lincoln below and you can you can check it out for sure a link share episode. that was the last book. I. Read and then I just picked up another book today call the compound effect about Compounding investing making something worth more later on Yeah. Aright I'm also reading the Flower Farwell Chef, our shower chef when I mentioned like. Cooking it's a long book. It's it's like five hundred pages that but it's one of the things I'm reading through to try to get better at that. Did you already read for our work I did a long time ago I upstairs you relate. Veteran. It's it's a good book is a good writer. But that's one of the books reading just because if you say I've got this in my life I'm not really good at this and that, and you have a reason to get better at it like my reason to be better cooking because I like to eat. And I like to eat through the taste guide. So if you have a weakness is to say, okay then how do we fix it? What's the next step? For me that's reading a book and watching videos on a good better than cooking better. It's funding a problem in your life like first off it's saying, I've got a problem and then doing fix it. And that's. Things I'm doing. So for our chef foreign, we're really linking Tim Ferriss today. Yeah. We're GONNA Hashtag Tim Ferriss. Yeah. Well, honestly us one of the inspirations for me to start this podcast listen to this podcast, a lot and a lot of different podcasts that was in two and that was the inspiration that I. WanNa. I know a lot of people that can. Share their knowledge in their thoughts about their life. So, why not do it myself and I'm also having awesome conversation is in the process. So really good coffee. Yeah Yeah. Yeah. Okay cool. So Katie is there anything else that you would like to add to the listeners? And I'll ask that first and then I'll get to I would just like to add that I think now is a phenomenal opportunity to list all the things that you'd like to get better in either because you're not good at them or just because they interested you at some point and take the opportunity now because of corona to just really go after it and don't do by yourself like you're saying, find a person to do it with. There's no reason why not? Like we're all in this together we're all sitting at home by ourselves together. Get an accountability partner start learning something new start getting better at something that you were not very good. There's no reason why not to take hundred days. Finds something you want to get better at and then do it? Won't miss. This episode is going to go up and the this challenges either already live or he's going to it's going to happen and it'll just keep on happening. Hopefully it spreads. Where we have accountability partners. Or definitely going to be county partners for about like what project we're. GonNa do yeah. What's what's something that we want to get together and I have never served in this country? Are you GonNa? Go Surfing Okay we could. What's the next you said you wanted to five or six languages. What's the next one you want to era BEC- Chinese done Arabic? Yes. We're not. We're going to run a five K. Chinese. Okay, me how Abbey? So I know so far what was that? Hello, my name is. Okay I hope that. My friends who know Chinese are definitely be like that was not the right pronunciation you just swore at us. We just call this a female donkey yeah. Well. Sorry. Failed. He's. He's apologizing is picking himself up and he's going to do but for languages. For anyone ever struggles with the language. Know that if anyone ever makes fun of you. For your accent. You can laugh back at them because you know one more language at least one more language than they do so. You they laugh at you. You can just laugh right back because just way you're the one making progress. Exactly. Cool. And UH. Last thing how can people reach you for either design or find out what you're doing? So you can find me on Instagram, Katie Jenkins Dot Co, which ensure the link will also be below. Tag instagram or you can also find my website, which is Katie Jenkins Dot Co.. Which is K. A. T. I. E. J. E. N. Kansas dot co I just felt like I was saying a phone number for a second there. Anyway if you have designed quantum's and. Terms and conditions. You can find me Katie. Jenkins DOT Co. Awesome. Okay. Cool. Well, it's been a real pleasure to I had a lot of fun. I was really looking forward to this for the past two weeks or hour-long recipe to talk about this. I was like I. was really looking for is the whole time and I had fun talking Guus Yeah this is it's really been since I put this. This is one of one of the challenges that I put to do weekly episodes. It's been very very fulfilling to either catch up with old friends. And then just have awesome conversation. So for all the listeners who have gone to this point. Thank you for listening. Let me know what you've thought of this episode, and if you heard other episodes, please leave comments and share with your friends. And let me know what you WANNA. Hear about because honestly the viewers and. Only, doing this for other people to get to know my friends and the great knowledge that they have but also for me to connect with other people. So I've really enjoyed and will now be accountability partners for surfing and Arabic so done the yeah. Wow. Okay. This is going to be exciting I. Guess He's out out. All right everyone. Thank you so much for listening to this episode with Katie Jenkins If. You'd like to take part in the challenge that we propose during this episode. Just set a challenge, decide for yourself and find a friend to hold each other accountable for it. It's simple way to improve your skills or just learn something new I strongly recommend it because if you have friends that support you and you support friends, it's a lot easier to get things done. So anyway leave a comment if you started challenge or simply the episode, really really appreciate it and share with your friends. It's been a real pleasure and hope to see you next week. Thank you for watching and keep on dreaming.

army Katie Jenkins Corona Israel Missouri Tim Ferriss instructor Partner partner Home School Turkey Jenkins Katie Keady Jenkins Virginia abby Julia principal America Air Force Cessna
NPR News: 07-23-2019 10AM ET

NPR News Now

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

NPR News: 07-23-2019 10AM ET

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from frame bridge they make custom framing easy and affordable frame your art in photos at frame bridge dot com or visit their new stores located on Fourteenth Street and Bethesda row. Get fifteen percent off your first frame bridge order with Code N._P._R.. Live from N._p._R.. News in Washington I'm Korva Coleman. The United Kingdom's ruling Conservative Party has picked its new leader Boris Johnson. He's not going to become the country's next prime minister. N._p._R.'s Joanna Kakissis reports from London Boris Johnson is replacing. Theresa May who is resigning may lost favor as she struggled to deliver brexit Johnson has promised to remove the U._K.. From the European Union by October thirty first do or die. Brexit is daunting it destroyed to resume and has divided the Conservative Party. Johnson used the challenge to rally his party lately don't to me and I think that we know that we can do it and the people of this country a trusting in us to do it and we know that we will do it. Johnson has a tough road ahead especially as he negotiates with European Union leaders whom he has long vilified Joanna Kakissis N._p._R.. News London former special counsel Robert Muller will testify before Congress tomorrow. N._P._R.'s Giles signed a reports. The Justice Department has prepared guidelines for him. Robert Mueller requested the Justice Department weigh in as he prepares for his back to back appearances before the house. Else Intelligence and judiciary committees in a letter justice official tells Miller that he should remain within the boundaries of what was publicly released in his report on Russian election interference and that he should stay away from anything covered by executive privilege or wohlers already said the report is his testimony N._p._R.'s Giles Snyder India is disputing a claim made by president trump at the White House yesterday trump said India's prime minister had asked him to be a mediator over the disputed territory of Kashmir. N._p._R.'s N._P._R.'s Laura Freyer reports from Mumbai at a White House meeting with Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan President Trump said he would love to be a mediator between India and Pakistan on the issue of Kashmir. A Himalayan territory split between the two countries trump. said that Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi had asked him to be such a mediator when they met a few weeks ago but India's foreign minister super ammonia Njai Shankar told parliament more shots regressed as we made by the the Indian government also said any talks with Pakistan must be bilateral as in without a mediator and that they can only happen if cross-border terrorism stops Lauren Fryer N._p._R.. News Mumbai the Associated Press reports that a judge in Puerto Rico has issued search search warrants for the phones of government officials. This is linked to a growing government scandal that has triggered days of protests on the island published texts from Governor Ricardo Rossello and his inner circle have shown demeaning messages about women and others including. Outing Hurricane Survivors demonstrators want Roy CEO to resign. He's refused saying he woN'T RUN FOR RE election next year on Wall Street the Dow Jones Industrial Average is up eighty seven points at twenty seven thousand two hundred fifty eight. The Nasdaq is up fourteen. This is N._p._R.. The trump administration says it is giving more power to the Homeland Security Department to speed up the removal of people who are illegally in the U._S.. This will apply to immigrants who cannot prove they have continuously been in the U._S.. For two years or longer this means they won't be eligible for due process protections including a right to a lawyer and hearing the Russian Defense Ministry is denying accusations that its warplanes violated south. South Korean airspace and says South Korean pilots created a dangerous situation as N._P._R.'s Lucian Kim reports from Moscow South Korean officials say there were incursions by a command and control plane and two strategic bombers Russian TV carried a statement the Defense Ministry to US Ministry confirmed to ninety five bombers were in the area but made no mention of fifty command and control plane at which South Korea fired warning shots the ministry said the bombers were flying over neutral waters and at South Korean fighters made no attempt to communicate with the Russian pilots and conducted unprofessional maneuvers later the ministry said the two Russian bombers were holding the first joint long distance air patrol together with two Chinese bombers.

Boris Johnson N._P._R. prime minister Giles Snyder India Conservative Party Imran Khan President Trump Russian Defense Ministry Joanna Kakissis Prime Minister Narendra Modi European Union Mumbai London Justice Department Giles Pakistan Homeland Security Department US Ministry Robert Mueller South Korea Governor Ricardo Rossello
CNN10 - 1/9/20

CNN 10 (video)

00:00 sec | 10 months ago

CNN10 - 1/9/20

"In a heated standoff between the United States in Iran starting to walk. That's the first topic we're talking about today on CNN. Ten and I'm Carla Zeus. Always glad to have you watching throughout this week. We've been following the back and forth tax between America and Iran that have been taking place in Iraq which is Iran's John's western neighbour on Wednesday Iran launched more than twelve missiles at two different military bases in Iraq where American troops were staying. The attack came within the days of a US. Air Strike. That killed a top Iranian general in Iraq shortly after the Iranian missiles were launched. US President Donald Trump said all is well and and he made a statement about the attacks late Wednesday morning. We suffered no casualties. All of our soldiers are safe and only minimal damage was sustained at our military basis. Great American forces are prepared for anything. Iran ran appears to be standing down. which is a good thing for all parties concerned at a very good thing for the world? The American leader also who says he's asked. US allies to get more involved in the Middle East and that the US would further punish Iran's economy through economic sanctions but he also suggested that Tehran quits trying to build nuclear weapons and supporting terrorism. The US wanted it to have a prosperous future. In harmony with other countries Iranian officials was also spoke out on Wednesday supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said the. US was given a slap in the face and president. Hassan Ruhani said quote. If America commits a crime. She must know that we will act decisively as we have already shown but as far as Iran's missile attack goes some officials from the trump administration rations say Iran intentionally avoided hitting areas. Where American troops were concentrated? Suggesting you're on might have wanted to send a message but not actually trigger a US military response so it's possible that both sides here are looking for ways to calm things. Down all of this coincided with a roller coaster ride for global. We'll prices in the hours after the Iranian missile attack. They jumped up to more than sixty five dollars per barrel. After president trump's remarks they dropped back down down to below sixty dollars. It shows you. How events in an oil rich region can directly impact oil markets and with some investors breathing a sigh of relief over news concerning Iran? There was also some relief in another part of the world over news. Concerning wildfires. Australia's eastern coast has gotten some badly needed rain. A big help to firefighters but more hot dry weather could be ahead following yesterday's view from the C.. Today's report gives you one from the air a break in the weather visibility at nine hundred meters this bill. long-range helicopter was finally given clearance to fly referred about coastal on board in the air attacks. Supervisor for the New South Wales Rural Fund Service. They've got very little detail on exactly what doing so. They tried to just get some always gone since the board of fun. That cross from Victoria into New South Wales world three pots the for south coast over the weekend. Decimating townships firefighters have been unable to get an aerial view of the monster. They're battling link until now with a front stretching more than sixty kilometers wide. It's burned all the way to the sea engulfing one of Aden's largest largest employers the woodchip mill but as the smoke billowed and we'll continue to for weeks possibly months. This enormous would Paul nearby lies is untouched as does the jetty. The priority for firefighters isn't the massive blaze burning out of control but rather the small the fires that have jumped containment lines posing new threats to horns and townships it'd be sputtering stuff mediators of the fall of it says Donald Trump back. Divide the again able either. The top of the township visibility is better in in book up different go hit a place. Launch will cost me time to route. Five has been able to take this guy. You're on being bombed up doc. Twelve to assess the extent of the damage by Spain to be rounding EH crops. The days will those motive ebbing Akron. Heaven just bane activated allowing them to keep those files but as much as possible people condition cure. Brace on Friday two blackhawks soon pugh is an and pilot. Kennedy directed them to nearby. Dan's to fill up the three thousand two buckets with water and extinguish identify hotspots. To me but it was Georgia. Peach the Ericsson Sky Crane that made the biggest impact sucking up nine thousand eight hundred liters of seawater at a time. She got to work. Dousing the flames uh-huh what organizations official mission is to provide the safest most efficient aerospace system in the world space x FAA ICAO or civil air patrol. This is the mission statement of the Federal Aviation Administration part of the US Department of Transportation the FAA sets rules for pilots planes and drones. And while we're not sure if any any laws are being broken in Colorado and Nebraska where multiple drones have been seen flying at night a report in the Colorado Springs Gazette suggests they could be part of a secret secret. US Air Force program that uses and monitors drones still the aircraft have some residents on edge in Colorado and Nebraska. That is so creepy a mystery in the night sky would some say are drones. Lots of them but no one seems to know from where or why that little right right there. Jennifer Rawlins was visiting family in Yuma County the day after Christmas when she spotted the flying objects capturing this one on camera says hovering there. It's a mystery history and you want answers. Yeah and I think everybody out there does too. It's really unnerving to be out there by yourself in the you see these flashing lights near your home. You WanNa you know what it is. And why. It's out there the enigma puzzling Colorado and Nebraska law enforcement in more than a dozen counties witnesses say the drones typically appear after sunset onset as many as thirty flying information two hundred to three hundred feet above ground some with wings Benz estimated at six feet one sheriff pinpointing the area where a rancher spotted some New Year's Eve the observed anywhere from five to ten drones over twenty five Mile Square radius. Although they don't don't believe the flying objects to be malicious officials want answers. Colorado Senator Cory Gardner tweeting that he's closely monitoring the situation of Federal Aviation Administration spokesman telling CNN multiple FAA divisions and government agencies are investigating these reports. It's not clear if the flights are breaking any laws ause but they've drawn attention just as the FAA proposed sweeping new regulations requiring most drones to be identifiable legal or not CNN. Aviation expert. David Souci says they could pose a threat. People think oh it's just a drone it's a small drone it's no danger to aircraft but it is in fact a danger to aircraft there. We're still are made of metal and they can go through their craft and caused damage. Even engine ingestion cousin engine failure. Some theories suggest drones could be flown by private companies conducting getting land surveys or part of show like this one someone tinkering with new Christmas gifts. Not Likely Formation Drone and flying and fleets is is not something for the amateur in fact Souci says they might not be drones at all rather communications satellites. Who would also explain why it's been seen in so many different counties because at that altitude it would be seen from from hundreds of miles for now a mystery still unsolved Lucy Kalganov CNN Denver Colorado Ratto? And who's hungry for pizza now. Who's hungry for pizza from an ATM? mm-hmm there's a new one of those at the University of North Florida giving college students access to hut pizza around the clock. The pies insider refrigerated certain toppings already on them so they're not made to order but they are baked to order. That takes a little less than four minutes at a cost of nine dollars per pizza. Are they good. Good will their pizza. So if you WANNA pizza and the time is three. Am and you can warm up to the idea of a pizza ATM on Tran- Color Friend. Bring your hunger in your money. It's a short way due to a fresh baked pizza pie with Pepperoni if you dream of late night pizza this machine grit your wishes. Just oh go for the stink up. The door vicious goes. Hey if you're watching from a a classroom you could get your school announced on our show. Here's how from CNN. Ten Dot Com. Click this link right here to get your our official youtube page subscribe and then comment on the latest video with your school city and state. You could hear tomorrow on CNN

Iran United States CNN FAA Donald Trump Colorado President Iraq America CNN Ayatollah Ali Khamenei Nebraska official Carla Zeus Colorado Springs Gazette Australia David Souci Hassan Ruhani
Episode 25 - The Crash of the "Big Operator"

NO HOME FOR HEROES

19:22 min | 1 year ago

Episode 25 - The Crash of the "Big Operator"

"The. Well, welcome to this episode of no home for heroes know home for he rose explores histories, military mysteries regarding Americans who are missing an action from our past wars these long forgotten him. I as are remembered here. Today's episode is titled the crash of the big operator, and I'm your host Rix novel. No home for. He rose is a trademark productions sponsored by the chief Rick stone and family charitable foundation. For more information on the foundation, visit our website, WWW, chief Rick stone dot com. If you're hearing this preview of no home for heroes on YouTube, or audio burst, we invite you to listen to the complete on cast on apple podcasts or whichever podcast plant warm, you prefer today, story recounts, the brief career of young army air corps pilot from his days at Carnegie, tech, an untimely end in the blue waters of the central Pacific during World War Two. Was it due to enemy action or pilot error? Stay tuned. And we'll answer the mystery to what took the life of a young hero was such a bright future. All of us here at the foundation wanted dedicate, this episode to our loyal listeners at the armed forces DNA Identification Laboratory, sometimes called f deal. I remember only a few short years ago when the laboratory hierarchy, yet, the joint POW, M A, accounting, command or J pack referred to DNA is quote Zuhdu science in quote. Well, now that the antiquated J pack lab is defunct and asked deal is making most of the af inefficacious I guess we can say who is right. Well, keep up the great work after ill. And on with our show. Today's episode is from case number zero four two four from the investigative case, files of the chief, Rick stone, and family charitable foundation. The m I a featured in our story today was dropped from the official list of casualties from the battle of tarot from nineteen forty five to two thousand eighteen how does that happen and his actual crash site still remains a mystery even though it was witnessed mapped, and even get latitude and longitude coordinates. How does that happen? Well, stay tuned. While we explore a special double mystery on today's no home for heroes. John Young themes junior stated he was born in Harrison township Pennsylvania. He was known as Jack to his family and friends. Jacks hobbies included participating in sports and building model airplanes, when he was ten years, old, Jack joined the Pittsburgh press's junior aviators club in high school, Jack, even won a trip to England participate in the Wakefield model airplane competition, where he won second place. Jack graduated from Wilkins Berg, high school in Williamsburg, Pennsylvania, in nineteen thirty eight. And then he enrolled in the Carnegie institute of technology, also known as Carnegie tech, where he was a member of the institute of 'aeronautics sciences. The National Aeronautics association hand the Birdman of America club while attending school. Jack work for Westinghouse corporation, as a tester of switch gears. At the time of the nineteen forty senses, Jack was living with his parents, John and Irene themes, and a younger sister in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The house were jet grew up at six nineteen cascade road in Pittsburgh is still air. If you live nearby go by and pay homage to Jack at the home, where he was not able to return to please don't bother the current residents as we doubt. They even know that American hero wants to live there. At the time of the census jacket completed one year of college at Carnegie tech, and was still enrolled, their Jack's father was born in Russia and served in the US army wore one as an infantry Lieutenant he spoke German and it was implied as a superintendent in an insurance office. Jack graduated from Carnegie tech in nineteen forty two with a bachelor of science degree in 'aeronautics engineering upon graduation. He immediately enlisted in the US army at fort belvoir Virginia, on four may nineteen forty two and was commissioned, a second Lieutenant. Jack listed his father is next to kin. He completed all the necessary paper to receive ten thousand dollars in US government, life insurance and listed his mother is the beneficiary. In addition, Jack bought war bonds each month from his salary in the amount of eighteen dollars and seventy five cents and had them sent to a miss Anna Lois stallings in mokri, Georgia. This is another kind of mystery. We don't really know who missed. All links was a girlfriend perhaps or maybe even theon say who Jack plan to marry after the war. If you know the answer drops align and let us know. Things was originally assigned to the engineer corps in the army, but quickly received a transfer to the army air force reserve corps. He was sent flight school and later, graduated from the advanced flying school for single engine pursue planes and Spence field. Georgia, by the way. Spence field was in you. Guessed, it military, Georgia, or miss stallings live doubt, this was a coincidence. In any case. Jack received two silver pilot's wings in February nineteen forty three. Lieutenant was shipped overseas to Honolulu. Hawaii on twenty eight March nineteen forty three is a member of the seventy second fighter squadron at bellows field away while it bellows themes unit completed advanced training in the p forty warhawks biter in June, nineteen forty three the newer bell p thirty nine q era Cobra began to arrive at bellows field, and Jack's unit the seventy second eyder squadron, traded in their war hawks, or the cobras in many ways the p thirty nine was an odd airplane. It had a car door for the pilot. They enter the cockpit. But it was also a beast known as I flying cannon, in reference to the thirty seven millimeter cannon mounted in the propeller hub of each airplane and four fifty caliber machineguns almost ten thousand thirty nine were built during World War Two with most shipped overseas to Russia or the Russians use them for round attack against German tanks and infantry. Join with the three hundred eighteen fighter group Lieutenant sames in the seventy second fighter squadron, flew reconnaissance, patrols over the Hawaiian islands until December nineteen forty three while in Hawaii, Jack gave this interview to a local newspaper. Helen Burkey wrote in her column service, sketches Lieutenant Jack Fame's of the US, af is from Pittsburgh. Jack said, I'm a graduate of Carnegie tech, I was graduated in 'aeronautics in the class of nineteen forty two Lieutenant themes has always been interested in airplanes. He said when I was about ten I started to model airplanes, really got pretty good at it by the time I was out of high school. I had acquired great skill in modeling. I won second place in the international model playing contest. That was the high point of my life. I was sent to Wakefield to receive my ward, I was given five weeks at the New York, world's fair. I stayed at a big hotel attended banquets. And we had a Royal time I think I know my plane inside and out, Jack said, I call her big operators. She's a fighter and a swell airplane. I have a job promise me when I get out after the war, he said, but my ambition is to go into the manufacturing of aircraft. Well, little Jack. No. When he gave that interview he had less than forty days till you. In December nineteen forty three the seventy second fighter squadron in their new p thirty nine through off the deck of the escort aircraft carrier USS Nassau and landed at MAKIN island in the tarot at all on twenty three December nineteen forty three ten themes and his wingmen, first Lieutenant George s Verena shot down a Japanese zero fighter plane off Mili island. Both Lieutenant themes and Lieutenant Farina shared half credit for the kill in the official records of the United States, Air Force. On the next day was just happened to be Christmas Eve, thanks took off from the airfield on making his Pete thirty nine nicknamed as he said the big operator for another combat air patrol on this day. The big operator was shot down by the Japanese and Lieutenant things was forced to parachute to safety landing in the ocean with some difficulty. He was rescued and returned to his unit. On the afternoon of twenty two January nineteen forty four Lieutenant Fame's climbed aboard p thirty nine number forty two days, one nine five one eight at make an airfield for another combat patrol with his way. Man, I Lieutenant Rena. Lieutenant j aircraft on this day, probably a replacement for the original big operator that had been shot down on Christmas Eve, and as was the custom with many fodder policy in war to probably renamed big operator to. This aircraft today was built by the Bill aircraft corporation in wheat, the New York in nineteen forty two the model was officially designated as a p thirty nine Hugh one day, be it was like all the rest armed with or fifty caliber machine guns and one thirty seven millimeter cannon mounted in the nose of the aircraft. It was a beast. The circumstances of Lieutenant themes as loss on that day, it's best described by his wingman. In his official statement, the tent Verena wrote. On twenty two January nineteen forty four at sixteen forty hours second Lieutenant John themes. And I were just finishing our patrol. We were flying the northeast leg of a northeast to southwest. Combat air patrol along the northern tip of the terroir Alto, at an altitude of two thousand feet as ordered by control. I was on the right. I banked up a steep turn to the right which was our tactical signal to one hundred eighty degree turn immediately. I saw Lieutenant themes Bank left. I rolled out of my turn and looked over to where losing its aims was supposed to be at that moment. I was attracted by a large splash, I looked down in time to see a large column of water in pieces of the plane falling into the water from the splash. I did not see the plane hit, I called control and reported the accident. And then I circled the spot. The only thing I can see was an oil slick, I was relieved in about fifteen minutes and landed. Included with Lieutenant Farina statement was a hand drawn map with the notation of quote, plane crashed here in quote, an arrow, along with the coordinates latitude one hundred seventy three degrees. One minute and longitude one degree thirty three minutes. Thanks to modern technology. Google earth pro. There's an apparent conflict and the hand-drawn map and the latitude longitude coordinates Lieutenant things crash site, as shown on the map. Coordi- or indicated on the map and the apparent notation by Lieutenant Verena of plane crash here in the aero are really nowhere close to each other ones at the north tip of the will atoll and one's at the south of the terroir after. The graves registration unit report. A January nineteen forty four on payroll while or sometimes known as base you island and the island commander on terroir of captain ECB who'll in his report of June nineteen forty four both fail to note themes as a casualty. Thanks was on the American graves registration service list of Pero unaccounted for on their report filed on sixteen July nineteen forty eight However, I are investigators found that the typing was so bad on the initial American graves registration service report that it probably played a role in the fact that Lieutenant sage was dropped from future terroir casualty list, he remained dropped new to this bad typing until his loss was added to the official government list of care. Wa casualties in twenty eighteen. Foundation. Researchers have requested Lieutenant themes, individual deceased personnel file, from the national archives via of freedom of information act. Request in September. Twenty eighteen these requests are required by law to be provided within twenty eighteen within twenty days. Almost a year later. The individual deceased personnel file Lieutenant themes as you have to be provided us by the government. So what really happened to Lieutenant things at the time of his death. He was an experienced and trained pilot who had approximately five hundred hours of flight time. Well, the records indicate that the official cause of his crash was noted as follows quote. He thirty nine Q Erico number forty two days, one nine five one eight lost on combat patrol, approximately one and one quarter mile west of terroir. Hey, tall with other thirty nine suffered a high speed doll a high speed stall permits Cassesse rate of turn, causing spin and loss of control crashed into the c MO trace of pilot observe in quote. Well experience tells us that only two thousand feet of altitude, Jack would have had precious little time to bail and certainly Moshe. You was observed by the only witness Lieutenant green. Themes parents received a telegram award apartment on nine February nineteen forty four notifying them to Jack had been killed in action when his playing crashed into the ocean off terrible. There's no record in any available filed that we've yet to see that indicates it is remains were ever recovered or dental. Onto may nineteen fifty the state of Pennsylvania, provided Lieutenant themes parents, what they consider full compensation for his war service in the amount of five hundred dollars. Today. John Yang same junior. Jack remains missing an action probably still strapped in the cockpit of the big operator to at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean somewhere off the coast of terroir at all. Our foundation. Investigators have the map, drawn by Lieutenant Farina, and we have the latitude and longitude coordinates listed by the only witness to the crash, Lieutenant Corinne. We've had the serial numbers from the machine guns. And the cannon on board the big operator to when it crashed if anyone with the government listens to this broadcast in context us, we'd be glad to share the investigative report that we prepared for the family, and we would hope that they could go and find Jack and bring him home. The pittsburgh. Pittsburgh. PA. Vine were listening to this episode of no home where he rose, we hope you enjoyed today's production, and we invite you to check out our other episodes. You can ask subscribe to listen, flea free this listen free, not leave. But this infre- on apple podcast or whichever platform you like listen to podcasts and a special. Thanks iheartradio. Who recently listed are episodes, so they're available playlist? Don't forget to tune in every Saturday, and we will host a new episode of history's military mysteries missing an act episodes of no home for heroes produced from the actual investigative case files, the Bridgestone family charitable foundation, Nettie, gated, providing you permission to the families of missing American servicemen and missing American servicemen, as always, we greatly appreciate your comment in special link. Available for you to contact us on our website and WWW cheap. Rick stone dot com. Sure to wanna miss our next episode with another story about one of our missing American hero. It will be our special fourth of July Assode, complete with some long overdue, pharmore. Tune in to hear it for yourself next week on no home for hero. Until next time he careful say in wishing you Fairwinds following sees. I'm your host Rick stone, reminding you that horse the nation that has no hero. Shameful is the nation that having he rose, forgets them.

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Airline breach bigger than thought. Securing Mexican financial institutions. Demonbot vs. Hadoop. New decryptor out for GandCrab ransomware. Civilian Cybersecurity Corps?

The CyberWire

22:47 min | 2 years ago

Airline breach bigger than thought. Securing Mexican financial institutions. Demonbot vs. Hadoop. New decryptor out for GandCrab ransomware. Civilian Cybersecurity Corps?

"British Airways breach got bigger Mexico's financial institution say they've contained nominees in interbank transfers systems. Demon Batas infesting poorly. Secured had observers Google receives criticism for slow action against ad fraud. Bid defender in Romanian police producer decrypted for gang. Crab ransomware discussions of civilian. Cybersecurity corps are white hats, the radio hams of the twenty first century. Now, I'd like to share some words about our sponsors silence. Hey, I stands for artificial intelligence, of course. But nowadays, it also means all image or anthropomorphized incredibly. There's a serious reality under the hype. But it can be difficult to see through to it. As the experts at silence will tell you a isn't a self-aware Skynet ready to send in the Terminator's. It's a tool the trains on data to develop useful algorithms, and like all tools, it can be used for good or evil if you'd like to learn more about how AI is being weaponized, and what you can do about it. Visit threat vector dot silence dot com and check out their report security using AI for evil. That's threat. Becker dot silence dot com. We're happy to say that their products. Protect our systems here at the cyber wire. And we thank silence for sponsoring our show. Major funding for the cyber wires provided by silence. From the cyber wars studios at data drive with your cyber wire summary for Friday, October twenty six thousand eighteen Peter Kilby executive editor sitting in for Dave bittner. He's probably wishing about. Now, his vacation was just a little longer. He'll be back in your ear buds on Monday, the British Airways breach seems to have gotten a little bigger the airline is disclosed that one hundred eighty five thousand additional customers were also affected in that. Credit card information was among the data expose ensure access said yesterday that it's customers information and resources were unaffected by the cyber attack discovered on October twenty second AXA noticed anomalies in its transactions carried by the interbank payment system. S T E, I notified Mexico's central Bank which placed the country's financial sector on heightened alert news guy security in Radner warning of a button it that's been quietly establishing itself in poorly secured a patchy had observers intention appears to be to use the compromise. Servers for distributed denial of service attacks rod where call the investation demon. What was I noticed in new sky Honey bonds late this summer, researchers for now think that the button, it is the work of skids? But it's yet another annoyance to deal with in the US. Senator Warner democratic Virginia has asked the Federal Trade Commission to look into what it characterizes as Google's inaction against ad fraud. His letter was prompted by a report and BuzzFeed that Google had been sitting on its hands with respect to add fraud for some time. The article also prompted Google to move against the particular kind of adverse BuzzFeed described Google hadn't been as utterly inattentive as one might conclude from the senators letter mountain you had as security weak points out previously blocked websites from its ad network. When they violated Google's policies. What's new is that Google has now moved against applications involved in the fraud the action scenes late to Senator Warner is letter decries quote in attention to misconduct within the app store, unquote. He also complained that Google did not see fit to conduct a more thorough investigation of adv. Rod when. Researchers brought the matter to its attention in June. The Senator calls it quote willful blindness after the break will hear days recent conversation with Daniel prints. Remind Custer university shares his thoughts on quantum hardware. Primitives? And now a bit about our sponsors at VM ware. Their trust network for workspace. One can help you secure your enterprise with tested best practices. They've got eight critical capabilities to help you protect detect and remediate a single open platform approach data loss prevention policies and contextual policies. Get you started. They'll help you move on to protecting applications access management and encryption and they'll round out what they can do for you with micro segmentation and analytics wears white paper on a comprehensive approach to security across the digital workspace. We'll take you through the details and much more. You'll find it at the cyber wire dot com slash VM ware. See what workspace one can do for your enterprise security, the cyber wire dot com slash VM ware, and we thank M wear for sponsoring our show. And pleased to be joined once again by Daniel prints. He's a senior lecturer in cybersecurity at Lancaster university. Daniel welcome back. We wanted to talk about quantum hardware security primitives today, and I have to admit you sent that topic over. I'm intrigued what what are we gonna cover today? So this is based on some day when a spin out company from Lancaster haunting vice some of the work vets at some physicists doing right? Officers department instead of trying to buy the whole problem voting computes on complete also caters to the approach that we stopped team. So that she think about how we use effects to really provide some of the primitive functions within visual. And so some of the things that we're looking at here things like random number generation and unique content because of their. On the physical means in cost. All box. Very small Schuyler. Embeds cones unlike affects into asked. The beauty of what we can do now is to increase the security capabilities of some of the standard cryptographic processes that we have. So if you take the quantum round number generates instead of using suit around. Tons of pushback purses. We now have salsa chew. About some of these elements around for on time. So we. Number generation, particularly. They require the technology often quite lodge number of the sister, set a viable a whole line cod or Fukang for for PC. Some of them are even better Casey pieces of equipment. What we're trying to do is get down to very very scouts. They can be these these bonuses can be invited into chip salts. What's interesting is when you start to move to have cold some elements within stand taller for you proves the quality of the that we have improved security for everybody without having to have house late to complete computer or quit quantum cage division that intermediate step before we go straits into having quantum cryptographic solutions, everyday, Daniel prints. Thanks for joining us. Gain crab ransomware has been making a pesticide sell for some time. But now thanks to some cooperation between bit defender in the Romanian police, the no more ransom project has released an improved free decryption tool for this now where strain it's an update to the earlier decrypt her. This addition works against gain crab version, one with GD CB extension version, four with the crab extension and version five with its random ten character extension. The latest model game crab on the street. They're still working on a decrypted that will unlock data affected by game crab versions, two three. But we agree with your Opole. But this is nice work. So Bravo bit defender, and their colleagues in the remaining police that sort of cooperation makes one think some other ways in which private persons and businesses can contribute to such matters of public good. We note that many probably most do so already and bit defenders release. The decrypt is by no means unusual in the industry, but some are considering ways in which this. Of action can be taken further. The new America foundation for examples published a study calling for the formation of civilian cyber core. The volunteer body would study says help redress shortfalls of security labor. It's the authors credit that they don't simply do some lazy hand waving in the general direction of the national guard as they put it, quote, the organization would be modeled after a blend of cybersecurity organizations in other nations and proven models in other demands of security and safety inside the United States, specifically civil air patrol coastguard exhilarate or volunteer firefighters the goal would be to better involve and mobilise the wider community in tackling poor needs that are unlikely to be met through existing structures unquote would function as an exemplary of the department of homeland security new organization would work mainly in three areas. One education and outreach to testing assessments and exercise in three on call expertise in emergency response. We stress of course, that this is one thing tanks proposal, not an existing or planned government program. But it's worth considering since we hear similar, ideas floated in various conferences and policies impose it we might suggest a few thoughts of our own on the matter. I it's good to see the study's authors focusing on specific areas as opposed to offering sweeping rhapsodies about whole of nation engagement one so often here's seconds worth noting that there's a regular market for all the kinds of services, the authors list, there isn't a comparable market for search and rescue or firefighting and would not be a trivial matter to structure of tier core in ways that don't compete or displays that market. The study does point out sensibly that bug bounty programs amount in part to mobilization of hobbyists. They don't overstate this. It's clear that the participation in bug bounties is also kind of job either in the gig economy or even for some businesses. But there are enough white hats who do this as a side hustle to make the point worth considering bug bounties. Do pay. Successful hunters regular trade does provide essential services food, for example. So by groceries and supermarkets, and it's an important and legitimate business. Their community food banks that seek out to provide for those who can't for one reason or another participate in that market could have civilian cyber security core, take some lessons from food banks or would its activities map narrowly to what Washington calls inherent government, sponsored Bility's that is the kinds of things you don't leave the market like the army's ground combat functions or the court's role in trying criminals third. They suggest education inspections as possible activities for their proposed core, the model here would be the coastguard exhilarate with safety inspections, and boating safety classes, they'll help you see that you've got a problem with your boat, but they're not gonna fix it. That's a job for the boat yard and the training. They offer is solid. But at the enthusiast level, they have no intention of putting the maritime academies out of business fourth. It's with respect to the kinds of emergency response. Study seems on its strongest ground. The study's authors take the civil air patrol is the principal model here. Although volunteer fire departments in the coastguard exhilarate offer some analogies as well. We'd like to offer in our own volunteer spirit, a possibly instructive analogy we haven't encountered elsewhere AMR radio. Amateur radio has long had a good reputation for providing emergency communications into areas. Hard hit by natural disasters. This is less true today than it was in the glory days of ham radio fifties and sixties Bardsley because of improved resilience telecommunications emergency service networks, but there may be lessons there as well. The American ham radio relay league would be the place to start. You can find them at a r l dot org. They've been around for a little over one hundred years in the cyber sector may be able to learn a thing or two from them about all in. Tearing the public spirit. Britney Homer time is the director of information security at AMC theaters. When we come back, we'll have her conversation with Dave on building partnerships within your organ. Position to strengthen securities role. Now, a message from our sponsors, secure strucks, cyber-attacks intellectual property theft ransomware. These are just some of the cybersecurity events that have become commonplace in the news and in our lives. Protect your data. Protect your company don't lose sales in twenty eight teen a study from Cisco indicated over sixty five percent of company sales are delayed by at least one to two years simply because their customers don't feel satisfied with the company's existing focus on privacy. Seventy four percent of privacy, immature companies in that study saw losses of over five hundred thousand dollars while privacy, mature companies had losses half that number at secure strucks their season cyber security professionals can assess your current cyber security practices, create simple processes and procedures for complex solutions and fix vulnerabilities to protect your data visit secure strucks to learn. How they can help. That's S E C U R E S T R U X, a one stop shop for all your cybersecurity needs. And we thank secure strucks for sponsoring our show. My guest today is Britney hammered sign. She's director of information security at AMC theaters, the largest movie theater chain in the world with over ten thousand screens in nearly a thousand theaters worldwide, she's responsible for the development and implementation of AMC's global security strategy, she oversees all security personnel and ensure security concerns are addressed at the executive level. So when you think of theater, you don't really think about all the different interactions in different types of networks that you have as well as the data that you have to protect. So if you think of a store theater is similar to that. So we have transactions and merchandise that happen. We have third parties. At are actually streaming the feeds to the actual cinema. And then a big chunk of our focus goes on our loyalty program. So anyone that signs up using one of our loyalty programs? We have a duty to them to protect their data that. They provide us as well. And so how do you protect each of those systems individually, and is there I mean is there cross talk between them which your approach to that of our environments are fairly well segmented, some of those are proprietary feed. So like, I max those types of things we generally keep separate, of course, our environment. We keep separate our corporate network is a little bit different than what hits our website. So everything kind of we try to segment and as much as possible. So today one of the things we want to touch on is this notion of educating your board and getting your security projects funded. So what is your approach to this? What is the interaction you have with your board? I generally talk to them. We have our board meetings every quarter. So it is my responsibility to kinda give them the threat landscape at what we're looking at some of the projects that we have going on. And where to take it in next and has the board. Been open to your message. So when I originally started here, and I think this is a good place for everyone to start generally boards and executives only come into contact with security via media feeds so anything if they see on TV or they hear about on the radio, they're generally interested in that security is relatively new so being able to change that into a business approach. Explain those things in a way that they understand can be very difficult. But you have to know that you're going to be asked about those things. So you have to be prepared and be able to relate that to your business. No in terms of getting things funded. What's your protest there? So I need understand your executives. So what motivates them is? It just fear. Not being that headline company is it more compliance related. So maybe audit findings or the penalties that come along. With those are they more interested in reputa-. Tation brand damaged may hurt. Their stock prices. Are they looking to get some financial gain at of having these security capabilities? So I you need to understand what your executive team wants, what motivates them to invest, insecurity. A lot of times you'll be asked to compare to other industries. So this is kind of a something that you want to be cautious about so whenever you're talking about your industry vertical. And they start looking at these other companies you have to start thinking about what is the size of the company that you're comparing yourself to are they the like industry are they feeding and protecting the same type of data, and then most importantly is their program successful. A lot of times we see all these metrics in these dollars behind businesses of this industry of this is that are spending X percent of their IT budget. Are x percent of their annual budget on security. But how effective is dead. So you have to be a little bit cautious. When you start comparing companies than like verticals? Yeah. That's a really interesting insight. Cutty handle pushback from the board. It depends. I don't I guess is the answer. I really take the approach that my job is to educate the board. So if I can effectively communicate the risk I have to be okay with them taking the business approach and saying that's not in the cards for this year. Or there's another project that's going to need to be funded over this and them accepting that risk. So I don't necessarily push back. But if I failed educate my board, so they can make educated decisions that certainly on me. I guess my first step in the strategy is starting to create a security committee, and the security committee is comprised of various business leaders. So you wanna have anyone from marketing HR, certainly I t but in Representative from each part of your business be a part of the security committee, and you need to understand what's important to them. So how is the business making money? First of all, and those are the first things that you need to think about defending. But before you can start to put those processes in place, you should start creating these partnerships understanding, your executives understanding your board members. Sometimes this news launches or coffees or walking and knocking on someone's store. It takes a lot of time to do this. But what you gain in. This you start to understand your your business partners objectives. So if I'm talking with HR, I need to understand why they need to click on that attachment, right? It's probably a resume that their job is to open up the resume, and you have to think about how your security projects are going to start to impact in effect the way that they do their day to day business is just going to be something that's gonna help them. It's going to be something that hinders them. Because if it's going to be something that hinders them to probably going to figure out a way to work around it. I like to think that everybody really wants to do their job. And maybe that's me putting on my my rainbow glasses, but I feel like people want to do a good job. And so they're going to figure out a way to make the business more effective make their department more effective in streamline processes, so you have to figure out a way that you can integrate your security projects that actually improves their job functions. So one of the things that I like to do is when I sit down, and I'm creating these partnerships is is ask them if there was one thing that would make your job easier. What would that be sometimes you get information sharing? Sometimes it's being able to have this type of tool. Well, that's good for me to know. Because then I can go back to Macy a bunch of people across the business security is kind of unique in that it crosses multiple departments. So you can start saying consistencies in the actual business and provided tool that may actually help the business, and once you're able to do that you create that partnership, then you start. In writing these business champions. And so these are the people that you've actually helped along the way these are the people that are going to start feeding your security message for you. And once you start to get these people on your your security committee. These business leaders that you've made changes and improvements in their department. You start to really get the ball rolling. Right. People are starting to buy into this idea of security that it's no longer a hindrance. This is the security department our security team that can really provide some value to the company Benz Britney homered time from AMC theaters. And that's the cyber wire for links to all the stories mentioned in today's podcast. Check out. Our daily news brief cyber wire dot com. Thanks to all of our sponsors for making wire possible. Especially to are sustaining sponsor silence to find out how silence can predict you using artificial intelligence. Visit silence dot com. Violence is not just as Bonsor. They actually use their products to help protect our systems who cyber wire. Thanks to our supporting sponsor VM ware, creators worked base one intelligence. Learn more at M word calm. The fiber wire podcast is proudly produced in Maryland out of the startup studios of data drive with their co building the next generation of cybersecurity teams and technology. Cyber our editors John Patrick social media editor Jennifer Ivan technical editor, Chris Russell, non Peter Kilby sitting in for Dave bittner, you'll be back next week. Thanks for listening.

Google Daniel Dave bittner British Airways fraud United States Mexico Benz Britney AI Peter Kilby executive AMC Terminator producer AXA Rod Lancaster Fukang
What were the BONE WARS?

