19 Burst results for "Aimee Mann"

"aimee mann" Discussed on Ask Me Another

Ask Me Another

04:02 min | 11 months ago

"aimee mann" Discussed on Ask Me Another

"Does it have to be awale. We recommend antagonised with the more popular visage. among the young readers. For instance could not the captain be struggling with the depravity towards young perhaps voluptuous maidens. I'm gonna go ahead and guests moby dick. That is correct. I love. I love that idea. It's very hollywood. does it have to be whale. Can it be sexy ladies instead. Can we now rewrite moby dick with sexy ladies as the antagonised. I think it's i think it's a million dollar idea of fear as fears audio has cut out. Can't hear you fear. I'm back and back. Oh okay when did you cut out of fear we were doing them. Moby dick question. Yeah was that fun. Did you guys have a good time with that answer. Since i was a blast you miss. Maybe the best question. We've done this whole game. Did you talk about the maidens did you talk about the maidens we talked about the made in. We made some hollywood jokes good time. Yeah yeah no middle age made did not not that a maiden okay john right john this former baltimore anchorwoman said that. She was demoted for being too emotional. She said they didn't wanna pay all my contracts so they just kept me on and said we'll put you on this talk show just to run out your contract oprah. That is correct. Well guess. Oh hey who's joining us. This is my daughter. Augustine also known as tug must say. Hi hi chuck. How's it going. Tug is seven and currently completing second-grade online. Now are you learning a lot. Really not really. That's the same imitative. They're not learning now. Nothing happened okay. I'm gonna talk to your mommy for second. Okay okay okay. Here you go. Proving that critics are clueless art critic. Louis leroy called this painter's work impression because looked incomplete. More like amir impression of a scene. He wrote a preliminary drawing for a wallpaper. Pattern is more finished than this seascape monet. Cloud monet is correct and being a lot of trouble. If i that one i think yeah louis leroy or lewis lee roy. I have no idea. But i'm assuming it's louis it just would be just would look like a jerk so typical of the french to have a french pronunciation. French name would hate cubism heated. But no what was coming. I just wanna say live shows are so much easier. Also thank you for being part of the most technically weirdly fraught trivia show. I am a hero. Emily john you guys are the best. Thank you so much for dropping in and play in a couple of games. Thank you so much for having is. This was so much fun and we have two more friends on the line with us. We have power couples. Singer-songwriter composers amy man and michael penn. Hello good morning. how's it going. How's it going. How you guys managing. What kind of pandemic are we having. Yeah what kind of pandemic are you having. Michael has been very productive. He's always working..

moby dick Louis leroy hollywood Moby dick john lewis lee roy oprah baltimore Augustine amir Emily john amy man michael penn Michael
Rocky Pendergast & Aimee Mann Time Travel to Kill Hitler in New Prank Call

The Howard Stern Show

04:48 min | 2 years ago

Rocky Pendergast & Aimee Mann Time Travel to Kill Hitler in New Prank Call

"This time we told her rocky had gone back in time in order to kill Hitler and by the way. Just so you know making a cameo in this call is real life. Lago regular amy man. Oh yes this is big in the This is a very big get in the world of Rocky Pendergast. At no point in this call. I just want to point this out ahead of time. This Kathy Question Rocky's ability to go and time travel ever amazing. She never questions his ability to find and kill Hitler. The whole thing is quite frankly absolutely absurd by the end of this call. I don't even think Hattie knows what planet trees on. But here we go. This is unbelievably. This is just unbelievable to me. It's a saga listen carefully as rocky calls into Kathy and goes back in time to kill Hitler. Oh I am going to take phone calls so let me see with calling. Him Jolly Rocky GS. She's I will run out and searchlights. Okay where you calling from gelling? I would go with the details but as I say I've gone back in time to you. Know to kill Hitler. You're going to kill by the nineteen forties and the the German invasion of Europe. He's off your are traveling. You should see it Kathy. Darling Little Hawk say Tell C. Not Body Whorl Adolf Hitler himself to get on Raucously who speech. You're kidding now. Be careful because by the I've already recused boaty exclusives daily matter of heating a buck. Oh how increased just hitting the dotting all of the most exclusive members of the Nazi high. Come on here. Why just in front of me. I see fast. Who trueblue Klaus Bobby Cisco who could check the vitals? We shouldn't Adolf Eichmann. How Golden Ball in eighteen to death? Dr Joseph Mangla Boo Heinrich in the. And I'm going to kill them. Oh Kathy everyone this and move on. You'll never guess who. I brought me singer-songwriter in Logger. In the incomparable amy. Ma- GLENIS. Hey Rocky Great Party. Can AIMEE Mann so sure. Lamey time travel with you anytime. Darling Amy I had no idea you shawl over killing Nelson. All of you are so down getting this speech ship. Hitler really ready to. It knows your chance. Rocky ooh He'll be careful to yeah and not to spoil. You'll live with Nazi. Get together but this little boy back in run walk. Hang on to these buses getting away. Let me just moving down. You're not you have great rift to the space. Josh me Me Off they ceesay Hello Oh oh I hope. Oh Oh dear well. Let's all send prayers in hugs to him. Jeez I do hope that I exist. I hope I exist and I thank you so much for choosing to listen to live with heavy voice of inspiration and encourage men

Adolf Hitler Kathy Question Rocky Rocky Pendergast Lago Hattie Adolf Eichmann Dr Joseph Mangla Boo Heinrich Josh Aimee Mann Klaus Bobby Cisco Little Hawk Europe Amy I Logger Nelson Raucously
5 Music Podcasts You Need to Hear This Week

Feedback with EarBuds

02:42 min | 2 years ago

5 Music Podcasts You Need to Hear This Week

"This week's theme music a worthy lifelong companion. The curator is Paul or fiscal. The head Honcho music matters much newsletter. Here's why Paul chose this theme he says music is one of life's great joys. Don't ever take it for granted. Granted don't let it wash over you dive in with both ears and your whole brain whenever possible. Here are the podcast and episodes chosen by Paul. Monday's episode comes from Song Explorer and is called Aimee Mann patient zero. It's nineteen minutes long in this episode. Listeners owners are granted a backstage pass to the magical mysterious songwriting process with one of the best song. Writers of her generation. Tuesday's episode comes from Sound Opinions Gins and is called Opinions on Tool Lana del Rey and more farewell to Reco- CASICK and Daniel Johnston. It's fifty eight minutes long in this episode. pull up a bar stool and hang out for a while with a couple of highly intelligent highly opinionated music critics and friends. You'll always be better off for it. Wednesday's episode comes from Pri Arts and entertainment and is called. American icons crossroad blues. It's twenty minutes long in this episode. Robert Robert Johnson is more myth than man at this point. Change that perspective for yourself by listening to this fascinating podcast episode. It explores both the legend and the reality of the mysterious mysterious Blues Guitarist. WHO AS LEGEND HAS IT quote made a pact with the devil end quote down at the crossroads Thursday's episode is from strong songs songs and is called Mr Blue Sky by electric light orchestra? It's thirty five minutes long in this episode. Musician Kirk Hamilton. Is that fun. Super super talented friend. Every true music lover wishes they had in this incredibly entertaining. podcast Kirk presents a strong to his listeners and peels it back layer by layer air to reveal. Exactly what makes the Selecta tune just so special and appealing. You'll never hear Mr Blue Sky quite the same way again promise. Friday's episode comes from the Beatles Anthology podcast and is called Anthology one. It's twelve minutes long in this episode no narrator just an amazing exhaustive dip collection of audio clips of the Fab. Four check out the first of this eighteen episode twenty eight our podcast in addition to hearing from John Paul George and Ringo listeners. Listeners are treated to tons of song snippets from whatever time period. The lads are discussing at the moment a brilliant and intimate historical document of the most famous band ever. Those are the podcast recommendations chosen by Paul for this week's theme music a worthy lifelong companion.

John Paul George Mr Blue Sky Kirk Hamilton Paul Head Honcho Robert Robert Johnson Aimee Mann Lana Del Rey Sound Opinions Gins Beatles Anthology Pri Arts Reco- Casick Daniel Johnston
"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