Stuff You Should Know

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

What were the BONE WARS?

"Hey everybody wanted to talk to you about our old friends from squarespace. You need a website everyone. It's like the future and if you don't have your own website then what are you doing in squarespace is the best way to do it. It's the all in one platform to build a beautiful online presence and run your business and right now we when they have a new feature email oh campaigns say more and sell more with squarespace email campaigns. It's really great this again all on one platform that makes it easy to unify your brand and voice from your homepage to your emails pretty great everyone and right now checkout squarespace dot com slash short stuff for a free trial trial when you're ready to launch. He's the offer code short stuff to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain. Hey everybody it's Josh and Chuck and we're coming to see you. You guys some of you. Some cities just listen up. That's right because you know we just did Chicago and Toronto and went great yeah and I think our topic of went really well sure. Did everyone loved hearing about right. So if you're in Boston can come see us on August twenty ninth at the Wilbur Portland Maine Maine at the State Theatre on August thirtieth. I can't wait. I'm going to Labor Day weekend. I'm going to stay the whole weekend. I'll be all over Maine. That's great man world. We're going to be in Orlando on October ninth and then on on October ten th we're going to be in New Orleans man and then later on that month. We're doing a three night. Stand the twenty third twenty four the twenty fifth at the Bell House in Brooklyn. That's right twenty fifth is sold out you can still get tickets for the twenty third and twenty fourth and we will see you then. Check it out at S. Y.. S. K. LIVE DOT com. Welcome to step. You should know a production of iheartradio. How stuff works hey and welcome to the podcast? I'm Josh Clark. Clark News chose to be Chuck Bryant and there's Jiri over there and <hes> our that was a limp blimp laugh chuck. I've gotten better <hes>. Are you a dinosaur a little bit. I got a little dinosaur neanderthal Leander Ptolemy earned from twenty-three me yeah <hes> but to spite my dinosaur heritage I was never big time into dinosaurs says the kid. We're you know not like bits astounding chuck how similar we were children. I know <hes> the only difference is is. I didn't smoke when I was seven years old. Fourteen the ripe old age of four started smoking <hes> so it wasn't like. I don't know if it was the same with you. It's not like I had anything against dinosaurs or kids who liked dinosaurs so they're kinda cool and I had some like like figurines here there there but it wasn't anything like I was nerdy about in any way shape or form yeah I mean I think there was there's a certain movie that really really got kids leads into dinosaurs. The Lost World Know Ferris Buehler's Day off in that movie came out. You know when I was older yeah same here think Oh. I remember what year that was like. I was in college though <hes> I wanna say it was like ninety two to ninety four one of those years I would guess but kids these days are and it's not just my kid but I I see lots of kids in her age group that are obsessed with dinosaurs. Yeah Yeah and I think that's cool like what a cool thing to be obsessively as you so much stuff you know about the deep past about evolution <hes> about you you know walking Lizard Bird creatures. You know there's a lot there's a lot to learn from like being interested in dinosaurs. That's very cool thing to be interested in about death in extinction sure rotting fossils ation yeah all the good stuff right <hes> but the the whole interest including the interest that was around around when we were kids that just kind of passed us by but definitely you know the the interest in dinosaurs that gave rise to the idea of Michael Crichton even writing Jurassic Park and then and Steven Spielberg even making it into a movie the interest in dinosaurs in America. You can actually trace back to almost <hes> a specific winter later in a specific place in the nineteenth century in the winter of eighteen seventy seven in particular and it was the result of a vicious mean-spirited petty rivalry between two paleontologists that really kind of sparked America's interest in dinosaurs dinosaurs yeah I mean it feels very <hes> Tesla. <hes> who's the other guy. What was his name Marconi? Maybe you're <hes> affairs bueller. It's really reminded me of the Tesla Fares Bueller rivalry ferris won that one square in the current wars which by the way that movies coming out of U._C._l._A.. Trailer know who plays who you know. I can't remember now but I saw the other day and it looks it looks pretty good. Nicholas Cage plays both roles God. How great would that be A._C.? D._C. Right yes like that's two hours right there right. There's there's actually going to be a movie or there was going to be a movie about what we're about to talk about today. Did you know that now I kind of wondered though yeah it was scheduled for production. Steve Carell was GONNA play Cope. Oh and James Gandolfini was gonNA play. Marsh and James Gandolfini died unexpectedly in the production just got K. bashed and they also found out that the title the bone wars had already been taken by a <hes> adult pornography Yup. We're we're so on the same page we totally sucked children no interest in Jurassic Park or any dinosaurs but we think the names of porno films is hilarious are big interests so <hes> I thought it was funny you know we commissioned this piece for <hes> for the grab stir and he's a big dinosaur guy and he was somewhat shamed. He was like a just any said it two or three times. I can't believe I didn't know about these guys. Yeah we're like Okay Gr- observatory yeah but so I feel like he learned something something along the way <hes> and he starts out and I think it's a good thing for us to talk a little bit about just <hes> before these dudes how Paly paleontology came about about yeah <hes> and that had you know I think since people started stumbling upon bones even by accident before it was even a discipline people were like Oh man look at that thing. I'm going to pick that up and take it with me right. I think they used to get classified. Also mythological creatures dead Gods Ed's or something like that <hes> but the first documented paleontological expedition in North America was carried out by none other than Lewis and Clark Yeah. Did you know that before. Did we mention that in the episode. Do you think I don't know but I did know at some point from somewhere. Maybe it was the <hes> the Ken Burns piece but that you know one of the things they did. I mean they were they were logging everything including bone deposits but they spend like a week <hes> <hes> around Salt Lake flats or Salt Lake Gully your salt lick something <hes> where there was a big old salt lake that used to attract dinosaurs in <hes> pleistocene mammals <hes> from two different periods everybody pitcher emails away <hes> and the bones that would collect there were really significant so they spent a week like excavating there but that was the first one but that was even before the world the word paleontology was coined. Yeah that was an eighteen gene twenty two in the French Journal diff- Zeke and <hes> there are a couple of people that preceded <hes> and in fact <music> <hes> one of whom went on to be sort of a mentor to cope but I got him Edward Hitchcock and another guy named Joseph <hes>. Is it light your leaky. <hes> I think lightly is what I've seen the most Yeah Elliot D. Y.. <hes> and he's the one that went on to to work with cope later on but I just put a pin in this but but in eighteen fifty-eight a pretty important find <hes> basically the only big dinosaur find on the east coast where the fossil bones of urban core your name <hes> Hadra Soroush Falke in New Jersey and it was a big deal because it was on the East Coast and this is where the stuff was going on at the time and you a lot of footprints on the East Coast but not a lot of finds like this yeah it was an enormous finding <hes> lady <hes> was called into up excavator and put it together because he was America's first vertebrate paleontologists I mean he was the first guy and was really prolific and really good at what he did. <hes> and like you said would eventually become a mentor to one of the guys we should probably introduce now <hes> because light he was working in <hes>. I I think I real- burst of energy came in the eighteen fifty s early eighteen fifties and <hes> within about fifteen maybe twenty years there are a pair of guys who had come along and just completely changed the field of paleontology it started out very normally just another scientific field very exciting lots of discoveries to be made a mirror. That's the point of all this right. Is that like if you have a brand new scientific field everything you come across is worth writing about describing ascribing you get to name everything was really exciting like dynamic time for the field of paleontology but but a field of science science is the character of it is based on its earliest practitioners and Lady <hes> was a very steady normal scientists who there's very reliable so he kind of paleontology up like that but then along came a couple of guys who would form this rivalry and they would change all of that <hes> No. I don't think necessarily surly to this day but there was a a lot of sniping that used to go on in the field paleontology that that was because of the tone that these guys set yes in both of them would end up <hes> basically bankrupt at the end of each of their lives because of all their efforts to outdo and undermine one one another's work <hes> right so we're talking about two dudes <hes> one is <hes> marsh and one is cope <hes> on on ah off Neil. I've never heard that name before. I think his parents made it up. Maybe T H E off Neil Charles March <hes> born in October eighteen eighteen thirty one in New York and he was <hes>. They didn't have a lot of money in his family. <hes> they were farmers <hes> he would have been a farmer but he had in this kind of really changed his life. He had a very rich uncle named George peabody <hes> who would go on to really kind of fund his education in early early parts of his career later on just pluck them out of the farm field basically and said I. I have no idea why he did this but he said you I I like the look of you and your brain gene nephew and you're smart would be my guess is that it okay well. I don't know how he demonstrated it. I guess is what I'm trying to say like. How did his uncle say yes? You're the one Oh you know. smarts are always evident okay while he plucked him out. Send him to boarding school then sent him to Yale in eventually sent him off to Grad School in Germany so <hes> marsh where it's GonNa Call Mark. His name is just too ugly and horrible to say out loud yeah <hes> he was basically set he was fine. He had a benefactor in his extraordinarily wealthy. <hes> <hes> philanthropist uncle yes so cope on the other hand <hes> similarly <hes> had had money but his was like in his family. He wasn't like poor with a rich uncle he had a wealthy family right very prominent family in Philadelphia Pennsylvania. He was born in July eighteen forty forty and he went to you know all the <hes> I was going to say trappings but I guess all the benefits of being born into money he went to very nice expensive boarding boarding school <hes> and that wasn't so much up his alley so he dropped out when he was sixteen and <hes> because he had a rich <hes> <hes> Rich Dad <hes> it allowed him a lot of opportunities that other people wouldn't have <hes> including going to college later on even though he never graduated high school school yeah well there so it was definitely impart because his dad but also this was a time in like say the eighteen fifties it was lax but also like even if you wanted to go on and become like a <hes> <hes> get a p._H._d.. American universities weren't you know they didn't offer for many P._H._d.. Programs in sciences right <hes> so there was a there was a whole <hes> something called gentleman naturalist who were amateur self taught right <hes> scientists who just just did the work. They knew what they were doing. They figured it out as they went along and they actually develop some of these fields fields and so he kind of subscribe to that school When he hears this loaf he learned <hes> what he needed to learn? Yeah I mean because if there's one thing we're going to learn about copay over the next <hes> thirty minutes or so as he worked hard God yes. He's my pick of the bone wars. He's who I put my money behind his ear Guy Yup interesting. Did we ever say his name. Edward Drinker Drinker Cope yeah so weird middle name it is he was a drinker literally really what's he was also. He's also a quaker her and a pacifist to that's right so at College at University of Pennsylvania <hes> that's where he met Joseph Lady he was one of his professors so that just the kind of kickstarted their relationship <hes> during the civil war he went to Europe <hes> the American civil war because he didn't want to be you know he didn't want to go to war. He didn't want to go fight. He want to dig up bones yeah and he was a quaker pacifist to that's right so he went to Germany in eighteen sixty three he met marsh and they really liked each other. At first they had a lot in common. Obviously I get the feeling that in Germany in eighteen sixty three there were probably not a ton of Americans who were super interested in dinosaur hunting and so they they locked up became really good pals <hes> they came back to the U._S.. After after the civil war and friends and we're both like all right we're GonNa go do our thing independently but we're gonNA keep in touch. We're GONNA SWAP INFO early on here. It was all very friendly at first right and I think he can make a pretty good case that they probably cut their own palm's and clasped hands and became blood brothers during the German meeting okay probably so that's over going with because they really did like each other. <hes> and things were going along just fine to kindred spirits with a common an interest in paleontology <hes> and they may have continued on that way although I sincerely doubt that that's the case <hes> which means I just under my my own instatement but <hes> after the civil war they both went back to the United States to start careers their own careers and marsh <hes> or cope. I'm sorry he connected with Joseph. Lady who he had met through the University of Pennsylvania and the Academy of Natural Sciences they worked together there and so he went off with lady to study bones that were found that hadn't field in New Jersey where we're light. He found that first skeleton right and so being being friends with marshy naturally co naturally extended an invitation. Hey come visit me in the field. You gotta see this place. It's amazing. There's fossils everywhere. You'RE GONNA love it and so marsh came out for a visit and this was this is mark one in the turning point of their relationship. There were two distinct marks. <hes> each of them point two one is the the end of their friendship. This was the end of their friendship starting with Cope. That's right so both of these guys had <hes> privileged. It's like we've been talking about <hes> for marshes part his uncle his rich uncle donated one hundred fifty grand to Yale <hes> basically to sort of get March Ajab <hes> they created the peabody museum of Natural History and then they were like well. Hey we need a professor to chair this new department treatment and so why not your nephew and they said bully that's a great idea so it basically cost one hundred and fifty grand to get marsh <hes> this. This job is the chair of Department of Paleontology at this new peabody museum at Yale University right and so they said yes <hes> we wanted to make you the first professor of Paleontology in America. Marsh said yes. That's a great idea. I like where you're going Yale. I'M GONNA spend a lot of time here. I can tell so that's that's marsh setting off on his little trajectory basically ensconced himself in jail right cope <hes> remember he was is basically a highschool dropout and he had to kind of make his own way <hes> he had trouble at first finding a position until he struck upon on a place called Haverford college and he got a position as a professor of zoology there <hes> and they said well. You're a high school dropout so we'll just give you an honorary very masters of Arts degree being now your professor yeah. There's this great working out for. Both of these guys yep although cope didn't really like her for that much <hes> <hes> he ends up quitting <hes> and they actually kind of a it's kind of describes his personality a little bit that that incident that he would get a a good job <hes> having kind of been carried into that position and then says this job is B. E._S.. I'm quitting that he was apparently prone to kind of a quick temper here there yeah I mean it's it does make the point. It's kind of hard to piece together a personality from someone way back then but by most accounts cope was a bit mercurial <hes> a little more outgoing <hes> marsh was a little quieter and in kind of known as a bit of a flake <hes> you know but considering their backgrounds it sort of makes sense where they ended up <hes> marsh you know they they win about their work. In very different ways marshon published his first paper until he was thirty years old <hes> he was a lifelong Bachelor Co married when he was was twenty five and cope you know even the way they wrote Cope wrote these very sort of flowery <hes> descriptions of things will marsh was much more sort of rigid and sort of dry and scientific yeah like if you if you read cope stuffy. He's trying to like set the scene for you. You know there's one paper where he was describing pterodactyls and like it's a scientific papers. All you have to do is describe the bones and the measurements and extrapolate and that kind of stuff but he's like painting the picture of what it must've been like a on a cliffside by the ocean as a troop of these things were dangling by their claws. You know cigarettes yeah. It's super cool but definitely transport the reader there. It was a little extra dollop of something that that you didn't have to put on but cope definitely did put on which is surprising that he put anything extra into his his work because he published at an extraordinary pace so much so that marsh in particular was like this man is obviously fraudulent. Nobody can publish first this much yeah for sure and we'll touch on that a bit later. <hes> the big difference in their earlier careers was <hes> when when it came to religion <hes> like you said earlier cope was a quaker and was a religious man <hes> marshals not he was not very into religion and he was fully down with evolution and natural selection in Darwin whereas cope kind of had to make it all fit within his religious beliefs so it's not like he outright like uncalled Darwin a fraud or anything like that but he worked in like the actions of God into his theories and sort of made it made it all work according to his religious beliefs which is I mean back then a little <hes> a little bit different but even back then for a scientist sort of an an odd thing yeah for sure but he he he's he tried to rectify science in his religious belief and the way that a lot of people did that back then was to subscribe to Neo lamarcus Lamarque ISM which is this idea that <hes> changes in a population take place on the individual level like an example I saw was if you're a blacksmith and you use your arm a bunch to hammer. You're going to get a big old bulky arm right well. When you have kids you're going to pass that bulky arm that you developed in your lifetime lifetime off to them and that's how evolution happens and it's much more directed by God than what Darwin was saying which is you're just born with the random mutation when and if that mutation happens to make it more likely for you to to survive to pass along your genes than that mutation will get selected by nature which basically has has nothing to do with God so there was a real struggle for Cope throughout his lifetime rectifying the two especially considering chuck that the body any of work that he produced really helped prove Darwin's point more than anything yeah for sure <hes> when it comes to like where things went wrong because they were still buddies up up until this point? It seemingly looks like marsh drew first blood. Yes <hes> we mentioned that hadn't feel dig earlier so it's <hes> eighteen sixty eight cope has left his job at Haverford <hes>. He's not very happy there so he leaves he's really kind of feed on the ground doing the work publishing papers papers <hes> which will see later at an alarming rate and working with lady who we talked about and he invited marsh because they're buddies and he's like Dude Dude. You gotta come check this out. We found a legit dinosaur fossil on the east coast marshalls like great. I'll go check it out. He loves what he sees and says this is wonderful friend. He's doing such great work here. Pat On the back then he sneaks back later on by himself and bribes the workers there copes workers in ladies workers and says hey man if you find any mortgage specimens send them to this address and here's a little dough for your effort can. Can you believe that yeah I mean just straight up sold him out right so marshes just outed himself as a very warm e type of fellow not to be trusted and the way that I so there is a really great American experience episode called Dinosaur Wars that really kind of described it like to to cope he subscribed to that gentleman scholar type of mentality. which was there's unwritten rules? You know like I came in showed you my corey and you went behind my back to steal my fossils from my corey. Not Not cool that was cope's take from marshes point of view he was kind of from the <hes> the business like American School of of <hes> to conquer it all costs and he owed no allegiance really to to cope in that sense that he saw an opportunity and he took it and that was marshes view of the the whole thing but to cope that was like that was not very cool and I'm going to remember that but I'm still going to tentatively remain friends with you all right well. Let's take a break and we'll come back right after this and we'll <hes> we'll talk about what <hes> marsh always said was the reason they were no longer friends right after this take <music> hey everyone. Did you know that the Diamond Casino Resort is now open in the heart of below Santos. Yes the Diamond Casino. Resort is a one stop destination for quality entertainment high end living in grand theft auto online. That's right they offer a range of experiences for all kinds kinds of players. You can try your hand at Casino Games like three card poker blackjack and roulette play slot machines with a variety of prizes and much much more also you can look it up by purchasing a penthouse and becoming a V._I._p.. Member you'll gain access to a series of action packed cooperative missions Angel Access to V._I._p.. Lounges high limit tables and a range of special services via the penthouse phone including aircraft limousines Hula experience the never ending universe of multiplayer he player gameplay possibilities in grand theft auto online and the latest free update the Diamond Casino and resort access it free with every copy the grand theft auto five available now at Rockstar Games dot com awesome all right so marshes <hes> really screwed his friend over his back paid off dudes to send him stuff <hes> but according to marsh he's like that's not why we weren't friends anymore that that was not what really killed our friendship at all. Here's what happened later on that year co published the paper <hes> establishing this new species <hes> alas most Soroush platoon areas nice thank you <hes> marsh goes goes to the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philly check this thing out because they're still sort of friends at this point right and cope showing off his things like look at this thing I put this thing back together and and look at the skeleton it's amazing and said my friend it appears you have fallen into the classic Paleontology Trap and mounted the head on the but Yup Wong and this was a humiliating thing for cope shirt so much so that <hes> he realized Oh God I just wrote a paper describing this thing with its head on the wrong end in the American Philosophical Societies Journal Journal and ran out and tried to buy as many of these copies as he could just to cover up his his mistake and <hes> the way that the way that marsh rush put it later because he ran around telling everybody he could about this gas is very glib about it. Oh very very <hes> like he wa- he just wanted to make sure that everybody knew that cope had screwed screwed up right Looking at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia where this skeleton was in the first place that's right so what apparently really happened is is marsh comes in and it just says Oh actually the neck vertebrae is in is in the wrong position that got everyone over there looking and light. He's the one who actually said Oh no when you have the head <hes> in the wrong place where the tail is and to fully paint a picture here. This wasn't like some huge big deal like mistakes. It was very early on in Paleontology <hes> everyone was doing their best. <hes> there was a lot of trial and error going on a lot of guesswork and it wasn't like Oh my gosh she you know it's not like someone today drawing the head of a bear mounted on his but <hes> they were doing the best they could and and it wasn't like some huge error right now and it is true from what I understand that cope did run around trying to buy the copies of the American Philosophical Society Journal no that had the incorrect part in it and he was <hes> humiliated especially the fact that marsh was involved but it definitely wasn't marsh running to rescue to save paleontology <hes> in in coach just being a wuss overall it was definitely incorrect picture that marsh painted but regardless of how it's painted painted or what actually happened that two prong attack on the friendship both of them perpetrated by marsh frankly if you ask me they ended their friendship like they're they're friendliness was basically out the door. There's some evidence that in the following couple years when they wrote to one another they would kind of jokingly reference some of the stuff in the past but that even that eventually dried up and they genuinely became bitter bitter rivals made all no more pronounced <hes> when the West was opened up by the transcontinental railroad because all of a sudden you had said earlier that the the fossil fields in the east I were the well the the conditions of climate and geology and these were not conducive to preserving dinosaur bones. The exact opposite is true of the Western western United States in the West opened up. It was like come on and Paleontology. The timing of the two is just astoundingly perfect. Yeah I mean we're talking about the DAKOTAS Kansas <hes> just bones everywhere and not even too hard to find a lot of times <hes> <hes> I mean if you're a paleontologist and you headed west if you had some protection because this is <hes> despite all our efforts that was still sort of a dangerous area for a white man from the east to be traveling around <hes> the native American tribes there in the western tribes did not take kindly to a lot of it no because think about it like they went from the wagon trains of settlers coming through periodically two trains daily moving people in and out so it was a big deal to the western eastern tribes who were fighting back and pushing back against this encroachment in wave that was coming much more strongly than it had been before the railroad too yeah for sure so from this point on the guys took very <hes> sort of different I guess were forced to take different approaches to their careers. <hes> cope basically spend the rest of his life as a working paleontologists like feet on the ground for the most part. He didn't work at a college. He didn't work at a museum <hes> until much much much later <hes> he was not like taking care of her funded by the government so he paid for all the you know he came from wealthy family so he paid for most of the stuff himself <hes> <hes> sold his farm his family quaker farm and got a big fat inheritance and started going West in started amassing this big collection that was actually his which was <hes> a really big deal because since no one was contributing to his <hes> financial <hes> burdens he ah yes technically owned this stuff right he owned it fair and square. I mean he'd financed his own expeditions. He paid for the shipping and transportation of these things which is another thing. The road helped it not only open the west help ship enormous bones back east to the museums but he was paying for this so yeah that his collection was his own <hes> marsh on the other her hand being ensconced in Yale he was able to rely on Yale Yale. Families government contacts that Yale had to finance expeditions nations that he went on so in his mind it was his collection but <hes> technically it really wasn't because he hadn't financed any of it himself it it had all been financed by others the thing the thing about marsh though chuck is that he was the first one to make it out west and because he was the first one and there he basically considered the entire western United States his turf and everyone else was encroaching on it which is awfully rich if you can remember what he did to you cope back at hadn't field and set back then there wasn't any kind of ownership on any fossils but now that he's the first one out West there is such thing and they all belong to him for sure <hes> Suco then you know when it comes to academics they also were really really different in how they approach things <hes> we kinda teased earlier about how much co wrote and published and boy it's astounding <hes> it seems like he published throughout his career about fourteen hundred academic papers in the eighteen seventies he was doing about twenty five papers year and in one winter alone of eighteen seventy nine and eighteen eighty he published seventy six papers papers very prolific to the point where it was pretty easy for someone like marsh to poke holes and <hes> kind of say that he was either either <hes> copying people or plagiarizing people or just outright fraudulent in that no one can write this much stuff <hes> it also presented a problem in that cope <hes> he was publishing so much that he had a hard time getting stuff published as a while after a while because there weren't a ton of scientific journals and it can't be like listen man. We can't publish like ten things a month from you or a quarter because we'll just call this thing the Cope Journal and he said that's a great idea right so in eighteen seventy seven he bought the American Naturalist Journal for Himself to publish his own works which ended up being a really <hes> <hes>. I don't know about bad choice but financially I it is what really put the biggest dent in his <hes>. Future fortunes was sinking a ton of his own money into this <hes> American Naturalist Journal. Oh is that right. I thought it was the silver mind the journal set him up for it. Oh yeah the silver mine was a last ditch effort to try and make a a little bit of money because he was almost broke by that point so so he but he does have this forum now <hes> whether it's a good business opportunity attorney or not he has a forum to publishing <hes> and and like you're saying he broke to so many papers not only was it just too many for the journals to keep keep up with there are also a lot of questions from these journals like wait a minute I if you're like a deliberate thoughtful scientists you shouldn't be able to publish this much and one of the problems of the bone wars the rivalry between cope and marsh that that really Kinda got both of them to be the first to rush to name a species or make some new discovery <hes> so that the other one couldn't is that there was a lot of sloppy work that came out of it and when there's a lot of sloppy sloppy Texan nominal work where are the same species as getting different names from different people at the same time that takes a lot to untangle and apparently it took <hes> paleontology many any decades to kind of undo some of the sloppy work that was kind of laid the foundation of the field in in the eighteen seventies yeah and especially copes feet because for his part marsh was very much more methodical did not publish nearly as many papers but along with that comes a lot more prestige. No no one was GONNA no one's GonNa talk about marsh and say that he's publishing too much. He's doing sloppy work <hes> so as a result they were published in some some really prestigious journals over the years kind of almost exclusively and he had like you said Yale behind him so he would take students a lot of times. Make them pay their own own way because this is all very expensive endeavor for the time <hes> you know cope was it was sort of creative in how he would fund some of this like he would had latch onto other western expeditions had nothing to do with paleontology those called the wheeler survey which was a mapping expedition that he was able to hook up with so he would cut corners and save where he could but with the power of Yale University to behind him in these students who would pay their own way. Marsh had a real advantage when it came to <hes> staking his claim out West right and also there is one of the first expeditions he went on <hes> was funded by the families of some Yale student so it was some you Yale students and marsh basically playing cowboy out west and the I I guess the first day once they arrived out west where they were GONNA dig <hes> Buffalo Bill Cody shows up basically kind of like as a guest star to appear in just delighted thrill the cowboys boys <hes> one of whom wrote about the whole expedition and the whole thing up published in Harper's so whole thing kind of demonstrates that <hes> marsh as much as kind of seen gene is like this meek deliberate scientists was also really good at Self Promotion to oh for sure he would wear gun. I think he sort of fashioned himself as a <hes> Teddy Roosevelt type or maybe a buffalo bill type and yeah he would suit his own horn for sure <hes> for his part cope <hes> after for his father passed away spent less and less time out west in the actual field more time in Philadelphia and he would hire guys out in fact marsh would later go on to do a very similar thing where they would have their <hes> diggers out there <hes> excavating and then sending bones back to the east coast where they can do their <hes> dig in and do their studying there right and it's out West that this book the famous bone wars really started to take place but like you were saying neither Marshall or cope were there but what was going on out west all the dirty deeds and all that stuff we're at the at the direction behest of these two so you WanNa take another break and then get into what the bone own words really all about okay. We'll be right back <music> everyone everyone attention and it is clear that no one has time to go to the post office. Yeah you're busy. WHO's got time for traffic for parking for lugging all your mail and packages? We Love The post office. It's a real hassle though okay yeah that's why you need stamps dot com and we love stamps dot com everyone because they got behind stuff. You should know from the the very beginning and they've been with us for a long time. Yeah we love them for that amd because they eliminate trips to the post office and they save you money with discount. You can't even get at the post office yeah. They bring all the amazing services of the post office right to your computer. You can use your computer and printer to print official U._S.. Postage twenty four seven for any letter or any package any class of male anywhere you WANNA send it. It's that simple yep. Sam Satcom is a no brainer and right now. It's even more brainless because you can get a special offer that includes a four week trial plus free postage and a digital scale without any long term commitment just go to stamps dot COM click on that Oh microphone at the top of the homepage age and type in stuff that stamps dot com enter stuff all right chuck so the eighteen seventies roll around the West is opened up from the transcontinental railroad the the it's giving up its fossils. It's just crazy how well preserved fossils are out there because has of <hes> heat and dryness in wind erosion exposes them in there was a a part of that American experience documentary where where they they showed a picture of like just this landscape that you could see from the train and <hes> they said that that some expedition was riding by figured that they were riding by a just a rock outcropping and they realized that it was just a field covered in dinosaur bones that that's it wasn't rocks. It was bone. That's how many bones there were out west so the West is starting to yield this stuff and just one place would become like a treasure trove in another place would become a treasure trove and each of these places <hes> some prospector would find a big bone in the first thing they would think of was I need to either get in touch with <hes> cope or marsh because these guys are going to want to know about this and they'll probably pay big bucks for it and that's really once they stopped <hes> mounting their own expeditions. That's how they got. Most of their bones is from amateurs getting in touch with them. Yes this you know this would open the door for these guys to really kind of <hes> get underhanded. They would hire guys away from each other. They would pay for information about the other person's digs and bones. They were getting they would outbid one another like they eventually like I said both these guys would end up pretty much financially ruined in the end they were reports of sabotage of theft. <hes> there were reports reports of dynamiting the other person's like digs in their camps. Well one thing I saw listen to this. Marsh ordered that if his men couldn't get bones <music> out of like a a find like they couldn't get it out. He said smashing them do not leave them is that they would like smaller fines that they would dig up that they didn't think were as important <hes> they would smash so the other person wouldn't have anything to do with them yeah so they were smashing the fossils that they sought for science because of their rivalry that's the insane degree that it reached yeah and you know it's easy now to <hes> and i'm wondering if this like how much they had to trump this up for a movie script because it seems like some of this is exaggerated <hes> i don't know if they found actual evidence that they would dynamite each other's camps <hes> it seems like the most they would do is like you know push dirt back onto the things that they had dug out <hes> and not you know again their lackeys out there doing this stuff right <hes> and you know these guys this is all kind of perpetrated by marsh and cope themselves they would kind of trump up these stories <hes> in the press and things to kind of make the other one look bad so while there were bone wars going on i'm not sure it was quite as like <hes> exciting is they're made out to be well there were like shootouts or anything like that but i mean just the fact that these two paleontologists are trying to sabotage one another's career is kind of hilarious in of itself you know yeah i mean and it could have you know the fact that these guys were driving each other and it's like this is the lens we look at it through now is like did this hurt the field paleontology or help it and you can kind of look at it from two angles <hes> and one hand whoa what if they would have worked together pool their resources is maybe they could have found a lot more and gotten a lot more things straight than they didn't have to untangle later or maybe because they were so competitive and drove each other to work work harder maybe they were covering things because of that because they uncovered a lot of stuff like they were both super prolific together i think <hes> between between the two of them they accounted for one hundred twenty six new species of dinosaur and that's just dinosaur yeah and again this is at a time where you could like stub your toe and look down he just discovered a new species of dinosaur because so little work had been done in the field but yet they definitely did dr one another to <hes> <hes> to to work harder and faster and try to outdo one another and one of the big benefits that the field saw that you can point to in retrospect and even at the time time was that winner of eighteen seventy seven that i was talking about <hes> this is like winter in wyoming it's not a very welcoming climate <hes> and yet both marsh and cope hired their prospectors their bone diggers to <hes> continue working through the winner rather than taking a break break like you traditionally what you've dug in the summer row papers in the winter they said no keep going this is just to the bones that are coming out of this place to good and i don't want my rival rival to be the one to take them all out so both kept working through the winner and out of that one winter we got triceratops we got a pet assuras zora sega's biggest source and all from that one winner of eighteen seventy seven and i if you can't look back and say yes these guys drove one another to to this level of discovery i don't know what you can say i just throw my hands up in disgust otherwise did that makes sense sure okay <hes> i mean <unk> as a paleontologist you could literally just say <hes> you know the triceratops i discovered it yeah and that could be that could be your career right there let alone the stegosaurus a source on top of the triceratops come on sure and then a paradis <hes> that may sound vaguely familiar here let me drop in on you that you'll say oh oh you're ready brontosaurus same thing apparently yeah i didn't i didn't even fully get a i mean this gets into the weeds with like serious serious paleontology pedantry in netting out but yeah i i see brontosaurus allow me to nerd out for just a second the <hes> the the point of the apache source brontosaurus being the same thing with different names as one of those things that's frequently laid at the feet of marsh saying this was sloppy happy work on marshes part and maybe if he hadn't been competing with cope he would have done better work that's probably not the case but he named the same species two different things things because he thought they were two different species in the later paleontologists about twenty thirty years later came along and said i think this is the same thing since they were call the pat source i i that's what we're gonna call this from now on an so scientifically brontosaurus should've gone i can't believe about say is the way of the dinosaur but somehow how it got into the the cultural zeitgeist and everybody said no we like saying brontosaurus more i blame the simpson or <hes> the flintstones because of the brontosaurus birthing who who knows if that's the case or not but that was that was supposedly the brontosaurus in the stores are the the same thing in really you're supposed to call pat sawers there you have it folks netting out so in the eighteen eighties this is after the big rush of the late seventy s <hes> things started to change a bit so marshes got a couple of good jobs he's the he's <hes> he works at the u._s. geological survey <hes> and and is the president of the national academy of sciences but financially they're not doing so great on either side because like we said earlier they'd spend a lot of their own money trying to outdo one another right so <hes> marshes in way way better position than cope this is actually at a point when cope is kind of against the ropes but rather than both of them just kind of going their own way the dinosaur wars have kind of ebbed a little bit and they can just kind of go off in in work paleontologists or the rest of their life marsh decides to come after cope <hes> in dealing the deathblow the moment marsh had a position of power that he could use against cope he abused used his position immediately he was very high up at the u._s._g._s. and he used that connection to freeze cope out of any any chance of getting any kind of government funding for any further expeditions so cope was basically penniless sorry chuck because he had invested in that silver mine that that he use the rest of his money for basically the silver mind went bust so we lost all of his money and now his greatest enemy and rival was in charge of the purse strings thanks for government expeditions and had basically said you're not getting a dime cope so cope was left with his collection and nothing else that's bad enough but then marsh decided to take it one step further and he introduced some laws into the u._s. g._s. <hes> i guess bylaws said if government mint <hes> if a government program agency has funded an expedition any fossils collected from that expedition belong to the government and any sent the u._s._g._s. after cope's collection he tried to take copes collection the only thing cope had left he didn't have his family anymore <hes> he was living alone in like a tiny apartment surrounded by collection it was all he had left a marsh tried to take it from him and actually marsh failed because cope could prove that he had paid for most of it that's that's right and it was that collection that kind of funded the rest of his life he would sell off parts of it here and there <hes> when he needed to make rent and stuff like that <hes> he did get a job he in eighteen and eighty nine he was hired as professor of zoology at the university of pennsylvania so that's good at least had a little bit of an income and <hes> it was they were a dead to each other at this point though <hes> spent a lifetime battling each other cope was just infuriated the links marsh would go it was all just there's very petty <hes> at this point and neither one of them come out looking great <hes> because of a career of sort of backstabbing each other and <hes> they went to the press yes <hes> in the end i think it was <hes> copious taken these copious notes over his life about all the grievances he had against marsha the years and he went to the new york herald they published an article about this but it ended up just making both of them look bad made marsh look bad because of the things he did made cope look <hes> tom petty and angry about everything and this is all kind of played out in public in the press right and in this in this first article <hes> when cope went to the herald herald <hes> he accused not just <hes> marsh of of <hes> like wrongdoing but also the u._s._g._s. of corruption and that actually got the interest of congress who started investigating and <hes> ended up cutting the u._s._g._s. budget by like half so marsh ended up losing his job and his position and has had paleontologists that the u._s. and in a beautiful ironic twist that law that he himself had inserted <hes> in through the u._s._g._s. this g._s. that anybody who's collection <hes> had been financed by the u._s. government <hes> could lose that collection meant that he actually lost his collection collection the government came after his election and took a substantial chunk of it for itself because it had finance so much of his expeditions so it ended up turning him inviting him i'm in his own rear and he lost a lot of his collection which really burned sa- cope died i <hes> he died in eighteen ninety seven at the age of fifty six <hes> but not before he would issue a challenge to marsh which is i'm leaving my body and my brain to science and i betcha my brain's bigger than your brain <hes> marshon ever took the bait <hes> he died in eighteen eighty nine of pneumonia at the age of sixty eight and by all accounts did not <hes> take part in this brain measuring <hes> competition this this posthumous competition in the grave <hes> which i think is kind of funny <hes> but that brain i think copes brain is still <hes> still under the ownership of the university of pennsylvania today it's still wanders the halls at night amazing ghostly brain rain that's the surprise ending to this one that's right and i guess in the end <hes> marsh is credited with eighty species to cope's fifty fifty six which is not bad plus also cope has that fourteen hundred papers under his belt to a lot of papers <hes> you got anything else about the bone ores nope well that's it everybody there's a i think there's a drunk history episode about this i never saw it but it looks pretty good i would recommend the american experience it's episode on it and just go read up more on it because it's pretty interesting stuff and since i said <hes> it a bunch of times just now it's time for a listener mail all right i'm gonna call this <hes> civil air patrol this is from jackson <hes> share belotti can i ask you a question yes there is a big influx of civil air patrol emails out of nowhere did you notice did not yeah we got like a handful of them just out of the blue and i didn't no if if something happened or what but i guess it's making the rounds somehow who knows maybe we're on the civil air patrol watchlist weblog they thank you so <hes> from jackson he says i have been a listener for about seven years since i was ten years old anyway a senior master sergeant in the civil air patrol patrol and have been in it for about two and a half years is really excited you guys finally did a podcast on us is not a ton of people even know he exists <hes> some say we are the air force's his best kept secret but that one i'd have something on your guys <hes> it is nice to get some publicity we like that though you guys totally nailed it did an awesome job always being a cadet in the program of like to hear more about that part <hes> maybe do a short stuff on it someday cut life is more more of a training life then actually doing the stuff <hes> like learning how to lead effectively and all that jazz <hes> we also have a lot of mini bootcamp things things that we go to further are learning <hes> anyway you did an outstanding job and i would appreciate it if you could give a shout out to my squadron the green mountain mountain composite squadron it's not bad not a bad name green mountain composite squadron sounds like a wholesale furniture material i was gonna say it sounds like a sort of a modern bluegrass band oh that's a good one two yet like there's a lot of symptom involved you're okay santon mandolin okay and that was <hes> from jackson jackson is he the front man for this <hes> bluegrass band of course all right well thanks a lot for <hes> for writing in jackson hopefully we fulfilled all of your requests <hes> and if we didn't t. s. for you you if you want to get in touch with us like jackson did you can go onto stuff you should know dot com check out her social links or you can send us a good old fashioned email rep spank it on the bottom and send it off to stuff podcast iheartradio dot com stuff you should know is production iheartradio's how stuff works for more podcasts from my heart radio is iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows the diamond casino resort is now open in the heart of loss santos a one stop destination for quality entertainment i'm in high end living in grand

Marsh West America Joseph Lady professor Philadelphia squarespace Josh Clark S. K. Yale University Maine Chuck Bryant University of Pennsylvania Orlando Cope Journal Cope New Jersey Boston United States
Episode 39 - Finding "Old Shaky" Buried In A Glacier With 52 MIA's Aboard: Part 1

NO HOME FOR HEROES

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Episode 39 - Finding "Old Shaky" Buried In A Glacier With 52 MIA's Aboard: Part 1