"It's the perfect activity to go along with listening to podcasts. I'm going to tell you I'm not the hugest jigsaw fan. But you know, who is Amy man. I love jigsaw puzzles because it is relaxing because it takes very little brain power. But it does take a small amount of brainpower enough brainpower is the part of your brain. That would normally obsess about things you can obsess about. Where's that goddamn piece that looks like a weird guy with a with long arms? I think that's maybe my problem with the puzzles is that I can't relax. It doesn't relax me. I think that stresses me out more. Yeah. It's crazy. That's like a game activity that takes more of my brain power. I understand that. It's why I used to like boxing. It was like so you had to involve every part of your brain. And you couldn't afford to relax in any way. So here's the thing. Chance to get anxious about stuff. That's exactly right. You push the exiled out by using your entire brain. Anxious about getting punched in the face. You're a lot less anxious about other more archaic things. That's true. Yeah. It's amazing. What a good clock to the to the jaw can do for just clear in the old brain crystallizes a lot a lot for you for thirty five dollars a month. You get a coffee mug engraved with the maximum phone rocket logo. Guess what? You don't have to put coffee in it. I don't drink a lot of coffee patina, a drink almost no coffee. I would still use that mug. I drink macho t now. Yeah. Yeah. It's working for you. It's good because it doesn't it's got some extra thing. And it's so doesn't make me like super crazy wired anyway, nobody's interested in that. I'm interested in it. Dietary choices Egyptian licorice mint is kind of odd that in it's kind of weird, but you're kind of weird. What do we get for fifty dollars? We get a medal engraved maximum phone membership card personalized your name. You.

Amy man boxing thirty five dollars fifty dollars
"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

"And that's so fascinating. This is one of the things that I you know, across the board across art forms across different personal experiences that I think is becoming clear that I don't know that it would have been able to articulate. Know before we started talking to people about this, which that there are these forms, and we all wanna be the people who don't need the forms. We all wanna be people who can who can just instinctively can virtually riding bolt of lightning to ever. You can take the bolt of lightning and go. What is this bolt of lightning? And then you go, okay. I'll take the bolt of lightning, and I'll wrap it around this thing. Yeah. Or what I was gonna say is that these forms are actually like vessels that help you build a skeleton that you then imbue the soul. Oh, yeah. It's like you animated with the sole. It's not like it's just a science project. My art professor you said I had painting professor that. I have very distinct memory of him saying don't fall in love with the process. I was like fuck you. I love the process now, I understand like, oh now I get what he means. Like the process doesn't matter. If you wanna make commentary about the process that make commentary about the process, but like you have to make the commentary about the process like you still have to have the end result. It can't just be like look at this journey. I took it has to actually be which is what like social media's for, you know, why it's like not it can't ever really truly be like its own art form because it's a journey. It's journal and a journey so streaming networks like ours and other ones I've learned recently that they're just kind of like, you can do whatever you don't have to have a three extra and people are so like get rid of the three extract sugar and. Like everybody else's going like put it it works. It works for research right around and it works for people to watch. It's not we're not making a movie, it has a very long, you know, have a season of television. If you expect people to watch ten hours of something they need to have a ride. They can't be you can't just be on the same path that long like you need a bunch of acts. You can't just be random. You have to you have to understand that there's arcs to everything, you know. I mean, like when you said ride, I was just thinking of literally being on rides and Disneyland, and you know, you get you get an every right and Disney land, you you get you get into structure or whatever. And it's like dot today. You're introduced to the characters like, whoa. There's a something's going to happen. Like, oh, there's a conflict like there's a real peak? That's been no we're going to like it really does. Yes. A three extra. Yeah. Reid. If it either just went on a flat track at the pace that you leave coaster boarding platform from or if it was just immediately a loop. Lupin and then right, Johnny hill. And then like weirdly flat towards the middle and the end. Need that much cool down the road or well not? I know what you mean. I mean, the rotor is the react structure of that is when do you get your legs up under you? But I'm thinking of the ride that has like a bunch of different names. I think the last time I wrote it it was called like the music express or something it looks like a roller coaster, but it just rides on a circular track. If you sit. Yeah. Like it just spins around, and it's like a rotor. It's fun. And then you get on it. You're like. It doesn't do any tiny hills. Just like, oh, this is just you need the DJ in the booth who's going do you wanna go faster? No, I wanna get. Yeah. You know, the I mean inspiration is real, and we don't know everything. So there are other forms to come. You know, there are other forms to come down the pike. But at the same time, the sole does need a vessel. There are in there are working forms that we can use and to continue your Frankenstein, Ian, metaphor science Munster Indian..

professor Disney Johnny hill Ian dot Reid ten hours
"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

"Well, let's talk about the writing a little bit. I am really curious with your wonderful show. Take my wife. Thank you you. And Cam were both pretty active. I mean, I'm obviously during your writing and filming seizes you weren't out on the road doing comedy jumped around a lighted season. We did because we didn't know what we were doing are like, oh, we shouldn't have been doing this. But nobody told us we shouldn't. We just did. Well, what was the head you written for a scripted show before not at all? I hadn't even written a sketch. Well, I had never opened final draft. Well, no, not at all not one bit. I don't even have a specific question. I just need to know because I 'cause writing, you know row. Yes, script or something. I can't even imagine. So I am what happened. Well, we hired a really incredibly talented head writer Shana mcgarry who is just her understanding not only of the format of television. But also, the like emotion of television, like how her understanding of story and how how it fits all of those things is just like tremendous. And so if it wasn't for her it also the other writing staff, which was we had two additional writers in a rhetoric assistant. So like. Luckily, the thinking is you don't technically write the script per se in like I didn't have to like learn formatting day one or anything, but I definitely had to run very quickly alongside other people going like how does this work kind of thing? What was so what would be the process like what would like to write your show? I mean, how did we how did you do it? The nutso thing about our show is that we wrote it in a sensually we developed it in Rhode it. That is to say we outlined a season of television, which was only six episodes at twenty two minutes per per episode. But this is still a lot of information. In six weeks, which typically let's say a television show, just pulling these numbers out of my butt, ten episodes gets twelve weeks to write and develop. It does not seem like a lot. Yeah. The even that doesn't seem like a lot. So we did the work of that in four weeks with like half of a staff that you would you would typically have like probably eight people for that room. So how do you start you start with an outline like like, basic? I mean, worry what we did was. Well, everybody came to our stand up show. So they saw us doing stand up together. And then we told stories for like two days about our experience moving here because that's the we set up the time frame that we wanted it to be we told those stories people took notes than our head writer was like all right. This is how I see us going getting from point a to point b do you guys like point aid you like point B, and we were like, yes. Figured out those other points like what is the? Journey that they're on together. What is the journey that Cameron is on what is the journey that RIA is on? And so we like figured out our ace story or be story, and our C story, and then figured out additional people for them to interact with how do they fit into the world. And then that just is the formula that we used for the whole thing to make sense. See I I mean, I know this is very inside baseball. Once again baseball is your thing. But this is is just so at baseball fascinating to me that that you put your personal stories and totally the your, you know, people, you know, and characters, you know, and things that happened to and, and you, you know, you can dress the skeleton right with with your personal emotional things, and it and it works and it holds up like it makes a makes a complete creature..

baseball Shana mcgarry writer Rhode Cameron twenty two minutes twelve weeks four weeks six weeks two days one bit
"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

03:03 min | 3 years ago

"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

"I'm just talking into the microphone because I naturally do it. Hello. I'm Amy, man. And I'm Ted Leo. And you are listening to the art of process house. My level have me really soft. So people have to pay attention to your voice more just by sheer volume. What give me that look? It's a look that Sears through the radio waves. You don't crunching yet? I was just eating a very crunchy rice cracker, which is the best kind of podcast cracker. It's better than all, gene. Because it doesn't dry your mouth. I went saw somebody at a party bet. Someone else that he couldn't eat it small stack of Sultan. So my like in ten seconds at a time. It was like, I don't know an inch and a half tall. Oh, it wasn't a whole sleeve. No. It was not a whole who wasn't also if it was like, maybe an inch maybe two inches tall. It was like a, you know, but you would definitely go. Yeah. I could eat that. Now, what happened was this person was annoying? Okay. And I think the person who bet the other person was tired of this person being annoying. And he knew that the guy would not be able to do some salting knowledge. He had some salty knowledge that I could've told this guy when somebody bets you that you can't eat a staggered saltines. You should probably just ignore that. There's a reason you can't. And I think what happens is a certain amount of saltines will dry your mouth completely right? And you will not be able to chew or swallow or talk, which I think might have been the point the whole thing slick. Wow. I knew a person once who insisted that if you eat assaulting have it in your mouth and then take a sip water. You get a flavor burst as he would call. It is the first of all. The term flavor burst with saltines is hardly. Burst a new flavor or more of the flavor of like a glue e pasty salt glue. I don't know. And I don't think it was ever. I don't think he ever really expanded on what kind of flavor that can be a new flavor boost burst sleepers that's really dumb, plus their gluttony. And you know, me I can't gluten. No. Yeah. That's right. That's why we're having a rice crackers. I like rice crackers too. I was I was raised on rice crackers. I mean, it's been over fifteen years since I have not been able to eat gluten. So at this point, I Mike. Hey, I'll if it's got if it's if it's starchy at all. And it has some salt bring it on. You know, I have the had the opposite. Because I had silly AC is a baby. Wow. So grew out of silly AC. Yeah. Yeah. I couldn't tolerate dairy or when I was a child like when I was a baby. So we're talking like, you know, hundred seventy and I had to have like rice milk and rice crackers instead. And he was pretty hard to find back, then Italy special you on all that imposs-..