"Hello and welcome to this episode of no home for heroes in your next stop. Wasteland aircraft number fifty one dash one one zero seven took off from mcchord Air Force Base in Tacoma Washington fifteen thirty hours that's about three thirty pm for a projected seven hour and three minute flight the ELMENDORF Air Force Base and Anchorage Alaska. Today's episode of history's military mysteries will be chock full of odd coincidence fair warning heard and fifty two miles from her family home strange coincidence perhaps for those of you who believe in such things card have in common stay tune while we tell you about one of the most incredible cases we have ever investigated clean podcast on Apple podcast four whichever podcast or streaming platform you prefer well our questions today art episode of no home for heroes his perhaps are all time winner in the twilight zone category so conjure up a rod Sir Hey we have ever been involved in and rarely do we investigate one of history's military mysteries the contained so many bizarre fire novel all of us here at the foundation want to dedicate this episode to just one loyalist she was airplane buried in a glacier for over sixty years with fifty two missing servicemen on board and enough mysteries to fill an entire our episode today is titled Finding Old Shaking Buried in a glacier with fifty two M is on and I'm your host Rick Stone I begin with what do auto atomic bombs missing jewels a Hollywood star of politicians relative and a ghost Heidi www cheap rick zone dot com. If you're hearing this preview of no home for heroes on your youtube or audio bursts we invite you to listen to the no home for heroes is a trademark production sponsored by the chief Rick Stone in Family Charitable Foundation for more information on the foundation visit our website I the case involved the potential recovery of fifty two American heroes listed as missing in action the largest single recovery case of incidences and odd head scratchers that we have to number them just to keep all the strange facts straight but today's part one of our on at the exact moment that ole shaky crashed in nineteen fifty two with fifty two men aboard exactly three thousand five hundred arrival in Anchorage was twenty to thirty three hours that's all about ten thirty three PM in the evening sufficient fuel was on board for eleven rolling in let's head off into that world between sight and sound we're GonNa fill your head with so many strange occurrences that you will thank you have just entered the toilet carried fifty two men mostly Air Force and army personnel but one from the Marine Corps and one serviceman from the name estimated time odds-on Cohen Board Cold Shaky cruising at about nine thousand feet across Alaska's vast ear today's episode is from case number zero three three six L. The investigative case files of cheaper sewn and Family Charitable Foundation disco the flight was designated Flight Number D thirty nine slash twenty two belt thirty nine slash twenty two and Surrey due to forecasted icing conditions the gross weight of the aircraft prior to takeoff was one hundred seventy four thousand seven hundred today story is just too epic to be told in one podcast pitcher probably be a book or at least a two hour movie for star the weather or the flight is described in this official record that was filed after the crash there was about ten miles ability icing level at one thousand feet at Middleton island in route was well but say a little bit sketchy thirty not winds up to nine thousand feet between Middleton and ELMENDORF pilot reports from this area however indicated that sixty breath Cheney no you may have heard that last night before American modern history Captain Cheney received his Polish rating on twenty may nine eight hundred fifty nine flight hours as a pilot co-pilot also sometimes referred to as the first pilot was Captain Alger in fact a C forty seven southbound into Elmendorf have approximately the same time reported a ground speed of sixty eight knots for the win the key Adam to note in this description of the weather along aircraft fifty one eleven zero seven's flight path is that sixty five to eight forty six pounds which was just within a whisker of the C one twenty four hours maximum rated gross weight one hundred seventy five thousand hours and thirty minutes of flight time an extra two thousand four hundred and two pounds of fuel was added to the aircraft to compensate for extra power extensively to transport nuclear weapons and designed to transport a tank bulldozer or two up to two hundred soldiers the United States not not wind were noted by other aircraft but that information was apparently not available to captain new-ball onboard shaky there's no indication the aw named whole shaky because of the noise and vibration from the four huge Pratt and Whitney r forty three sixty piston engines anneli equipment during exercises and overseas deployments this period of time when we lost shaky was during the Korean War Oft Aircraft Commander Captain Kenneth James ewbal percentages pilots rating on twelve April nineteen forty three and he had logged two thousand five to eighty mile per hour winds however this information was not then available to the pilot of coal shaky this was the last confirmed contact promotion she never arrived at Elmendorf Orient Airlines flashing passenger plane who stated that he picked up a scratchy radio signal on the distress channel that said quote a search for aircraft eleven o seven was delayed by very bad weather which continued for three days after the aircraft failed to arrive at Elmendorf Air Force Base while other aircraft the United States Air Force were often affectionally given individual names complete with nose art the C twenty fours at the time the flight reported that it was just east of Middleton Island in the Gulf of Alaska south of Prince William Sound and it was flying at nine thousand the C one twenty four a known as Globemaster was the largest cargo plane in the American Air Fleet at the time it was used reports later proved to be accurate a member of the Fairbanks Civil Air Patrol Lieutenant Terrace Moore who was ironically the president title search Prince William Sound the search was hampered by reports of wreckage spotted in the water offshore and a captain of North West that produced three thousand eight hundred horsepower at twenty one fifty hours well let's see twenty one fifty sounds like about nine fifty pilot reports from the other aircraft in the vicinity indicated moderate to severe icing and turbulence the weather cross-section forecast intact enough right inefficacious however the wreck quickly sank deeper into the glacier is a search and rescue team was the searchers finally reached the tail section in Blizzard Conditions Finding note forty three and his log three thousand four hundred and ninety two flight hours as a pilot the copilot and the pilot were Berry experienced thousand feet airplane appeared to have slid down the cliffs and exploded throwing wreckage across several acres at the time it was found the tail was observations Sullivan and more road in their reports the aircraft is scattered over at least two acres and covered by eight feet of fresh powder record that aircraft eleven o seven was equipped with radar and there's evidence the captain do all was not flying on instruments own with noon being buried in about three feet of snow in quote further recovery activity was called off and ultimately the passengers and crew why the search and rescue team man suffered from frostbite and rations ran low while snowfall trapped me on in their sleeping bags as tint sides collapsed obliging each other too big the other members out on ninety semper nineteen fifty two twenty five November nineteen fifty two thirty two military planes began to scour the area along the flight path and four coast guard four strategic air command or SAC was the initial operator of the C.. You want twenty four Globemaster there were fifty in service from nineteen hundred of the University of Alaska and Lieutenant Thomas Sullivan of the Tenth Air Rescue Squadron I spotted the tail section of aircraft eleven o seven sticking out of finding no trace of survivors or additional wreckage they returned to base camp on our way up we had carefully set out the trail as long as we have to land we might as well land here in quote well these all became red herrings none of these spent several hours on the is confirming that the wreckage was that of the missing see one twenty four a quote one fact is obvious from all fifty two or officially declared dead by the Department of Defense official caused the crash was determined to be navigational or craft access cover and a member of the Alaska National Guard reported what he thought he saw as human remains snow inquiry after returning from the side Lieutenant Moore stated that the plane was quote obviously was flying at full speed in quote when it struck at the crash site this bite seventy mile per hour winds helicopters reportedly flew beyond their safe operating altitude theresa four days before near Mount Janet on Colony Glacier about thirty miles east northeast of ELMENDORF air force base right outside anchor error well remember there was found approximately thirty miles off course secondary factors including whether and radio off-course and into an area where the mountain were higher than the planned altitude of their flight and there buried deep through nine thousand nine hundred sixty to their primary duty as we said was the transport nuclear weapons between airbases and to provide airlift of sack person Mount Gannett the elevations of which is nine thousand one hundred feet remember that captain devolve reported that he was flying at nine wins and poor weather for several days they establish a base camp at five thousand five hundred feet which was eight miles eight miles from the tail section the snow on Mount Gannett six days after it was reported lost six days after its loss they landed their piper super cub and almost sixty years until the phone rang at the Joint POW I Come Accounting Command in Honolulu Hawaii and there was no one there to answer it when the phone rang but me shortly after eight o'clock on thirteen June night two thousand twelve an air force lieutenant colonel needs within minutes correlated Captain Duval's dog tags to a missing in action report an unresolved casualty listed in the Intelligence Directorate indicated that none of the casualties were recovered and therefore all fifty two individuals on board were officially listed as unresolved Alaska

ELMENDORF Air Force Base mcchord Air Force Base Anchorage Alaska Tenth Air Rescue Squadron Rick Stone Tacoma Washington Alaska Lieutenant Thomas Sullivan Captain Duval Lieutenant Moore Globemaster Alaska National Guard University of Alaska Mount Gannett Mount Gannett Honolulu Hawaii official
12.19.19 Commission-free investing; Social security scams; Getting rid of a timeshare

Clark Howard Show

00:00 sec | 11 months ago

12.19.19 Commission-free investing; Social security scams; Getting rid of a timeshare

"I'm so glad to welcome you here the Clark Howard show where it's about. Can you learning ways to save more and spend less and don't let anyone ever rip you off speaking ripoffs coming up in today's as Clark -rageous moment scammers are targeting you regardless of age with cons trying to get your social security number number out of you. I want to tell you what you need to know and coming up later I think about how Evergreen Green has been how it's gone on forever people calling me desperate to unload timeshare that they bought that maybe at one time worked really well for them and then it's not going to talk about what you need to know to get rid of that timeshare and how to avoid getting scammed r-maine websites Clark Dot Com and as we close in on Christmas. We're in the last week of Christmas shopping. I WanNa tell you Clark deals. Is there for you working around the clock to give you the best. Last minute bargains for here dollars so you can get the right gift for the Right Person Etta Clark kind of price. So I I want to share something with you that in my gosh almost thirty three years on the air there's been a trend trend that has been unmistakable. Over this third of a century I went through the first probably fifteen years I was on the air. Never taking a question about saving for retirement spending in retirement anything like that. It just did not exist as a topic. Those I I probably fifteen years but since then in ever increasing numbers people call me and ask about out various retirement questions either starting out wanting to know about saving in a 401k. First Time they've done on network doing a roth. IRA being mid-career in trying to catch up or being at the end of the works cycle and wanting to know decisions to make moving forward as they approach retirement. So why is it that for the first decade and a half I basically never had a question about it and now it's so common. What was the difference? Back in the Nineteen Eighty S and nineteen ninety S. By far and away. The biggest difference was people retired with pensions. Then so they weren't really having to make these decisions weren't having to make choices weren't having to try to figure this out nope today. Almost nobody has a pension and who you can depend on is me myself and I and so that's led to so many more questions in an area that people find very confusing. Well I know there are a lot of people people in the financial industry that want you to be confused so that you'll feel like you need them. You need to pay them. You need to let them handle it for you and you may be intimidated or bored by or anything like that. Don't let yourself be a sitting duck overcome that and a lot of the organizations that were self-serve now offer various forms of service to help you. Fidelity investments has been experimenting with Virtual Reality Tool to help. You figure. You're out how much you need to save. And what you should do with it. And all that and all the firms all the big ultra cheap firms vanguard fidelity Schwab which are the big three of low-cost investing all three of them have various various programs. To if you just don't want to have to worry with it that make ultra easy for you to to start. Investing and to keep investing and there are various strategies they use all of which involve you paying no commissions and paying ultra low costs for investing. So know that you're not alone you don't have to have a salesperson and there are wonderful low cost choices for you available at cars dot com. I have information for you how to get started with a Roth. IRA how to make choices in a 401k. Okay and how to know what it's costing you to invest and remember these key rules. You do not invest with an insurance company period and I prefer that you never invest I with a full commission stockbrokerage or a bank or any brokerage affiliated with a bank. I want chew with low cost providers. I want people who are putting you first and charge no commissions. Do you know that if you go invest with an insurance company it can cost you as much as four hundred times in fees and expenses. What what it costs to invest with the low cost house like vanguard fidelity or Schwab four hundred times more and the greatest indicator of what kind of money you'll have down the road is what you pay up front in expenses? Patrick is with us on the Clark. Howard our show? Hello Patrick how you doing doing great wonderful thank you Patrick. Tell me how can be of service to you today. So L. has been a I'm a recent convert to the Clark follower team and I hear a lot that you want us to or you recommend and Going with the Credit Union for for summer. Most all of our baking and so I've been looking around and Arizona where I live and all of the local credit. The unions seem to be Getting kind of some bad reviews. And there's a lot of complaints around junk fees and things of that nature and I was wondering if there are some nationally You know some national credit unions that you'd recommend or is am I going to miss out on some of the benefits that are smaller local credit. Are you one of those all right so first things first. I've got to congratulate you. That is so fantastic. The you've been doing the kind of research you've been doing the been reading online reviews and seeing what people are saying and I'm terribly disappointed. Need to hear that from what you've seen on line. People are disappointed with credit unions. They're finding local to you but usually the best way to find a credit union that P par happy with that would being local as to ask people where. Oh you work do you work. Do you work for yourself or D work at an organization that company headquartered Gordon Florida. So that's not gonNA provide a ton of benefits are right. Then I wanna I wanNA give you a online tool. Were you can see what credit unions are available that let's start with what might be available for you in Arizona and it's your money money further dot com and you'll be able to find a credit union near you. There's a button in the upper right hand corner and you just put in your Zip Code and you'll see what is available near you and then you'll be able to eliminate the ones that you've seen the nasty reviews for as far as national credit unions. There are a number of really really large credit unions. I and many of the largest ones are available generally restricted to people who have served in the US military or do currently currently or their family members. And did you ever serve in the military. Did Not okay. So there are some credit unions that are military related that you can join even as current or prior service one of the big ones and the country is Pentagon Federal Credit Union. That's Penn Fed Credit Union and they have different Ways you can join the credit a union by joining military support organizations for very low cost. And then you're eligible for Penn Fed membership okay and that is a very well respected large credit union but the credit unions generally larger ones are. They're I mean they're huge national or worldwide organizations like Navy. Federal Credit Union is all over the globe and so a completely different kind of feel. Then you'd have with a local credit union in the Phoenix. Metro or the Tucson Metro Phoenix Phoenix. So Phoenix has a lot of local credit unions. And I'd be really surprised. Surprised if you didn't find one that when you checked online reviews people weren't happy with it so pretty active credit union market market. Yeah well maybe there's another question that I had. So I was focusing on ones that were as close to a billion dollars Under management spent or higher thinking. That was a good way to gauge. Maybe the stability of the Credit Union is that in my face on that or so the different your friends you get not so much stability the difference you get when you get to a billion is that generally. They're going to have more resources to offer the latest list in online banking apps and more cutting edge kind of features. Then you're GONNA have with a smaller local credit. You know people go with credit unions for different reasons to get better deals on checking better deals on savings or better deals on lending And those are the two areas people tend to concentrate on and side is a general over is a true overgeneralization. Credit credit unions tend to fall more as savers credit unions or borrower's credit unions and where they put their biggest emphasis and so really think through. Why why you want that Credit Union and see what best will meet your needs? Matthey was with us on the car. Coward Show Hi Matthew Space Matthew. You're interested in becoming a pilot. Is that right. That is correct. Well that's really great. I mean could you. You be more brilliant. I can't the pilot shortage in the United States. Worldwide is going to be the greatest over the next generation that it's ever been. I mean you write your own ticket today. If you trained to be a pilot not to mention that you get to do something you got paid for that you love doing exactly well. How can I be of help with this? Well I'm looking to finance it and I was wondering what I should be looking for when trying to finance my schooling okay. Can I tell you I would start at a different question. Question Couple of things. I'd like you to look at because of the severe pilot shortage. A number of airlines now are offering their own subsidy program for you to train to be a pilot and that that way you greatly reduce the risk you face with the borrowing you might do otherwise have you worked for any of those airline land-based programs. No I have not. I never thought about that so I would say that would be a number one priority. Number two is in more and more states now. There are state school programs where you go to a traditional four year state supported college that offers aviation programs had to be an aviation mechanic. Pilot those kind of things and so you graduate edge weight with a degree and a pilot's license and you do so at state tuition rates and state at a much. I chill lower price. Then you'd pay otherwise the other thing is that if you live in a state that doesn't have a state supported campus campus. That has a state school. That has a pilot training program. You may be able to use one of the multi-state consortium where you're able to go out of state state and pay in state tuition at a state school that offers pilot training so rather than concentrate on. How you're going to borrow a mind numbing amount of money which to get multi engine rating is gonNa cost like a quarter million dollars? Something like that. Yeah I'd much rather you not spent anywhere near that and get trained where you're part of the feeder system for a particular airline or that you get it where your state helps pay for you to get that license now. I've also been told that also look into the Civil Air Patrol. Is that something that would be useful. I have had that suggestion before. And I think that's a great idea a few to check with cap and see if there is an opportunity through civil air patrol for you to get a pilot's license out of lower possible all costs. Check them all out before you start thinking about how you're going to borrow a quarter of a million dollars. They say breakfast is the most important meal of the day at AC hotels we agree. That's where European inspired breakfast features pursued a slice razor thin and fresh croissants imported from France all served in AC kitchen talk about a wakeup call. AC hotels the perfectly precise hotel. Today's car courageous moment is something to take to heart scams involving people trying to get your social security already information out of you or other personal information up twenty three fold in the last year. According to the New York Post and criminals are using every manipulative technique. They can to con- personal information out of view. The most important thing is do not engage anyone in conversation who claims to be from the Social Security Administration. They're not calling and anybody calling pretending to be is with near near one hundred percent certainty acrylic and know that they're no longer targeting just the elderly they're targeting people of all all ages with all kinds of fish stories about why you need to cough up personal information or pay them money to protect your social security. Ignore them all hang up the phone. Delete Female Contour from Cox has all your favorites all in one place and with the contour remote you can use your voice to fund them on live TV on demand and streaming APPs like netflix prime video and more seat Cox Dot Com for details. Thanks for taking time out of your day to join us here on the Clark Howard Show where it's about your empowerment with knowledge see can keep more of what you make Clarke Dot Com. Our main website Kark deals dot com is where we post deals for you around the clock so important this week. If you're a procrastinator and you haven't taken care of everybody who's been nice on your list maybe even buy gifts for some. That have been naughty. We got the deals for for you at Clark Deals Dot Com. So what's not a deal when you own a timeshare that you wanna Wanna get rid of so. I have used a phrase for ever that timeshares or a defective product. The reason season I call him. A defective product is in normal product. When you buy it has intrinsic value when you decide? It doesn't fit your life anymore anymore. The unfortunate thing is that most timeshares most not all have basically no value. Oh you and the marketplace for you once he bought it from the developer most the value of it went down the drain rain with marketing costs commissions and all the rest think about the overhead. That's involved in selling a single condominium unit fifty or fifty one times instead of selling condominium unit one time to one owner so the value of the actual real estate is pretty much a visceral rated by being sold by the original developer developer. All those time. So what do you have to sell. If you don't want that timeshare anymore. You have an obligation that may cost a buyer thousand bucks a year. Let's say for that week for maintenance and other expenses that are passed onto them. I mean I can go stay somewhere really nice for less than that thousand dollars and then I'm not responsible for a time share but there are people in love them. What if you don't maybe he did but your life changed and you don't well number one? I want you to know that. There is the possibility in rare cases for you to sell a timeshare back back to the original developer. The Original Marketing Organization. Lot of the big hotel chains the the guide into the timeshare Biz. Don't want the word out there. How little that week is worth because people put them on resale sites at the same time that the hotel chains is trying to sell new weeks? And you're saying I'll pay you three thousand thousand dollars takeover my week. What does that do the hotel chain trying to sell a week for twenty five or thirty thousand dollars? The value. The perceived value in the marketplace is demolished so a lot of times the developer. If they're still actively marketing weeks six may be willing to take that timeshare back from you. They probably most cases won't pay you anything but now there's they might pay you some to get your week back and inventory that they can resell now wanNA mention a website. I mentioned to me by a listener and it seems to be legit called responsible. Exit Dot Com. Let me repeat that responsible exit. Talk calm and it's where various real estate developers are trying to keep you from posting a week. So you've got where you're trying to dispose of it and you're willing to pay anybody thousands of dollars just to take it over. That's just so bad for their business. They can't stand it so responsible. Exit Dot Com. It's where the developers are trying to protect their reputation and as a side benefit. You protect your wallet but if you've got a week somewhere that the developer is has done. They've washed their hands of it. They're out they're not actively selling they're not interested in you at all WanNa mention again the timeshare a user's group that I've talked about over the years that you can go to and it is like a co-op of people where they post about the development and the the the units they have and all that and then there is a selling form there to sell units and it costs. I think like fifteen twenty bucks a year to be remember and then you can post a week and the best potential buyer of a week that you wanna get rid of that. You can't get anybody normal ways to WanNa buy it or people who already own a week at a place and we'd really like another one. Maybe their families grown or maybe they want to bring others with them. Maybe they have relatives. That's too close for comfort for them to be in the same unit but they WANNA have family family week together but separately. They could buy your week from you or you could pay them to take your week and you just stew a traditional real estate closing with whoever you would sell to so you have no further legal obligation on that property. Heather is with us on the Clark. Howard show hi heather? How's it going? It's going well today. We've got some decent weather for For this time of year sure well great. Well how can I be of service to you. Well I heard you say that couples should have credit cards in their own names so despite being a blended family my husband and I went all in together on financial transparency and combined all of our finances when we got married so now we each have cards with each other's names on them for almost all of our credit cards some of them might be authorized users. But we could be co-owners and I don't even know how to tell the difference and I'm wondering if that authorized user is just as dangerous as being a CO owner so dangerous. Let's talk about what danger means in this case so if you are co owners you're both owners of an account. What one does the other is legally liable for? If you are an authorized user on a card you can use it. All you want. And you're not responsible overpaying and you're not responsible for your spouse's use of it either even if you're married you well okay. So that is one exception. And that's people who live in community property states. The debts of one are treated as the debts of the other in most situations but there are actually very few community property states and most are in the southwest or parts of the West. So how do you know if you're an authorized user on a card or a CO owner. Do you just have to call the credit card company to ask and hope you get an accurate answer. You might be able to tell from looking at your credit report but the best way is to do just what you said is to call the customer. No service number and say you're trying to figure out if your co owners of an an account or if one of you is authorized user so if we keep very little debt on the card at all or pay it off every single month. I don't have any expectation that that's going to change then. Being having both of our names on the credit card doesn't seem to have the same kind of risk right and it's also really great for both of your credit because it means that both of you look like you've got a lot of cards because you have your cards. And he has his carts right. Yeah so but by by crossing where you got authorize users together on some of them and you got co co Borrower on others. Then it means both of you look like you've got quite a amount of available credit and you should both have as long as you've been paying your bills on time. You should both have great credit scores. We do and that sounds like from this that we probably don't need to change anything so no I mean the the time that people call me in distress with your question is when the personal relationship is deteriorating. And that's the only time that these questions of authorized user co-owner or whatever became really dire important but if everything's going on swimmingly then you're just fine great. We'll have a great day and I appreciate the question because it is a one that can be very confusing and again in unhappy happy relationship situations it can get really really into being a problem. Nikki's with us on the Clark Howard. Show Oh Hello Nicki. Hi Clark. How are you great? Thank you Nikki. You have a question about reducing your debt right. So Oh I'm looking at reducing My Bet income ratio and I was told that if I make early car payment that That would help but my question is when I make early payments but when I make extra payments do I pay that towards the insurance or do all I paid it was the principal always okay. So here's why you're not doing anything of real benefit to yourself if when you when you say about paying interest only what they tend to do. Is they credit you a month ahead on your payment. That's not what you want. You want on a payment credited. I mean you want the principal credited instead of paying a month ahead or something because once. You've removed that principle from the loan. Those dollars never generate interest ever again. So there's a big advantage to you now. There's a weird weird thing though I've got to tell you. How long ago did you take out the vehicle loan? It's been a year okay. Some some loans. Did you get the loan car dealer. Yeah all right sometimes when you get alone from a car dealer there could be three potential hazards for you. The loan could come with prepayment penalty where you're actually penalized for paying the loan. In early or it could calculate interest one of two really awful ways. One that's known as ruler was seventy eight or the other known as some of Digits D. Did you get a copy when you financed of the actual loan when I did all right so there will be a section in there that will tell you how interest is calculated. And what you want to see he is. The interest is calculated by simple interest or daily interest or some terminology like that. But if you see the sum of digits or rule seventy eight is not really going to help you much to prepay on that loan I. It's a really despicable way that even when people pay off alone early they're still stuck with the interest on that loan. Okay now Out Go ahead other person so when I make an extra payment when I'm when I make a payment towards my principal other than my regular payment do I need to contact. Contact the loan company and tell them that I want that to go to mypillow premium. Yeah pretty much what you do is you call and you okay. You want to make an extra principal payment not a monthly payment. You want to pay principle. How do you do that? And you get a monthly coupon no all right so you got no monthly statement. You got one once a year or two. I think I think they send a statement but it comes through the credit crappy. Okay so I don't. I'm paper so I don't see it right. I want you to you. See it because there may be a form that you send in a separate check that you say this is four principal and there'll be a box on there that is principal. prepayment okay because you don't want them doing games with your wallet where you send it in with the intention of paying on principle and instead they just say Oh yeah. You've already made your payment for February. nope that wasn't what I was trying to do. I'm trying to pay that principle down Larry's with us on the Clark Howard show. Larry you have a mortgage question. Inform me how's it going. I do Clark Whether I should do a reverse mortgage or a regular mortgage I know you spoke really badly about reverse mortgages that I I give no famous right so reverse mortgages become appropriate when you're pretty much out of other ways to pay for your life. Do you own your home free and clear or do you still have a mortgage on it. I do Clark Omb. Oh my home and I'm retired. I retired say a retirement for myself me also say security. I had four fifty minutes out retired my wife and I. It's pretty quick when I know I'm sorry. So are you finding that each month. You're struggling to live the life that you'd like to just to do more things To travel more things on how all those take a few a WHO Credit card bills. Okay so if you do a reverse mortgage I use a pretty simple back of the envelope way to think about about it. You'll usually have expenses involved in making that loan happened. They can add up to as much as ten percent of the amount of money. You're borrowing against the value of the house. Well I did check with a credit no name of course and I gotTa really we really low interest rate and say if I wanted just ballpark now. One hundred and fifty thousand out of my house at about three fifty My payments were about. I was worried about it if I die. Where my way to handle it so with a proper reverse mortgage you? Don't ever have to pay back what you borrow. Okay see with a real reverse mortgage. What happens is the house? Pays you every month instead of you paying a lender so is that the best or Or a home equity line of credit or or refinancing the house so if the refinance rate was re what's really good sure her but the idea is the you don't have anybody you're worrying about inheriting that House Right. Well my sons will get it and I I said if they want to keep it that ever came on the reverse is an alternative potentially is or your signs are they of means. Could they afford till lend you money against it and then that would be money that you would already. Oh them when they inherited the house could do that. So yeah so if the idea is for you to have more money so you can live a more comfortable life life. I think you should involve your kids and see if there's a role they can get involved with and providing the extra funding you need with the understanding standing and intention that they get the house when you're not gonna live there anymore you're listening to the Clark Howard show. Thanks for joining us today. The Car Howard show is produced by Kim Droves Joe Lars Guard Debra Reese and gem airs and Remember Twenty four hours a day where there to serve you at Clark Dot Com and card deals dot com.

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Daily Brief, Monday, January 20th, 2020

World Oil's Daily Brief

00:00 sec | 10 months ago

Daily Brief, Monday, January 20th, 2020

"Welcome to the daily brief the world. Oil podcast network daily review of market news emerging trends new technologies and the people who are advancing the oil and gas industry. Here's Cameron Wallace with your top news. Stories of the day. Good afternoon and welcome to the World. Oil Daily brief podcast. I'm Cameron Wallace. And these are your top oil and gas headlines from Monday January the twentieth between the three main energy forecasting agencies. Somebody has her analysis for two thousand twenty completely wrong. The EU is mulling a military mission in Libya as oil exports grind to a halt and Republicans are plotting their own green strategy as pressure from younger voters mounts to address climate change. I up somebody. Big Got Their analysis of the twenty twenty oil market completely wrong. That's the bottom line. From a comparison of supply and demand forecasts provided by OPEC the International Energy Agency in Paris and the US Energy Information Administration the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries agreed in December to deepen output curbs until the end of March OPEC's research team sees that packed continuing to drain global stockpiles. Through two thousand twenty by contrast the EA and the EIA inventory levels rising even if the deal gets implemented in full the OPEC plus group agreed in December to lower their combined output target by a further five hundred thousand barrels a day plus a voluntary additional reduction four hundred thousand barrels a day from Saudi Arabia which depends on everybody else meeting their targets. Opec's latest forecast shows global oil inventories falling at an average rate of almost one hundred thousand barrels a day over the course of this year assuming the December deal is implemented as agreed and runs through March. That rate of draining could hit three hundred thousand barrels a day if the measure would last throughout twenty twenty even if the group fails to implement the deal in full without what remaining. Atas December level. Opec's numbers show. There still be a small decline in global inventories. This year the other two agencies both have very different and less bullish outlooks both see stockpiles continuing to build even if the agreed output cuts implemented fully and extended for the whole year. The same differences are apparent in the views of three agencies on the effectiveness of the OPEC. Plus output cuts since they were introduced at the start of two thousand seventeen OPEC supply demand balances show that global oil stockpiles have fallen by six hundred and fifty three million barrels since the output cuts were introduced at the start of two thousand seventeen withdraws in both twenty seventeen and two thousand nineteen offsetting small build in two thousand eighteen once again though data from the I. E. A. and the I. Both imply that the output restrictions have done no more than limit the size of the global stock builds since the start of two thousand seventeen. After initial draws in two thousand seventeen stockpiles replenish the following year and then remained essentially flat in two thousand nineteen the net result according to the I. A. Is an increase in global oil inventories of one hundred million barrels? Since the start of two thousand seventeen and the end of Tory nineteen while the I. E. A. Data Show them rising by one hundred and forty two million barrels. So where is all this oil? Well each agency have slightly different things. That accounts different methods for counting. And then of course their assessments can differ as well divergences aside OPEC and its allies remain resolved to press on with what cuts aimed at draining excess stockpiles. Saudi Arabia Energy Minister Prince Abdulaziz Bin Salman sudden an interview our endeavor in OPEC plus is to try to bring him in Tories to a certain level where it is within the contours of recent years. He said that range should be around. The average of the last five years and the period from twenty ten to twenty fourteen not suggest the group doesn't exactly have a precise target OPEC's latest monthly report pigs. Ocd commercial oil stocks at two point. Nine two billion barrels at the end of November a little higher than the two point nine one billion reported by the way that puts inventories of between eight point nine million barrels and seventeen point five million barrels above the average level for the past five years but there is one thing on which the EA OPEC do agree we CD commercial stockpiles are sufficient to cover sixty days forward demand which is half a day below their latest five-year average. This is a much more useful measure of stockpiles and simple volume and it was suggested that there's agreement that OPEC got inventory levels back to at least one of its measures of success so now all it has to do is keep them there over the next two years. As the high inventories levels of two thousand fifteen and twenty sixteen drop out of the ruling five-year average. Today's episode of the daily brief is brought to you in part by energy web. Atlas Energy Web Atlas Delivers Real Time Market Data Analysis and coverage of midstream infrastructure and downstream projects as the most comprehensive tool in the market energy web atlas provides access to key global project details and context for operating licensing construction engineering companies. This is the only fully integrated global intelligence platform for liquids and Gas Pipelines L. G. Gas Processing and refining petrochemical projects users can effectively pursue business opportunities with greater market insight and the most current project intelligence to learn more visit. Energy WEB ATLAS DOT COM. The European Union may deploy military mission to help enforce an arms embargo and a potential ceasefire Libya. As the block scrambles to contain a conflict that's drawn in Russia and Turkey and threatened to stabilize the Mediterranean while no decisions were taken at a meeting of EU foreign ministers in Brussels on Monday to officials present in the discussion said there was consensus that preparations should begin for expanded naval and air patrol mission. One of the officials said that any troop deployment presupposes a UN Security Council decision and a truce between Libya's warring factions as many countries are wary of active involvement in a raging conflict. European leaders are trying to regain a foothold in Libya. After they were sidelined by Russia and Turkey support for opposing sides in the conflict. They WANNA find a way to enforce a UN mandated arms embargo nominally in place since two thousand eleven after World Leaders Meeting at a conference in Berlin on Sunday to respect it. The you already has a mandate to monitor the embargo but its naval mission. Lacks any warships and its efforts. Have Been Hamstrung by disputes with Italy about where to park migrants saved at sea one of the participants in Monday's meeting. So the e you can't expect to be taken seriously if it can't commit forces to patrol its immediate neighborhood. The senior diplomat said the mission discussed on Monday would in essence be an expanded mandate and a new name of the so-called Operation Sophia which is currently in place without any ships speaking before the meeting EU foreign policy. Chief Joseph Burrell said. The block has to decide how it will ensure. Libya's tentative ceasefire holds in order to capitalize on the limited progress achieved at a meeting of leaders in Berlin on Sunday. Libya's oil output plunged to the lowest level since twenty eleven this week after eastern military commander Khalifa half. Dr Began a blockade of several ports in his offensive against the UN back government. A ceasefire requires someone to take care of it. We cannot say this as a ceasefire and then forget about it and parole said is. He arrived at the gathering Brussels arms control embargo control. There are several possibilities and the ministers will have to decide what to do. In order to help implement the agreement of yesterday's conference. He said the leaders meeting in Berlin on Sunday agreed to work toward a more durable ceasefire in the North African nation yet. The talks also showed how global powers are struggling to find solutions to a conflict. That's raged for years. Half tar has led a month long assault on Tripoli and fighting continued outside the capital the weekend global oil prices jumped above sixty five dollars a barrel on Monday as the Libyan disruptions coincided with the shutdown of some oil output in Iraq reigniting fears about the markets vulnerability to geopolitical risk in key supply regions. Libya holds Africa's largest proven oil reserves. After HALF DR blocked exports from ports under his control. The State Run National Oil Corporation declared force majeure on Saturday allowing Libya to legally suspend delivery contracts. Libya won't be able to pump more than seventy two thousand barrels a day once it storage tanks are full according to a spokesman from the NFC down from more than one point two million barrels. A day on Saturday Dario Cristiani a fellow at the German Marshall Fund the. Us said the Berlin conference achieves only a truce not a real ceasefire and there are no clear mechanisms to sanction. Who violates the truce or the arms embargo which means there's no real way to stop external interference highlighting the complexity of the ease objective to find a way forward? The Greek government has said it will not accept any political deal for Libya the dozen annul an agreement the Libyan government struck with Turkey on maritime borders. You Foreign Policy. Decisions require unanimity. Eu officials are concerned that unless they have say in the Libyan peace process the block could be vulnerable to waves of immigrants flowing across. The country's fragile borders Libya has been a gateway for migrants seeking refuge in Europe and the EU is also concerned that the chaos in the country is proving fertile ground for Islamic extremists who've targeted Europeans in the past under the terms of Sunday's agreement. Half Tar who is backed by Russia and Libya's internationally recognized Prime Minister Fayez El Sarraj will now each put forward five names for a committee to hash out. The terms of a more permanent halt to fighting the United Nations is pushing for a meeting of that group. Geneva WITHIN DAYS. Today's episode of the daily brief is brought to you in part by the Sustainability Leadership Conference in energy. This first of its kind event is for all professionals with an interest in developing a sustainability initiative for the company working on technologies to make oil and gas cleaner and minimizing the social impact of the production and use of hydrocarbons. Abstract for the conference are being accepted online through Saturday January. Twenty fifth to learn more about the sustainability leadership conference in energy. Please visit sustainability in energy dot com. Finally Today House Republican lawmakers held a closed-door strategy session over their approach to climate change on Thursday as they face intensifying pressure from younger voters to address the environmental threat. The huddle was spurred by recognition among some Republican leaders that the Party has seated the debate to Democrats Representative Garrett Graves of Louisiana. The top Republican on the select committee on the climate crisis said there's been a lot of credibility given to some really crazy and dangerous irresponsible ideas. We've got to make sure we're working to inform and educate the public about the dangers of some of these policies. Grays addressed his colleagues at the session along with Representative Greg. Walden of Oregon. Who's the top Republican on the House Energy and Commerce Committee? The meeting came amid polling showing young Americans want politicians to tackle climate change and warnings from gop strategists that if don't address the issue they could alienate and entire generation of voters. It remains to be seen if Republicans can make any change in party or many of its politicians including president. Donald Trump has denied that they're human factors behind climate. Change Minority leader. Kevin McCarthy convened the Special Policy Conference discussion which was the first held this year. It is set to be followed by similar gatherings to discuss privacy technology and other issues that call out for deeper caucus wide conversations. The session could help inform later. Republican climate proposal built around advancing green innovation carbon capture technology a nuclear power McCarthy said Republicans are identifying realistic policies that can build on us progress in lowering emissions without decimating our own communities and dismantling our economic system as we know it. Democrats are preparing to advance climate change legislation in the house this spring potentially forcing some Republicans to take tough votes on the issue before the November elections the moves east to exploit Republican discord on topic amid growing public alarm of global warming and as ambitious proposals for addressing it such as the green new deal. Shift the debate over what should be done. So far. Congressional Republicans have promoted accelerating innovation in Green Technology and the meeting was intended to help them convince the public that their proposals would do more to curb. Greenhouse Gases Worldwide Graves said Republicans can offer solutions to climate change that not only do a better job of reducing greenhouse gas emissions globally but do so without abandoning traditional conservative values of living in government low taxes and Free Markets. Republicans say that policies put forth by Democratic lawmakers and presidential candidates that would throttle fossil fuel development the US wouldn't propel economically viable low and zero emission technology instead they argue the US needs to propel innovative solutions that are attractive for export and can stifle emissions from China and developing countries grave stress that quashing fossil fuel development in the US could increase greenhouse gases globally by making the world more reliant on natural gas from Europe and Russia that generate more emissions. One of the problems. We're Democrats misfire is that they've deemed oil and gas the enemy when the reality is it is emissions need to be focusing on graves said lawmakers need to be looking at innovative solutions that have been applied in the United States. Not just some conceptual pipedreams and there. You have it our top oil and gas news stories for Monday January. The twentieth content is courtesy of world oil magazine and the Bloomberg News Service to read more on. Today's topic's please visit world oil dot com slash. News. I'm Cameron Wallace. Thanks for listening today. Thanks for listening to the daily brief on the world oil podcast network. If you have any questions or comments on the program please email editorial at world oil dot com and check the show notes for more information about today's episode. Don't forget to subscribe either on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast also be sure to visit world oil dot com for more information about today stories and sign up for our free daily newsletter.

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562 Portland International Jetport