Ted Leo Sears Italy fifteen years ten seconds two inches milk
"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

04:11 min | 3 years ago

"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

"And the curved line along the back of the leg tells you that that's sort of like where the muscle is. And you get pressure in shape in as few lines as possible. Other people will describe it with more. But I like simplicity so things like I used to really hate when characters would turn to the side and in anime in their mouth would sort of appear to be floating on the side of their face. But now that I've been working in animation. I love that because it has a very functional purpose of being able to still get the the clear image of this mouth on the still image of the profile of face without having to warp all of the edge of the front of of his we do both things. Like, sometimes we'll have it float on the sides will have it open in the front, but I really appreciate both choices. Now. It's not. It's not wrong to me the way it used to be. It's just a way to let you see and understand mouth on face. Yeah. That's fascinating with the interest in in simplicity. Was that? Always there did you play around with different styles that were more complicated. And also like is that partly limitations, or or or is it all choice or not to suggest? Not insulting. Limitations. I think about my own style. Like, I really liked simplicity. I like a really simple base approach. You know, having said that I can't say it's not influenced partly because I'm just not a person who can go like flabby blabbity. Oh, yeah. I mean, when I was doing comics, I was really interested in detail, and I would get so into really into wrinkles on faces. Like, I I wanted to make work that uglies, not quite the right word. But I didn't want it to be pretty I wanted it to be physical. I was really into clampett cartoons and just like visceral folds of feeling that you could grab onto these characters. And I would really go overboard with draping in folding draping. Sort of things pressing two got really into like when you sort of close your arm like the shape that gets made by the above your elbow, by the muscles on your arm. I would like really describe that. And now, I think like who needs to know what's going with that really. It's not. But I was really into that some reason and just every strand of hair, I wanted to draw every strand of hair, I would spend when I was working on comics. I would had some pretty unhealthy habits. I would stay up all night. I remember. There was one that right? Stayed up all night and justed the hair on one one person's head all night, just to get every strand of hair, those there was a real shift between forest and trees, and at some point really maybe the forest is a little more important than individual leaf on each individual tree. I have a question about that. As it relates to conceiving a season of show like Steven universe. While obviously the plot goes through from one to wherever it. Is now each episode usually resolves the issue, the conflict or whatever. So how do you write thinking of both the forest and the trees in that regard? I mean, we go macro micro all the time, and I'm sort of working on a lot of different episodes at different stages of completion all the time. So when I'm writing new episodes, we always have to take a big step back. And we plot what the story is within that one episode. But then also why that's important for the over-all arc. I make a lot of charts and timelines and a lot of times they'll be an episode that's four something. But you won't know what it's four until twenty or sometimes fifty episodes later, you'll be like, oh that was there to set this up because you need to know this in order to know that and that's all done by essentially gritting out what you need to know when in order to slowly uncover this info. So there's a high level of organization that has to happen. I mean, did you feel? I feel that way that you know, have to be reasonably organized before it can be creative. That chaos does not really help..