Airplane Geeks Podcast

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

562 Portland International Jetport

"This is the airplane Geeks podcast. Our aim is to educate and inform you explored expand your passion for aviation in entertain you a little along the way this episode we talk with the Director of the Portland International Jet Port about airport noise. How an airport attracts airlines airport development and other topics in the news? The a three twenty-one Nieto has an excessive pitch problem unique airline seats with more middle seat space and unruly passenger passenger gets banned for life and find and any electric airplane company begins taking customer letters of intent we also have interesting interviews from the sperling farm pancake breakfast and fly in the director d'oeuvres. The owls head Transportation Museum a young Cadet from the Civil Air Patrol in a retired professional pilot in best of all David is back. It's all coming up right now. Welcome to the airplane Geeks podcast. This is episode five hundred sixty two of the show where we talk aviation. I'm Max flight in joining me. Is I get ready for it. Get ready for it. David Vanderhoek off our aviation historian is back. Hi everyone thanks for all the great wishes etc <music> over so I'm here a mock. Don't expect much for me but I'm feeling better. I'm finally home. It's been a long July but things are better and again thanks to everyone who reached out to me. Good dodgson prayers and we're getting a little bit stronger everyday great to hear. You just got home from the hospital today. I got home at one and we're recording this seven hours later so that's that's that's determination. I know Max West asked me if or maybe it was my somebody asked if you're going to be on tonight Mike have asked and I and I said no of course so that was a surprise. That was a great surprise when you popped up on skype so I'm really glad that you're back. We're all glad David to be back also with this is our main man Mica from the great though that's not really the great north. What do you call main recall main up there? How do you refer how do you self refer to where you hang out MICA? We work in vacation land vacation land yeah. That's what it says in the license plates get does doesn't main actually is a really great place for vacations at least nine months out of the year actually all twelve months out of the year. You just have to know how to deal with snow. Oh yeah and I guess can attest to that. That's right. Our guest is Paul Bradberry. He's the airport director for the Portland International Jet Port P WM that's in Portland Maine. Paul's held several positions at at the jet port since August nineteen ninety two and he was appointed the airport director in two thousand eight. He's responsible for the overall management operations in planning at the jet port. Now the jet parts been busy <hes> Interpol's leadership they completed the largest capital improvement program in their history and included a new parking garage hundred thirty seven square foot terminal expansion and aircraft de icing fluid capture facility and the rehabilitation of the North South runway. I forgot to do something earlier. which I just remember now so go away Trescott? The terminal expansion was only the second terminal project in the country to receive the U._S.. Green Building Councils lead gold certification the I've heard that L._E._d.. The aircraft the icing fluid capture facility recently received a C._i.. The I in a two thousand eighteen environmental achievement award for mitigation. That's pretty cool Paul. You're also a licensed professional engineer in a refugee from Rensselaer polytech onto the podcast. Thank you so much yeah you too. When I start up I'd say Geez I've only been airport director since two thousand eight and suddenly that's over a decade away? I know it's amazing. It's amazing. I forgot to introduce Max Trescott aw I guess excited because David was here Max. I've forgotten all about you. Sorry Apologize. Mexico is host of Aviation Newstalk podcast. He's the two thousand eight see if I the year and he is probably the world's foremost well at least on this podcast foremost expert on learning to flyer purchase the CIRRUS aircraft he Max Hey amax happy to be here happy to have David Beck and <hes> looking forward to a great show. You're probably getting pretty mad that I forgot to introduce you know I was just about to cut and leave but you know before I left all right well. We're going to be talking with Paul about airport noise and how near Port Attracts Airlines and airport development other airport topics but first. We're going to get started with a little bit of the aviation news from the past week. Is everyone ready ready from the West ready up here at W._M.. Ready the first up from simplifying DOT COM. This is the Airbus a three twenty-one Nieto has an excessive pitch problem make a heavily. We've been talking about pitch problems in another context over the last several months you know yeah. It's really surprising that neither Boeing nor Airbus can find perfect pitch does seem to be a problem these days well Yasser the European Union Union Aviation Safety Agency has issued in a D and airworthiness directive <hes> for Airbus a three twenty-one neo airplanes <hes>. It seems that certain elevator Iran computer AH lack back part numbers installed on some airplanes can cause an accent quote excessive pitch attitude in certain conditions enduring specific maneuvers <hes> the A._D.. Also says this correction or this condition rather if not corrected could result in reduced control of the airplane <hes> so there isn't a whole lot of detail here about just exactly what this is but you know these these kinds of airworthiness directives thing issues come up over the lifetime of aircraft of an engine and requires adjustments along the way. I guess this is in in that category. When I wonder is well I a couple of things is Jeff Helmuth on the show talking about seven thirty seven Min Max as you know pilot one of those a former F. fifteen pilot he talked about when they test aircraft and how testing aircraft with all the Co.? That's written it. The comp- The computer code written into an aircraft even even the engineers don't often know what they do when it test pilots lies at the test pilot come back and said. Did you know it was going to do this and the engineers didn't know that he possibly could and I think this show is that it's not just a Boeing issue and it's not just an Airbus you. It's it's a fact that we have aircraft at a very very complex these days and they're run by computer and we need to know what they're doing. It's it's not like windows. We just reboot at thirty thousand feet Paul. You know we we talk about a dis as important ones come up from time to time <hes>. Is there any equivalent sort of thing for for airports or could the F._A._A.. Issue and now they couldn't you wouldn't get an airworthy this directive would you know but what it is is called our part one thirty nine certification so we have our own <hes> airport certification and in fact our annual review is starting tomorrow. Wow How <hes> how extensive is that does that I have a feeling this isn't something gets done today. No it's a three day process with the F._A._A.. Part One thirty nine inspector so they check everything all your training records. They do a thorough practical review of the airport. Make sure all your markings and everything on the airfield is <hes> meeting basically basically you're proving your ability to operate a certificate at airport. In how often do you have to do that once every year once every year every twelve months okay every twelve months says the full inspection obviously you're always in touch with your part one thirty nine inspector on a regular the basis for <hes> a light pilots through the physio. Yeah I would imagine there are some pretty strong analogies. They're very good. Is there anything that's really equivalent to an in terms of how to know some some processor processor some issue that could be shared by a number of airports and so the regulator comes in and says okay. Here's this announcement to all airports that you know there's this issue or something has to has to take place. Is there an equivalent times. I mean if you look back to the mandate to have runway safety areas at airports that all essentially came out of the F._A._A.. In our recognition that it makes sense to have that over shoot and underrun on every airport at a commercial service airport so <hes> that was a very big part of the I._P.. Program for many years to get that directive so the every airport was compliant with that there was handling commercial service all right. I think we lost the Max Trescott. I don't think so oh you're there. I just wanted to try to get rid of me so just to come back to <hes> excessive pitch that was noticing earlier in the week that Boeing announced. They're gonNA take up four point nine billion dollar charge in the second quarter for all the issues related due to the grounding the 737 Max and they said that there's GonNa totally wipe out prophets <hes> not only for the quarter but it looks like perhaps for the year they were talking about booking pershare profit of a buck eighty and apparently this charges worth about eight dollars seventy looser share so pretty expensive. It's massive and you know to comments one was I'm wondering in terms of this airworthiness directors for the three twenty-one if they had not been crashes on the seven thirty seven Max. Do you think it would it just come down to an Airworthy as directive because social media. I think is what grounded the plane or the truly more issues with it and the other thing I was GonNa say is I'm wondering if Boeing is is having trouble pitching seven thirty seven maxim new airlines now uh-huh oh boy it had to come up in the yeah I it's. It's hard to say yeah if if there had not been fatal accidents <hes> with the the Max jets I think it it it might have been done on a completely different different way if it had I if it came up at all it may not have even come up at all I dunno <hes> but yeah this <hes> this this cost to Boeing and of course it keeps accumulating as time goes by <hes> you know the airlines lines <hes> that are financially impacted by by grounding of course continue to be impacted by this grounding with each month that goes by so Makati that number you know that may go up depending on how long along these things are out of service only think so. This is just <hes> five billion for the quarter so we may have a couple more quarters ago before these aircraft her back up in the air. Guess and southwest flies up here into W._M.. I'm wondering Paul. has there been any issues I with MACs with South West yes so last year we had the the seven thirty seven Max in the schedule right up until it was grounded in fact I had people calling me about whether they wanted to go on that southwest flight and <hes> A and it became a moot point because ultimately they were grounded prior to that flight taking off and that was late in the week after <hes> this was all coming around and it had already been grounded everywhere else <hes> so you actually had flying passengers contact you ask ask you about the safety. I did indeed wow that's amazing. Gee All another day in the office right. You never know what to expect again. People I mean worldwide you were starting to have questions ends on F._A._M.. Boeing right because the rest of the world had grounded this aircraft in F._A._A.. was late to get that done and it actually took a presidential tweet as many <hes> may remember all right well. Let's move on talk about seating. We talk about seats <hes> lack of space and so forth. This is an item from <hes> mirror dot co Dot U._k.. New Airplane seat could solve one of the most annoying things about flying <hes> this is about a company and I'm not sure exactly how you pronounce this Milan Law Bayard Molin Lob or lab M. O. L. O. N. L. A. B. and <hes> I'm not sure this is exactly new do because there have been variants of of this idea basically what they're doing is looking at a section of three seats that you would typically find an airplane and then they have several variants of this when they call the space seat ones the staggers seat in ones the side slip seat and <hes> over the past few years these have been <hes> in the press one form or another but the basic thing that seems to be common across them is that the middle seat is is wider but it's a little bit lower and it's a little bit by a few inches and a little bit farther to the aft it's set back a little a bit which when you start to think about it and especially you think about the arm rests it allows three people to sit side by side basically <hes> but with that recess seat in the middle the elbows bows are also recess and so don't interfere with the person next to you so I think that lets them construct a seat. That's three inches wider twenty one inches versus eighteen <hes> without the the interference arm to arm. It's kind of an interesting concept and it certainly anything that you know gives you more effective. Well let me put this way eating. It gives you less effective crowding. It's got to be a good idea. I'm not sure I I still want to sit in the middle seat and I don't WanNa give airlines any excuse whatsoever to crowd more people onto him an airplane but what if that seats three inches wider and you've got more elbow room you don't have to fight for the armrest if that seats three inches wider that means that the seats on either side of an inch going to have narrower they're exactly the same. There's a video there's it's short video and it's a promotional video. That's <hes> I think <hes> O on the website for this company that sort of shows this and it it does look like it might be effective the other very of this side slip seat <hes> this was something that actually was <hes> written about on the runway girl network a year ago and that's another intriguing idea which is that the the <hes> the aisle seat <hes> slides or can slide in front of that middle seat partially and if you do that on both the right and left of the of the I'll you effectively create create a much wider. I'll so the thought is is you bored by window seats I and with these seats slid to the side. You've got much more. I'll space in much less congestion of the passengers trying to get all their you know the garbage all their luggage. They brought along up into the overhead bins. If this thing works as well as it seems like it might or as it's portrayed so you think everybody would be jumping on us with thing I worry about as if I'm sitting in the middle and I've got wide shoulders which I do what happens when the pastor to the left and right of meat recline due to my shoulders get <hes> you know hit by their seats says I go back then they the I think the back rests clear the wider middle seat so yeah it's it's kind of hard to evaluate but <hes> we'll have a lincoln that show notes obviously to to the article that <hes> in the mirror that we've been looking at the website for this company is airline seats dot Biz Biz being B._I._C. and there's some videos there and we'll have <hes> one of the videos anyway in the show notes. You can take a look at I'm just well. I'm just glad that there's somebody who's thinking about this problem. Some somebody WHO's not the airlines who's thinking about. How can we get make more space for passengers and we all know there is no empty middle seat anymore? ooh Yeah that used to be a kind of a wasted space well. That's where you put all your stuff that during flight yeah those are those are all filled now yeah. You can't put your lap child there anymore no from N._B._C. News women find one hundred six thousand dollars and banned from airline for life after trying to open plane doors <hes> Boy Mike this was on what <hes> jet to Dot Com Jettou and it was just <hes> just unbelievable that finally somebody's being fined for doing this aggressive abusive and dangerous behavior on a flight and not only fi but and the airline I frankly I wish they were banned from all airlines. Yeah I know it wouldn't we see these instances of <hes> really aggressive passenger behavior. It usually does 'cause action to be taken by the crew crew in this case it was the crew and some of the passengers got this passenger restrained <hes> but <hes> Jettou says that <hes> they've issued a lifetime ban to this twenty five year old woman and they build told her more than eighty five thousand pounds after her disruptive behavior caused the flight to be diverted and in fact the R._I._F.. Scrambled to typhoon fighters to escort the aircraft apparently she also tried to get into the into the cockpit and so that sparked fears of <hes> you know a hijacking hence the typhoon fighters show up and now if we could only just ban people and find people who try to take their carry on luggage with them an emergency evacuation yeah another bonehead move I was looking at this though actually I was trying to find out what had happened to this woman <hes> after her arrest rest and I didn't find any update on that but I did find another article that apparently a couple who helped restrain this passenger. They're upset. They're upset because they got a complimentary soft. Drink in thank you and that was kind of it and since jet to is GonNa Char is charging this woman all this money. They think they should get a piece of that. I it seems kind Kinda Kinda crazy. I guess it was a bouncer involved in this to <hes> the bouncer said she <hes> she was only petite but she had the strength of fully grown man. The only time I've seen anything like that was when someone had just dropped acid and ahead super strength so I. I don't know what's what's happened here. I think it's Kinda ridiculous for it's good that other passengers assisted in this <hes> restraint but twenty piece of the of the fine is I don't know gets too much. What do you think I think it's a little crazy but again? Do you think Jesse was really gonNA collect money from the woman. You think that's actually going to happen. They say they're going to aggressively try to get that money. I don't know if they owe the R._I._F.. If money for the <hes> the fighter escort or not but you know there's the fuel there's the inconvenience and cost to handle <hes> handle the other passengers on the plane. You know all that I mean it costs the airline money. It's not just the We'd like talk to find her because we you know it's a way to spank this woman. Their actual costs incurred cash outlays but we'll see their story A. N.. Online amp air to open orderbook for Hybrid Electric Airplane <hes> We we talked about Amer in episode five fifty six where they announced their first public electric flight and <hes> Max Thi this is that the Cessna skymaster right right the <hes> you know the push me pull you airplane and <hes> you know twin engine so we've got a <hes> a hybrid version of that in what <hes> what ampere is going to do is they're going to start taking letters of intent intent for this airplane at Air Venture which is underway right as we speak. I also just want announcement. The came out from air venture that impairs announced plans to exist <hes> to modify other existing aircraft including colluding in this is really notable. I think the Cessna Caravan and also the Twin Otter and I think the reason that's notable is the caravan fleet is absolutely huge. Fedex uses I think somewhere on the order of four five hundred these airplanes <hes> for a lot of short-haul movement of packages every night and I'm sure allow those flights are an hour or thereabouts <hes> so I would imagine that would be substantial cost savings defects if they were to modify their fleet now the announcement was for the Grand Caravan. That's not the particular version that Fedex is using but I'm assuming that they could retrofit older <hes> versions. That Fedex has so yeah. It's an interesting time right now. <hes> when you have an airplane like the skymaster astor that has an you know puller engine in a pusher engine like that. Do you have to have a multi engine rating for that kind of an airplane you sure do and if you get your training for your multi-engine reading in an aircraft of that type there's a limitation placed on your license. It's called a single engine. <hes> I'm sorry it's called something like <hes> asymmetrical thrust or symmetrical thrust limitation something like that what it means is you learned to fly in a far less complicated twin therefore the Michael at you fly a conventional twins that have the engines out on the wing the big problem with most twins as we lose an engine it just becomes a handful of control whereas with the skymaster view losing engine well you've lost power but you don't have the control issues that you have with other aircraft <hes> and Maxwell there'd be any special certification for electric powered aircraft that you know about his APP in disgust at all and should there be no. I don't think so I think they're gonNA look at that. Moore's <hes> an aircraft issue unless as a pilot training issue there are. Dr Some funding limitations right now for example I think <hes> The way the light sport aircraft rules are written. They can't have electric powered aircraft but that has more to do with certification than with <hes> with the rules for pilots licenses and again. We're speaking with Paul Bradberry Portland International Airport Director Pob. Can you tell us a little a little bit about <hes> the jet in terms of the size relative to other airports in the region sure <hes> so the Portland port we just had a great milestone in twenty eighteen. We broke two million total passengers in or a million boardings in a million D- plannings in a single year which was a brilliant. We did the welcome for millions employment. It was a great time in back in December <hes> so that's that's the size is and how does that compare so we're we're some other reports in the region would be smaller than Bradley Hartford and Logan but larger than Manchester or Bangor for instance I in terms of scale and size <hes> the Greater Portland area. He is a metropolitan statistical area of just over half million people and we're. We're one hundred miles <hes> from Boston so that gives us a pretty good air. You know we compete very well against Boston. We're just far enough away that <hes> that the the big sucking sound from the large hub does not affect us yet I I shouldn't say that it used affect us more but now with the the level of service we have people tend to be choosing the <hes> the close airport just for convenience. Yes makes sense all right now. I Know Mica. Has You know mic shows up everywhere Mica shows up on lots of podcasts. He shows up on other radio programs. You almost can't turn around and you know out in Mica and I understand he's been doing or participating or attending some kind of airport noise advisory committees or something what's what's going on with with all that in his mic helping helping out she just getting in the way we always love to see mica because he is such a knowledgeable guys so so it's always good to bring that kind of knowledge of aviation into any meeting because what we have is a many times these as noise meetings. I mean airports. They generate their own community around them. Whether you like it or not Denver can move you know the new Denver which isn't so new anymore from the former stapleton you can move thirty miles away and then the city will just bill backup around you yes so so you're always going to have the interaction with people and you WanNa make it as as beneficial impossible but I I've. I've had messages come up. Why do you have that? Why are they taking off over my house and people don't even recognize it? Planes Take off into the wind and that runways designed around prevailing wind directions. They don't know that so you really have to start very basic when you get out in these public meetings in so who who holds this meeting the town organizing organizing these meetings or are you or some other organization so we have a standing noise advisory committee in it's a committee that was set up by our city council but it has representatives both citizen and <hes> you no government representatives from not only Portland but neighborhoods and the surrounding communities to really make sure that we're understanding what the issues are 'cause airports have to do you know when you haven't always issue something the noise compatibility the plan so we've done one of those and it's through the F._A._A.. In what's called a noise study or apart when fifty study <hes> and is this kind of a committee something that's fairly common that <hes> you know with airports and the communities around them or are you the only in the world that do this no. I think it's pretty <hes> I think it's it's. It's fairly standard. Especially the Busier Airport is you'll start to have more noise issues. <hes> but what we we'll have to remember is aviation is interstate commerce and that is controlled by the federal government rate. It's still interstate commerce just like trains so we all have to recognize. You can't just say as public use airport. No you can't land and no you can't take off. I mean it is a public facility that is in control by interstate commerce so they are allowed to land. It's <hes> it's you know by by Congress. That's what we've stead stated. Nonetheless we WANNA do what makes what it works for the community to the extent weekends we change you know approach patterns. We we have a harbor visual we try to you know make sure those departures into rivals when possible or over areas at a less populated <hes> and who <hes> who who attends these meetings besides Mike this does the F._A._A.. Attend <hes> in what about the the residents does attend to be just a few of the the regulars who who always come more is is there <hes> different people to come at different times so I think communities change over time and we have a <hes> but again so the normal people that are that are members of the committee appointed by their communities they come into to all the meetings but <hes> recently had one in south Portland to discuss required navigation performance approach and the reason for that is we communities there and it's much more established community now. They're concerned about approaches to the runway. We'd actually already done are now have departure procedures that took the aircraft off of this community but you know many people have just moved in since that was done in their seeing the additional approaches approaches now so now what is the less noisy type of operation is now causing problems and I think just generally people seem to be getting what was okay. Perhaps in Nineteen ninety-two back before four. We had these really what are now quieter aircraft. <hes> things are changing. I mean we we used to have the seven twenty-seven flying from Fedex and it would make South Portland where you held this meeting. Shake shake it over <hes> back in the back in the late nineties. That's long gone. They now fly a Boeing seven fifty seven which in comparison is very quiet and then you look at the Airbus <hes> the new engine option e. three twenty twenty. Yes <hes> what a quiet lean yes <hes> and that's what frontier flies into Portland so really brilliant to see that and at one of our noise meetings. They said Oh they're discount carrier. They'll never fly the three twenty Neil and then I pulled up there orderbook book which was all about eight hundred twenty and the inaugural flight to Portland I was so excited was an eighth hr twenty Neil cog great great. Let me say that this last meeting <hes> there was the room there was held in. It's a big sign. It says it holds ninety six people it was standing room only because there are people standing around and most of the people that spoke were screaming and hollering and saying I lived in my house for two years and I can't enjoy it and I finally spoke to and I said you lived in your house for two years but you bought a house under a flight path and the airports been there for what forty five fifty some more than that something like that and they were talking about. This aren't have approach just just won't work and I explained it and people we're very very angry with me. I must say that people were not happy with what I had to say. The fact was all at a lot of logical sense to it yeah. This is an interesting topic. I think because I'm I'm sure that it it takes a lot of Banerjee for an airport to maintain good relationships with the surrounding community Paul are are there other other things that you do <hes> besides this advisory committee to try to they have those conversations with the community. Absolutely I mean when we do a master plan. We really try to involve the community so we had another committee that we set up whenever we do a major project where the terminal expansion or our master plan update. It's not going to be as good a plan unless you have all of the community represented so I mean business interests neighbors <hes> neighborhoods also just leisure travelers and we also get representation. Even from <hes> Toryism in in those entities are convention visitors bureau so you WanNa have all of that input into whatever plan you do and we were one of the early sustainable airport master plan adopters so we WANNA be out there and infront but there's also it was quite a bit of an education just on what an airport does and that's why we relate to have mica come to these meetings because it is <hes> sometimes I went to the city of South Portland and they were looking at a zoning change on what is now a golf course which is unreasonable <hes> use within our approach in this is our noise preferred approach to runway one one and it's our noise preferred departure on Tunein Alas. I went in there and said a residential zoning would make no sense in this area. It's well above the sixty five decimal day-night level average <hes> for for noted for the by the F._A._A.. For appropriate uses alas. They said to me Paul. We're so glad you came out. The devil is in the details. We know the devil in this case is aviation noise and you want to protect this approach and they thank you very much and went ahead and approved zoning because there's such a shortage on housing in South Portland in this case straddle the Portland Oakland. I couldn't believe it. I was aghast so you know what's going. I mean this creates more problems for you. In for the residents who are going to appear sprout out of that <hes> out of that land in the reason residential residential doesn't work you can noise proof residential but residential just by its very nature. People want to have a life in the outdoors they wanna be on their back dex and all these things. It's not an office building where people come in do their work and leave. The residences. Are People like to play in their backyard so it's just inappropriate zoning for an approach in that was our preferred approach which is defined within our noise compatibility program so I I was really aghast it was it was really sad to see that happen. Yeah Yeah <hes> now of course we have one co-host here David who <hes> until fairly recently basically lived f the end of the the runway Philadelphia and so <hes> David so you're you became very used to the noise associated with the airport did that eventually kind of get tuned out so that you never even heard the jets coming and going or did you just enjoy them so much that you know you wanted to hear them. Dependent ended upon which way the wind was blowing the answer is I was used to it but then again I grew up at the end of the runway will a grove too so it's a challenge and of which I I know my father. They're struggled with for years because people would say things send letters to the bay saying that you need to stop flying your airplanes at two o'clock in the morning and waking up my cat and my father would right-back that the base flatlined closes at midnight so we don't know what you were hearing so it's you get used to it but I can understand the sentiment where where people will be outside and they'll hear something you know when we had air show like I've said the past I was one of the turning. My house was actually my swimming pool was one of the turning points for the blue angels because it was a perfect barker for them to turn inbound to the runway the grove those kind of events people buy a house and in all fairness a lot of times SAMSA real estate agents. Don't talk about the fact that this house is in the flights flight zone you know and people buy houses because it looks great everything and then they realized you know but but like Mica said I mean we used to say the base was around since nineteen nine. There were airplanes flying out of that area so people who've moved in but urban coachman expend even at Willow Grove was was a challenge because more and more the developments moved in around the base so and you have to the other part about it as you have to think about and our guest can speak seek to this you need areas at the beginning in the end of the runway just in case you know you don't want that civilization to encroach so close that jeopardizing using an aircraft that comes in and overruns the runway or whatever that can be really challenging in in a suburban environment where you know airports attract businesses and airports attract people people and then the taxes go their taxes go up because they lose the income because the base closed but that's what they wanted so picker pick your poison but encroachments really bad thing as far as civilization goes in airports yeah yeah when when I lived in northern Virginia in Fairfax in the sixties <hes> to go to Dulles you had to drive through the woods in of course <hes> as we know now it's it's completely developed all the way out to Dulles you know the civilization has grown up around Dulles to the point where it's very close and I think that's probably a a problem everywhere but <hes> Paul you you mentioned frontier out <hes>. That's a relatively <hes> <hes>. They're relatively new to the airport are they. Yes that's right just over a year now so it's <hes> it's very good we're really pleased to have frontier because it it it really pushed our market mix and gave us a a very good leisure and they I gotTa love their slogan their slogan is we compete against the couch. I mean they're they're fares can be that low. Of course you'll be. There's alicarte ticketing in there right that <hes> everything else that you wanna bring including your bag is is additional but it allows people that just WanNa get out to some tropical location for the weekend. It's that or sit at home on the couch watching Netflix movie right so the the it really is good and it was good for market mix and did help to get us over that <hes> you know that million million passenger employment mark or two million total passenger mark which is great so what's that process like I mean I I've had to believe leave. It's more involved than just frontier brings up Paul bradberry and says hey we're going to start flying to your airport. You go okay. What's the process like so sometimes it can be very quick <hes> that people recognize market Turkey but many times it's years in the making I mean you really are competing and it it's different between frontier and in your other legacy carriers so <hes> you know southwest? How do we end up with southwest? Will they bought Air Trans so we ended up would south west so it was a pretty quick transition but on other carriers I it can be much longer dance when we originally got airtran in year that was quite a long <hes> process of reaching out to them <hes> really drilling down in doing some data analytics on the routes in the markets where they fly what the stage lane lane SAR and looking at it for them. What are the passengers daily each way what we call p Dues P._D.? W passengers daily each way to certain markets in improving your case to the airlines I mean these are very expensive pieces of equipment and you're saying hey take your sixty million dollar piece of equipment or whatever the equipment is from twenty to sixty million dollars in please. He's invested in our community and and we'll we believe it will make money so there's a lot of that. I'm pleased to say now I mean even March twenty percent. We haven't had to work as hard on air service in recent history because we're concerned. We are actually not concern on having too many passengers in too short time because bricks and mortar respond much slower to the didn't day in passengers or a new service can start up and you also have Cape Air <hes> flag onto the through the airport. They're they're flying. They all turboprops they are. They fly the 402 so they're a small. It's only nine seats but they're starting September eighteenth so they heaven. It's it's back to the future for us. <hes> after nine eleven we prior to nine eleven. We had hourly service to to Boston <hes> but post nine eleven you know you add an hour and a half to the screening time and suddenly it doesn't make as much sense to do those routes that are less than a four or five hour drive right so this is something new and we'll see Cape Air. It's a small enough service but they'll also be looking at getting us out to the Massachusetts capes province town as well <hes> in the future so September eighteenth will see it's <hes> they're doing four flights a day and looking forward to it in for the future more important for me with this piece of equipment is we start to see some intra New England travel beyond Portland Boston and province down and more importantly only need some interim mean people don't realize it's a big state <hes> but just to get depressed kyle four and a half hour drive. That's <hes> that's a long drive yeah much much more comfortable in plain like something that <hes> care would provide on on the other end you know one of the great disappointments for me and this year that happened at P.. WM Is that we lost year. Round jetblue service tip blue happens to be my favorite local airline. I just really like flying them force great service great aircraft and now they're only doing flying from here at C._W._M.. Half the year they've they've cut their services J._F._K.. Regularly how did that happen and maybe you can't be discussed but are we trying to get them back fulltime. It's at a possibility I'm just curious. 'cause we lost something that I think there was a lot of letters to the editor after about it. It was a great concern for the People Portland and I think it's very sad yeah I mean we also had many what <hes> jet blue frequent flyers mosaic customers. They're the do a lot of miles on jetblue so jeb lose an interesting airline. It's not like your your other carriers. They have focused cities and one of their focus cities Boston in really they were only doing <hes> three flights a day to J._F._k.. That just wasn't enough flights to do a station and I think they also also had equipment concerns on again. You're competing are tournament investment even in January but they're supporting a whole station off three flights a day. We said this isn't sustainable. Bring more flights to Portland but they're focused that he was Boston and then I think what really push them was in Delta offering so Delta had laguardia but they started J._F._k.. Service as well so you start to add in and it's it's it's pretty significant competition for them when right out of Portland you also had another their carrier <hes> doing j._F._k.. Service so that that made it pretty difficult for them to <hes> to compete at the end set I believe without being able to add the additional flights and we still remain. Hopefully we speak with them regularly. We have a great relationship with <hes> with jet blue and we think it was one of the unique items that we had the other certain other airports didn't was we had jet blue. <hes> Manchester dint back when Manchester were significantly larger than us that was one of the things that we offer that they didn't so <hes> certainly WanNa get jetblue back and look forward to them but they have to size up in Portland to be a viable option <hes> year out now the American Association of Airport Executives <hes> just just recently. I think <hes> gave out some awards and Portland International Airport was was one of them tells about that. I'd be pleased to I mean this has been a Greek process. It's on our aircraft the icing fluid capture and processing we are actually the first in remain the only airport in the country they can capture type one eighty F- in type four to the extent comes off tape one eighty F- when you spray to get that ice and snow if you're playing after a after an event or just do frost shot in the morning we have a central capture pad all that goes into <hes> underground tanks and we do a glide back to suck it up off the off the apron as well but then we have we could be making vodka but instead we distill <hes> aircraft crafty icing fluid and we're the first airport in the country to <hes> to be able to then have an F._A._A.. Approved manufactured aircraft chasing fluid from E._D._F.. Effluent so are really pleased with our business partners inland technology's really a win win for us on the environmental side and <hes> was great to get the recognition from <hes> Triple A. American Association of Airport Executives. What was the motivation for undertaking that so when we we're doing our large capital improvement program <hes> we recognized in the in the even means department of Environmental Protection wanted us to look at best available technology in there are other options to capture A._D._F.? One you could just ship it to your local. Sanitary sewer unfortunately Portland's <hes> sewer district could not handle the <hes> the propylene glycol which is non toxic but does use a lot of oxygen when it breaks down so they couldn't they couldn't handle what's called a biological oxygen demand <hes> so that option was out and you could do larger ration- ponds but we're very constrained airport. We just didn't have the land were more like Logan. You know we're very close to the downtown center and under a thousand contiguous acres we do have some extra land that protects the the the one one approach but beyond that pretty land constrain so no place for narration pond so we realize we're going to have to process on site and we started doing that. It was very inexpensive so one of these things you know <hes>. What do they say? <hes> necessity is the mother of invention <hes> in this case we <hes> we were looking to really reduce our cost but at the same point <hes> it ended up being a award winning innovation <hes> interesting yeah that's great and and congratulations <hes> <hes> on that <hes> that recognition. I'm sure that everybody that was involved in that is <hes> at Portland was just really pleased. I and you're in the process of expanding de Icing peds to aren't you. Yes that's exactly right so <hes> starting next year we will have even more dicing space on our central. The icing pad to push forward and I should say that every. The aircraft we launched Portland de-iced in Portland <hes> is done with our own A._T._f.. That was manufactured right here. <hes> we also get fluid from other airports <hes> we're receiving a higher concentrate fluid from Dulles us we take fluid from McGuire Airforce Base and we're selling it to other airports as well <hes> so we're we've sold some Bangor and we look to continue that and back to Dulles so it's <hes> you know it's it's it's one of those triple nets good for the environment and we're starting to offset our cost sufficiently to be competitive with other options. <hes> let's touch on a few things relating to passenger experience. I'm noticing that airports these days other <hes> other businesses are <hes> sprouting more and more recharging stations for for electric vehicles is is that something that you're doing at the jet port as well absolutely we don't have the charging stations installed yet because we are first project it kind of in this same sustainability we were in early <hes> grantee from the F._A._A.. Of What's call was five twelve grant so we use that funding to put thirty thousand square feet of solar panels on our parking garage uh-huh and you can see what comes next now that we have sunshine being turned into electricity the goal there was to be able to now start to allow vehicles to be charged and we're putting in we've made our first order on <hes> on recharging stations on slow charge urge wins and we're looking to get more in our short-term lot over the next quarter. <hes> I imagine that's that's a pretty healthy investment. You know we don't know where parking and everything and electric vehicles will go so we have to look at our parking garages in think what will be ten years now. How will parking garages function so part of my thinking is there has to be a product there that people will buy and it may be they wanna go on their trip in and know that their vehicles fully charged when they get back instead of the autonomous vehicle driving home yeah that is that too there was somebody I know? We talked about this while ago. There's somebody had an idea in thinking about this and imagining a a parking garage with all of these electric cars charged up the idea was you could use all that storage that stored electricity <hes> in off peak hours and you would actually utilize us all those batteries. Ah I guess during peak hours in then recharge the cars during off peak hours I guess that would only apply to long-term parking. I guess but that was kind of a novel thought well. It's a it's a great idea. I mean that is the problem with these sustainable items like solar is that they're only working when the sun's out right exactly right so you need to do something in that time when you're not generating right right I use the use the electricity or you know run the airport or something well. We've got more of these planes that have the electric engine's on the back that you mentioned earlier the because I believe that was a pusher. Push your motor. Maybe we'll have to put charging stations on the apron side to yes right right. How about with <hes> Uber and lift and that sort of thing are you seeing more and more passengers arriving in departing the the airport using those kinds of transportation methods we are in Maine Gist? We just finally got the law amended in the state of Maine that allowed us to put some rules on where Uber Lift and how they operate so I'm finally now getting data <hes> back and we are seeing that it is significant <hes> on Thursday night eleven P._M.. They're they're breaking sixty <hes> sixty pickups and our wow. We're one of those yeah we're in origination destination so we are really busy at five A._M.. And we're really busy from eleven peed twelve thirty a mike his. They're a good <hes> restaurant at the airport are we have. We have the port in eat at the airport dot com don't we well. There's nothing really on the the passenger well on the passenger side of it once you go through six years that David David. There's nothing really you know that if you're not a passenger if you're not going through security there's not really anyplace replaced come at the airport unfortunately and <hes> and eat and watch the runway and and that's one of the sad things about <hes> about the airport is that there's no real place to be able to <hes> to watch runway except for a wonderful parking area that <hes> pulpit in several years ago that's right next to the MAC jets F. B. O.. Now when Mac jets was built they put up a big beautiful hanger and let me just tell you I bid inside that hangar it is gorgeous and it blocks with a view from <hes> what sides to nine <hes> but <hes> but it's <hes> it's a great place to watch aircraft but you can't actually be inside needed a restaurant and do that but <hes> but it is Paul actually put up a sign there so that you could see what kind of aircraft flying in and out now that sign needs auto update in eventually it will be probably needs to be moved about ten yards to the to the south and they happen to but Paul actually put in this parking space because there are a lot of people that loved the plane spot. Oh yeah I know it's <hes> I it was. It's a shame <hes> after nine eleven I think <hes> that many of those kinds of locations became unavailable or they. They close them down. I know there was one spot up at <hes> for me up at Bradley less time I when past there was there used to be a little pull off parking area where you could go but there's you know there's a fence across it now and you and you can't watch the airplane at least not from there. Maybe there's some other places that you know. I'm not aware of but <hes> yeah I it's kind of Nice that because the spotters of course are avid enthusiasts and I always kind of <hes> liked the logic that said that you know instead of shoeing spotters away from airports you really want to encourage them because they're are great set of is kind of watching over what's going on and you know I'm. I'm not quite a spotter but you know I'm a my Navqi obviously and the lot is always full. There's always four or five cars air and it's not really necessarily Lee spiders. It's families it's kids. It's parents bringing their kids out fathers and sons and mothers and sons and and little kids at people watching main is a pretty rural state and a lot of ways so when you fly if you're from Turner in her main you're from you know in the middle of green main and you come down to the airport. It's a big deal so a lot of times people drop off their family and they'll sit in a lot and watch their bad airplane depart and watch your family. Go Away someplace because it's unusual and it's really a wonderful place to watch kids and you may recall did a story a few years ago about watching a father and son watch a P fifty one when the colleagues foundation was here and it's just a beautiful thing to see and I like to go there not just to watch the airplane but to watch families watch the airplanes yeah. We've also got <hes> the top level of our parking garage. The elevation of strange enough is almost identical to the elevation of the air traffic control towers. <hes> you know so the controllers are at the same elevation so I I also also reference to people to just <hes> take right up the first half hours free so if you just get in and out within a half are you don't even have to pay the park but you can really get a good view and I also like to spot that Mike mentioned it's it's on a a bit of a hill to and it just gives is a really good view of the airfield from that point. Well Paul anything <hes> coming up with the airport. I mean you've just been through this big capital program so <hes> maybe you're maybe you're all set for a little while or do you see some things in the future. Sure is surprisingly enough. There's there's always stuff. I mean for us the next fees for us as we're working on trying to get a <hes> accustomed facility built. <hes> I think many of heard that now you can stitch a <hes> you can circumnavigate negate the globe on low cost airlines <hes> in in the it's different today you know how you can you can cross the pond <hes> on a twin engine aircraft that say a narrow body <hes> that wasn't the case when I started in this business and <hes> you couldn't even get from Portland the Yucatan Peninsula on the equipment we had but now the equipment we have can get us really anywhere so it's important that we start looking at making sure we build the international connectivity directly from Portland Portland in the future this isn't you know daily service to Heathrow but I can see some real good opportunities for less than daily service too many different destinations in kind of this new world of low cost aviation all right well good <hes> I keep telling Mica and I need to make a trip up there and <hes> and say hello and we'll be sure to to stop in at the airport Mike Oh he can <hes> check out the airport well. I've got another possible couple dates for you. Max and we'll talk about that probably in a little a bit okay good good all right Paul. Thanks a lot for <hes> spending a little bit of time with US Director of Portland International Jet Port Paul <hes> how about a website where can folks learn more about the jet absolutely absolutely it's Portland Jeff Port Dot Org so peo- R._T.. L. A. N. D. J. E. T. P. O. R._T.. Dot O._R._G.. So pleased look at it. There's a lot of information up there and <hes> would love to have anybody coming in and out of Portland to fly through WM to rate and you know the jet poured also has a very large twitter presence and they do a great job on twitter informing people of what's going on here. If there's any kind of issues happening and also letting people know what growing so you can follow all of the jet put on twitter and twitter handle is if you just you can just go on twitter and go straight to Portland jet for you'll find us yeah all right. The Nice thing about Portland Jeb poured is <hes>. There's no other jet port so if you just take him poorly you're you're going to get US Portland airports that Portland on the West Coast so we had to have something to keep us from being confused that said we still sometimes get each other's passengers that <hes> from Europe that made or or Asia sure that made a mistake and they're down at our information counter saying I thought I was in Portland Oregon. That's a problem that's the problem. Is there ever any any pressure to name. Rename the the airport. After a specific individual most airports seemed to be named after people there is pressure sometimes but what I like to say is on a small hub airport really all we sell as geography so it is very important that our name be the geography so Portland Portland Maine. If you name it after person I asked people where's John Wayne. Where's Bob Hope and in fact unfortunately now bob hope is rebranding to get the geography back in their name because people there if it's it has to be a big enough airport for the name in the geography to match <hes> Yes yes and of course it Bradley international here? We have that problem because nobody knows who Bradley is anymore happen to be a David might know this David. You know who Bradley Airport is named after that'd be a bit of Trivia Mr Bradley Mr Bradley Yeah. I think he's an Omar Bradley I think I think it was Milton. Bradley wasn't no no Jeez I know I think it was a a soldier. The died in a training accident. I think in World War Two or something like that I should know but that's probably more than ninety nine percent of the people who live in Connecticut know about why it's called Bradley you know the Knoxville Airport is named for <hes> soldier as well. I think it was a World War One soldier but same thing Tyson is the name of that airport. Hey well when we're done. I'm I'm gonNA Google and find out if my recollection of where the Bradley named came from is accurate but all right again Paul thanks so much for joining us thank you so you know <hes> last week on on July fourteenth it was a sperm wink farm pancake breakfast and fly in and I'll tell you a little bit more about that when we get there but it was a wonderful event as it usually is in yeah you know one of the places well house had made it. It's not really a particularly well known town appear in Maine but it does have just a beautiful Jim of Transportation Museum in it and toward the end of the fly in while aircraft were departing writing and so you're GonNa hear some AIRCR airplane sounds yeah. I know we all hate that. Don't we especially if we live in certain areas south Portland but that's another story but well the airplanes aircraft were departing. I got a chance to interview with Kevin Bedford who's the executive director her head Transportation Museum and he arrived in a nineteen forty one P._t.. Seventeen German by plane and we talked about what makes the head museum unique and worthy visit we are with Kevin Bedford the executive director of the owls head museum who happened to fly in in the Queen of the flying today and Kevin before we start talking about the Alison Museum. Tell us about the airplane you came in okay. We came in in a in the museums one thousand nine hundred forty one Boeing steersman painted an army training colors blue and yellow yellow peril <hes> <hes> it's an aircraft. That's been our collection for quite some time now and we use to to give rides in so that people can experience the thrill of flying in a biplane an open air cockpit and that's something that people just don't really have an opportunity to do anymore not only not a by plane but certainly an open cockpit is a unique unique experience. It certainly definitely is. I know I remember my first flight in that aircraft in fact in for about fifteen minutes. I was holding on his tight as I could because I was sure I was gonNA come popping right out of that cockpit but writing down from Al-Said said today took us about an hour what a comfortable and secure aircraft it is to fly now we have listeners all over the world and they know that we're here in Cape Elizabeth main which is right outside a Portland but they may not know where Al-Said is so where is al setting relationship the Portland and how far flight wasn't well. It's a fifty three nautical miles. We made it a little bit longer because we wanted to stay overland rather than crossing Ponobscott Bay. It took us an hour. We were cruising at just under eighty knots and so I know by car it's a it's a ninety mile trip down to Cape Elizabeth so eighty to ninety miles and we're right near <hes> a a key town is is Rockland Maine or three miles outside of Rockland and if you're flying we are actually on the Knox County Regional Airport so people can fly right in and visit the museum. Tell us a little bit about the outside museum. What's there and what's the mission of the museum? The Al Said Museum was was was started in one thousand nine hundred seventy four by three gentlemen working together Thomas Watson Junior James Rockefeller and Stephen Lang and they got together <hes> Tom <hes> came came over to Jim rockefellers little grass strip on next to his house in Camden one time and after they'd met he <hes> he cinema note saying wouldn't it be wonderful to have old aircraft flying over owls head and so shortly thereafter by nineteen seventy six to three work together with a number of other interested parties <hes> to put up two buildings on what had been in World War Two <hes> training airport and now a regional airport art and we've grown through those years from nineteen seventy-six through today to housing well over one hundred thirty thousand square feet of exhibition in storage space we focus on ground and air transportation and the time period for collecting is primarily inception of motorized transportation through the beginning of the first World War One thousand nine forty. Where would the airplane Geeks podcast? Tell us a little a bit about some of the aircraft in your collection. Well we have <hes> we have a couple of honest to goodness <hes> real aircraft from the earliest days the pioneer days of flight a Jenny Jenny any aircraft that belong to Tom Watson. We have a standard aircraft again a World War One trainer like the Jenny from the one thousand nine hundred sixteen seventeen eighteen era and we fly both of those aircraft <hes> we fly both of those aircraft <hes> at our events during the summer every two weeks we have we have a ground in air vehicle show and the thing that makes Al-Said so special and so different different is that we demonstrate our collection in the in the museum business. It's normally not a good idea to break things that are in your collection but in that we are demonstrating through through actively running our cars are motorcycles bicycles icicles aircraft and and and stationary engines in that we're running those they do need to be repaired. The other part of our formula <hes> is is the use of <hes> dedicated volunteers over two hundred volunteers who work with us to maintain those collections and as they work to maintain those collections they learn the old techniques for keeping them alive and they transmit it down from generation to generation so are there no static displays everything in active display or dynamic with the outside museum well there are static displays within the museum itself of course not every single day in Maine is the perfect day for flying or driving for that matter in an old car or airplane but on average every about ninety percent of the vehicles there are inoperable condition and we'll be brought out at some point during the year two to be demonstrated. We have a we haven't we have an active educational collection of model ts for instance four different model ts sees that we can give rides and really any day of the week during the summertime and in the winter we actually have a Model T. snowmobile to that we sometimes bring out and demonstrate the Boeing Sturman. We came down in today as an example of what we would call the model model not for our demonstrations purposes allows us to get people up in the air so they can experience as we talked about before in terms of getting people up in the air. If people come to the onset museum to visit which I hope they will and I hope to one day as well and the people want that experience of flying in a beautiful historic aircraft how much does that cost and what kind of flights are available. Well the flights we have our average about twenty minutes which is a good introductory in good introduction to to biplane open cockpit and the price their price right around two hundred dollars and in events we often have specials and what a beautiful place also fly out set of people don't know it's it's right on the coast so you're seeing the gorgeous rocky coast of Maine when you're up there yeah I think the other thing to consider is that every bit of money we make from any charges associated with <hes> with flying in these aircraft goes right back into maintaining our collection action and continuing our programs moving forward continuing to move the skills necessary to keep all of these old vehicles running moving through the generations anything else. We should know about the museum well. We're working on a book right now. That's that's that's. That's an idea brainchild Jim rockefellers and history early history of the museum in working on that we got together recently with the staff and and one of our our staff said you know I think I know what the title of this book should be. It should be fun. That's what the museum is all about. It's a great fun place to be you will learn it's an educational facility but more than anything and anybody coming out of the museum will come out with a smile interfaces so we'd love to have you come and visit and the same would love to be there sometime. Thank you so much for spending some time with me here on the airplane Geeks my pleasure wow that sounds like an interesting event. It is an interesting event Max and <hes> you know one of the big spectacular event will one of them. That's coming up as the wings wheel spectacular and that's on August third and fourth and you know. I don't know what you're doing Max but I I've never been to the outside museum. You've never been to the outside museum and not only is it airplanes. Its engines and I think you have a slight interest in engine so maybe you should come up here. Make a trip to Maine. We'll drive up from Portland stopping but Moody's Diner which is known for some of the best pie in the world especially the raspberry and make a trip to the outset museum and then we'll talk about some of the secrets that I can tell you about the outside museum but there is someone here with us that has been at the outset museum. Yeah you have to love the House Museum <hes>. It's the only museum I know that truly is a living museum the planes that they have on display they fly. It's impressive. It really is impressive. You'll have a great time and I know it's late in my a bio mechanical engineer. I simply loved going to that museum and seeing the engines actually work well you know I pulled up the schedule. The wings wheels spectacular in August in and they have automobile demos they have in here aircraft demos. They have iconic engine Demos <hes> that sounds interesting and you know Max that it's on August third and fourth and I don't want you know really spread this around but six is my birthday. So what a great birthday weekend it would be. If you came up here are a we'll talk. We'll talk all right. What else do you have from sperling well? You know how much we love the Civil Air Patrol and we've interviewed some cadets <hes> from the civil air patrol down at the Uber Housi- center a couple of times and we had Armando carry on here who was still working with the civil patrol even as a retired from the from the U._S. Army but if we couldn't do this Berwick Fly <hes> sperling pancake breakfast and fly in if it weren't for the civil patrol directing traffic so I had a chance to speak with Cadet First Lieutenant Emily Earl where at the spur wink farm pancake. Pancake breakfasts and fly in sponsored by E._A.. Chapter One forty one here in Cape Elizabeth made and we're talking with First Lieutenant Emily Earl who's part of the Civil Air Patrol and one of the things that you do but this chapter does every year and what bunk chase who really has helped organizers wonderful flying every year has said couldn't be done without you is run traffic and take care of things here at the flying. Tell us a little bit about you. Organize that we just asked to see who is available and who is available well if they need training for air control we help them out with that if they need help with <hes> learning how to control cars we help them out with that. Explain the situation here a little bit because for people who are just hearing about it they need to understand a little bit about the farm and about the layout about where planes park and a little bit about the road situation. Tell us why you're so important we help <hes>. When the planes fly over the road we help cars stop so they don't get hit by the cars and we keep an eye on people make sure they're not in the way of propellers and other planes coming in one of the things that people have to understand is we're in the middle of a horse pasture and in the middle that horse pasture is also the grass airfield on one side of the horse pasture is a is a parking area for the aircraft on the other side is the landing strip and in between a road where all the vehicles come from so you have all your guys watching traffic yesterday we stop them when planes coming into land and on the landing strip and then we let them go when there's no complaints coming in and do you get a lot of cooperation or people not paying attention to you for the most part we get cooperation and then those other people that just kind of do what they WanNa do and what would you say does your biggest challenge in organizing this and putting it all together in terms of getting people here in the chapter and in terms of once you get here pulling it all together? I think biggest challenges actually getting the numbers for people to show up to help us out <hes> mm-hmm. The people that are here are actually very helpful and you're a great crew and it's just wonderful to see everybody here working so hard and you have a bunch what's he agents for the Civil Air Patrol so cadets <music> Our ages twelve to twenty one and then senior members twenty one plus and how do you get into the C._A._p.. I actually got into it. <hes> my boyfriend dragged me to a meeting so <hes> but word of mouth the a lot a lot of the cadets recruiting from those schools. I'm a lot of senior members are going out and like here. We get a lot of inquiries like who are we. What do we do so we get some memberships that way as well? So how long have you been with cap and what are your favorite parts about. uh-huh I've only been with cat for about a year and a half now and one of my favorite parts is just being around learning about the planes like I've been up in the aircraft a few times learning how like they owe craft works and learning how to do search search Mess Jen's in the back of a plane. Emily thank you so much for joining us here on the airplane geeks. Thank you so much for working to take care of this marvelous flying. We couldn't do it without you thank you. It's always great to be able to talk with someone from cap a really is then. It's I mean what a great organization the work that they do is so important you know critical but just the opportunity it gives people young people especially to experience aviation and AH build an interest in that is it's just wonderful so I got one more interview for you and this was just spectacular. I had such a good time talking to this guy. You Know How when the aviation bug bite you it just it never never let's go. It just doesn't go away. We'll Tom O'CONNELL. He's from Wales and he's a real good example of that. He's a retired professional pilot and he'll tell you who flew for you ended up retiring from American but boy anyway he's his eighties now and a unfortunately he lost his medical last year and but you can hear that the sky is still calling him when he talks about flying you can you can just see his eyes lineup so anyway. You can't help but feel his passion for flying when you hear Tom's voice so let's give it a listen. Hey it's your main man Mike a here. We're talking with Tom. O'CONNELL from wells may now Thompson flying for a long time and isn't flying any longer but Tom. How did you start flying and win? Was it well I grew up down at southern Connecticut about ten miles north of the bridgeport airport and that's where the aircraft's fighters were being made for the Second World War <hes> by Sikorsky Aircraft and prince what the other the navy veteran was right down bridgeport show. I had airplanes fly in all of this guy when I was a kid just growing up and I liked him. I had model airplanes from the time I could afford them. Show when I got old old enough high school I got one year of college in and in the second year of college I started. I think it was maybe seventy. Maybe this year college yeah. I you're a college. I started flying dual in a d she st she five. I think it was like a like a Piper cub and and I started flying that and <hes> and then when I got my associate's degree from the College New Haven of College <hes> I met my wife and we got married. When I was nine thousand nine hundred she was seventeen and from the wedding she had a big family letter brothers and sisters from the wedding was enough money given so that I was able to take the money in and I had about fifteen hours in and I bought a one thousand nine hundred thousand nine Luscomb I got checked out in it and a couple of hours and flu death for not one hundred fifty hours by virtually all the time by myself you do that in those days you could get away with so I ended up with one hundred hundred sixty seventy hours so let me ask you a quick question you said back in those days and back then love just more or less about when was that that was in <hes> I graduated from high school in Fifty Three Associates Associates degree in college <hes> nineteen fifty five? I got married in nineteen fifty six and I had that airplane in fluid for your and a half made a club out of it crashed it up so he cashed it in night of money to knock money done bridgeport and join flying club and put enough hours to get a private license and commercial license and instructor rating and do instructing and I managed to get a job right across the street from the airport show I worked fulltime and a job and part-time nights and weekends instructing and flying and wait my way up and got a job in in a airplane on the field about big twin engine food F for about six months and then an airline hired me when I was she must be twenty four twenty five years old. I got hired by an airline and I stayed there with the airline to low sixty so let me ask you what what airline did you fly for and what aircraft did you start with. I started with Mohawk Airlines in UTICA New York going to DC three and ended up up it we merged with allegany. It'd be merged with two or three airlines and grew into a big big airline and now they are American Airlines that this date right now and I give all my mail from American can imagine Geico from Milwaukee to American lifetime and everything worked out good after I retired. I ended up after the airline Flying Charter for over twenty years. I've actually going into Alaska in flown flow planes for two summers up in Ketchikan Alaska where they had that accident recently. I flew out of there for two years when I was sixty sixty two sometime around so what <hes> what kind of float planes flying I was flying aligned to beaver in one eighty five. I float a beaver on the weekend because the regular guy what was off and I flew one eighty five. I'm fletch during the week. Did you have a preference for either one of them. I loved them. All yeah well great. I don't care what was I I love him so I understand you recently had to give up your medical. Unfortunately what what were you flying just before you gave that up every small airplane that you're on over to twitchell's. I've instructed there for over twenty years so you said you you're flying charters up here in Maine where you flying charters trump put a Lewiston Auburn airport mainly because it wasn't far work from my home and meanwhile by the way I did put an airport in my farm. My farm is five hundred acres and I put an airport in crashed airport which is still open at still used and I still have a couple of airplanes. I have a j tree cub and I have a Cessna one seventy two and I totally year ago. I was flamed very regular. I've flown governor around here iphone Olympia snow on many many trips. I was very very busy all my life time that I hooked into a bitch and Madonna learn how to fly the commercial down. There and work get started with aviation about twenty earning twenty three years old or so until just recently. I was extremely busy well. It sounds like you've been flying more or less around sixty years being grounded now must have you feeling very constrained. You still managed to have friends. Take you up and get you in the air yeah all the time I flew flew a lot. I never had any bad times. We never had any bad emergencies. Everything worked out and all my training. I did all my training. Every time I trained on an airplane. I came out get tabs number one but a lot of times and I found it very easy to learn aviation and the fly aviation and I still do what advice would you give to young people who wanted to get into aviation now. What would you if there was a fourteen year old kid right here in front of us saying I want to be a pilot? What would you tell them well? There's so expensive. I'm not learn how to fly as ridiculous. Everything is so expensive you have to work <hes> very hard somehow or another to build up a couple of hundred hours to get your commercial license. Once you get your ground your commercial license you try and get an instructor rating. You can go to college for this and get get some time in and get us much as it's good to go out and get J. Three time and the small airplanes the airlines airlines are looking for a lot of experience true Fischel good trading drew colleges and air schools then you get with the airline and get the airline and you're in your good pilot and you pay attention and <hes> paying attention is extremely important and you like flying so you'll love it and <hes> once you get your first year with airline. You're pretty well unless you really mess up badly. You're guaranteed a job until you're sixty years old and even sixty five day changes to now as long as there's another person in the cockpit who is under sixty and his current and good pilot so <hes> I I recommend you have to like you have to like airplanes and then just read all your and get a chance to fly every time you can anyway just so go flying. Go flying would've do something try and keep the fly and go and even if it's just model airplanes if if you find an airport and start if if you can do that it would be find an airport and start getting to know about airplanes and airport and do your world that good as you go along building up your experience level and this fly in is one of the most wonderful things for young people because it's not like when we were younger and you could just walk up to an airport walk out in the hangers and do some hanger talk this allows young people in this day and age to come up and actually see aircraft and talked to pilots and meet people like you know. There's no doubt about it. It's it's a good time and I hope that they add a <hes> can pick it up and continue it and keep going. You know you gotta like it. I mean if you like it and you love it. You're going to do it. That's all it still has a certain amount of people in this world the fall in love with airplanes in business and that's why we have the airplane Geeks podcast. com want to ask you one more question before we go. It's a question borrow from the plane talking U._K.. podcast some friends of ours across the pond from us and their question assist you flown a lot of different airplanes in your time and there may be planes thinking about all the aircraft had ever been that may not be in existence anymore planes at are still flying now. If there was any aircraft at all that you haven't flown or maybe that you have that you would like to fly again whatever airplane it might be. What would you like to get your hands on and actually fly Piper Cub? That's the one time thank you so much for joining us on the airplane podcast. Thank you very much for letting me talk to kids. I say if they're interested. Push it get it. You can do it. You know aviation grab up short help now. Wow I like Tom. You know I years ago have flown into Utica New York on Mohawk. I wonder was the pilot he might have been and wasn't he just amazing and you could just the love of aviation and his voice the whole time through it and what I love of my favorite part of that interview was right at the very end taking that that question from plain-talking U._K.. And asking him what airplane if it was anyone in the world. Could you fly at. He just wants to get back in his J. Three cub. He misses flying. That's amazing all right. Oh thanks for capturing those interviews Mike any other kind of quick closing thoughts on this growing farm flying there was only one disappointment in this bird wing farm imply in just one. I mean there were forty. Planes Were Great Plains they they they did a missing man formation for finance break <hes> fin passed away this this last year he owns a farm but his wife said for as long as she's she's still going to host the fly in but because he passed away they setup <hes> four one eighty five and they flew a missing man all on one hundred tires by the way and it was it was a beautiful sight to see but the one little complaint that I had you know it's been so rainy and cool up here in Maine this entire summer up until this past a couple of days and it's been so rainy that the blueberry crop has not been really harvested yet so the blueberry pancakes they were made with New Jersey blueberries anything wrong with New Jersey blueberries but highbush versus low Bush Gimme the low Bush main blueberries Newbury's any day. Put the main blueberries or coming right. They're still there still coming. Oh yeah they're coming out to be here. I'm sure they'll be here by August third and fourth Max all right well yeah. We're GONNA have a conversation about that. I think <hes> Yeah Yeah. We may have to try to make that work all right again. Thanks for the for the interviews Mica any <hes>. I don't think we have a lot of what's up with the GEEKS. <hes> these days <hes> Max West you're probably just flying around in that <hes> in the serious right busy as usual just all kinds of projects going on so nothing report create and <hes> so David <hes> where again we're really glad to have you back in. We're going to a hope that you'll have some <hes>. What's up with the GEEKS stuff for coming up in the coming weeks as you get your strength back and <hes> you're able to get out in about <hes> hope that happens quickly? We'll take we're taking one day at a time good so I mean that's the best I can do right now. So it's you know one day at a time. It feels good to be back on the show and was able to record tonight but getting late and I'm getting tired. I bet you are yes mica. What's up well? There's something I kinda wanted to bring up. It's not necessarily good news but it's but it's important news because Max you guys <hes> both Max isn't David sure you remember the letter that we got from my friend. BIRLA was beautiful email that we received about her experience and love aviation since she was a young girl and unfortunately I just only heard recently Birla had a stroke back in January and I've spoken with her since she's recovering her husband Sahlin who was a b twenty four or pilot during the war and flew through the Pacific well he hasn't been doing really well and he just had a heart attack on July twelve and I just heard <hes> heard about that from <hes> from his son who was my best buddy through college and he went into the hospital he had a couple look good days and and he's in hospice so I just wanted to mention him because I've been thinking about him and don't Oh exactly what's happening now but let's all send our our hope some thoughts and prayers and that's such a tried expression but there's nothing that you can say that that really means what I mean but I'm sure that the listeners who have heard the story and know what I'm talking about can feel what I'm saying yes and they're both in their ninety. s four that's amazing yeah solas ninety seven and <hes> on the weekend. I want you to come up here. BURL IS GONNA turn ninety five all right <hes> one quick shoutout last episode we talked about DB Cooper a lot and how one of the individuals that has been thought ought to be DB cooper by some people anyway <hes> passed away well we had a tweet from at DB Cooper podcast and there is apparently a podcast podcast called the cooper four tax which is at the Cooper Vortex Dot pod bean dot com. You can listen to it there in what will have that Lincoln the show notes so if you are really interested in Khun DB Cooper very well you know there's a podcast for everything and there's a podcast about <hes> DB Cooper and all the theories and different opinions about that whole mystery so <hes> check out if you're interested all right. That's a rap for this episode. WanNa thank Paul Bradberry for joining US Director of Portland International Jet Port Paul. Thanks again for coming on the show is great talking to you. I look forward to seeing you up up in Portland Sometime Looking for Judas well thank you so much and of course the website is Portland Jet Port Dot Org. Let's tell folks where they can find us online and David Vander huff. How about you you've been you've been kind of getting back into the social media thing a little bit lately? I've seen a little bit you know you can you can find me on twitter at D._M.. Vanderhoek F- you can find me on facebook if if you knew how to Spell Vanderhoek and eventually I'll get back to blogging and writing on our what just flew by black but most of all you can be part of our slack listener team you can do that by sending an email to the the geeks at airplane geeks Dot Com and we'll send you an invite so you can join the fun there. Mike Can Attest that slack is a is a good place to hang out and last but not least after my brief hiatus <hes> I'm GONNA bail out my co host and I'll be back on the U._A._V. Digest on Fridays Great Yippee and if you <hes> here in our slack team you would be able to see a photograph from your venture of <hes> Rob Mark and hill standing together so <hes> we have some fun things going on there all right Max Trescott were folks find you you know I talked with the rub earlier in this week and he categorically denies being DB Cooper's. Let you know that <hes> She's trying to put an end to that rumor so well. Let's see <hes> this week on aviation news talk episode one fifteen. Were talking with Mike Whitaker. WHO's the former F._A._A.? Deputy administrator. That's the number two guy at the F._A._A.. He was also the chief next-gen officer. He's also a relatively new private pilot so we talked about his interest in general aviation the future where it's headed and also talked about Nexgen exchange so you can check that all out at aviation newstalk DOT COM or wherever you get your podcast. If you WanNa send me a note just aviation news talk dot Com click on contact at the top of the page and shoot me an email yeah. I'd like your get their itis episode so thanks yeah. I think that's one of those things that seems overly simple when you just hear the term but then when you really dig down to the subject you realize that it's actually a lot more complex in there just a lot more gosh is involved with it than than you might think. That's right Mica <hes> our main man. How do we find you online well? You can get via email at Mike at Airplane Geeks Dot Com and while I don't have a lot of social graces I do have a little bit of a social presence and that's on twitter I main fly and May I n e fly main flying also on that slack team and like David said it's a fun place to hang out. That's great and you can find me on twitter at Max. Flight can also find me on linked in David mentioned that the U._A._V. Digest Dot Com and with Mary Kirby at Pax X. podcast dot com talking about the passenger experience you can find us at airplane geeks Dot Com show notes it airplane geeks Dot com slash five <music> six to our show is by Bruno. Masao has always you can find his compositions. That incorporate aviation sounds at Pro Musallam dot com so please join us again next week as we talked doc aviation on the airplane podcast by everybody. Keep the blue side up have a good night and thanks for listening yeah.

Portland Paul David David director MICA Portland Boston Boeing Mike Airbus Max Trescott Fedex Maine Paul Bradberry Nieto jetblue Portland International Airport Paul Bradberry Portland Intern Interpol Dulles
548 Champaign Aviation Museum

Airplane Geeks Podcast

1:32:46 hr | 1 year ago

548 Champaign Aviation Museum

"This is the airplane. Geeks podcast. Hurry, Mr. educate and inform. You explore and expand your passion for aviation and entertain you little along the way this episode. We look at the champagne aviation museum in Ohio their restoration work, the volunteers working on the aircraft. And how they see the role of an aviation museum in the news. We look at seven three seven safety cards that are confusing. Some passengers the scaled composites model for zero one flight attendant trip brokering while air ending operations and the 2018 eighteen Collier trophy winner. We also give some firsthand impressions of the twenty nineteen sun and fund fly in and expo. It's all coming up right now. Welcome to the airplane. Geeks podcast. This is episode five hundred forty eight of the show where we talk aviation. I Mex flight in joining me. I is max trescott. He's host of aviation. News talk podcast. He's the two thousand eight see if I of the year, he's an expert on the Cirrus aircraft mex- west where we're back from Sunan fund. Well, I'm not back. But you're back. You know, I was thinking you said that I was joining you, and I was thinking no that was last week. I spent all week with you. How could I mean, we're now thousands of miles apart again? As we are. But you're back home. And I'm on the way home indeed nice to be back here with you again. Yes. Absolutely. He and also with this is David Vanderhoek, our aviation historian who was not at sun fun this year. I david. That's right. I was not it's unin front. Looks like everybody had a great time. It was nice having a week off to be honest. So but looking forward to a good show tonight. Yeah. Now, I think you all listening may have heard the the last episode here what we did was when we were at sun and fun myself and max trescott and launchpad Missouri, and rob Mark got together, and we recorded a show on sun and Fun Radio. So of course, that was broadcast live on the sun and fund AM radio station as well as over it live ATC dot net. And so it is we took the the recording in just slapped an opening and closing on it put it up in the feed for you all to to listen to and max trescott, you you had a I thought an interesting observation after we did that which I agree. With concerning how it felt to have that group together. Boy, I don't remember the specific observation, but boy, it was great. Great fun. I really enjoyed you know, sitting across from you and Robin the launch pad, and it just what was the operation. I made. Yeah, you were saying about how especially with respect to arrive who we haven't had on the on the show in the same capacity for quite a while. And how it was just it was just like old times. Right. We just slid right into it. And felt like we never never been away for any length of time at all, right? In fact, the I saw rob less than a year ago. But I have not seen you for seven years. And yet, you know meeting up with you it was like, oh, yeah. It's Maxine we talk every week. And it didn't feel like we hadn't seen each other for seven years. Yes. Yes. So we'll we'll talk more about signed fund a little bit later in the in this show. He, and we have some other recordings and interviews and. Things that we will provide to you all listening in the future in the not too distant future. So you can you can look forward to that. But like, I say, we'll talk about side and finding a little bit more coming up but first introduce our guest, it's Amy brower from the champagne aviation museum in Urbana, Ohio. Amy is the well, she does public Amy you do public affairs donor relations education sounds like you're sort of person behind the scenes that does almost everything that would be. Yes, let me say thank you very much for inviting me to be part of your podcast now, I ran into the well, yes, I ran into Amy how long ago was that a month ago. Maybe something like that. After I had been at the air force museum in Dayton. And in looking for a place to. To grab some food that was more or less on the way home. What did I do? Well, we dipped into the eat at the airport the hut com. Site found Grimes field airport in that has the airport. Cafe and also notes the the museum right next door. So actually me when I ride even though I was hungry. The first thing I did was head right over to the museum. It's a it's a spectacular place. It's a it's a renovation factory as much as it is a museum. Yes, actually within the next month, or so it will change even more as the seventy two hundred square foot workshop will open so all of the tools and most of the active projects like the wings and the bigger things will move over there. So I actually will get to begin to start putting together more of a museum atmosphere in that larger building. Yes. Because that was under construction when. Here sounds like they moved along pretty quickly. Because I I guess I wasn't expecting it to come together that this quickly. But that's fantastic. That's great. Yes. They broke ground in early November of last year. And it's it's a basic hangar building. There are no frills that I also surprised at the speed because you mentioned the air force museum. It takes some fifteen years to build a new building. I guess that's the difference between, you know, civil engineer or you know, defense whatever you wanna call it and actually private contractors. Right. All right. Well, we're going to have a great conversation with Amy learn about how you how you build a b seventeen bomber in some other exciting projects that they have going on. But first we're going to talk a little bit about the aviation news from the past week, or at least some of it will probably go through this always say this sort of quickly. If for no other reason in the fact that I don't know if if max t is tired is I is exhausted. It is. I am. I don't know if we can talk too long about the news, but we'll give it a shot. So why don't we get started? With the news is everyone ready ready from the west ready in Philly. I ari. It comes from this is insider dot com. Passengers on Southwest Airlines thought they were flying on a Boeing seven three seven max after confusion about their on-board safety cards. Interesting interesting how how could on-board safety cards confused passengers enough to think that they might be flying on a grounded airplane. I can tell you because I flew southwest Florida in back, and I saw exactly the same thing on my way out there. And I had exactly the same reaction initially until I read a little further of some of these people didn't understand that. There's a different a difference between the seven three seven eight hundred and the seven three seven max eight and they both share a common a safety briefing car to the back pocket of every seat. And so when I first collapsed at it. I saw seven three seven max eight, and I thought what the what the what the heck and. I kept staring at open it looked around. Okay. It also says above that seven three seven eight hundred. I think a lot of people didn't notice that that that's going to do a listed and it caused a little bit of panic. A lot of tweets on Twitter and a lot of posts from concern. Passengers it seems like under more normal circumstances. More fortunate circumstances, I guess probably most passengers wouldn't have any idea. Well, that they're even on a seven three seven, let alone dash eight hundred versus max ater max nine, but the result of all this. Everybody's quite aware of of these airplane designations these days, but I don't know. I don't think that would be the case otherwise now, it's unfortunate. There's an interesting picture. That's also in this new story, and it's a shot from a helicopter or drone or whether appears that shot from a couple of hundred feet. And that shows grounded Southwest Airlines seven through seven max aircraft on the tarmac. What they call these southern California logistics airport in Victor, Cal, victorville, California, and I count twenty four southwest jets all park next to each other. My recollection is that they have the largest portion of the seven three seven Bax fleet that's out there. And I know it's on the order of a few dozen. So I don't know if it's, you know, twenty four thirty six or forty eight, but certainly this picture shows more than half of all south west grounded aircraft in one place. Yeah. I mean, besides the tragedy of the loss of life, which is in and of itself pretty pretty horrific. I don't know the the the pain the difficulty that Boeing and others are going through is I is really significant. And I mean, I I don't think anybody is clothing over the fact that Boeing is in such this difficult situation. I hope it doesn't last too long. But we seem to be saying more and more increases in the time at the fleet might be grounded. It's just I don't know. It's just it's just really unfortunate. Yes. There was a story today that American Airlines announced that they're extending their groundings out through the first week in June. I can't remember June fifth or something like that. So obviously, even the airlines that have all these planes. Don't know for sure when they'll get the final fix. From Boeing in southern just increasing, you know month by month, the the date when they're gonna bring these things back in the service. Yeah. Yeah. Amy de run across people that have concerns about flying commercially in in general or any kind of reactions at your picking up on I haven't I don't really move and those crowds. I guess so no the first mention I heard of it was today when I was meeting with the National Park Service. We were discussing the fact that I'm getting a presentation ready to go to Boeing to see if we can get some funds since we've got four Boeing aircraft in Champaign aviation museum, and the comment was made. Well, it's probably good time for them to be, you know, feeling more philanthropic. Yes. Yeah. How that's interesting. How receptive? Do you? Find companies, you know, the manufacturers in terms of supporting the museum. That has their products. I it must vary. A lot from one company to the next. Well, I know how generous they've been in the national museum the United States Air Force. The signs are all over the place to be honest champagne has not truly approached bowing to this point. And so they are top of my list. I like to go big or stay home. So again because the b seventeen is one of their icon ick aircraft aircraft in genders a lot of emotions, and it was called the flying fortress and appropriately that aircraft could take a lot of abuse and still bring most of its crew home as it did many many times during World War Two. Aircrafts that I know you don't have in the museum is a scaled composites model for zero one in. I wasn't terribly familiar with this. But I guess. Is ABC reports in secret airplane stops at F B O? This is aircraft made kind of a bit of a public appearance. I don't know if that was intended or not I love this story scaled composites for a one is a drone demonstrator max. Yeah. I it's got the shape of the Lambda weighing the v tail, but it's optionally manned if I flew in twenty seventeen and it's been I guess the best way to describe it as it's been conspicuously out in the open. But nobody really knows what's going on and it stopped the PO because it was on its way transiting to Pawtuxet river to I guess can't as it was described by somebody the petting zoo, kind of look and feel to it. But yeah, I can you can imagine. A stealth prototype. Pulling up to your local FBI say fill it kind of. We might be a little bit of JAMES BOND flying the Beatty. Five Jay up to the gas station to fill it up. So we don't really know what it's who owns it other than skills composite built it. But it's a demonstrator, but it's got technologies that we probably don't know about and it was done on cheap. Yeah. I thought wasn't part of our reportedly. One of the objectives of of this aircraft was to create a demonstrator that had a a low production cost. But it there's an article it's an older article from maybe from last year in in Defense News that it has some dimensions for this Makati. Saw that one. I did I've got it up right now. I was kind of intrigued by the similarities between it and the Cirrus type rated in it is a single engine aircraft. And of course, it's got a v tail so that the thrust doesn't burn off the vertical stabiliser, the traditional attell configuration of most airplanes. It's got a little more power than the Williams engine on the Cirrus jet. That's round oh, just under fifteen hundred pounds of thrust this over three thousand pounds of thrust from Pratt and Whitney engine, and it'll go mach point six point five, and I kind. Guess that it was single engine. When I I saw the note that said flight aware had tracked it at two hundred thirty nights. And I thought met doesn't sound like two engines yet surprisingly the wings fans only thirty eight feet, which means it with your radically fit into a standard t hangar. If someone wants to pick one of these things up they should be able to fit it in most any hanger airport. Yeah. Yeah. And you you might want to take a look at the show notes for this. Because there's some there's some photos in there. There are actually a couple of videos out there as well. And we'll have links to all that in the show notes. You want to get a look at this for a one scaled composites plane, and Mr. trescott, why is he engine intake on the top of the few slides and bled out through the tail? Let's see how military you think? I have no idea David go for it infrared signature. Yeah. Of course makes sense. If you go back to the F one seventeen the v tail of the one seventeen and the beaver tail were designed to reduce the infrared signature. For a slow moving drone or you a s like the avenger or any of the new unmanned combat air vehicles. They have intakes above the few slides to lower their infrared profile and the V tails, reduce the signature from the ground and protect. So it's not really era dynamics as more as far as the military is concerned. It's less about aerodynamics and more about infrared signatures to minimize raider across section makes total sense since all those greater a radar units on the ground looking up might as well put the the messy inlets on top of the airplane. All right moving on aero, news dot net. United warrants flight attendants against illicit trip. Brokering for some I read that I thought it said tip brokering, no is trip brokering in the airline has warned flight attendants that they need to stop the practice of trading or choosing flights that they'll work when there's some compensation involved, and I guess you United is serious about enforcing that prohibition. I guess I guess max. It's a prohibition in their policies. I think these kinds of trades have always happened to some extent. And I don't believe, you know, the airline has a problem. If to flight attendants decide, hey, I'm gonna swap my trip for your trip problem is that apparently flight attendants who have seniority are able to bid and get really nice trips. Those would be ones that allow you to pack your hours into his few days as possible. So that your home? More days out of the month. And since those are valuable commodities, apparently they've actually been selling these, you know, desirable trips to their less fortunate colleagues who have less than seniority, but with still like to be home, you know, more days out of the month. So yeah unite has kind of stepped up and said, let's not do that. I I'm sure this will shut that down. I guess for a period time or maybe drive. It deeper underground, I don't know. And some more news on. Wow. Air in in some ways are our favorite budget airline. Of course, we had schooling Mogensen on the on the show the CEO of. Wow. Air some time ago. Wow. Air has ceased operations that happened about ten days ago in lift a lot of stranded passengers though, some of the other airlines stepped up and really were very helpful by coming up with kind of emergency fe- special fares for people who were stuck at airports needed to get back home. And couldn't because they're who out tickets were now, essentially useless. So it's great that the airlines can help each other out with when things like that happen. I did notice just a day or so ago that school he was quoted as saying that he was looking to get while back up and running again. So we'll see how successfully is on that we've been watching this airline scaleback considerably. Over the last few months as they were starting to have cash flow problems. Of course, they weren't able to fix that soon enough. I'm guessing it would take a major cash infusion. And you know, I'm a little skeptical that having watched it fail under reasonably good management that somebody would might be willing to sail share. Let's roll the dice. Again. Here's you know, tens and twenties millions of dollars to to have ad again. So we'll see I mean, I think it just tells us that the long-haul discount airline models, you know, fraught with problems. Yeah. And also my perception of guys like school who start an airline is there. Not of the personality. Type that's likely to have a setback or failure. Then pack it up go home. And that's the end of it. And I'm sure we'll see him come back in some form or another whether it's Styler airline or something else in. Aviation. You know who knows? But I think I don't think he's done yet. You know, I think you're right. And it's probably premature me to kind of say, hey, it's not likely to work out. You're right. There are numerous as serial airline entrepreneurs. I was listening to podcast recently about David needle men who had started a jet blue. And is now off starting to get another airline. So yeah, I think when these people get airlines in their blood, they they have difficulty stopping they just want to keep doing it. Yes. Yes. All right, one one more story. We talked about the call your trophy, some episodes ago. This is of course, the Robert J Collier trophy. That is presented by the NA the National Aeronautics association each year. And what was it max, you you kind of characterize it as what the Nobel prize or something like that of aviation very much. So yeah, though, it's an American prize. Definitely. So it's only going to go. Typically to couple that's got some connection with aviation in America. But beyond that, the I think it's a good analogy a lot even even the folks at NASA will refer to it as the Nobel prize of aviation, and I think it's kind of interesting that you know, we we have had our picks in the past and at times a different host here airplane. Geeks have correctly picked who the winner was. I think we got a big goose egg on this one. I don't think any of our host to pick the winner. So go ahead. Tell folks who it is. That's right. This was the the auto g Cass system, the automatic ground collision avoidance system, and they said this team, quote, successfully completed a rapid design integration and flight test of critical life saving technology for the worldwide f thirty five fleet. So David auto G casts that that was something that like he'd Martin developed. I believe in conjunction with the US air force, the f thirty five jay-paul the joint program office as well as NASA and the defense safety oversight council kind of a team effort, and it started with the f sixteen program, the sixteen was the first moment the ground with the G caste system, and basically it. My brain just turned the mush co. It's like a collision avoidance system. Well, it it it's to prevent purpose flying into terrain. What's the proper term max trescott that I missing control flight is. Yeah. Control flayed into see fit. Yeah. What he said controlled flight into terrain. So I mean, it it. It's an alert system that the aircraft recovers earlier than normal pilots. Should they lose control of the aircraft in there might be a terrain thing? So it was very successful in the in the F sixteen program, and they quickly moved into the F thirty five program. I got to admit it's kind of nice that they picked the safety program as for the war, not just technology development. But in this case the safes live, and there is at least one I think maybe a couple of videos out there. It will put a Lincoln this show knows to one that's auto GECAS, say's unconscious f. Sixteen pilot, and this is some declassified US air force footage. It's kind of dramatic. I I don't it it show. You're looking at the at the, HUD. I think I guess that's what you're what you're looking at in this. You're looking through the HUD. Yep. Yeah. Yeah. And so I don't know what all that stuff is in the. Trescott probably understands fourteen times much of that as I do. But but in any event, I guess the pilot the sixteen pilot is is unconscious and for I don't know what reason, but and as apparently about to impact and the to the ground, and you can hear the voices of others on the radio become I think increasingly more concerned, and then I guess what we're seeing is system takes over and saves the pilot saves the plane. What's remarkable is if you look at the L Timet, which is in the right hand side, they were operating somewhere around fifteen thousand feet, and he went from fifteen thousand feet down to five thousand feet in literally just a handful of seconds. I mean, he was going down extremely rapidly. And I suspect that they had just performed some type of maneuver which pulled a lot of G's that caused the pilot to go on conscious, and he probably would have been. Dead had the system not kicked in and level the aircraft off and then started to climb it back up. So I think it's a excellent choice. And it's just an example of how some of the new software driven kinds of safety systems. We have out there are really enhancing safety in in aircraft. I see this all the time in the Cirrus aircraft that I fly fly with the envelope stability protection. Which for example, if you start to Bank over to forty five degrees. The stick will in movie back to about thirty degrees. Or if you pick up too, high it'll pull forward to prevent you from stall and things like that. And these are all new kinds of things as early generally Asian in the past seven or eight years, but you know, all these little things make a huge difference. And by the way, I just because I was go ahead. Say I dove tail off of that all of those little things make a huge difference. It's not a very far removal thing from avoiding flight into terrain as an aircraft avoiding a stall automatically. Yep. Yep. So I mean, I it's interesting that this is a very successful program. And then we have the Boeing max, which has got kind of the same intention to override the pilots, and that has catastrophic effects. So it goes both ways, I guess it's kind of interesting because somewhere acronyms camps and an m s I went in. I pulled up the list of collar trophy winners for the past ten years because I was thinking it's been a while since there's been a a military contractor who was wanted. Sure enough. I was right on that back. The last five six years it's been either things like the Cirrus division, which one last year blue origin, which is a space related thing before that was the NASA GPL dawn mission, which was the the one that I voted for when I was on the on the selection committee back in two thousand fifteen the Gulfstream prior to that and all the way back to twenty thirteen is when the David room of this one northbound Northrop Grumman. X forty seven b was the winner of the caller trophy. All right. Let's talk about the she got really airplanes the champagne aviation museum. Now, I'm so glad Amy was able to to join us when I walk into that museum. So there's a a lobby area. Let's call it there. And they're actually a few interesting things in there, including that. There's a the ball turret is in the in the lobby right? Amy. It isn't since you were there. The extra be seventeen engines now in the lobby is well, yes, I'm remodeling. It's going to have its engine note along with it. So that you can push the button and hear what it sounds like. Oh, I like that. I like that a lot. So there was nobody the lobby when you know when I was there. So I sort of pushed open the doors into the main hangar area and. It was amazing. I mean, you see a lot of aircraft there. Then we'll we'll talk about about some of those and you also see a b- seventeen which is in. Well, I guess two major sections right now, and you see many many people in their fabricating parts, the semblance components doing all kinds of restoration work. It's an active shop, so Amy tell us a little bit about if you could sort of the origins of the museum of what what it's beige your mission is give us sort of the background on the museum. Well, it's one man's dream. So in the summer of two thousand five Tom Riley, brought the b seventeen liberty bell up to Grimes field foreigner show, and was of course, selling rides and local businessmen and private pilot Jerry Schiffer purchased a ride and was just entrenched with the experience and was also struck by the enthusiastic support from the town. It was like the entire town of Bannon's rounding areas was out to experience this be seventeen historic World War Two aircraft up close. And as it turned out. Something went wrong, and I beg your pardon. I can't remember what it is. But the liberty bell ended up staying for a couple of weeks while repairs were made. And So Jerry shift forgot to have a lot of conversations with Tom Riley and the rest of the crew that accompanied the liberty though, so a little. Bit later on maybe a month or so Tom Riley called the airport manager grinds because he had another project another b seventeen g project that he purchased parts including the fuselage, and he asked the airport manager, if she happens to anyone who might be interested in purchasing this kit, basically to build this armor, and that's how it happened. It was you know, within two weeks they had signed the contract agreement. Now, the sad part to this story is that November twenty ninth of that very same year the first shipment parts Rives at Grimes field. And Jerry Schiffer has taken off on a ski trip to Montana in his Cessna four twenty five conquest, and he crashes near Belgrade Montana and is killed. So he doesn't ever see the completion of the beginning of the completion of his dream. And so. The widow and the family decide that that's going to be his legacy that they're going to see this project through. So the shipments continue to arrive, and they put them in a hangar there at Grimes field and the family business purchases the contract, I guess, you know, from some sort of follow through his from Jerry's will assume ING and then late in two thousand seven they decide they wanna create a flying seem around this be seventeen restoration project. So in two thousand eight granted that five one c three status by the IRS. And and also in two thousand eight was when the Schiffer family donates, the funds to purchase the b twenty five the champagne go, and so that becomes the seconds asset flying. Well, it's the only flying asset, but the second aircraft and to the museum inventory, and then two thousand ten they built the building that you walked into. And so it actually, you know, they move into their official home from the hangar over on the Grimes field. And now as I said earlier, they're going to be opening the seventeen hundred square foot workshop, which will be nice because I don't know if you call or not max, but the wings are hanging on the wall there on this. There are several new cells. I think they're four sales because we're building the sells for the liberty bell at the same time because she had the fire and her engine. It's quite the story for someone like me who's more interested in history. And of course, I specialized in World War Two history in the Cold War and my college career to follow this journey. How this this comes about? I mean, the volunteers in this museum are simply extrordinary the things that they're doing. And what happened was they found that they needed to buy all sorts of parts, you know, they've got these pieces, but they're missing a lot. So it's like this elaborate, jigsaw puzzle. That's missing many pieces and the parts are very expensive. They're costs prohibit. Give because no one's making them, or, you know, salvaging them, or, you know, going up to recover them from crash sites. So in new project manager joins the museum in two thousand eight just as they're thinking, they need to buy tools expensive tools to be able to make these parts, and he actually teaches and trains the volunteers. How to make the tools so that they can then make their own parts. So it starts with the fact that they found a radio room that they had pulled out of the water. So they take it completely parts. And while they're at it. They make two copies of it. So that then they can they're not technically permitted to retail these parts because they don't hold the patent American Airlines holds the patent for the Boeing B seventeen design. But they they're through donation made to the museum. So the the next clever step is they go to the Smithsonian and purchase the, Mike. Proficiency with the complete set of blueprints for the b seventeen g they pay to have them digitized of all on tier takes the burdensome project of completely cataloging every single one of these parts, and I've seen the book there's a lot of parts. So now, there's they're completely digitize. So they're on computers. He can look whatever part you need and print out the sketch for that. And then they end up selling complete sets these blueprints to other be seventeen owners. So they basically recoup the costs the initial cost of buying the microfiche and having to Gitai st- there's twenty five thousand plus of these drawings for these parts. As I was walking through in having some conversations with some of the volunteers who were fabricating as parts of Massembe's. I I asked that question. I said, how do you said, you don't have the original prints or anything, do you? And they said, oh, yes, let, you know, let us show you, and it it's it's just amazing to be able to have that available into look at prince of the originals that that give you all the specifications. And they actually they do when they make usually when they make one they'll make double or triple or quadruple because champion has now become the place for the other b seventeen owners to come for parts. And as there's currently ten of them still flying or was eleven, but again, the liberty bowsman grounded until she gets her noon sell finished and put on its champagne aviation regime is being very fair about the pricing and about the kind of donation that they ask because it's become this. Collaborative sort of effort to keep these bombers these icon ick aircraft flying and sharing them with the public. And as I said earlier, they are there's so much passion and motion that surrounds this particular point. I mean, I see a lot of that in the air force museum, but not to this degree. If that makes sense, tell us a little bit about the volunteers, the kinds of people who are they are the young or old or have backgrounds in manufacturing, or who are all these volunteers. They come from all over we have doctors dentists former FBI agents engineers, we actually have the son of a World War to combat that. We have a Holland native who was retired from the Royal Dutch airforce his connection to the aircraft was as a child operation manna child. How? Where the seventeens drops tons of food over Holland. He remembers that as young lad. So that's his connection course pilots employs pilots around, you know. Army air force marines navy because now we have the new C one. A that's the newest aquisition civil air patrol. We have teachers we have mother's. We have a a young mother with a homeschool loud. I think he's ten drives some Columbus. Now every Friday, and is he's working on the aircraft because you actually have to take a riveting test. You can't just walk up to this aircraft and start doing things because the project managers responsible for certifying every single part mean, he's the one news licensed by the FAA to do. So so it's a it's a very specific process. And I the first thing I made was a Gusset ring Gusset rid wing. I think I said that right? There's three words, and I always get the order they appear missed up. But I literally went to the computer printed out the sketch went in got the medal did all the cutting did all the sanding, you know. And now it's part of the wing, and that is really. I don't know. How to explain that feeling to tell you that? I am now part of that aircraft. Who'd you ever built or create anything like that before? Now, I made a joke I've not ever operated. Power tools other than the drill in my life. And I still have all ten of my fingers. Now, you've got parts on this be seventeen. It's well, she and she is a conglomeration of five other b seventeen right? There was a like a recovery from what was Alaska. Yes. I spoke to that gentleman today. He's a very interesting jonsman. Do you know how that came about? Well, there was a it was a crashed be seventeen in. Yes, right, Alaska. Well, and see you can find the particulars of what they got from the b seventeen. And when it looked like on the website the me being me. I'm like, how did you know? It was there who told you it was there. How did you know you wanted it? So this gentleman was in Alaska visiting his daughter and son-in-law, and he goes to Dorf air force base to get his haircut. And he's in the barbershop, and he sees this gentleman wearing a jacket with the heritage museum patch on it. And so they start talking about museums and Paul at this champagne aviation volunteers name. Tells him about the project they're working on it. And the Alaskan gentlemen says will you need to go out and get this airplane. That's here that's crashed. And so he immediate problem usually goes hires a helicopter, and they can't find it. They're trying to plot it on the mat the cannot find it. And of course, as the explains to me helicopters are very expensive. They're like two thousand dollars an hour. So he comes back and makes contact with a Bush pilot as he calls it and asks him if he's aware of this crash be seventeen in the Bush pilot replies. Sure, I fly over that every day. So they go out they go up. They go out they see the site. And then he goes back to the helicopter because literally it's in the swampy area. So you have to be dropped in. He said the helicopter couldn't land. They literally had to get as close as they could to the ground. And then hop out of the the heat. To hike to the site. And it's it's a really neat story because the entire community including the towel Keaton airport donated so much of their tooling and their time to recovery the helicopter pilots donated the cost of the fuel. So something that was estimated to cost two hundred and fifty thousand dollars actually ended up costing less than forty thousand. Because of the emotional connection that these bombers and gender. It's fabulous. It is fabulous. And so this that particular bomber did not see any combat in World War Two. It was a firefighter and apparently the engine blew up in the pilot managed to land it in Alaska, and I think they've only lost one crew members that was at story, but all of the other aircraft. There's a book called final cut about all the b seventeen and existence book. Surprise. You know, it doesn't surprise you. You know? But let's let's let's go as our friend launch pad would say KiKi, there's two aircraft that I really love. And that's incident in the Fairchild. If you talk about World War Two civil air patrol. The Fairchild is actually the Fairchild twenty four is probably one of the sexiest aircraft from the thirties ever. But the Stinson also are really important aircraft for the war at home. I'm glad you guys are working on preserving that aspect of it. Besides the piece of the bombers always get all the glory. But really cool stuff is things like stint sins. And of course, I'm a fan of see one I have one living in my backyard for all intents of purposes, but MS liberty what I have what I have one living within two and a half miles away from me really at the Delaware valley historic. Aircraft association will grow. They have C one trader. I call her the ugly girl between the two youthful eighties because she's not that attractive not not next to the twenty five in the seventeen. It's not her fault. You and I share the Fairchild I love that aircraft. I'm currently engaged in active argument with one of the chief pilots. He told me that they've already given me my first flying lesson, and they keep trying to get me to come pilot. 'cause there's so few women pilots. Right. And I said only if I get fly Fairchild, I absolutely adore that plane. It's gorgeous it's red and whites and do, you know who belong to our particular one? Mary Pickford and her husband who apparently has made was buddy. He was not very good at flying. It crashed it most of the time. So Tom told me that I would not be allowed to fly that until I had four hundred hours. I said, Tom I'll be dead by then. I told him I said, I won't get my pilot's license you unless you let me fly that aircraft. But at least have you gone up in it. No, not yet. They're working annuals right now. So you need to grovel and get at least get up in it. We have one that comes in. Mid-atlantic air museums World War Two weekend every year that it actually was an official search and rescue aircraft and actually. Drop bombs on a submarine off the coast jersey. So those are the Musee hairstyle did. Yep. They they did it for civil air patrol because our Stinson did our sensens- painted in the solar patrol colors, and it still has the attachment on its wing where it carry the bomb. Nope. The Fairchild also did it believe it or not that too. That's why you come on these shows. But no. But it's. I like. For all of those people out there. I'm gonna preach. I'm gonna lay it on the line. Like, I've told the gang down at this Massoni and every year there are more craft at the house e center than the SR seventy one. And the space shuttle discovery you need to look left you need to look right and spend some time dealing with the little stuff in the corners. Because that's the stuff that you're gonna find really interesting and really loving be seventeen or amazing b twenty five's or amazing H one thousand six is still my heart. But something like a Fairchild or Stinson that. Tells you a story more than probably a b seventeen is probably a good thing. And sounds like you getting quite a collection at or Bala. Well, I agree with you one hundred percents, and this is what I'm trying to. And I'm going to say, I feel like you. Remember the three stooges when he would knock all their heads together. And it would make that coconuts. This if you can imagine it, of course, I'm surrounded by pilots and most of the male, and so I- remind them that our new mission statement that I gave them as touching lives by restoring history. Not touching lies by restoring be seventeen. Yeah. She does. Thank you for saying. I'm gonna bring you with me next time, David. So that you can perhaps make that coconut sound with their pets. It's you know, to I have a background in your museum curation and a good museum has a focus. Unfortunately, aviator museums a lot of times, they don't have a focus and what they get is. Well, somebody shows up with an airplane, and they take it. And then they don't know what to do with it. And it doesn't do that aircraft Justice, and it doesn't help to museum. So all of that. I mean, a good coherent. Curated museum is is great. And what sounds great about? Your museum is to be able to go and watch them restore it. I was last month two months ago now hard to believe I'm out in Hawaii. And they have to be seventeenth swamp. Ghost which they've restored. But you can see the background. You can see the people working you can end young people can get really motivated to. Wow. What's it? Like like, you said, I mean, you popped rivets. That's an awesome experience and kids need to see the, you know, their stem. It's great. But there's also a lot of jobs out there that required a working with your hands and getting a little greasy, and you know, being agrees monkey and all of those kind of aspects that a lot of museums tend to gloss over, you know, nobody's going to restore like the air force museum. Nobody's gonna restore like. National airspace museum. But then again, you hardly get to see what they're doing is far as restoration in this case, you've got the ability to provide a hands on experience, or at least an up close and personal experience. Yeah. Okay. I'm getting off my high horse now. Sorry. No, no, no. You've got you've got receptive audience. Here. I assure you because you use the word museum, and I've told them some aircraft and a building don't make a museum. That's not what makes a museum. It's the story have to tell it's, you know, the education that you're going to provide it is all of those things that make the museum. I agree with you. One hundred percent asked me how many times at the air force museum. The guests come in and women over the fact that the air force museum did not get a real shuttle, and but the model that they have that you can get onto that's full scale. And appreciate the size of the orbiter and look inside. The crew compartment trainer and see all of the switches and the multibillion dollar hygiene station that's worth much more than a multibillion dollar paperweight. That's oh, maybe you, and I are good to have. So. I always talk about the fact that the air force museum was crushed that. They didn't get a real shuttle. But in all fairness there in the middle of nowhere. I as far as excessive -bility and NASA wanted as much punch as possible, and they weren't going to get their first choice because NASM got their first choice, but the shuttle simulator in the crew crew simulator. That's there is is an impressive addition to that hanger and supports the air force mission. You know, and it gives other opportunities for other places to come up with something. 'cause here force museum is the air force museum. It's never it's going to be that way for the till the end of time, it's designed to be a point of reference for all United States, Air Force military aircraft as for as far as air forces concerned since its inception. Plus the enemy aircraft at what? Again. So the shuttle sort of doesn't fall into that mission low, it doesn't you're absolutely right. And thank you for that. Because the air force exited the shuttle program in the late eighties. Yes. Because they weren't big enough to carry what they needed. They went back to the rockets, and but everybody that's one of those icons again, the people associate or recognize quickly. I guess is the word I'm looking. News. But I was actually just I I hate to off the subject max, but I was actually very privileged my first year as on tier there to entertain a lady from NASA who she never really told me what she did. But I do know that she attended every single shuttle launch and landing and still was well known with a NASA, and she would hear the gusts make this comment, and she she would give them an earful. And she actually had I had an amateur photographer take photos at her request of all of the research and development planes. You mentioned the x forty seven, and you know, the shuttle and she took those into NASA NASA was thrilled with our exhibit. And that's a big compliment in my mind. Yes. Well, he is I recall when I was there at the museum there are number of vents that the museum holds and participates in in other locations. I guess you can tell us a little bit about those airshows. Yeah. Yes. Well, the be twenty-five is participating in the living history flight experience, which is a special limited categories traffic at from the IRS which allows passengers and so we all have to go to ground school training in order to be crew three crew and seven passengers. And so basically, she gives that experience of being able to fly and the bomber and retain Lee, we let people on the museum got up into the cockpit or into the sea one eighty or whatever happens to be sitting on the floor at the time this seventeen, but she goes, we'll be going to Tennessee this year to New York. Illinois course, Grimes has its own air show the one place interestingly enough because you mentioned Oshkosh. She does not go is Dayton. She will not be going to Dayton because we're not permitted to let people ride her. So which is kind of disappointment. But but you will be up in in New York at Genesee. Oh, yes. Okay. I'm planning on being there to. Yes. Good. Good. Okay. And I'm hoping Randy's actually working on the annual right now for the c one a I'm actually looking forward to riding in that. 'cause she'll be able to carry a lot of the stuff that we need to bring along with us since most of the Bombay area and whatnot is meant for passengers in the b twenty five so I was kinda looking that's in need are craft actually got to sit sit backwards. I didn't expect that at first. Well, that's because keep in mind. That's what happens when you go down and catapult it also if you were sitting for if you were sitting forward on an aircraft and most boasts carrier onboard delivery aircraft do this the to currently does it the teach do face backwards because when you hit the carrier deck you go forward. You don't really wanna get slammed into the back seat as you hit the deck. So that's why they're always facing backwards. It makes sense. Thank you for explaining that that would make sense because he'd probably not be good for your neck. Would it not really? So it's really kind of exciting because of the the amount of hours. I mean, the volunteers over the last five years put in over one hundred fifteen thousand hours now, it's just since the executive director started having them log in. So that started in two thousand fourteen so who knows how many? Hours from two thousand six to two thousand fourteen were put into this aircraft. But she's the ladies to the point where it's now become fine. Piecework I guess for lack of a better word and without a hangar. We're going to get point. We can't go any further. There's no room to put her wings on. So that's our our our newest sort of challenge. I guess is. And that's why told you Boeing is at the top of my list because the c forty seven that's a Boeing now. They bought just went right on the head Douglas, Donald Douglas. They bought them, right? Yes. Unfortunately, a Boeing forty seven. Yes. Yes. And didn't they buy Mitchell as well? Or is that one of the other ones MO the b twenty five is also Boeing because the Boeing. Purchase North American. Well, North American got purchased and went through and then became part of Boeing so Boeing there are Boeing Mustangs in their Boeing B twenty five and yes, it it's not it's discouraging. Well, nice. Like you. I love the fact I've understand eight twenty six are rare. Is that true, David, they are and and. Really? Well, anybody eight twenty six is they're not really rare. But there as rare there's not as communists to be twenty-five, but they are fairly common as a war bird. And they were and the reason why interesting enough we just tell to your conversation about your seventeen parts be twenty five survived a lot because after the war because they were used as executive transports and trainers. So there were a lot of them that went surplus and then get cut up and scrapped H one thousand six is survived a fight in both World War, Two Korea. And then Vietnam special k which is a b twenty five b twenty six K that was just restored. And was I grant bleep ranch champion last year at Oshkosh fought in Vietnam. But those aircraft a lot of them went into the firebomb our world all you have to do is. Watch always the movie the lead aircraft that gets Mr. Dreyfuss into heaven is an H one eighty six invader that's painted a lot similar to your yellow one. So the firebombers saved the twenty six fleet. So there's there's a lot of those that became Warbirds and got restored. So anything to put Pratt and Whitney or are double wasp in right? Max, of course. Yes. But the I understand the engines for the b seventeen are are all done. They're all overhauled and ready for the wings. Is that right? They are then the cells are the ones that they're working to complete now. And like I said because to are one of them goes down south, so and then we have the extra engine, which I told you is now on the lobby I painted it's container. And we've got I actually came up the idea of rigging some wire around it. So people can actually still touch it. Because again that's mission. Statement. You know, it's about touching these things. So it's it's a pretty piece of equipment. I like it are need to plan a trip to a high. Oh, I think. Do I would love to have you. Because like I said, I need some of that coconut noise. These pilots. They just you know, it's it's about more than one aircraft. It's about all of the aircraft. It's about what they did. And we are so fortunate to have so many World War Two vets over the last several years. Of course, their health is deteriorating that we have one World War at that. Is there every Saturday? He's ninety five years old. He's a tail gunner he completed thirty five missions, he shot down three Germans one of them in ace, and he still drives his own car. He still lives by himself, and he comes in. And just watch him talk to you know, young people is just amazing. I mean, he's a walking talking relic, and it's his favorite thing to do. And my socio at Frank has just finished as of Friday, the tailgunner somebody. So it's all ready to go. It's finished. He was restoring that because his father was a tail gunner who was shot down in France and became. POW for a while said that was why he had been working on that particular project to that's this is kind of the flavor of this museum that I got when when I visited well that plus is it turned out. I was I was there around lunchtime. And everybody decided they were gonna hit off to that that airport diner that kind of drew me to the to Urbana in the first place, and they invited me over, and we all we all had a nice lunch together. But it's just this. There's this feeling of participation of sort of a communal passions something like that that that's what I found when I went to that museum. Just and just randomly started talking to people I ran across. I mean, including you, Amy and and others as well. It just has a completely different field from any other museum that I've walked into. I think that's a good way to put it. I mean, it does and the engine new Idi in there. For example, he treating is a very expensive process. I'm sure you're all aware of that. 'cause you're all airplane experts, and they were spending thousands of dollars on hey, treating while we have a heat treating oven, but it's only four foot oven. So if you're thinking about those long wing spars is at term. Okay. So one of the volunteers figured out. He takes and cuts the medal. He rolls it into roles. Almost like a cinnamon roll he heat treats, it they made molds, and they have forty five minutes to unroll it mullet, and saving thousands of dollars just that kind of ingenuity that you know, commitment that investment in this project. It's just amazing to me. But you know, what they think up, and they're actually he's shown me parts of the aircraft. That are actually made better than the original aircraft is on. I looked at him. I said you can do that. He's like, yes. He's like, yes. Because we'll be flying. We want it to be more sturdy. So where the two pieces of few slush come together. Max, you know, with their apart right now, there's an extra they put an extra metal like lip. I guess relaxed better word so that when they attached together it will be reinforced so where can our audience? Learn more about the museum. Well, come visit because that's the best part, and you might get to build something. Otherwise, it's it's the website champagne aviation museum thought org. So there's a YouTube. There's a live feed. Right. Yes. So and of course, donate because I much would like to have I call it her room because sorry, David. But you know, it's it's about time for those start thinking about those wings being put on her. And that that would let the eight twenty six come inside too. Which is also on my list. I hate to see them outside like that. So we would have room for the ADA come inside. And and get worked on. And also I was very excited that they let me convince them to start working on the forty seven. We can actually get her back in the air faster than we can get the b seventeen finished which is great cool. Very well, really interesting conversation. Amy brower. I'm I'm glad I related to the museum. I'm glad that that we met that I met you that you were able to to come on the show and kind of spread the message of what the champagne aviation museum is all about. So thanks so much for that. Thank you for vitamin. I appreciate meeting. You interesting. Gentlemen. Especially david. I think David is most interesting gentlemen among us. But what do you think? Trescott? I can't disagree. Okay. All right again. Amy, thanks so much. Thank you. All right. Well, the big I think the big topic on what's up with the geeks is her adventures at sun in fund max, trescott, you you've been a number of times before over the years for me. It was the first visit the sun and fund, and I have to say it was really a an amazing event. Got to meet the lots of folks, some of them new folks that I didn't know before some of them people that I knew but had never met before. And and I got David I went flying. I went flying in the pistol motor glider, which was really really exciting. An interesting experience. It's really something you know, when you. When you leave the earth under prop power get up to two tude in turn off, the motor Feser, the feathers, the prop and and just glide from there. It's kind of it's kind of a neat experience in Matthew up in that Pippa stroll after I did as well. I did. Yeah. That's really fascinating craft. It's the CENA's. And of course, Pippa stroll has just sold her thousandth the aircraft's doing fabulous there. And what's to me was moten? Most noteworthy about this aircraft was the exceptionally long wings. They're about a fifty foot wingspan, but you can pull off or you know, with a tool you can remove the outer five feet of each of the wings, which brings it down to something like thirty nine and a half feet, which would just barely put it into a standard forty foot hangar. So I thought that was kind of interesting design, which makes the aircraft a little bit more useful. For people. But what was amazing was with those long wings when you shut off the engine. It has twenty seven to one glide ratio compare that with a Cessna one seventy two which is about a seven to one CLYDE ratio. And boy, we came down really slowly one point. We were probably I don't know maybe six seven eight miles away from the lakeland airport that four thousand feet in the pilots. Oh, yeah. We'd have don't troll gliding to their, you know, typically, I'm used to look in a point that I can glide to it's probably, you know, somewhere with a forty five degree angle down from the aircraft in this case. It was practically on the horizon. So that was pretty remarkable. Yeah. Yeah. When when I was at the the pilot we did a a to g wing over and then he handed draws over over to me. And I I was the only the only fear. I had is that he was going to have me do a wing over like that. Like, no one was going to do that. I was not not ready to do that on my own. But but otherwise, you know, did some anew bringing glided around and in in did pretty well. So it was really really cool really wanna thank Pippa stroll for for giving us that opportunity. Another thing we got we got to meet Nikki now, if if you've only started listening to airplane geeks relatively recently last year to you may not know, but Nikki was a student pilot, and she sent us reports to sort of document her progress towards getting a her pilot's license. And so it was really fabulous to to meet to to meet Nikki, and she's continued her flying. She's she kind of lives for flying these days, she's active in the civil air patrol in doing all kinds of things. So she was volunteer as part of the civil air patrol presence. They have have cadets, and and others that. What would you that man, the runways or they provide, you know, safety for the aircraft coming and going in? I don't know if you knew this but son fund presented Nikki with a safety award because it turns out to last year. There was an incident where a guy was approaching a spinning propellor in apparently didn't realize what was happening and what was going to happen to him. And. Yeah. And and Nikki is sort of sprung into action. And she says the the people around that witnessed this say that this guy came within about three feet of the propeller, and if Nikki hadn't gotten there and done, which he did that, you know, he he'd he'd be dead. So they gave her an award for that. So that was pretty cool. Wow. That's. Remarkable story. I had not heard that. Yes. Yes. It was out towards the end of the the not the war. Yeah. I guess the Warburg area. But in fact, she showed me some some plastic fencing that they now have up there to provide a barrier just because of that incident. So the you know, they made that change, but it was great great being at the the the radio station. Lot of aviation podcasters a ton of aviation podcasters. Were there got to meet a lot of great great folks, the va Larry's, both both of the Larry's lots of other place, lots of other people Dave abbey, and this there's so many people that it was just a great experience. I had terrific time. You know, one thing that because he kept asking me because of my first time at sun and fun kind of what my big impression was and one of my characterizations. I think of. The experience overall is that I love attending weekend airshows and typically go both days, but still even over two days, you you feel kind of constrained by the schedule. You know, if there's something going on, you, you know, that you want to catch you've got to be there because that's it. That's the opportunity whereas with a week long show. It's it's a much more relaxed different kind of atmosphere with with the blue angels performing on four different days. If you're in the middle of, you know, a great conversation with somebody in miss the blue angels performance. It's it's not a big deal because they're flying again tomorrow, and you could just go then I thought that really changed the sort of the pace of the, you know, of the time there, and the the, you know, your Billy to do many, many different things and still be able to do everything. It's a really nice show. Oh, I think what one of the nice things about it is it's a little bit more compact than the larger show to the north which makes it a little bit easier to to get around. I found that I was carrying times a fairly large pack because I was giving presentations every day, and you had to get from the parking lot to where I was giving presentations, and it was pretty easy to hitch a ride almost every every leg of the way with either golf cart passing by or with the with the trams. And so I would say there's a little bit less walking than at the at the really big show. In fact, was one humorous incident. I know you recall the very first day that I was there you rob market, and I were going to meet for lunch at s in the sun and Fun Radio location. That was going to be around twelve fifteen and I was worried that I might be a few minutes late, and I saw golf car to go flying by me, which came to a stop because there was a cart blocking in front of it. So I'm behind the golf cart. And I said, hey, can I have a lift and the driver turns around and goes. Yeah. And then he did a double take and looked around Max's that you, of course, it was rob Mark. So we were both rushing to meet each other. But we ride at exactly the same time. Pretty funny. But you know, I I found it was fun running into people that are from California that I don't see accepted places like funded other large airshows. So that's pretty funny in it's kind of interesting that, you know, some of these people don't live more than twenty thirty miles from me. I never see him out here. I see them out there. So those are some of the connections. I enjoy making when I'm there I gave presentations every day one day to to seminars was my night flying safety seminar at the other one new one that I've put together called so you want to fly or bias Cirrus. And of course, I mentioned the news talk podcast at the beginning of the seminars had the seminar on Saturday for the Cirrus early on. I said and how many people have ever listened to the aviation news talk podcast more than half the hands went up. I thought I had never seen that before. He usually usually it's just barely half. The hands of heard what a podcast. Is. Thrill that a lot of my listeners came out for that, you know, particular podcasts. Yeah, it's kind of for that particular seminar. So it is kind of fun to run into listeners Lotte listeners, you know, sent me a text and emails and we met up with a few of them and it was quite enjoyable now. Speaking of highlights, there's one that I'm surprised you didn't mention where were you viewing the blue angels on Friday well on Friday for for that particular. Blue angels demonstration I was actually up on the balcony around the top of the airport tower. Oh, I had a command view of the blue angels demonstration. I it was really, you know, it's different. It's a different perspective when you're up high like that for for one thing, you can see farther to the figuratively to the right and left. So in other words after they make a pass over center field. Of course, they continue on and they have to form up or regroup, and you can see a lot more of what they're doing out in the distance out of your out of your your view. If you're down on the flight line watching. So that was pretty interesting. So and you almost out there. Why didn't make it up there? But I wasn't able to stay for very long. We have kind of a comedy of errors. I didn't know that you were headed there. And once I found that you were there I headed over there. And they let me through the gate because I said I wanted to join my podcast or front at the top there. I got up to the. Top. We're looked all over dude. And see you and they said, okay, let someone escort this gentleman back down. Again. I think my mistake was not saying that I was part of the media since we had our our media passes their lo and behold, I could see you because you're on the balcony outside. So it was only once I got back down and had left the gate area that I discovered through their phone call or text message that hey, I was within a couple of few. But the thing that really struck me about the view from up there is that the blue angels, look like they're substantially at eye level. Was that your experience? Yeah. Yes. And and you'll and and you'll quickly learn that the blue angels, don't necessarily look like what you're supposed to look like you're down on the ground. Yes. It is different. They a lot of the Thunderbirds in the blue angels. Okay. This is how dorky I am. And how many times I've seen them is from various other angles other than show center, the formations don't look anything like what UC? So the diamond pass in review they are in a formation that makes it look like the diamond pass in review at show center ground, if you're up high or farther down range or maybe in line with the end of the runway, you're going what am I seeing? You get a different perspective. The angle allusions the allusions that the blue angels and the third of birds play. Yes, I mean, not to take anything away from the, you know, the flying skills. No not. But but but they do do that. Yeah. And I think they do the same with the noise because the, you know, the sound patterns were in some cases, you know, a bit different. So I think that not only do they fly in patterns, and in ways that impacts this or the visual impression of it. But I think they do the same with the engine or another way to put maybe more simply and directly as I think they you know, they sort of throw the exhaust the crowd. So that you know, you get the the maximum affect of the sound of the engines. But yeah that was spectacular. And it looked to me like the towers actually, police location wise, you're probably I would guess at least a third of a mile from from show center. And yet there were many times when all the aircraft were passing each other right there next to the tower was homeless like some of The Moor's looks like they were being put on for the benefit of the traffic controllers. And by the way, kind of estimated that tower was roughly. One hundred twenty feet, so it's a pretty tall tower. And it was a great great, you know, vantage point. Yeah. So as I mentioned before we have some some great interviews I'm still exhausted from the week. And so I can't I won't be able to think of all of them. But few of them, we have the executive director who helps explain that sun and find this is this is a campus where a lot of activities take place throughout the year. This is not a situation where everybody comes in for one week for an air shows and everybody goes home and comes back again one year later, there are significant educational a variety of activities that take place throughout the year. So we we talk about that. I talked with a teenager who in order to fund his flight training created a company and sells related products. So. You look forward to hearing that. And this mother interesting interviews, I ran across a family. They have a family business of doing G A aircraft, primarily not exclusively actually, but primarily g aircraft interior restorations, and, you know, customer interiors, so they, you know, work with the pilot to pick fabrics and pick colors that complement the airplane and in the effect that the pilots trying to achieve and they pride themselves in the quality of their work. But also in being able to turn around quickly. So that the pilots not without playing for too long. So we had interesting conversation with them and a number of others as I said, we'll be bringing those to you in the coming weeks. So what do you think same time same time next year? Same time next year. No doubt about it. I also one of the thing. I know I could go on. I just so I'm still on the high from from this event. So the I drove from Connecticut to Atlanta and the and I spent Sunday night with dispatcher Mike's family. He's got three kids wonderful kids and in the plane would was to fly down from from Atlanta to lakeland Florida for sudden fund in his nineteen sixty three beach musketeer but Mike woke up Monday morning sick as dog he had a fever. And there was no way he was going to be able to to fly. He shouldn't be and be filing. So I said, well, I guess I'm gonna drive the rest of the way to Florida now we were going to camp out with his plane. He had the tent I'm on my way to Florida suddenly now, so I had to stop and buy tent, and I'm thinking you were you were in a in a in a hotel max. But you know. Yeah. My idea of camping. Is pull up the Hilton Eappen? Right up late. So I wasn't really. Terribly looking forward to sleeping on the ground. But you know, what that is a big part of the experience to is the the people you meet to the conversations that happen, the friendships that are created just by living in a campground with a bunch of other people. I it's so I'm not sure if I want to get a hotel next year or if I'm gonna camp next year, but Nevada I will be there. Next year also told the folks of the sun, Fun Radio who are amazing bunch by the way that I'm going to hopefully, become a volunteer next year to help them out and kind of contribute. You back. Some more. That was definitely a fun place to hang out that was really essentially, the main meeting place for for Maxon me when we were there as it was for a number of other podcasters in the volunteers there they've shall better and his team are just very warm welcoming. And we felt like we belong there. So that was it was it was nice. And of course, it's very central location. So it was a good place to to hang out and be in the shade a little bit and have some fun folks to talk with and a place to sit down and things like that. So yeah, it was it was definitely an awesome experience. One of the things that I heard, and I don't know all the details on this. And you probably got this from the director something I had known before. But apparently all of the profits from Sunan fund a plow directly into aerospace education. Yes. Kinds of activities. What what more do, you know about that? Yes. Actually, the the week long son infl- son in fun fly in and expo is the the major source of. Funding for all of these educational opportunities that they provide throughout the year. So it's that's that's how it's viewed. They actually have an you'll hear all this. But they've they actually won an award for the degree to which. And this is this is my terminology. You'll hear the proper terminology in the in the interview. But for the way, they leverage the fly in the air show, and the way they leverage all of the the educational opportunities that that they provide a meal, you'll hear about how many pilots have been created, you know, as a result of this, and, you know, the impact on students from the area, and and so forth. So they've got some recognition and other airshows around the country frequently come to, you know, benchmark son and fund to learn. Yeah. How do they use this great asset to educate? More create more pilots and do all these things that you want to accomplish. So I it really isn't amazing thing. That's that's a great interview coming up. There's one other aspect that things have changed. I hadn't been Sunan fund for probably about six years. And when I was last there presentations, give them by folks, like me work done intents. And I thought that's what it would be like again this year. And I was quite surprised to find that that all of our presentations were indoors most of them were at the place. I was not familiar with and that's the central Florida aerospace academy, and this is pretty remarkable. This is a centrally a high school with a focus on 'aeronautics in aviation. It's a rather large facility. Let's see I think it it was three stories tall lot of classrooms in it. And I was essentially teaching in a classroom how you felt like back to high school. With the, you know, the kinds of desk there in the bulletin boards and stuff like that. So that's a rather unique asset I'm not aware of any other school like this where in the world, but pretty amazing that for folks interested in aerospace, engineering, they can go to a high school. It's geared right toward them. Yes. Yeah. I instead of thinking of of of this as an airport or is a big campground or is lots of fields the way to think of it is it's a campus. It's a campus. It happens to have runways and control tower and schools and a museum, and you know, all of these things so fascinating stuff. The only negative. I would say is connectivity. In many cases, even text messages took you know, half an hour to go through that was kind of a problem. So I bet we have tons of great listener feedback at the geeks airplane, geeks dot com. But honestly, I haven't even looked at it. So for those of you who have written in. Hoping to to hear us respond to your to your emails. You'll have to have to be a little patient as we get kind of caught up with that and get more sleep than we've been having the last in the last week before we close out anything else. So we want to touch on. Well, can I do my what's going on with the geeks? You know, David would pale compares, no go. Go ahead. Good. Mike tweeted out the other day and Mike yet kept me up all night. No, Mike tweet. Well, he was he retweeted the fact that he didn't realize that a certain aircraft that he said someone near and dear to him would know that there was at least fifty seven variants of. And the person you're endeared him was me, and the the aircraft. They were referencing was the C one thirty so Mike I decided to give you a little research project since I was up all night thinking of all the variants. So as as of right now you need to do the following. Hopefully, you're ready to dictate this and writing this down. So these are variants of these are these are, okay. I'll be specific. They are non transport variants of the C one thirty and they are only United States Air Force or navy variants or Marine Corps. There are no foreign variants in this list. Okay. And what's in the list? Well, here's the list. Okay. Here's the variants for all you to research. Mike up the triple C the combat king the combat king to the combat shadow the combat solo combat spear combat. Talent one in two commanded to command solo compass. Call credible sport dragon spirit ghost rider gunship to harvest hawk H C one thirty eight crown Fulton pave pronto pave spectre ski birds spectre spooky stinger surprise package and last but not least fan Albert. Did. You create this list off the top of your head. I mean, you you didn't did you look these up or did, you know these? No, I knew most of them. Yes. Yeah. Double check my other ones. But I think I missed TAC TAC Immo too. So yeah, it's kinda like see see when thirties it's kind of like the same list that you know, name every aircraft Thunderbird, flew and name every aircraft a blue Angels' flow. Yeah. You know? So yeah, that's that's your that's your little research project. Mike, so. Very good. I have I have the thirty or forty books on the on the subject if you'd like to read them. All right. Okay. Well, I think that's that's going to do it for this episode. Maxine some are you going flying tomorrow? Max, oh, I've been flying already today. I had about six hours of flight training, by the way, I just pulled up a tweet that came through a day or so ago in it was kind of timely because I had been teaching about the Sears at sun and fund from at flight notes on Twitter. He tweeted out headed dream that I want a brand new series SR twenty two and max Truscott was helping me transition to it from the warrior. Also, the panel had a built in spread so machine the tag of coffee here someone else replied and said the best part of waking up as an SR twenty two in your Cup. Wonderful. All right. This wrap this up Amy Bauer from the champagne aviation museum. Amy, thanks so much for coming on the show. Why we look forward to seeing you are you going to be up in New York yourself. Good. Well, at least I'll see they're it's not that far for me. I know you all you all should come. And I'll see if I can't wrangle a ride for you. That'd be great. I became for. What you say there? Well, if you ask my axe who's met me he knows that. I can be quite persuasive. Yes. Yes. Yep. Yep. Yep. I've already made my hotel reservation sexually. Well, as I understand it. There's not that many places to stay. So I made sleeping in a tent on the field. Like you did in Florida. Yeah. Actually, I got a sweet or something and rented a floor that would have been great. So so thanks for coming on the show as always you can find us on the web at airplane. Geeks dot com show notes for this episode or there's well, but if you want to go straight to them they're at airplane. Geeks dot com slash five four eight when I was at the museum took a bunch of pictures. So we'll put a few of them in the in the show notes. If you want to send an Email that's the geeks airplane, geeks dot com, and you can find us the best thing to do is. Subscribe to the podcast that way, you won't miss any episodes, and you can do that almost anywhere any of the podcast apps I s or Android. We're we're in there. We're also in Pandora now growing Pandora population of listeners also Spotify as well Stitcher in tune in. He that's tell everybody where they can. Find us online is the C max trescott start with you can find me at the home of the aviation. News talk podcast, where we talk about everything generally, the Asian and that would be aviation news, talk dot com. Just click on contact at the top of the page. Or if you wanna leave a question that will answer on the show. Just click on listener questions. Great in David Vanderhoek. How about you? You can find me on Twitter at DM Venera. You can find me skulking around museums. You can also find me on our slack listener team. Which of course, we want you to join enjoying the party you can do that by sending an Email to the geeks at airplane. Geeks dot com, and you can also find me on the a digestive which we just sort of released a little late. So this checkout this episode? It's kind of interesting we had a very lovely replacement for max this week. So that's right. See you ABD. VDI just dot com. Great in Amy once again, the teller listeners website for the museum would be the champagne aviation museum dot org. Cool, and you can find me linked in just look from X flight also with David at the UAB digest dot com as he said he and with Mary Kirby at Pax X podcast dot com. Are outgrow is by Bruno Mus. Oh, so this is like the advanced notice for the those of you who have stuck with us the whole episode. So I made some interesting recordings of the the blue angels performance. So if you like engine sounds, and if this works, I might have something special coming up, so listen for that, maybe treat that his little teaser. But otherwise our outgrow is by Bruno MS sewn you can find more of his compositions incorporate aviation sounds at Bruno miss own dot com. So please join us again next week as we talk aviation on airplane geese podcast by everybody. Keep the blue side up. Thanks for listening. Fist. Right. A left. Wiegmann day. Mix me a pickup. He went to Derek. You said a kid some clays. Trying to do.

Boeing air force museum David Vanderhoek Amy NASA Cirrus aircraft champagne aviation museum scaled composites Grimes field max trescott Tom Riley Fairchild FBI United States Mr. trescott American Airlines Dayton United States Air Force
APG 384  Turtle on the Tarmac

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

APG 384 Turtle on the Tarmac

"It's the guy airline pilot guy episodes three eighty four <music>. You're listening to the airline pilot. Guy Show the view from our side of the cockpit door with your host gap in Chat Broadcasting Live from pay P._G.. Mobile headquarters in Oshkosh Wisconsin today's special show reported on the twenty first of July Twenty nineteen in today's episode a small playing pairing skydivers crashes in Sweden and Pakistan reopened its airspace civilian flies more news your feedback and in today's plane tailed killing killing him hillier so get all settled in tray tables Ceefax the upright and locked position electronic devices power on. I'm Radio Roger and flight three eighty. Four oshkosh is ready for rush hill over one walk into the airline pilot guys show. It's an aviation podcast and we are all here in Oshkosh Wisconsin for the E._A.. A Arab venture we're going to introduce everyone anyone just in case you on these people are from oshkosh Dr Skydiver Marathon runner strict trading junkie connoisseur and commercial multi engine instrument rated pilot and Dr Staff Jeff and that's okay is the refresher on here. Okay there you go and from across the table. Ah Professional photographer former R._A._F.. Are Fighter pilot current captive for an international airline based in London. It's Captain Nick Buddy great here. The episode of the world at this <hes> walked up festival repeated. You bring your swimsuit. No sadly I've been running around naked that is that that's very alright and also across the table actually right next to me. He is a barbecue master. Mortgage Motorcycle Pontoon boats skipper under one hundred hundred for an captain for a major U._S.. Legacy carrier captain well. I got lost folks. I found last week to join the party. It's great to be yes. We're glad to hear little bit late late. The never right all right so as we said we're here at Oshkosh today is actually the air venture is not quite officially started that will start tomorrow and end but we arrived while Captain Nick. I arrived on Thursday in this beautiful R._V.. And <hes> it is now Sunday and the official start day for air venture is tomorrow morning Monday the whatever day that is twenty first twenty six twenty. I think twenty-second thank you and man naked. I have been having a great time. He came in last weekend and you'll remember because we just recorded the show. Oh <hes> the the day that he came in and then on Monday morning we left <hes> for <hes> Dayton Ohio and the U._S.. Air Force Museum but stopped in Lexington Kentucky to do a tour of the big ask Fan Company and we had a great time Greg Peterson was our house. He works at the company and he gave us a grand tour and it was a lot of fun. It was a spice certainly and thank you very much great <hes> a giving us these time <hes> demonstrating those big donkey fans. They were very impressed. Sorry big ass fans very impressive. Yeah wouldn't you say big oss no okay and so we kept kept on going after our little tour her and headed up to Oshkosh no we didn't we ended up to Dayton arrived at our AIRBNB and then we met up with few folks at a bar ladder eleven or something like that and had a nice <hes> beer era too and <hes> some nice food and <hes> next day we went to the U._S.. Air Force Museum a whole bunch of people joined his there and then after our big brand meet up at the U._S.. Air Force Museum spent pretty much most of the day they're actually before we went there. Nikolai <hes> had a real treat. <hes> Major Rick Bell invited us to <hes> join him in a C.. Seventeen simulator and it was a blast we got to fly that and <hes> what he wants to fly in inverted colors because it was like you're playing on it but tried to fly before the WIG is collection of hand flying an automatic. I think that <hes> I was just kind of confused. A lot of the time is a different way of flying <hes>. It's an entirely different way flying altogether yes a different. Where's that from early okay? I wonder if I have that <hes> sound effect probably somewhere somewhere. It's an entirely different kind of flying altogether. It's an entirely different kind of flying anyway. <hes> we had a grand time and manage not to crash the airplane or the simulator and all they go to the ground. The controls became a bit stiffer harvest move yeah very often it might have been <hes> yeah major wreck on the controls exactly yeah <hes> but anyway it was a great time that we went to the museum and met up with all these great people and then afterwards several of the people that were there at the museum also <hes> came out and joined us at another <hes> another Bar <hes> like a local cooper brew pub or something and and we had a great meal there and <hes> some more beer and then we called it a night next day we <hes> headed out from Dayton to Makina Illinois actually floss more and what I was always wondering why the people in that town had great teeth I think they do they've lost mandated. If you live with you must boss more than the average person anyway <hes> such a good joke to I don't think he's only heard of the few days and <hes> another AIRBNB. They're a little coach <hes> house. I think that's what they call it coach House next to another house and <hes> we had a nice meal at the at the bar at the train station. The train station station Bob was very good. I let him yeah time there and then we slept another night and then the next day we headed over to the gentlemen <hes> who from whom we rented at this beautiful R._v. and he gave us a two to three hour checkout on all the systems of this very complicated thing <hes> cop the systems of the of the R._V. and how to do all the slide outs and other safety precautions <hes> showed us how to drive the thing went around the block and then he said Okay Mr Deaf sit down you have it and so we did a little test drive and he wanted to be sure that <hes> wasn't gonNA crash the thing I guess and we passed the muster not the mustard and <hes> headed off for US caution about three and a half hours just under three and a half hours later we were here in Oshkosh. Would you like to add any flavor to that those screaming most of which was done by me <hes> particularly when a great big purple garbage can flew off a truck in front of us and Jeff at like nowhere to go so we just carrying on and as the only thing we could do so there's now a very flat garbage cans sitting in the middle of the I forty here yes or whatever interstate that was at the time. How is your the first night in the R._V.? was how is the weather did get a little bit exciting. I've never being subject to a tornado warning before but luckily it wasn't Info Wisconsin Wisconsin Weird Winnebago. It wasn't for county. No Yeah Winnebago County <hes> most of the severe weather was just a little bit to the north of us. I think they had a tornado touchdown in Appleton. Yep We just had thunderstorms horrendously heavy rain big be fascinating clowns Lotta wind as the gus fronts went through and it'll go very exciting for what so do I just drank until I fell asleep and that was enough to endure it anymore. Yeah pretty much a common thing every day. Just drink enough to basically pass out then you don't hear thing getting it was very sad. I mean we were great. We spot and it's a great spot but very sad for a lot of the other people trying to get in and take up the camping sponsor weather some people had they tend to completely swamped <hes> blown over and things there were some crop damaged set me up and appleton where aircraft landing because they were able to get in here and then we had a second front through and that was equally by so basically the places become pretty waterlogged it has so I'm just looking at the window here. You may hear it in the background. We have the windows open <hes> even though this does does have a very nice three air conditioning system which I'm thinking we'd probably should've just left all that on and just close windows it. He's pretty noisy like consistently but I'm looking at the window here and I'm seeing a whole bunch of <hes> r._V.'s and <hes> trailers and such like they must have finally opened up the gates for these people to come in as we just before we started recording the show we we learned that <hes> they stopped departures couple days ago because of the weather and then I mean sorry rivals and <hes> <hes> the saturation of the ground and <hes> the on the airport and taxiways and everything else <hes> they couldn't really park the people on the grass had like the Big Tundra tires and <hes> we just learned right before we started recording that they have reopened the arrival so everybody's finally coming in and apparently they've opened up the arrivals arrivals of the the big rig campers here on the R._V.. Area so that's what you're hearing in the background but that's good news because these people have been out there for a couple days and they've been like parked at the mall parking lots and just like on aside street not billy the Oshkosh experience they were hoping for it was great timing for Nick because we came in on Thursday afternoon before all the bad weather wet weather and such so it was just lucky timing. I guess we got here when we did. You want to say something was going to say that we thought about doing it. Outside would have been a whole lot more noisy if we're outside doing this right yeah so I've got to sit in that line today. Fortunately we were able to get around most of it because we had <hes> frank was very nice was nice. Not Come pick me up in Madison when I flew in today and <hes> he had already registered so made okay to get him but still even with that still to this forty forty five minutes to get through traffic but it was amazing how much how much was lined up. I can't imagine can't imagine how other people felt sitting out there with really no information. There's really no out view passing on information so in the <hes> yeah just so it's great you know power that whole whole story is that <hes> we got informed. Today is shown picture of a one seventy two that toppled in a brand new piper cub had what would was thirty five hours voice voice something hours that toppled by storm as well and damaged extensively. Won't we understand so it's pretty yes body up here. I Guess Yup was <hes> so cadarache. Thursday joins US yesterday <hes> so is that kind of a pretty easy go. It was not smooth so let me think what day it was so that was Saturday so Friday night at home. There was also a pretty significant thunderstorm that came through my area which not a big deal there. Obviously I was not traveling but it did kind of prevent me from sleeping. I'm pretty good sleeping through anything but this was a pretty intense thunderstorm like complaining seemed like it was just across the street. One of those see the flash in that immediately bang the whole house shakes type of thing so it was around midnight finally got to sleep about one o'clock. I heard a notification on my phone and I rolled over and looked at it and said <hes> <hes> your flight from O'hare to Appleton has been canceled great so that was for the next day not going to deal with us right now I just rolled over went back to sleep and then got a pretty early in the morning being at planned to do that already to run in my first two miles of warm up stuff I was just on the phone and on hold with American Airlines trying to figure out how to either book it or get a refund or whatever apparently there are a lot of people calling them at six o'clock in the morning East Coast time for probably various similar reasons. I could not get on the they were able to revoke me into appleton that day or today or tomorrow seems like like Appleton is a popular destination right now. I'm not sure why so anyway. They said well we can get you the Green Bay nine thirty at night. No not really do that just goes as far as Chicago not a big deal rent a car drive up to appleton. You can rent cars one way from for most of the major car rental companies here but apparently they've had enough folks do that did not have any additional one way rentals available for any of the major car rental companies out of Chicago kind of a last minute inquiry into that so I started looking around at other airlines and was able to actually find a seat on the united flights that was later in the day like four something in the <music> after noon three fifty arriving just before five o'clock that'll be okay still reasonably earlier in the day not a big deal just a little bit of extra time to wander around O'hare and so got to O'hare no problem <hes> collected my check bag checked in both of my bags with united just because I did not want to have to look them around the airport for six hours decided that I need to leave the airport to get a Nice Chicago hotdog authentic one and it was about one hundred in six degrees real field temperature in Chicago. Yesterday might be the sweatiest one point two mile walk that I've ever done I did it twice all the way down to the restaurant and all the way back but you aren't sweating. You're Gla sparkling Berkeley now as quite twenty gross and there was like sixteen sixty mile an hour sixteen not win and it was just like hot air being blown in your face as gross so then went back to the airport found space in the lounges which was nice and air air conditioned had a couple of adult beverages their border my plane everything boards on time push back from the gate on time and the previously mentioned <hes> whether that came through here earlier in the day yesterday I was approaching Chicago at that point which showed the winds shifted and they decided to turn the airport around right after we pushed and we're trying to head towards the runway so then we had to wait for all of that to happen. I think we spent an hour on the ground taxiing at O'hare and hold on this happening. I can see the storm getting closer and closer like a lot of lightning very dark looking clouds assure just a lot of wind nasty things coming with it but we were able to get out just before it got there so <hes> two hours gate to Gates O'hare to appleton which is like. I don't know how many miles trip hundred and fifty nautical miles maybe maybe yeah two little little <hes> delayed but got here here just fine eventually found someone to find my Nia check bags which actually came on earlier than I did and then these guys took me up Frank Chandler very nice for him to come up to Appleton and collect me as well and I've been here ever since francs being a complete troopers name Levi sincere thanks to him and he's fantastic Dole's who's also Steph who has he's been bringing these being taken us around the place and give it takes out shopping Morris everyday offered use of vehicles and things and <hes> being really great so thanks very much different yeah big shout out to frank so not only did he take Nikkan I up to Appleton to pick up Steph but he also this morning is headed out early and went out to Madison to pick up Dana Yeah it was it was great. He was waiting with smile and videotaped me. Come down the escalator. Each still is just such a great person to ride from Madison to here. We actually spent about an hour and a half half. Maybe a little more but for the most part about it all he got to watch me go shopping the supermarket which I bought plenty of food for us to now have and for me to cook for us <hes> for a good part of the week hopefully and then <hes> of course because Mason enough does a liquor store attached to that same convenient. It was very convenient but problem. This is my built liquor stores about seventy dollars more than my bill at the at the supermarket just eating five the people are in the right place off in aim drinking beer and it's in here but the stuff the alcohol you bought was pretty nice stuff. I mean not get Kalam. I've got <hes> Bellini with a twenty five year limited edition I bought some vodka and and <hes> plenty of beer beer might last week long already drank what five bottles of it's only bought so darn breath over the past six hours but so I'm like Dr The staff I had a relatively easy right up one leg into Madison in the jump seat of course because <hes> got bit zinc airplane seats available but now for for us at acme. It's not a bad deal right. That's a good thing that Che's <hes> people still traveling <hes> but very pleasant rides first time ever been seven one seven cockpit <hes> I've been on the seven one seven before but never flew in the cockpit in the jump seats a tablet smaller smaller than the mad dog eight ninety very similar to ninety jump seat but a little bit smaller <hes> but really Nice avionics package is watching them operate the aircraft in you know it's really nice airplane so if I do hope fly that aircraft a Mexican looking forward to it because it seems like equate quite nice flying planes as well as I said before everybody that I know who who has flown or as lying it love it so Larry go excellent so here we are here. We have some yeah thank you frank. Yes here's what's a cheers definitely is wonderful symphony so frank. When one's dinner exactly disconnect? Let's see what else do we want to talk about. <hes> this. This R._V. is really Nice that we've been telling you about it for quite some time. It's nice and comfortable <hes> will really get to test its capacity cassidy tomorrow because the fifth member of the crew lives the producer. She's coming in tomorrow and we'll <hes> we're sorry you're not here right now to join us for this show this yellows but beer beer here while you're not here but you're so she's still kind of controlling everything from her position in Toronto so anyway look forward to seeing her tomorrow and then we'll be all whole all right <hes>. Can I just just to one quick shower up for a family member really my son's girlfriend Betham as a friend. Look I sure friend of relation Reese Harry who is apparently devoted list so brilliant. Thank you very much at least think breaking excellent just quickly before we get into the coffee fund <hes> something came in meant not to mention this on the last show. <hes> Richard Said Hey <hes> my name's Richard recently started listening to the show. I have a question how we're not sure you may be able to answer it. I'm trying to listen to all the episode starting from Zero Zero one episode one however on my iphone on podcast and only lets me go back as far as episode ninety three. Is there something I may be doing wrong would really like to go back and then subscribe as a patron or to the Coffee Club. Thanks Richard Richard You. We do have a way for you to go back. <hes> the reason why I decided to start at episode ninety three is because Dana was on episode ninety and I just thought it was bad for New People to start at that wasn't I'm just kidding. Get it off ninety one yeah that's true see that's why you know that I'm not really being honest here. <hes> so the way the podcast or delivered are via something called an R. S. S. feed and that's why the way I tunes and podcasts and all these other apps work and and there's a lot of information in that feed and there are some rules out there as far as how much how much data can be in this feet before it just becomes too great and at a certain point they start lopping off episodes from the beginning so we are right at now right now about ninety episode ninety three to three eighty. This is three eighty four <hes> so you can still listen to the show by going to the website airline pilot Guy Dot com and <hes> there is a podcast tab. You can do a search on on the website and just search for like zero zero one and then you can listen to it from the website <hes>. I'm sure that <hes> there's a way that I might be able to work with the <hes> the podcast Guru Mike Del to come up with a way. Perhaps maybe make separate R._S._S. feed and then we can have a feed for the early episodes maybe the first couple of years and then <hes> feed that covers all the new stuff but we're gonNA WORK EP the early years the early yeah and <hes> so you can always go to that <hes> to the website and listen to Oliver shows so and you know. I think it would at work if you went on Google and just typed in A._p.. G Zero Zero One A._p._G._A.. Zero zero to probably take your right. Let's let's do experiments that works alive experiment on air while we're recording steps. That's GonNa do it before I can do. Nothing that's why is reach if my phone over here yeah on spotify and get all the way back to Fabian excellent. I don't know why spotify has the news A._p.'s jeep zero one. No <hes> will maybe the whole when I looked at the feed recently <hes> the actual feed. It's an X._M.. L. File the earliest line was ninety three so I'm not sure what's going on there. <hes> I guess there's not a lot of bandwidth here and I'm getting a lot of that's okay. Checking doors. Okay took the the video. It's always does ron like this yeah well. It's not working no Internet yeah. I was trying to get back into the chat room and it keeps kicking me out because my internet is not the greatest <hes> oh well. I think that'll work. Give it a try what he and see what and let us know that works for. We're trying to solve this problem and and also on Pandora Ali back to episode one okay I'm. I'm imagining that they probably have an updated. The R._S._S. feed <hes> recently. They're using an older version of the feet. I'm guessing I don't know it doesn't have her latest episode. In there. Too probably does okay so what what I'm finding now is. I don't really know exactly three eighty three and they're not I don't know anything about feeds so all this stuff I said right before this point back going back about five minutes but at least when fifty percent two percent yeah exactly fifty percent of post will be better so Richard. Basically I don't know the answer. We'll try to come up with some sure Mike Del Might be listening to this in and he'll get a hold of me and and probably WanNa shake me and then he'll tell me what to do okay so basically a big never mind there and let's see that's about but it I think anything else talking about these are all things I never raced. I got nothing else okay and now guess what it's time for the Coffee Fund and singing being the woods Donnie words Allah fear. I love coffee. I Love Gee I I love the A._p.. G Community coffee and tea and the job Hamby Bacau but the coffee is your way to support support the show financially and you can find out how to do that by going to airline pilot dot com slash coffee. Give us the money yes these questioning and since the last episode using the Coffee Pot classic method didn't have this very excited. Yes okay you contributed and you're listening right now. You know who you are to do. Dan South and the those are the people use the Gothic on classic but we also have Patriot nego become a patron of the show going and we have some new producers and here they are. I'm GonNa talk about them right now mm-hmm. Maybe nobody keeps you know there. Were some yes. We have to new producers so hey thank you all of you for becoming patrons of the show if you listener want to become a patron head over to airline pilot dot com slash coffee you'll be glad you debt at so tweets all right right when that Great Sky Bolus dumb very professional standby on Hugh mm-hmm and from the Mirror dot co Dot U._K.. Nine people are dead after a small plane carrying skydivers crashed into an island in Sweden witnesses watched in horror as the aircraft plummeted into the island outside the northern city of who mia on Sweden's eastern coastline killing all aboard one witness said he heard the strange sound and watched as a plane plummeted added knows I toward the river boom then crashed out of sight with Allow Bang X._l.. Peterson sixteen was sitting on the couch at his home near you mia airport eating when he heard a sound from the skies becoming higher and higher pitched actual said he is used to the sounds of the planes arriving in departing but described the noises like one hit never heard before he went outside saw planes circling. He began filming. Filming and seconds later captured the plummeting rapidly. He said he heard it crashed with allow bang than everything went quiet axel said his pulse rose sent his pulse rose. What does that mean? Oh his bob okay excellent said his pulse rose and he barely breathe thinking what the hell's happening now what the hell's happening now. What do I do now? How's that should we do have more dramatic reading of that okay and he called for his parents who immediately alerted emergency services at a press conference following the crash aircrash investigation day not just arrived on the motorcycle? Yes <hes> aircrash investigation authorities told media all dead Swedish including one person who had dual citizenship the authorities rejected reports of wing and fallen off the airborne plane before crashed witness reports in the Swedish media said some of the parachutists racine trying to jump off the plane just before the crash authorities in Sweden said the plane had taken off from the you may airport shortly after one thirty P._M.. And sounded alarm up to twelve <hes> it crashed in the river near the island of stores son Scar which his car which is located about two kilometers from you man airport anyway so <hes> we there's more to the story which will happen the shown outs but the <hes> the interesting thing is the first little video thing that you can click <hes> there. There's a news report and they show cell phone video of the airplane coming down and it really does almost appear that the wing as it's hard it's very very fuzzy too hard to see <hes> but it almost does look like the the wing had fallen off but I don't know that that might be the nose right here in the body of the airplane right here on these are the wings I dunno smoke trailing could be but if you look at the video. I didn't doesn't look like smoke so that you know I don't do we know if so what about if that's the case now say the shorter part of the photograph looks at the body of the airplane yeah the longest Miss Mrs Wings gone and the way it was falling out of the sky and spiraling it kind of lends credence to the fact that one of the wings fell off but we don't know <hes> but check it out yourself. You can watch the video but I was going to staff since yes you do a lot of skydiving the ad mentioned there that the skydivers were seen trying to exit the airplane. I mean that would be all as possible. I actually have not clicked on that video <hes> but it would depend on the attitude of the aircraft the ease of getting out at that point and generally what you do like if there is an aircraft emergencies skydivers are going to take their direction from the pilots whether they should try to exit the aircraft where they are or if they should stay with the aircraft <hes> but there's some emergencies where that's just not possible <hes> so that it is up to the individual skydiver what they're going to do at that moment but if the attitude was quite unusual that might just be hard to do you might not be able to get to the exit although I would imagine all the centrifugal centripetal from where you're sitting whether it's on a seat or a bench on the floor Lotta Times in skydiving aircraft. You're sitting on the floor of the aircraft <hes> it could be really difficult to get out so hopefully we'll know you know I'm. I'm sure they're they're doing the investigation of <unk>. Perhaps they already know what happened here but we don't have that information yet so tragic yeah definitely not good for <hes> yeah all right next. One is going to be a McDonnell Douglas M._d.. Eleven freighter Monday June six twenty sixteen. Oh thank you steps pointing out to me that this is the final report. Apparently this happened what three years ago yeah a little more than three years ago <hes> U._B._S. flight five live x sixty one suffered a runway incursion nose gear collapse in a takeoff accident at Seoul Inchon international airport the aircraft and McDonnell Douglas M._d.. Eleven F- cargo plane was bound for Anchorage Alaska. <hes> the car the aircraft's takeoff weight it was six hundred twenty nine thousand six hundred pounds which was below the maximum allowable takeoff weight of six hundred thirty thousand five hundred was pretty darn close. The flight was cleared for takeoff from runway three three left. The aircraft reached veon speed after ground run of six thousand four hundred thirteen feet at that time the crew her noise originating from the failure of the number nine tire which is the left-hand tire on the central landing gear the number ten tire on the same landing gear also ruptured vibration and torsion forces then caused the owner the our <unk> over over drag race says Oh wer but that must be a type of the lower lower yes. It's missing an L.. Thank you the lower drag brace of the central landing gear to break the drag race then hit the body several times this caused a rupture of the hydraulic system brake system one reducing the total break efficiency to about forty eight percent as those kind of close to our <unk> accuracy rate here as the crew rejected the takeoff with four thousand the six hundred thirty five feet of runway remain in the aircraft again to decelerate the aircraft required a deceleration deceleration distance of at least fifty five hundred fifty feet from the position where the takeoff rejected as a result the M._d.. Eleven stopped at approximately recently one thousand five hundred ninety one past the end of the runway the nose gear collapsed and the number one and number three engines contact with the grass the let's see who was the I guess the accident <hes> Investigation Asian Board for South Korea <hes> noted that there is an inherent difficulty in determining the flight performance of an aircraft after one when limited information and little time is available to the crew for go no-go decision the U._P._S.. Flight Operations Manual states. It's that after V. One rejecting takeoff is not recommended unless the captain judges the aircraft cannot fly but the manual does not establish a definition of non flying <hes> the accident investigation board notes that it would be beneficial for the aviation industry to provide flight crews with definitions of Don flight flight ability and additional guidance and training as to how to judge aircraft light performance under certain circumstances especially after V. One <hes> so the cause of this translated from the Korean language after takeoff determination speed be one the high-speed take-up abandonment is performed by the tire of the central landing gear and the drag brace defect and the runway is separated. It's not a brick translation we've been clear for limited time available information on the encounter situation dynamic instability of dragging of central landing gear after tire failure decrease and breaking performance due to the rupture of hydraulic pipe of brake system so taken. I had a conversation about this. You know in Dana would agree. I'm sure that <hes> our policy are all our airline policies. Are you do not in in the high speed takeoff realm reject to take off for a tire that blows <hes> or fails <hes> but this case might be a little bit different because to tire <unk> to tires failed in the lower drag race was like out there banging around making all kinds as a racket and it could have been the determination by the captain at this point that the aircraft wasn't gonna fly but like all I can say that are guidances that you take the airplane with a tire failure unless you think there's no way the airplanes the plane's GonNa fly the wooding something like <hes> unambiguous indications that the aircraft cannot fly sea. That's a good word unambiguous that gives you an out because there was like this May ahah Bennett situation whereas ambiguous yeah waiting for that I describing should give briefings yeah. <hes> trouble is that you really can't diagnose exactly once Hatton down the bank that and slows the engine instruments are fine. If you've just lost hydraulic system that's usually nomin ambiguous situation because you hear a lot of annoys doesn't mean the airplane count fly and what I would reject for would be yeah the flight control stop moving or you lost two engines and you are still safely on the ground they those for me would be cases when I would avoid above e one but generally speaking that this failure I would've the thought fell into that category <hes> yeah I mean take take for example that case willow run up and just outside Detroit with at M._D.. Eighty product <hes> the captain chose aboard because the flight controlling went with the elevated and tried to pull off the ground and it wasn't rotating wasn't rotating that to me is a that's a clear unambiguous is not flying so well but you know this kind of coming back in almost saying <hes> <hes> you know how how is he gonNA know. Days lost two tires down there number one on M._d.. Eleven doesn't have well actually the M._d.. Eleven has new <hes> indicates some GRANDPA straight so much worse on seven one seven so they they may may have flash up for them but again I agree with you. It's it with that type of situation. You can take your plane flying more than likely <hes> you know unless it cut all hydraulic lines. When it came up the aircraft was going on fly just fine so I agree with you as I would take that would take him? I think in most cases the most pilots would made the decision to continue yeah. I know Monday morning quarterbacking but <hes> yeah I think sternly the the teaching whether it falls into you'll mindset at the time I still say that the captain has to make a decision and it's not an easy place to be to make that restaurant difficult decision to make especially in in in a very split split here of a moment I mean he taught me microseconds here but it was flying a hugely heavy aircraft so you know stopping that was going to be a nightmare in probably the only indication he had the confident I mean he he doesn't know separated down there all. He knows that he's lost his titles. That in that's just my basis on knowing that the seven one seven flight Dick Instrumentation is just like the N._B._A.. So they had the ability eighty two you know it probably flash up that he lost two times but that's probably the only information he had be. My guess yeah and it's only gets and you're caught away. Is I think from the cockpit to where that center gear is pretty far off so you may not have been able to hear any of that going on. I don't know with being on the flight recorder yeah all right anything else desire Adam that look at Robert Fairbairn <hes> sent us in this piece of information from ABC Web Dot Com and it's regarding the eighty S B preflight requirement issue clarified so some pilots. There's an operators will have another series of preflight checks to conduct when the D._S._p.. Mandate Kicks in on January first twenty twenty the F._A._A.. Says in a new policy statement it will be up to pilots and operators to make sure the gear I guess the D._S._p.. Gear will actually work along their predicted flight bath as part of the flight planning process operators will be required to exercise quote due diligence in the form of a quote preflight availability prediction to make sure that an adequate G._p._S. signals available for the eighty s be out to function properly for the full flight in most cases. The due diligence requirement will be satisfied by checking the F._A._A.. A._D._S. service availability prediction tool that just rolls off the time the S._A._p.. For the intended route doing creates a record in the S._A._p.. System that the preflight work has been done so you're checking what you're doing interesting yeah. The check is targeted mainly at those equipped with non was US G._P._S. receiver because they're more vulnerable to service disruptions that makes eighty s be less reliable the F._A._A.. Also notes that if the G._P._S. status changes while the flight is in the air or the S._A._p.. Itself is unavailable pilots. I will not be sanctioned for noncompliance with aid E._S._P._N.. Requirements likewise of weather or other circumstances require deviations in areas where G._p._S. is unreliable. Pilots will get a pass when planned or known G._P._S. disruptions occur the F._A._A.. Hey we'll issue a not an earlier story based on the F._A._A.. Policy Statement mischaracterize the scope of the preflight requirement and the F. A. is applying further guidance on its applicability so there you go <hes> anything to at no but I think it was interesting that they actually it records it in the system when you do the preflight work so you know not a terrible thing but I feel like more things might go that way in the future just in general this because that <hes> G._p._S. has done is reliable as they thought it was going to be like the the G._p._S. Ray <hes> being not quite as it's the the different G._p._S. availability like for example. We're being retrofitted on. I request so maybe we don't have quite the <hes>. I don't know if we have lost G._P._S.. No we don't wait so but I'm saying I think it's more about the availability of G._P._S. than it is the equipment in the airplane. I think I think so as well <hes> but some receivers are just more susceptible to service <hes> disruptions right because we're talking about four or the intentive Brousseau you look at your route into see what the G._p._S. Rave <hes> because it says here the check is targeted mainly at those equipped with a non last E._p._S._C._O.. Because in one vulnerable to service disruptions disruptions which can be vulnerable to that it's just that it's not loss. It's a little bit more likely more likely so that's let's see <hes> yeah. I think the overall point being there can be service disruptions in the G._P._S. system and they want to make sure that before you go flying if you're going to be just because of a D._S._p.. Out to be functioning properly need to make sure that that function will work since it's an IT's mandated to have it because Nexgen is basically predicated on this G._p._S. array in the system and everything else and that's why they're you know decommissioning all these Brown based navigational national aids and everything else <hes>. I wish we had dispatched to make way here right now to comment on that. That would be good. Mike Mike I don't worry as well. Maybe you went back to Honda Lactic. His plane is planes and fun to lack act because they wouldn't let them come in here to land but maybe one of those little airplanes that we were looking at on your APP stuff. Maybe one of them is Mike euhrer quite a lot of them. Yes can you tell from the little green airplanes which is now no anyway anyway <hes> moving onto de airspace over Pakistan reopens <hes> We talked about this on earlier episode Pakistan closed their airspace <hes> and now they have fully reopened its airspace space to civilian flights nearly five months after it was closed after a standoff with India the closure forced international airlines to reroute around Pakistan and cost them tens of millions of dollars state-owned Air India and other Indian Airlines worst hit Pakistan shut airspace in February after India carried out an airstrike against what it said it was a terrorist training camp in Pakistani territory and I'm not GonNa go through all the details of you know all the political details y they were fighting with each other but basically the two countries were shooting down airplanes and firing things at each other and <hes>. They said you know we should probably shut down. This aerospace doesn't look like a friendly place to be flying but apparently they've worked out all their differences at least just enough to open up the airspace again. It's starting to hit. The Indian carriers isn't it because I'm looking at the <hes> the losses that Air India spice jet <HES> INDIGO and go l. lost nearly eighty million dollars due to the closure of <hes> that s space and mets presumably just because they had to read around it all the time yeah so guys make peace not war that's right. You'll make more money honest. Yes peace love money. That's our motto here. Peace Love. We love and money. Do I mentioned the coffee. Okay <hes> moved on a small plane ditches in water off Maryland near Ocean City Maryland. <hes> the sole occupant was evaluated by paramedics and released he was identified as Trevor Deal twenty-three of rebuil- Virginia according to the preliminary investigation witnesses said they saw our soil said Beth that they were on the beach at Twentieth Street about six fifteen P._M.. When they saw single engine airplane crashed into the ocean about a quarter of a mile from the shoreline and it's really the real reason why we're talking about? This is the video that somebody took on the beach in portrait mode <hes> what they're going to do I know but anyway <hes> still good video it shows the Cessna one seventy two I believe yes or g <hes> coming in and basically right before splashes or touches down in the water and <hes> nobody was hurt. Shuts up with the airplane algae is so question. Did you have this give them. I'm you know what I'm trying to remember from the because actually did watch video and I didn't realize it was an R._G.. Version maybe did have it scared and then go back and watch it to be sure to a just a busy week. I don't remember <hes> but yeah the job well done to be honest. If you're going to put the plane down in the water I think he did a really good job of it. <hes> does it can get the attitude that he landed at and trying to minimize Aissa injuries himself and and others so he left the gear up so good decision young definitely to end it does choose your nose over a little bit at the end but I mean you all your weight at the front end and nine. Oh that's how they ended up. Yeah okay. I'm thinking what are they looking at to to see that. They didn't have didn't have the gear down there looking at the CIA people in the Charon okay. That's why we have this on second regular buddy the chat room we appreciate it all right and then finally <hes> l. by the way do we'll have that in the show now. It's do watch the video. This is my favorite though this is the best one thank you live forever ever found. That's okay. This is from Global News Dot C._A.. So Canadian this has got to be Liz that came up with this one at she looks at all those Canadian sites polices Spain have detained a man accused used to try and to smuggle half-a-kilogramme of cocaine. That's that's a lot half-a-kilogramme yeah yeah <hes> into the country under a comically large to pay the Columbia man arrived in Barcelona on a flight from Bogota on June eighteenth. According to the Spanish National Police Authorities noticed he was wearing very tall wig and looked extremely nervous. He was also wearing a hat in an effort to conceal the wig police questioned the man and asked him to remove remove moved the wig he did so revealing a large packet of cocaine glued to his balding head. Hey at least it was kind of matched his hair color. Though you gotta hand it right I mean it matches his hair color but it's like way above his head and does not fit the proportions of his head joint hamburger patties. He's got something underneath it which does not suspicious but the photo of him with the WIG on with the IT looks like a tred wrapped in Saran wrap up his head. Yeah that's good description payment. It does the way they say the <hes> the site with a calm quiet ingenuity Jalali thank you. It's been small my on my ingenuity. The drug traffickers has no limits on going well. That's not very clever. If you stick took it does have a limit tried before police have found drugs hidden inside breast implants fake buttocks wigs and various articles of clothing. Maybe I have a future drugs might win yeah. You know what you're wearing fire yeah. You need your other thing than the yeah. It's like four inches above his head like a helmet. Yeah big fail. They're big fail. X. Accounts like a bike this own hair on a little bit yeah. It's shameful sure I'm just going for a bicycle right now that I've landed here in Spain nothing to see here move on all right well with that. It's time now for your feedback incoming message all right going to start with the item to Ben Toledo sent us up. Never Brian looks like she already took that out. Okay thank you. Liz Tissue changed the order. This is from Tom. Rolls Royce Trent just wanted to stop buying. Give you an update with what I've been up to over the past few years since it's been it's way too long since I've reached out to you all I was one of the people that put together the meet up at the Louisville Slugger Museum in August. It's twenty seventeen a B._g.. To eightyish since the meet up I deployed with my Air National Guard unit to the Middle East for six months to refuel many different types of military aircraft. This unfortunately delight my commercial flight training as the first this month. I'm happy to report that I've passed my commercial single engine land. Check ride completing my college degree in aviation and adding on C._F._i.. To get my hours built up congratulations to job great okay <hes> to the A._p.. Crew what master's degree would you recommend to get that would be useful in the airline industry as a management pilot or as a backup <hes> for some reason. I cannot keep a medical law degree law. What about Masters Business Business Lot Lot? It'd be would actually come in handy. Did you know S._T.. Young Law degree and <hes> just being able to read the contract language understand the contract language in in work through the contact language can be a huge benefit. I would also agree with the <hes> <hes> you know a business manager. Degree would work as well but a lot of these something that you can never know ah underwater basket weaving scuba diving. It's another good one good choice I would also add as we all usually do. When we were talking about bachelor's degrees <hes> it should be in something that you know if you have to if you lose your medical and you can't flies a pilot something that you really want to do <hes> something you're interested in doing <hes> would be something I would recommend as well? <hes> and I also say that getting a management I mean a master's degree isn't necessarily a requirement to get higher by the Airlines for sure <hes> let's say ninety. I don't know the exact the exact <hes> breakdown but ninety something percent. Maybe Ninety eight ninety nine percent sent a pilot's hired out there that have college degrees have just the standard for your bachelor's degree but since you mentioned as a management management pilot yeah that's that's what we recommend. I think yeah I don't really have anything to add to that to be honest. <hes> and that's good advice Dana Doyle skip data's part goes Dana's <hes> up retrieving some beer from the fritsch caterer. He's our caterer <hes>. Let's see Oh bump. That was the only other question yet so listen to me. Ask The question then you can come back around and asser here you okay with regards. I think nick trying to get your attention Dana. I was going to finish it off the dribble the knicks beer wasting <hes>. If you hear me okay yeah they can here. <hes> Dan with regards with getting my c._F._i.. What areas do you suggest that I focus on to make the practical test as easy as possible runway focus on the runway? That's always a good thing <hes> focus on starting the engine. What did you use to motivate yourself to keep pushing on getting the flight hours completed when you keep having those flights students that just seem to want to kill you so well? You know no honestly to answer your question. <hes> preparing is just being prepared for anything in really needs to look at the test standards <hes> because anytime you do a check ride to get you see a fine and you're going to have to <hes> usually do with the F._A._A.. And they tend to it really will come down to who you have for an exam so if you if you're lucky enough to get local Zama they everybody knows it's a really good. They're going to be thorough. <hes> no no. You need to know you oral in all the guy questions published by the F._A._A.. In the I don't know if they call them practice practical testings in what do they steph. It's been awhile duggan house distracted by <hes> opposing basis as their fault okay. No is this call so what's the P._T._S._D.. Have the study guy. The study guide in that's fantastic check ride is the commercial <hes> check ride. I thought it was so much but when you actually go and do the flying part of it it's commercial maneuvers so what I mostly mostly mostly but you have is some spin spin stuff you have training on that <hes> in a lot of its evaluating your ability to teach law flying from the right seat now. Yes it is a commercial check ride very summit to it but it's all doing it with your right hand. That's a big difference so so anyways <hes> as far as <hes> your preparation. If you have a really good flight instructor you should be good to go. They're not gonNA sign you off until you're ready. The question was if you're you know get. Somebody's trying to kill you. <hes> the biggest thing ended I always found was being patient in always talking if you're always talking and trying to correct the person in always be ready in in the expect the unexpected so if if your students going to try to land Nia playing for the first time don't defeat on for enhancing lap always follow them always get to know the person in in really talk them until you build up confidence <hes> any and see see if I that I had coming all the way through <hes> the biggest thing that I always was faced with <hes> is the inconsistency so once if I myself a good instructor I stuck with that instructor because they were able to really enhance my light abilities and understand the motivations behind. That's one of the biggest things learn we go through. Defy is what's motivating as a student to become a pilot. Em you know honestly I still remember uh-huh to this day one of the first thing one of my my earliest instructors said smoothness counts and so just know that you make a difference wink when you're teaching in the way that you present things in the way you talk people throw them through the maneuvers and that will help enhance their confidence thus enhancing your ability to be ready to handle anything story and I was an instructor pilot in the Air Force for four years and here's a real a really good piece of advice to you Trent <hes> the student that you think is the strongest and the one that you think that you can relax and not pay attention to what's happening is the student. That's going to really kill you because I can't tell you how many times that happened to me where I was just shocked that I thought I could really trust this guy because he was like one of the hottest sticks as. As far as the students and just you know not just kind of losing your focus losing your concentration kind of just assuming that this person is going to do everything they're supposed to do <hes> and then the shock when that doesn't happen and you have to remember. They're they're still students. Even they're one of the best students in the class they're still students and they still may make a really stupid mistake in a lucky me said in in Nick improtant Capitol Hill the further nick and probably attest this as as well but one of the one of the things that can be very true in the airline world as well. Is that what you just said is right through when when you are fine with somebody and they're real experience first officer captain even though they have all oh experienced it doesn't mean they're not GonNa make mistakes doesn't mean that they're perfect pilot so you have to keep your what we call monitoring skills <hes> in tune and be ready to react now. We talked with this impasse where I if I have a new new pilot pilot would renew ofo e. I'm more tempted to keep my hands very very close to the controls where you know you say. You're a little more relaxed with it but that's my defense mechanism being ready and even with when I'm fine with real experience X._F._o.. <hes> at this point I keep my hands in in a relatively close proximity. Not You know ready on my lap pretty much fever close to the rudder pedals and put on them <hes> so you know that's that's my old flight. Instructor Habits coming through in in Jeddah Waylon meal always trust but verify Im- make sure what you person's doing is what exactly we expect them to do if not as I said talk them through it yeah. Don't let your guard down basically easy way to say I should have set to begin but all right and <hes> let's see. I hope you're doing well and the next time any of you are Louisville or Cincinnati. Let me know the I._B.. As I'm Bourbon is on me that's going to be messy. Maybe just in your you know no. He said Louisville Horror Cincinnati. Maybe just consume them but that would be less messy. Yes that's definitely mess less mess and Dana. You'RE GONNA need to pay attention to this last post script. Can we please have a moment of silence for the forty five thousand barrels that were lost just a few days before the fourth of July here is linked to a local news source about the fire and it talks about the Jim beam fire at their distillery now they estimate a fifty million dollar loss so let's <hes> just a few seconds of silence okay. It's all right doc. It's up until they can make more. It's just make more but it's GonNa cost me a lot more money. Not Happy Fish drawing well on a lot of debt fish to how folks thanks Rolls Royce Trent for your feedback much appreciate it and good luck with the with your studies and getting that SIA by keep us posted on that to Jesse patient fifties all right Ben Ippolito who I believe we'll be here at Oshkosh if I'm not mistaken senators fee book <hes> via facebook he look what is being yeah okay. I didn't mean from face back. Okay attention snow here because I was looking straight at the word facebook when I said the do have a tendency to to confuse F._B._i.. For feedback and facebook to it's an issue I'm getting old. Let's just say snapper all right. Thank you for laughing because because Steph and Dana were just just had this ad look on their face is rumor. Mill says that that's fuel quite a lot of it naturally. So where do I start here. This is from Ben and he sent his link to A. I think this is a Oh that's right. I noticed this facebook a facebook post and it doesn't it's not coming in for some reason in our in our evernote feedback but I did do a screen capture of the photo of this jet taking off and it's a Virgin Australian. Oh Yeah I I've got the seven news for point here okay. Why don't you go? Why don't you take over show? What is a Virgin Australia of the a sixty-nine? I think it's a great flight number like to Flynn the aircraft returns to Melbourne Uh with a trail from the engine <hes> so <hes> Virgin Plane Abam for Hong Kong turn back to Melvin <hes> because they was a trial of vapor coming out of one of the engines it took off foot ten twenty six on Wednesday from Melbourne turn back about half an hour later due to an engineering fault while I I think it was an engineering foe but I think it was what he showed a trail what appeared to be <hes> from the right time side off the plane as it leaves Tomek the three thirty which was <hes> something I used to fly made it as far as Swan Hill sensitive America's isn't it. It's why I'm hill on hill before uh-huh in Australia landed safely and you can see quite a distinct trial of vapor reality engine now my guess was feeling so it is a reasonably common for across to have a rupture break in the field pipes and you've got to feel pouring out if can be from a tanker from just pipe somewhere and this <hes> looks like Elvis you gotta feed feel to the engine so it looks like the field pipes at some point prior to entering the engine have <hes> ruptured and allow field ago to go out and <hes> it did a Yui as they say in Australia here to say here to hanging Yui okay. Did you mentioned that earlier about that was like in Australia thing. Someone says Oh you did respond respond to said that's the thing here in the hanger even pronounced like a pronunciation guide for US excellent. Well okay so chuck you either. I've never heard of that. Chuck a union but definitely hanging hanging you write right yeah. Hopefully you know okay well chucky island that one. I'm so of course the only sitting here oh the good half of the bad half the good I wouldn't be bragging about that are so you'll remember the incident of the eight three thirty Canadian bunch run out of field going past the as those and <hes> Air Transat they go through thirty diverted into <hes> <hes> the Azores that can't think of it. He did the longest glide that any Dell Dell. Now's not del <hes> no P L._A.. Anyway something chat room. Please help us the Azores Air Transat flight. Please tell us what the oh I got it. Almost this love anyway. I'm looking it up. It probably be faster than that. After that incident yes <hes> rewrite Oli fuel leak drills and made it much simpler for a lottery lounges thank you to that was my where a feel leak was coming from and in the event of it <hes> coming out of the engineering or could be coming from the pilot or becoming <hes> up downstream of the feel of Sir you can <hes> you can either shot the engine down South Felix stops. You can try <hes> isolating it but basically thirty Minnesota. Take even if it's streaming feel it's a major problem. You may not even decide a shot the engine down because you know you with engine downing. I may doubling the problems feel. They can a single engine. <hes> if there's no danger you might consider it safer to do a two engine approach and shut the engine down once you're safely on the runway. That's the captain's call depending on what indications hadn't how severe it was but it's an interesting one that one at least I was recognized Ice Anneli and now the software in the buses will very quickly recognize misbalance tanks that could potentially be caused by a few leak and a warn the KRILL growth. Don't we have that to Jeff Yeah sure bracelet to hear no arrive in mass between our is between arrears in we we had to be between your is. It's okay. It's not the mess the mass mass nevermind I was going to say something and I'm going to refrain keeps out such disciplined just after if Real Nice after thank you guys beers right. You didn't get any but I didn't say anything bad why actually if you'd like another still have a gin and tonic particularly pack no not particularly no John. I don't think slapped didn't he. He was laughing because he just enjoys being together with the crew except those two together with inch due to know I mean I think the all do that. You're laughing because you're happy to be with US but LIZ is not here. He still at you still talking about speaking of Liz. This is from Liz Mississippi crash. <hes> from CAP DOT news have no idea what that is similar to make sense a young civil air patrol pilot lost Mr Life and Fedex made a wonderful gift to her family. Well done that X.. In tragic circumstances so the article <hes> continues that <hes> the Civil Air Control Air Patrol Cadet died from I'm serious injuries on July sixth when the Civil Air Patrol planes she was piloting crash landed on the Ole Miss Golf Course in Oxford Mississippi Steph. Would you like to continue the the accident occurred about three fifteen. PM On the seventeenth eighteenth hole not far from the university Oxford airports where it could at Master Sergeant Lake Little was headed as part of a of Cadet flight training to receive her private pilot certificate. She was airlifted to Memphis area trauma center where she unfortunately passed away <hes> right now. Our focus is on family and I'm not laughing because of the story I would just to clarify. This is a very sad and serious story. Unfortunately Captain Jeff is may quite difficult for me to read. He doesn't need to do anything at the moment that can read the entire story from here on Alex. Thank thank you for your assistance. <hes> right now are focuses on cadet little family and the members of her local squadrons said Major General Mark Smith <hes> Savar Patrol National Commander and CEO This is a tragic accident and we are praying for peace and comfort for everyone involved. We're working with the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration to determine what caused the crash little eighteen of starkville joined the C._A._p.. In August twenty seventeen and had earned six promotions during her nearly two years of service the latest to could master master sergeant in December. She was a member of the Mississippi Wings Golden Triangle Composite Squadron based in Caledonia. She also enlisted in June in the Mississippi Air National Guards one hundred seventy second airlift squadron in Jackson where she was going to be a C.. Seventeen loadmaster in addition to her civil air patrol and national <hes> Air National Guard pursuits little plan to attend the University of Southern Mississippi in the fall to study speech pathology audiology the memorial service <hes> goes on but <hes> <hes> this is the this is the nice part of this story kind of heart warming and tragic circumstances <hes>. This is from her family. I believe <hes> yeah I it is. Her family received a letter in mail. It says we received a surprise in the mail today from Fedex today today was to have been leaks. Check ride to complete her piloting in addition to gaining her heavenly wings this week to received her Fedex pilot wings as well. which was her goal driven dream? She smiling at me as she would. If I ever doubted her and saying the daddy told you I could do it. Why would you doubt me? Thank you Fedex fear compassion. They sent a very nice letter along with a set of their wings to the family of late little which I was very nice and that was her stated goal professionally to join Fedex at some point would did you want me to read the literature dear Mr and Mrs Little Layton and patent on behalf of the five thousand pilots Fedex I would like to offer our sincere deepest sympathies and your time of grief a fellow Captain Fedex made me aware of lakes lakes desire to fly with US someday while while we'll while we will never have that privilege I wanted to reach out and let you know she was on the right track. Pursuing a dream centered around a love for aviation which few people can fully understand as her family. I know you did understand and I know that professional pilots around the globe would join me and applauding her love for flying her courage determination and persistence or the exact qualities that make the best pilots and it is with deep regret. I learned over accident as your loss is a loss for all aviators. My kindness personal regards Captain Robin Sabarsko System Chief Pilot managing director flight operations at Fedex Express and they enclosed the Fedex pilot wings very very classy out in the pool captain semester this great letter yeah and gets here's my is <hes> and when I was reading this I was thinking this is so appropriate because people that love aviation are we're surrounded by how many hundreds of thousands the people here at Oshkosh this week that are just crazy about aviation and she was among amongst those who had that passion absolutely and I mean very tragic obviously very young but <hes> it it you know she was very driven for someone of her age. <hes> a lot of accomplishments already and it's just it's just a shame all right. Let Him for like the gym or do you want to read this when I get in Jeff and here's a monster inside lead me four to get to the washroom. Hopefully this time when you read it say hi Captain Dana. It's just a range of motion zero thing hit tears in our is is high captain chef. I was recently on the business ship to Minnesota and Got Minnesota Minnesota in God the opportunity to fly acme from Minneapolis back the San Jose. I flew seven. I'm not as the seven three seven nine hundred and there was there yeah and they're in a three nineteen back to Minneapolis. I got up close and and look at the M._D.. And I have a question into hopefully you ordained cancer. I consider myself in the formed have geek but I try as I might try but try is. I might we an angle here tries. I might I could figure out okay. Don't don't mess up. You're actually much better but try it. Let me sat over <hes> set that sense Dana. I think I consider myself informed ABC Geek but try as I might I could figure out couldn't figure out where they keep all the coal that the nonstop no party. That's a shovel into the brunt. I can't stop to keep the mad dog in the air also. Do you have to buy your own shovels. <hes> they provided by healing keep up the great show P._S.. Minneapolis being acne hub hoping to run into either abt Manda captains on Saturday morning <hes> not so much outside the apple in Edeka trying to run into you helping run into that's very very me listen Ramiro. That's so funny marrow. It's actually it's actually several mice on a treadmill now when I read this. I thought wow that is so funny. No wow I thought to myself wow so it's better to having the real things that in this one wow just giving wow. I didn't get to finish that by the way that's Minneapolis be P._S.. Minneapolis being a big acne hub. I was hoping to run into the A._P._d.. Mad Dog captains on Saturday morning but no such luck so I did the next best thing and listen to episode really to thank you on the flight home all the best to you in the crew Ramiro Yeah Romero that you're really a funny guy. We'll pass along that top-secret information to your Ramiro because it's it's true that's true. It's just it's clean coal. I'll have you know clean-burning. Yes all right anthracite. Yes yes if you say so how we doing Lazarie anywhere near the end of the show. A lot is seven thirty nine. It's yeah well. I think this is all the wrong time zone for some reason. It hasn't switched over right. Yeah seven has given us a time not since the half hour kit one that she said it was about in our at one point now half hour into the show is an hour ago or not quite an hour ago okay yeah I think that'd be great idea up ten minutes from the one and a half hour Martin. We're GONNA try to make this a little bit shorter show so so with that in mind. Let's do the most important the favorites part the best the best dares show thank you that would even better way to say the best this plane tale from the plane tale from the old pilot they all pilots plane tiles. Kill Kill L. him kill him. Kill him. The story has graphic references to violence. Injury may not be suitable for all ages. Please used discretion if you're playing it to a young audience. After many years of flying. I've always considered the flight deck a place of calm efficiency. It's a classically professional environment. The voice is already raised and even during the maze trying of situations or wiring emergencies the crew cod controlling their emotions staying cool and composed the voice voice recorder transcript Fedex flight seven five however is far from calm. It reveals one of the most terrifying situations on a flight dick that I can recall and it makes chilling reading. It's April nineteen ninety four on his captain. David Saunders I also Jim Doctor and fight engineer Andy Peterson climb into their at crop they see another pilot Alban calloway a jump seat passenger already on board and occupying the flight engineers seat he would leslie vacates the seat to get into the jump seat. Nobody comments and some his lack of protocol or the fact that is only baggage is a Qatar case which he keeps on the floor near his feet. However during his preflight shakes the find engineer Jim Tonka notices that the circuit break-up for the cockpit voice recorder order was out cutting power to the device he resets it but after stepping off the flight deck for a few minutes he founded a pop todd again or so he thought he resets it a second time the crew <hes> three ex-navy pilots unbolting as a replacement for the original crew which Calloway had been popped off because they had exceeded the flight hours earlier? They're not done so the conclusion of this story might hi to being quite different. The new crew were big fit man the oldest being the captain of forty nine years of age all Ben Calloway was also ex-navy and a martial arts black belt. It achieved much watching his life. It's no little thing to qualify as a navy pilot but since leaving the service things hadn't been going so well although he had a good job with Fedex calloway had made the progress he wanted his marriage was on the rocks and he'd been cold in by the company to face disciplinary hearing of a claims that he had made consenting his navy flight is in his hiring documents. It's possible that he thought this hearing might end his career. Calloway had recently taken out a two and a half million dollar life insurance policy which combined with a death in service pout from Fedex that should the aircraft he was traveling in crash. His ex wife in children would receive a very launch payout in addition calloway had transferred over fifty four thousand dollars insecurities in cashier's checks to his ex wife. This was undoubtedly to ensure that his family would be financially secure should he di believing that his life was in ruins calloway had hatched a plan and involved the contents of his guitar case not subject to the security security checks that we now take for granted all Bang Calloway had secreted in the case an old selection of tools to club Hamas to claw Hamas a spear gone and a knife for the operating in crew. The flight started just as had many times before they were departing from Memphis in Tennessee. I'm flying to San Jose California in the McDonnell Douglas DC ten freighter after an uneventful. I'll stop taxi and take off the crew settling down to the normal routine of the climb and chatting easily amongst themselves as pilots do it was Jim Taco of offices lake. He called gear up. Please I._S.. Hold if he can captain David Sodas replied on the Radio Right to eight zero two seven five radio outbound express seven zero five check came the reply. That's Cowley's Ridge. You know about Kylie's rich no no. That's it right there all this area right here. Yes see those trees yeah. It's a natural full line. Oh this is the new Madrid <hes> well. It's part of it yeah but it's much higher in elevation and <hes> the climate's different you drive in Kansas. You drive right over it well. Why is they chatted? They were unaware of what was a caring behind them. All Ben Calloway was reaching into his guitar case to take hold of a hammer. You quietly unbuckled his harness and stood food coming for do you live over in Kansas. Dave for now. I live in Fisher Bill O.. Fish Bill Great spall this point around fifteen thousand feet in the climb. The lives of the three crewmen booze changed forever and in the background of the easy-going conversation sickening noise can be heard on the cockpit voice recorder. The transcript blandly notes sounds of Hamma Blues Striking pilots all three crew members had been struck over the head with multiple ham obliges. The flight engineer was closest to the jump seat and he had to be an tanked. I with a vicious strike the fractured his skull and seven is temporal artery calloway then attacked Jim Taka the first off so with a full back candid blow that punched punched right through scowl turn into the captain Dave Saunders he struck from overhead but fortunately the hammer deflected off a metal Gombe on the overhead panel slightly lessening the first bloviate Lovato nearly tore his ear from his head Saunders tried to find him all but strapped in the couldn't do much as Calloway bludgeoned him again and again knocking him nearly unconscious hearing this sustained attack Calloway flailed about with the hammer inflicting gruesome injuries as the crew to their utmost to find him off despite what had happened all three what desperately defending themselves Dave Saunders shouted get up get him but the flight engineer was unable to move calloway retreated to get the spear on and when he returned he spoke for the first time sit down sit down get back in your seat. This is a real gun out killer despite having difficulty seeing and hearing little but allowed ringing in his ears Andy Peterson is the closest and he lunges forward grabbing the bumped tip of the spigot on Dave Saunders is up and out of his seat helping Peterson so tucker is the end one of the controls and he takes radical steps he heaves the huge airliner into were climb and then rosie across steeply over onto it side fighting for the spigot on all three men are thrown off their feet and they tumble by kind of the cockpit. The flight engineer has been severely injured in his blood. It is being splashed about turning the aircraft into a scene more akin to a channel house but he and the captain of fighting hard but starting to lose to the uninjured calloway the aircraft's warning MM system is continuously Alarming Bank Angle Bank angle whilst tuck shouts encouragement to the engineer Getty Mandy get him the first officer continues as extreme maneuvers reaching about one two hundred forty degrees of bank but calloway has got hold of the hammer again and is raining blows down on Dave sonus now in a steep dive with a throttles full power and the over spe- warning sounding again and again the aircraft is close to coming up part is it reaches four hundred sixty nonce. The noise of the AFLA around the cockpit is deafening on the wings and elevators are starting to flutter go to the controls and no longer responding and Jim Tucker has a problem the damage to his skull has rendered his right arm unresponsive flying with his left hand. He can't reach the throttles and they see. Let's go of the control. The speed indicator is now off the clock but he takes a gamble releases. The controls impulse throttles back eventually he heaves the aircraft out of the dive and keys the radio. The <HES> Center Center Emergency Emergency Center listen to me express seventy-five. I've been wounded. We've had an attempt to take over onboard the aircraft. Give me a vector. Please back to Memphis at this time. I'm Hari in the background that desperate struggle is still going on and Dave Saunders shouting. Put It on autopilot and come back here. Jim Replies keep him back there guys. I'm flying hurry up. Jim Jim Jim. Is it on autopilot. No I got it from the RIA. The captain said put it on all the pilot and comeback here quick Jim okay hurry. Jim Come back here now. Okay wait a minute. I'm coming Jim do it. Now Hurry Hurry in the meantime. The struggle in the Galley continued calloway had managed vanished grab the hammer one more time to strike the captain yet again with these flight engineer bleeding out from his seven autry. I'm with repeated blows to his head. Dave Saunders gathered his last ounce of strength pulled a hammer from callaway hand and the hidden until he stopped moving. Jim Takas now out of his seed and he takes save a monitoring the subdued man and Captain Saunders returns against the controls with Memphis's assistance he sets the crop up for an eye unless to land while shouting the chilling instructions to Jim An- Andy in the Galley area listen is he okay put put that the thing in his throat. I didn't give a shit of He's dead on not done. Kill him but hold him. You got him Jim Whilst Dave Saunders his studying his approach he shouts Jim you under control a you under control gyms voice can be heard from the rear of the company. No no something some matter with me. Dave shouted you. Keep him down here. I calmed Jim replied. The spear gun that was is pointing at Calloway had slipped from Jim takas weakened grip and the desperate calloway takes his chance with a clearance to land Dave Saunders his struggle re-start Anita shouts kill son of a bitch. Kill him kill him kill him kill him his crew struggling again so saunders puts the old upon bank in gets out of his seat to help Taco picks up discarded hammer and hits calloway again finally subduing him back in his seat. Saunders sees that they're now too high and fast for the approach but with some MM steep turns he elects to put the heavy aircraft on an alternate runway warnings of blaring as he sidesteps the aircraft but only three hundred feet from landing calloway again stance to find left the landing is hard and Dave Saunders uses all but nine hundred feet of the runway to stump but eventually he brings the DC ten to a safe hold opening a door they deploy <music> slide that allows emergency personnel and police to come on board with Calloway safely in custody the crew get that desperately needed medical help the aircraft looks like a disaster zoster area with blood pooling on the floor and splattered all over the cockpit and Galley however despite being taken to the limits of its strength the aircraft is eventually repaired and put back into service <MUSIC> Calloway is convicted of a piracy ungiven to life sentences without the possibility of parole is currently residing in the federal penitentiary in Atlanta Atlanta in May nineteen ninety four the airline Pilots Association Award Dave Sambas James Taka Andrea Peterson with the gold medal award heroism missile the highest award a civilian pilot can receive it was this hyun that calloway had intended to commit murder suicide by carrying everyday tools as he's better had weapons he hoped they would go on noticed in the aircraft wreckage and that the injuries inflicted would equally explained away as the result of a crack his plan to disable the the cockpit voice recorder though had filed thanks to the vigilance of flight engineer Andy Peterson Saunders Taka and Peterson had survived a suicidal and piracy but terrible cost Peterson had been lucky to survive the blood loss from his severed artery but eventually he would recover from that and his fractured skull saunders suffered multiple iterations to his head was stabbed in his right arm and had his jaw dislocated his right he had been almost completely seven. Jim takas skull was was severely fractured. The right sided paralysis would possibly eventually but he would experience ongoing motor function impoundment to his right arm and leg was all side blinded in one I as this of two thousand four ten years after the incident due to the extent severity of their injuries. None of the crew had been recertified as medically fit to fly commercially EH although Jim Taka List now return to recreation flying while that is i. I think one of the best that you've done captain nick well. That's very kind of Jeff. It was is spent tastic story so it's <hes> it's hard to make a mess of amazing event like that but yeah strike by knowing the story doesn't ever get any easier to listen to a retelling of it especially a very good one yeah held up for a long time on that one because it such well-known story but I've had so many requests from our listeners <hes> to tell it I felt perhaps dealing with it <hes> more from the cockpit voice recorder transcript point of view than anything else led me into the next plane tail which is sort of similar event and then into the one after that which is gained to involve a little bit about the history of the man who developed a voice recorders record <hes> each interesting enough. I I actually have seen one of the first voice quarters ever data recorders ever used a member a friend in smart yes John John Exxon brench right and so he has actual device in his basement so and that's the same device they're still using today in the mad. Dog Yet is above metal tape nick. What was that story about? have no clue. I've you know it was terrible Komo fantastic job. I mean you always out do yourself. It's amazing. Listen the work you do. All the stories are out there. All do is is rehash them and tell them but thanks very much all right. I think we should move on with some more feedback <hes> number five Sebastian before I start Captain Nick. I'm half British half French from my parents so I'm totally on your side. Whatever the whatever the argument yes good man Yeah Yeah? That's okay planes. Plane Tales is breathtaking though I apologize in advance but though weighing okay doesn't care anymore somehow he's not as excited as he was actually. I don't think any of US really just wanted to share my experience with you even though you don't need another feedback feedback to talk for hours but hey that's what A._B._C. members love. My aviation career started in France since I was a little boy and wanted to become an airline pilot my parents were living underneath <hes> charles-de-gaulle <hes> Peres runway to seven right final oil and while other boys would be playing football in the garden. I was spending hours watching planes. My nose up in the air flight training and the France was and still is very expensive and at that time you needed an engineering degree and a lot a lot of money <hes> to get into flight training. I believe my parents finances and my marks in mathematics didn't allow me to do that and instead I joined the navy to become an air traffic controller. I did that for a little more than ten years and was assigned to the aircraft carrier Charles de Gaulle for many missions in the Middle East. What an experience? This is one of the best experiences I've had up to this point in my life and working with the dissolve does saw RUFFEA RUFFEA too so rough out roughly performances edessa Raphael. Where's the Fiyal Okay anyways the D._R.? Performances was incredible. If you've ever read a Tom clancy book life during the missions over there for just like that Israel Israelis pilots getting curious Egyptian getting nervous Iranians even more and controlling fighters in the middle of civilian airspace or you basically don't exist is one heck of a challenge attach a few pictures that you might find interesting and entertaining yeah. We'll put those shown us. They're beautiful. Pictures getting bored though the military inefficiency agency when we were not at C.. I decided it was time for a change. My best friend at the time was just coming back from Canada and told me this is a great place to fly and the industry is going to need a lot of pilots in the coming years and there's this lady named Liz who lives in Toronto and she has just great so I started looking into and taking into account the great exchange rate between Euro and Canadian dollars by training costs started to make sense so after two years of administrative an immigration nightmare I managed to obtain a permanent residency status that allowed me to move over the pond and I think you've been talking about this previous episodes while properly studying what school you need to get proper training in another country is of utmost importance was not forget that an immigration permanent status will render the project very much easier. <hes> it is in my opinion the first thing to consider also for those who might think about doing the same thing don't forget the airlines will not invest into training in typewriting for you if you have a temporary resident status in the country so I guess you're saying you need permanent status anyways. I've done my entire trading in shoot Viel Shaw with the exception of my P._p.. L. That that I had obtained in France a small school that looks more like a diner on the border of of I seventy five than a proper school <hes> but that had one main advantage compared to the big schools in Montreal they had a lot of instructors and I was is able to do my entire training within a year when other schools were overwhelmed by the number of Chinese students they take Chinese student pilots that they take after getting my instructor rating. I was hired by an even smaller school in northern Quebec near the James Bay or they actually had only only a chief instructor but no instructor that was a great opportunity as I wanted to get experience fast being single instructor there. I flew around five hundred seventy five hours in four months. Wow that's a lot of time for months. What yeah say four months Yeah No? We don't even get anywhere near that now. That's crazy now`show now. How's that for time build up though I think back are looking back that it was a bit too much and L. Lost My desire to train P._p.? L. Or E._p._l.. Students I love training <hes> I was an A._T._C. trainer in the Navy but for me the professional aviation is all about the F. R. and I don't really enjoy saying all day quote use your feet and teach how to do slow flight patterns after that I joined in the same area a small seven three company seven to three as air taxi operations or under nine passengers to do Medevac Flying James Bay Indian communities tough-line old king air one hundred without autopilot or even a decent G._p._S. three thousand feet foot gravel runways long hours and extremely poor salaries. I mean I'm not doing this job for the money but twenty nine thousand a year is not a lot mostly considering the price of living up north patients we had to transport were very often obese people drunk and violent with no considerations for the whites every country has done some mistakes with aboriginals or Indians but even though it was sad it was still interesting to discover these conflicts coming from Europe. I had once to board a four hundred twenty five pound patient through the small door of king air one hundred not the funniest moment in my career I can assure you but it can't be done. <hes> honestly very very sad communities with extremely poor social conditions I was extremely shocked by the poor safety practices of the of this company and the quality of the training. I have since learned that most of the companies that that that small were often alike at the last transport Canada audit some pilots were asked to lie if they didn't want to be fired. This was the rupture point for me and I thought this is over knowing exactly which airline wanted to work for only sent one C._v. and that was lucky. I was recruited less than a month ago by the second largest airline behind Air Canada westjet and I have to say my life completely changed. I just cannot believe the resources money these guys investor train their pilots. The work environment is unlike any other company. I've worked for the past. I might be a young pilot with barely twelve hundred hours total time but I consider myself having a little bit of experience aviation industry and I sincerely believe this is the best airline in in Canada <hes> that is by the way entering a joint venture with Delta so a bright future is coming up right now. I'm still in the middle of this fantastic training. I'll be flying the Q. Four hundred from Vancouver and <hes> wear this ridiculous huge smile my face since this is really my little boy's dream getting real when I was hired by them I had to move from why Yankee Victor Oscar. I don't know what that is in northern Quebec Eh to Calgary. It's Weisi want Calgary cow. I'm sorry yeah why why V._R.'s Calorie Okay so <hes> right now. I'm still in the middle of this fantastic training. I'll be flying the Q. Four hundred from Calgary and I wear this ridiculously huge smile on my face since this is really my little boy's dream getting real when I was hired by them I had to move from Y vio in northern Quebec to Calgary along long thirty plus our drive and this is actually when I discovered P._G.. Thank you for making this Dr Shorter. I want to give you guys and gals an enormous applause for the work and dedication you put to given to give us this great. Show discussions are fantastic technical enough for professional pilots and wide variety to satisfy curious listeners bravo. I sincerely mean it. I think you guys are the best. Thank you very much weaker shit that even though it's been less than a month that I discovered a p._g.. I have tens of subjects. I want to share with you for today. Though I think I've bothered you enough but there's one last thing I would like to say. This is my advice for all the aspiring pilots who wonder how do I do this. But how do you take all the vice you can from professional pilots. They know it the best but most importantly do not listen to all the sad regretful people around you that will tell you quote it's too difficult and it can't be done or you have to be an ace in maths baths. It's not NASA it just requires passion and perseverance believe in yourself state curious and ahead of your career and you will manage. That's it for now as I said I have a lot of subjects. That'll be sharing very soon and let me know if you want more aircraft carrier pictures it will be a pleasure to share this experience tailwinds blue skies and a good cr F I if possible what's this year. I don't know yeah well. You'll have to send us another email Sebastian and tell us what C. R. F. Anyway. This is Sebastian robbery jewelry at look at these pictures and they're they're carrying credible credible so are the this is the <hes> the Dassault <hes> Eurofighter right Rafael. The Eurofighter does look like the Eurofighter I don't know what do you think nick okay. These are ships pretty sure their boats yes so gary's and that's an aircraft carrier because it's a ship with aircraft on it <hes> that's a I don't know probably had to have learned and something or other maybe anyway so we're going to put the for that the the boat with the thing that's got propellers at night. Okay thank you stating the obvious all right well again. Thanks you Sebastian for your feedback and we look forward to hearing more from you. Absolutely all right I think SA- bashing hit some really really good vice ace in your feedback so thank you thank you as trying to bend over my belly to lean towards. It's Mike Thank thank you feed being what all the data mean society okay. Shall we continue or are we are. We okay <hes> item number six jared E. L. T. signal leads to Portland pup. Captain Jeff Crew Not much to say about this one but a funny any story cheers. This is jared in Duluth Georgia the owner. This is from ABC Web dot com the owners of brewery put a crash airplane on display in their new Portland pub found our Sierra finding Canadian Ian runway friction and of course we know that one listening knows all things Canadian yes anyway crash airplane onto okay unbeknownst to anybody at the brewery. Something had accidentally activated the planes emergency locator beacon. What's it was a quiet Monday afternoon in February with only a few customers lingering over over beers at Portland's new vagabond brewing <hes> in as Portland Maine or Portland Oregon Pinot and don't know I'm doesn't really Portland one of the undetermined Portland we were all down in the Office for manager meetings says General Manager Kyle Johnson and the bartender comes in and very timidly says <hes> there's three guys from the air force here to see you they found the plane and the place they at least expected crammed into the pubs rafters as decoration like some sort of extra large hood ornament last September the founders of the Oh Salem <hes> that was Oregon death last September the founders of the Salem Bass brewery a trio of friends at former marines were looking for a statement piece that would enhance the Portland locations overall aesthetic and reflect their love of travel? That's what an acquaintance tip them off about. A nineteen fifty eight Cessna three ten be that had been sitting in field in tiny vander who've BBC for at least ten years after a guy with note Canadian pilot's license or insurance made a very hard landing and fled the scene so the group set out on a nearly sixteen hundred mile road trip to retrieve it the vendor who fire department <hes> up there got decommissioned and through the Canadian F._A._A.. Says the CO owner Dean House and we ended up basically trading keg of beer for it after repairing a blown tire narrowly outrunning a blizzard and some finagling at the border the crew got the plane. I'm back to Portland and stashed it in their new spot in southeast Portland in time for the brewpubs opening in February. It was only a few weeks later when the air patrol came calling. We're not sure what's going on. Johnson says we thought maybe we were in trouble because these guys look very official unbeknownst to anybody at the brewery something had accidentally activated the planes emergency locator beacon for at least two days it had been putting on a signal to every passing pilot and nearby airports one of the vagabond servers who friend whose friend end works for Alaska Airlines later said the captain of a flight got on the Intercom and asked passengers to press their noses to the window to see if they could spot the down plane not knowing it was actually roosting inside Bruecke. I found that one hard to believe anyway quote. They were very very nice about it. Johnson says the air patrol crew who eventually posed for photos with the pesky transponder. It's better to find a plane stashed up there than actually have cash play however ten years. Is that battery still good but that's what I want to know. They'll get it whole after replacing batteries in in in after hard landing because your plan to at least they ahead aluminum trade for aluminum trade for aluminum seems fair fits the theme of our Buck guests beer and bear all right excellent. Thank you jared so I think maybe one more okay. Is this a good one end on or turtles. Fuck this this from Brett and let's see which Brett is no so many Brett's here. We're GONNA find a little bit more Brett fry. Hey here a couple of times perfect with Brad all right <hes> he brought us some great beer by the way from Toledo. I'll use your last yes if he was here today or not or maybe okay produce agrees to okay okay Aereos <hes> with so many other news stories about unruly passengers or airplane troubles. This little story brings US smile Kudos to the crew for number one seeing the turtle although I'm sure they you pilots are scanning for five during taxi and to deciding exciting to delay for the turtle crossing but it was in Australia not the hurried U._S.. Gwede stop friend Turtle. If we saw Shaath Westwood well probably in software on airplanes lead something we love southwest. Okay Jetstar Airways flight had the cutest reason for a plane delay. The small turtle was crossing the tarmac suffice it to say he took things slow unsteady a flight Thursday from Australia. Gold Coast to Adelaide was delayed for four minutes after first officer James Fuller notice a turtle on the tarmac where his plane had just begun taxing for departure. They aren't the fastest moving creatures he told U._S._A.. Today in a statement payment I'd see rabbits on the runway before but my four years flying with Jetstar have never seen a turtle on the tarmac. I want to thank customers for their patients. While we gave the little fella right of way the captain alerted air traffic control and the turtle was able to return to unless bustling habitat quote wanted to give a shout out to our flight group who brought the plane to stop for a few minutes while taxiing at A._O._l.. To allow a gorgeous little turtles across the runway in front of the aircraft and made his way yes ask slowly give them a break. It's a turtle to the creek near the airport. Fence Passenger Lachlan Burnett wrote on the Airlines facebook page made mine and the other passengers day to see that lovely stuff J._Q.. Pilots well L. played excellent so then almost sounds like a show title to me. Turtle on the Tarmac Turtle on the tarmac actually love that pipe up never do some ability remember but that tomorrow on time amac Tarmac Kanak T._H.. M._A._C. Tarmac all right well. Hey you know what it's time for us to end. This show <hes> e._S._P._N.. Shorter than usual yes but it's it's not a normal show for us because we're on location here in Oshkosh and there's a lot of stuff going on around us and we're afraid that we're GONNA end starting to get dark and we actually need to cook some dinner you appear. I've got my head light. I do too so we actually have lights out there to eliminate blur per se eight thirty and it's Yeah Sandy Yup all right with that <hes>. If you want to learn more about the show you know what to do head over the airline pilot dot com where you'll find information about the crew the community <hes> Merchandise A._B._C. Live the plane tales <hes> site or webpage <hes>. What else is there <hes> all the things all the things? Are there hells even here. Oh what is Hill L. Here live yeah. We should have had him in here. Oh Damn yes. Are you sure he's not around somewhere in the <hes> he may be but we'll get to hill l.. Let's see let's let's let her talk about. SOC meets tesche means this week to follow us on the SOC meets because as soon as I have some sort of <hes> signal back on my phone right now I don't know brass thanks yeah it's T.. Mobile not doing so great right here in the R._V. At the moment but there are better places around <hes> Oshkosh for me to upload things so <hes> twitter facebook and maybe some instagram posts coming your way A._p.. Crew all of those places actually I take it back A._P._D.. Crew twitter instagram facebook dot com slash airline Pelata find us there. You'll feel like you're here at Oshkosh cash with us in toting myself service but this podcast has been done on my cell service for Sir. I'm telling how Pope I am. You're not promoting promoting it. That's correct. I think I don't know complain so excellent and <hes> we're on <hes> something very similar assoc mean well. He is hello he over here. He is there makes them. They can talk about side. Okay I stay N._F._l.. A._p.. Listeners please join us on on our slack team. Slack is a communication coordination and sharing platform that works on your Mobile Laptop for Browser on slack we share ideas and us we suggest episode and playing Kale's topic we plan events and meet up to get into the slack. He's slash cats airline pilots DOT COM. That's S. L. A. K. Sierra Lima Alpha Charlie Kilo at airline pilot Guy Dot com or send me a tweet with your preferred email address to at Hillel and I'll send you an invitation. That's L L spelled H.. One one eighty one hotel India one echo one and see you in slack sensible advice and with that <hes> thank you for joining us for today's show and that big round of applause for our producer and we'll get you in a moment yeah linked what she says. Oh Yeah what says Oh okay well anyway <hes>. She's got to get up for tomorrow morning. That's right okay and what else we answer sir. Thanks to our live chat room watching us all reporting mine. Even I live audience. We have to live audience. A huge live audience of one and <hes> but he was very very quiet so we appreciated.

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Episode 40: China / Russia Strategic Alliance

Newt's World

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Episode 40: China / Russia Strategic Alliance

"The United States now faces it impacts every American and we need to recognize what we must do as countries I encourage you to pick up a copy uh in my new book trump versus China facing America's good its threat I describe in detail the new era of competition communist China versity and Herman Partner founder of the American Foreign Policy Council security I started studying China military issues mainly by being exposed to them in college so I actually got into Stanford lose my guest Dr Oriana Schuyler Mastro Assistant Professor of security studies at the Wall School of Foreign Service and Georgetown of China Russia diplomatic relations both countries engaged in intense talks to deepen their political defence and trade relationships and NIA and US election interference we ought to be very concerned about this warming partnership this episode will explain why I'm pleased he's about China and were focusing on China's warming relationship with Russia in June two thousand nineteen China's general secretary is an assistant professor of security studies at the Edmund Awol School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University and an expert on China and East Asian circle offers access to extra content on the topic you enjoy exclusive invitations to members only online events and political analysis Asian Ping Matt with Russia's President Vladimir Putin during a three day state visit to Russia the occasion was to mark the seventieth anniversary and context on the two thousand twenty election go to Newt Center Circle Dot Com and become a member now I five hundred years mm time in mainland China where I discovered that we very much needed people in the United States that have a deep understanding of China to manage the challenges of its rice harbors will receive on limited edition gift as part of their membership join now at Newt's inner circle DOT COM and on this episode of Newsworld this is the third episode in our three parts for piano and drama and enrolled in a special program in literature and philosophy but started taking Chinese language and so I learned Chinese and then went and spent Scott Mastro under Moscow zoo with two panda's as the United States engages in an ongoing trade war with China and put sanctions on Russia for their annexation of crime enroll my last year there at Stanford Honors Programs at the Center for International Security Cooperation and that was the first time I was exposed to military and security issues I found them to be fascinating one of the most important components of the bilateral relationship and from there they continued on to get my PhD in the topic and to work at peaceful and prosperous world that has continued under US leadership is also jeopardy so in the eighteen years you've been looking at it how has the situation changed officer where I've been actively working on these issues so for me it's a personal passion but it's also a patriotic passion that I really do believe and have believed for quite some time that Act Jinping has met with Putin twenty four times since two thousand thirteen during their June meeting g referred to Putin as his best friend and this is the challenge that faces the United States the foremost challenge and if not managed correctly then not only would US security be at risk but the sort of stable talked about China Russia relationship and I kind of dismissed it and I said that kind of basically looks to Russia for Natural Resources and arms sales and author number of things that have occurred in the past few years that have made me question that original assumption and I think that's actually very important as a scholar China changes so much you really methodically weaves together a Russian and Chinese mutual interest how much of that do you think is driven by BURP think tanks in Washington DC working on defense issues such as rand and CNA s and then joined the military myself about almost ten years ago as a reservist some political support and international organizations but it's really a transactional relationship in China is not interested in anything else and will not be interested in anything else on the political side Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping have meant seven times over the past year and the two of Typically Matt maybe five times a year but they've met twenty four times judgment it's actually changed quite drastically and even small changes can be drastic when that happened for the first time so I even wrote a piece a couple of years ago and China and Russia conducted a joint air patrol in Chinese writings they talked about not wanting Russian involvement in the region and so in this case but there are many countries that feel those pressures from the United States and you don't see the same kind of courtship happening by the Chinese for example if you look at North Korea so that was kind of a enhancement of their security cooperation but even so in my mind that wasn't a huge side right I mean military exercises get difficult for the United States to counter it that's concerning to me do you see the Chinese being the dominant partner or do you see mutuality or how would you how would you phrase it since two thousand and thirteen well she has met with his US counterpart only sixteen times in the same period so they obviously have prioritize this on the political level now contingencies in Asia we might not prevail given Chinese military modernization so even the slightest Russian cooperation even if we're not two thousand eighteen that China participated in and it was the first time the scenario was it kind of counterterrorism scenario but was an interstate war scenario which made it relevant for more active in the security sphere in the region and so this was very problematic because the United States military is already at a point that in talking about Russia fighting with China or full and proper ability or even be sure that standard maybe Russia supports Chinese Taiwan effort with a squadron of fighter so you know I don't know the details of how this you know this joint air patrol took place over the summer but this is the first time that it was like China was inviting Russia to be just trying to cope with us so I think part of it is to cope with us I don't think it's a surprise that China's feeling the pressure of the United States and so is Russia's and reciprocity and the relationship for example if Russia was going to support Chinese goals in Asia militarily that they would demand that China supported assent you're thirty two hundred people to exercise it wasn't huge so I still hadn't changed my mind at that point it really made me rethink the relationship was when Dr in this relationship do you see the Russians being able to sustain the relative technological advantages they've had in military capabilities complicates our planning for the region overwhelmingly doesn't it right so my assessment is I'm not worried about an alliance between China and Russia an international crises that they themselves don't cause so I had previously thought that because China was not going to be supportive of Russia in terms of security cooperate states and involvement with China gives them more influence in Asia which they see to their benefit so the Chinese at least see Russia's a little bit the United States ability to defend its partners and allies in Asia and I think if the trends continue the way that they're going with the China Russia relationships eighteen years active they had relied on Russian technology and technological advancements for a lot of the past couple decades of military modernization but the fact that you even that would complicate us planning significantly and so what it made me realize is that China's going to start using this Russian involvement to me they're no longer looking rush maybe in terms of jet engine propulsion they still are looking to Russia but that's the only area and besides that I see China's a dominant partner and again this is one of the reasons I'd underestimated the significance of the relationship before because I had assumed that Russia would demand gauging in their own indigenous it ovation and obviously trying to take ideas and innovation stealing it from the United States you heard from other Russian experts that Russia knows it has to be a junior partner to somebody and being a junior partner to China is better than you know trying to be a junior partner to the United friendship or a strategic partnership a comprehensive strategic partnership which is the term that China uses to designate the highest level of relations with a country Jose legitimate rising power they see Russia kind of already declined carving a lot of trouble for no reason they don't like to be involved but I don't think it has to get to that level for it to complicate US planning and to threaten our interests even if we just have a close collaborator their goals in Europe and I'm pretty confident in my assessment that China has no interest in getting involved in Russian revisionism in Europe I mean China's sees themselves did you see that as their economy has ground down the debts also applied to their capacity to invest in theory I think from the Chinese person that they don't see Russia and the leading edge anymore and I think that assessment is largely correct whether it's just close friendship or whether it's actually an alliance diets and there were a lot of scholars pointed to a few events that occurred in the past year or two for example there was a big exercise that the Russians held called Boston young show paying southern tour in ninety-one ninety-two and the idea that as they opened up their economy that would lead to opening up there Asian and Europe that the Russians would be unwilling to cooperate with China and Asia but that twenty year patrol signal that assessment was incorrect and that maybe you know that that's going to be an additional factor that we have to consider coming up Dr Master explains why her views on China have changed in the last and their policies and their interests are so dynamic that we always have to keep an open mind to the things that we thought were sacred my logger secret and he do the first person that's in the nineteen ninety s that go navy couldn't sail without having visual range of the coastline and that their pilots couldn't fly at night and so the idea that we weren't paying attention I was just wrong in fact seems to me Deng Xiaoping who had helped found the Chinese Communist Party had no interest in becoming the country and therefore present will bring him into the World Trade Organization would make sense because we get them habituated to the rule of law and now the back on that one and the China you're now studying how has that view changed that's a great question it's hard for me to criticize any decisions that were made it being the idea that the rue engagement we would convince China that they were better off with the United States is number one this doesn't make any sense to me of course China wants to Western democracy in our sense and he had every interest in contract with the Chinese people that said look you get to have an open market for the purpose of creating part of the reason I disorder book China was because I realized that I'd made a series of assumptions starting with the threat not because we missed something because they were not a threat until probably fifteen years ago the Chinese military was so backward could've gone and obviously China went in a more aggressive direction so another thing to point out on the defense side is we weren't talking about China's national security enough wealth that you don't mind US running the country but we're going to still run the country how does your view of the China you started studying in two thousand security threats and with that my own personal views have changed greatly because in the early two thousands even by the sort of two thousand five to two thousand nine his trying doesn't believe in alliances so the form that the friendship takes might be different than what we're used to but the bottom line is what you laid out is this going to complicate timeframe it didn't seem that China was pursuing a strategy in which they're number one goal is to maintain positive relations with great powers like the United States and and post article that posited it generational but for me I'm never disappointed in China China his exactly the way that I predict that they will me into international institutions now we have since discovered that there are number of problematic results from that one I don't know if it's a generational thing there was a Washington he had always kind of thought that was just a poke the United States in the eye and as a security specialist what how was really looking for was significant security cooperation between the two like leverage over countries they started using it at every possible opportunity so we see China exploiting international institutions either rendering issues my primary goal is the protection of US interests and the national security of the United States and our allies and partners so many of the things China does very problematic from it previously because the information that was available is different than the information now I don't think we did the wrong thing by trying to Mesh China into the global economy that perspective but if I were a Chinese draw just I probably be telling them to do exactly what they're doing and so I'm not surprised or disappointed but I think that there are a number of ways islands that's becoming more and more contested I've been doing a lot of interviews with military personnel about this issue of how problematic for example Chinese the ninety s they weren't going to be able to compete with us but now they're dramatically more capable and they've made very shrewd strategic investor against countries whenever they're dissatisfied with something the country has done and we see them more and more being comfortable using their military forces in the region to intimidate them ineffective when they work against China like Human Rights Commission or coopting those institutions for their own personal benefits we see them using economic coercion point that the United States and China could coexist China could rise and we can manage that and then it could be beneficial for I think my own personal view changed reassure smaller countries in Southeast Asia that they weren't going to abuse their power so trying to wasn't engaging in the type of coercion that they engage in now so did seem at that them as a threat made sense they just made improvements that were so rapid and much quicker than we had expected and so I think now yes it took us some time to recognize the things one on the scholarly side I think we're not having the right discussion about the United States deterrent being eroded because of two reasons either scholars have we and I became a bit if someone say more hawkish on China because China's behavior changed all of a sudden once they had the military capabilities to do certain things and they have the economic other countries to concede to they're overly expansive territorial claims because of this I've become less optimistic about the price missile thinking about China's intentions they think China would never use force in the region so the United States doesn't have to be there to deter them or they have an overestimation of us the number one or the region they don't want to be deterred by the United States they don't want to have to listen to the United States when they make decisions and so while working on defense and security see the relationship characterized primarily by tension and conflict between competition between the two sides probably for the remainder of my career what this means is we're projecting power from very far distances and so we have to rely on things like tinkers to be fewer aircraft and that creates one ability that China can target the backs of cooperation and generally positive relations between China and the United States and instead just for realistic and pragmatic reasons we're likely to Tori that's very aggressive it raises the standard and so there are situations you'd think that US president would be unwilling to do that the second thing is just timing trey capabilities but they don't understand the constraints for example of range and how much more vulnerable the United States is because we have to rely on enablers could not sustain the casualties that potentially could be caused in that kind of setting so that being the case they clearly now are stronger substantial actually stronger and are on a trajectory to continue building that strength aren't they say oh yes I mean the trends and not in the US favor right now we're fighting our way in to the area to protect Taiwan and we have to destroy all these air defense systems and on our way increase the political threshold right now the United States if China military says those islands completely it's no longer safe for us to fly in sale there then it was both on the Taiwan straights in the South China Sea and I think my Ezra it's much more than the navy's I think we'd have a very hard time and and since the end of the Cold War they haven't noticed some of the significant military changes and advancements that China has made a defense side people are talking to does it matter that we're not willing to pay the same price because we won't right we won't suffer the casualties that would make us go home and this requires down through the Philippians basically the east China Sea and South China Sea and then the second island change the waters they go from the east coast of those countries to the next Chairman Lancy and so actually if we have parody and military power in Asia the United States is lost because deterrence is a combination of both capability China is projecting power from its own home so it has a lot of advantages and so for many people who maybe have just focused on Iraq or Afghanistan or even US domino yes the United States could take out some of these systems but some of these contingencies like Taiwan contingency China could take Taiwan in a matter of days and in we might not get there in time and so that's an additional complication the last thing is what you mentioned was casualties the United States does not have the level of kind of a first step before a military is even present before we can demonstrate resolve by sailing around or flying around we have to attack what China considers its adequate attention to I think we almost no understanding in the US of the centrality of the Party and the degree to which is about different issues when you referred to casualties that's about the balance of resolve versus balance of capabilities now a military person was eighty something like you know trying to these islands I am resolved and if we have equal capabilities but China's more resolved than our deterrent is weekend so we actually have to maintain a level of superiority and they've militarized and the South China Sea I can just blow them up sure but yes technically that is true but there's a number of problems with that and then the first is that China has what's going on here in China I mean the first thing I've never met Xi Jinping myself but my sense and studying elite politics is that of course these individuals want power tend to over simplify the relationship between the Chinese people and the Communist Party we tend to there are kind of tinpot dictators out there but only but I try to point out to people that Vision Ping's Party has about ninety million members and Donald Trump got sixty three million votes think people you're about enriching themselves and don't care about the future of their countries and the only reason they managed to stay in power is because of the repression of their people that's not exactly on trump versus China available now and auto invite you to join my inner circle a new digital subscription club news and we're just talking about what military strategist would refer to the first island chain is the primary consideration these are the waters between the coast of China and then Taiwan Japan all that China has this is just a fact and we shouldn't we start time convincing China we care as much about Taiwan as they do because we do not have to convince them of is it letroy capabilities in order to maintain our deterrent against China and that's eroding very quickly and that's a huge problem but I think neither party is pain the South China Sea would be and a range of opinion and so I'm trying to figure out why I get this range and and I'll break it down what I think I've kind of discovered there's to see awful on the global stage and that this message Xi Jinping in particular has highlighted the global role and the respect the world will have for China they want influence they want well but they also really do care about the future of China they want to see China continued to rise continued to prosper and to become but they don't find it necessary to be number one in the Middle East or in South America and I I wrote an article about this for foreign affairs in January February issue called us next will discuss what the United States Strategy China should be managing sales finance accounting orders and HR instantly right from your desktop or phone that's why net sweet is the World Hi this is Newt Gingrich after I served as speaker of the House I opened my own business gingrich three sixty agnete sweet dot com slash newt that's net sweet dot com slash nude to download your free guide seven key strategies to grow your Fritz net sweet dot com slash newt edge goes you get what you inspect now what you expect if you don't know your numbers you don't know your business but the problem growing businesses is cloud platform giving you visibility and control you need to grow within that sweet you save time money and on needed headaches as a small business owner I am profit focused and budgeting income staff marketing and sales his key to my success as the doc given all of that what should the American strategy so my personal viewpoint is I do like that we have designated China's district L. Superpower and I say this not that China has limited ambitions but to be a superpower you don't have to dominate every area of the globe even the Cold War the United States didn't dominate every the keeps him from knowing their numbers his there hodgepodge of business systems they have one system for accounting another for sales another for inventory did you competitor I think that is correct you know they're not they're not an enemy they're not an adversary an evil empire personally think that their ambitions at least number one cloud business system and right now that's sweet is offering you valuable insights with a free guide seven key strategies to grow your profits all of this problem and streamline your books looked net suite by oracle the business management software that handles every aspect of your business in an easy to use Lori and so on his sister big inefficient mess taking up too much time and too many resources and that hurts the bottom line too area of the globe you only have to dominate the most important dynamic ones in China has decided that that is Asia and China is very keen to be number one in Asia but I don't think don't promote that but it's just to say that I don't think China on the global stage wants to have the power and influence veto things that the United States does that they don't like Turley a relatively limited to the region that if you gave them everything they wanted if you gave them east China Sea South China Sea Taiwan we'd have nothing to fight about but the problem is given the huge country of billion four hundred million people approximately and a country of enormous work ethic and tremendous organizational skills by their relationship with other countries and so to compete with China focus should not be an undermining China trying to week in China but instead to me is that that is too much right in that puts jeopardy US interests and the interests of our allies and partners it's easy to avoid conflict if you give the other side everything they want and so I don't bother about what is our comparative advantage to counter China to increase our own influence we shouldn't be thinking of doing exactly what China does we have different China is trying to build an exercise power exactly the way that we do which is what made us so delayed in realizing that things like one belt one road it extends beyond that so we are in the strategic competition but in my mind what gives China power influence is it's conferred to them by other countries vantage is the United States needs to get back in the business of being also economic power because being the security partner of choices no longer good enough of this were strategic threat to us because you know building infrastructure and the developing world was not on our list of indicators of things to look for I don't think that we can there's about additional capability but it's mostly about horizontal escalation Asia is the most important region in the world over half of global GDP is there early and economic and political means to do that and not so much in the military one like the United States does the United States has to think dominates Asia is a global power and so it is very very important and when it comes to Russia and China working together Foreign Policy Council I was delighted when the first sponsor ourselves a more attractive partner to improve our own power and influence with all the other countries in the world so one level were almost trapped into having to think about Doc China to do the same things that we do so I think we miss a lot because we assume oh this is the only way to kind of exercise power so they do want to compete globally but they're relying on competing with them worldwide aren't we the nature of power changes over time and what I'm concerned about in the US approaches sort of two things the first is that we assumed do you think that the Chinese Russian dance together as essentially irrelevant from our perspective because if all we're facing is a happy that out but looking at how that would complicate US military operation is it that there are certain capabilities that Russia can provide to China for the two thousand eight meltdown watched as the price of gold and silver went up over three hundred percent while millions of Americans lost their nest eggs in the stock market many Laurean I know that having a balanced portfolio is a very important thing and they offer financial information and background information problematic or is it just that if we fight China then we're fighting both China and Russia technically and that kind of horizontal escalation it's problematic I think at this point we have it here we tailor investment packages to suit any portfolio don't risk the future of your IRA 401k or savings on paper investments he is just a phone call away regional competitor this not like the zone where the Russians are going to be able to apply much additional capability than what the Chinese have part of it I think the bottom line is there's enough evidence to suggest that there might be Russian involvement in contingencies in support of China even if it's minimal that we have to start man cash millions of hardworking Americans lost more than half of their retirement savings many of us still haven't recovered those losses even as the stock market reached record highs delighted to introduce you to the Oxford goal group most of us still remember what happened to our 401K's and IRA's back in two thousand eight during the financial crash in a flat. Ed I'm really delighted you would spend so much time with US thank you next I'm joined by Herman Purchaser founder of the American I really thought it through enough and so in our sort of red teaming war gaming tabletop exercises we always should kind of have now a Russia component of like by calling one eight three three three two seven nine four seven two or by visiting Oxford Gold Group DOT com slash news world financial security others were able to make gains most people had never seen before call the Oxford Gold Group today at one eight three three three two seven nine four seven two that I think is very helpful so whatever you decide to do in the end I think you'll find the information they have is really worthwhile and that's why of which I think go all the way back to the original system of examinations and the real issue confucianism focused on learning and undisciplined on hard work or visit Oxford gold group Dot com slash news world and request your free investor's guide investing in precious metals with the Oxford Gold Group is safe and see protect your retirement and savings with physical assets like gold and silver nobody knows when the next financial crisis will happen get prepared by talking to the Oxford Gold Group the unions seventy times and probably Russia sixty five times maybe have you been in China at least once a year since Newt's world was Oxford Group I love entrepreneurial startups of people who are eager willing to go out and do new and different things and as a history nineteen ninety four how do you see the evolution of the relationship between China and Russia much did you know that while the stock market crashed the price of gold and silver skyrocketed in fact investors who had the foresight to diversify a portion of their retirement and savings before Herman partner is the founder of the American Foreign Policy Council and a longtime friend describe fresh the mission the American Foreign Policy Council well how could Russia complicate or operation of the South China Sea how could they complicate our ability to protect the Senkaku islands with Japan I've tried to attack our ability to protect Russian between Russia and China could cause us some problems and maybe even big problems but I think it's not a durable relationship at tall there's which Chinese historically owned and still covered trying to control the Tory up until eighteen fifty eight and eighteen sixty and they did or two thirds of economic growth there the majority of the world's population is there and so on one hand you can say it's the only regional but on the other hand I would say show by treaty with Russia who had aspirations there but were defeated in the war with China in the Seventeenth Century which you see tends to be more internal repression and more external aggression so I think as long as you have Putin in power tweet travel abroad a lot building jeep relationships in many places how often have you been in Russia I've been in the former Soviet I want so I think that's the first step and then we can come to some sort of assessment about what the main problems are with that type of security cooperation and the best way to counter more than a little bit of reason to think there will be a rupture between Russia and China especially over the territory of eastern Siberia and the Russian Far East mission is to provide primary source information to those who make or influence the national security policy of the United States to that and Russia's going to be a problem not just for strategic reasons but also because of Putin's need to stay in power he's nowhere near as seems to be internally is he still there ten years from now and is there any sense when all of succession pattern you know in China if I'm stronger I mean just think of it today he's moving away from Successful Economic Model State owned enterprises are getting more twenty percent were assessing forty two percent were kicked up by a coup like crew chef or Gorbachev and if you're our we did an interesting study at American Foreign Policy Council of a hundred twenty seven post World War Two dictators of ten million or more capable they will replace him through an orderly process if Putin goes there is no press there is no party there is no structure if you attend to even official churches not talking to underground churches you're forced to sing Communist Party songs during Your Church Service Center now that make the case that there's a de facto military alliance between Russia and China and I think in the short-term corporate you would fall from power you still have Communist Party that has very well organized and we'll continue to roll we'll have somebody very thanks to the ability to choke off intimidate trade that goes through the South China Sea is a big big deal and it's very this power system and efforts were made at the time of Tiananmen Square to diversify power within that system or beaten who then structure that's totally unique to Putin when he goes it may collapse you may have a prolonged power struggle it's very hard to get across exportable the big unknown is what will happen with the generational shift you have now for some decades the brightest minds realization of power is ongoing in China and it remains to be seen to what degree there will be a reaction from other parts of the Communist Party to choose continual path ninety million members of the Chinese Communist Party him of Pretty Fair number who actually think they might achieve is to Americans the scale and the context of the Chinese Communist Party the Party controls everything it's absolutely eleven sir following the collapse of the Soviet Union Russia and China both needed piece so the demilitarized border and both sides China support for freedom of navigation exercises continued how do you see Putin evolving and how long do you think he can plausibly stayed back and the hardliners sensitive had increasing sway and since then you've seen those at want to centralize power like she'd be better future that the system might work so I think morale and China's high I think many of them believe their system is tator and you're looking at those numbers you understand that your future is not assured a tall and is dictator stay a long time you understand that culturally there's a big gap between them and those that are running the show now what that cultural gap will mean in terms of policy when this has left a big impression on them as has the growth of material well-being in China and if you talk to them aver than private companies if you operate a private company and Shino you're now forced to have members of the Communist Party on your board of directors rations of actually recently had a very large training program one of the biggest they've had in recent years with Russian and Chinese troops working endanger from us than from each other what once was a historic enmity between Russia or the Soviet Union and China partly because imperial Dan to get not just raw materials but military technology from Russia Simpson the relationship has lost something then there some people Utah on the Russians over Crimea we've been very tough with the Russians over eastern Ukraine we've had all sorts of sanctions a lot of candidly brought on by the nine people that are the sons and daughters of the party elite have studied in the US have studied in England and studied in Australia and relationship between China and Russia has to be a major concern for American defense planners the fact is that each of those countries thinks they have more nations nonetheless Putin who is a KGB trained agent whose grandfather was the chief Cook for both Lenin and Stalin Russia had stolen much of Siberia from China has been replaced by a deeper sense that the real threat is the United States the we are as the KGB used to say the and I look forward to seeing you again always a pleasure to be with you the emerging trump versus China facing America's greatest threat I describe in detail the new era of competition with Communist rule China Generation's marched through the institutions and when they control China I think that there's an ongoing I wouldn't even hazard a guess the only thing I know for sure is it will be it empire so he looks around he wants an ala he knows that Russia's not strong enough by itself to take on the United States but what if he can develop relationship was using ping on a variety of places and I think that any American planner looking down the road who is not planning for a potential Russian Chinese alliance thank you to my guest Dr Oriana Schuyler Mastro and Herman purchaser you can learn more about the China Russia's strategic huge implications for American national security evolves My new book main enemy and therefore they're working together they're finding ways to cooperate they're cooperating for example in Venezuela the cooperating with military as a country to survive I encourage you to pick up a copy of trump versus China available now have come from a background where he hates the United States he's always hated the United States and he said publicly the greatest tragedy

China United States Russia American Foreign Policy Counci Mastro Assistant Professor of Stanford America founder Dr Oriana Schuyler Wall School of Foreign Service Herman Partner Ed eighteen years ten years three hundred percent five hundred years forty two percent twenty percent fifteen years