Steven
"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

"And then everybody looked like this stay puffed marshmallow man laying. No, nothing. There was no contrast. And we kind of would just keep drawing them until we re arrived at that visual interest because it just works for a reason. We're gonna take a quick break. And we'll be back with Rebecca sugar. Is there a dull Anna car out of bar on the street? I'm Allegra Ringo. A small dog owner, my stash show house when she's excited, and I'm really covert a big Doug owner my dog tugboat tips over when he sleepy and we co host a podcast called cap at your dog airs every Tuesday, we bring you all things dog. Yes, dog news dog tech dogs. We met this week. We also have pretty famous guests on but legs. We're not gonna let them talk about the projects. Just want to hear about those dog. We don't wanna hear about your stuff only dogs. So join us every Tuesday on max fun. One of the other questions that we ask people because I feel like this is so important in a creative persons formative years is imitation. Like, if there are people that, you know, you directly imitated or you know, like there was like a negative imitate. Like, I'm not going to do do that specifically. But we're there people that that you imitated, and you know, in whatever sector, you know, the story or drawing or whatever oh sure I was big fan of Dunin Vasquez and invader ZIM, and I drew like him. And I was a big fan of one piece AMI one piece each Rhoda. So I would kind of made sort of a hybrid look from the two things before I decided to reject all things that was pre rejecting. All. Yeah. Yeah. The younger back then I was like I wanted to have a style. And I would see the styles, and I would say, well, I like, I like this person style, I want, you know, I want to do something like this. And then. When I went through rejecting everything was like, I can't just copy other people's styles. I think the way that I got out of it was ultimately realizing that it's not style so much as I'm looking at a series of choices that someone made for a reason. And once you start to understand the reason you can come to the same conclusion, you're not taking the surface decisions that were made into imitating without understanding them. Once you understand why someone made those choices knowing the why lets you agree with those choices that is really really interesting. I never thought of it that would in. I think it's when you're younger it's easy to get caught up in like, no, I just want the surface thing. Like just I want to be able to consider myself an artist or a singer, whatever what are some of those choices do kind of consciously. Remember that or it has to be in the moment. Let's see sort of like how many lines it takes to describe a leg. You know? I think you can do it in like five five lines. You can get like whole lower part of. Of a leg. Like how much detail you need in order to describe something or something like straight versus curve like why that choices made like you can get that idea of like if you're standing apart of your legs, taking the weight of your body ended the straight line meeting the curve of the top of the foot tells you this is where the pressure is..

Dunin Vasquez Allegra Ringo Rebecca sugar AMI Anna Doug
"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

"It's like the first time he is really hiding something from them. But it's he's doing it because he loves them. And it really changes everything from that point on because he starts to keep things from them that he thinks will make them upset, and that's become a really big problem. But the whole show is full of people doing things for what they think are the right reasons, and they're not the smartest things. But there let's it ruinous. Impetus ruins. I want to ask some questions about the structure of storytelling because I'm really fascinated. How people tell us story. I feel like I'm really bad at it. Like even telling a joke like how do you set it up? How do you build tension? How do you resolve it like where does that were those things fit in? Did you study structure or writing or is it intuitive? Or how how did that come to be part of you? Yeah. I mean, I studied filmmaking when I was in school let me to lot animated short films. But I feel like I would tell stories through comics and just by seeing feedback on the things would make sense, the people wouldn't make sense the people seeing what would resonate. I would tend to expect whoever was reading my comics to like really read between the lines and understand everything. And I think of learn to make things a lot more clear, especially 'cause I'm writing for kids. And were there was there point where you thought here's a bit of a formula. You know, the story works better when you. You put x over here. And then why in front of that? Or is it still more intuitive? Or yet? I think I try to really go with my gut feeling because I wanted I never want to do anything. That's can't like I wanted to something that's really on. But I definitely noticed just from cataloging everything that I really enjoyed the kind of build up that would have to happen, and you know, catalysts and climax and fallout and Dana Mont and all that I would start to notice in movies. Just how critical it was to really understand the relationships between characters like, I remember noting noticing this about him the movie robots there's blue-sky in the movie robots and people are fighting a bad guy that they've never actually met before. And then everyone parties at the end, but you don't certain people don't even know each other like em like everyone really has to have a connection see understand why they're coexisting. And I think Lindell from video games to because I really loved the ochre enough time Zelda game when I was younger and I loved that. It was all very personal like gin personally. Hurts you when your child steal away right in front of you in some of the other games..

Dana Mont Lindell
"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

"Yeah. And trenchcoats have like very expensive trenchcoats. I think you would she you sort of a cheap some of that. I mean, more than me and my curly hair. Anyway, you do have a lot of nice scarves. I mean, you're you're known scarf wearer. Well, we do put some wigs on you in both videos, although I've done the long curly hair wig. There's still time to put you in a wig along curly wig, Ted always time. Always for me to be the adult that I wanted to be. So the podcast today. A Rebecca sugar. I just think she's so fascinating does so many different things. And also, she's apparently big fan of my music, which I sense a little bit of jealousy on your part. And I'm wondering since I know that you are editing the episodes, I'm wondering if he left any that. And so I just wanna make sure that gets in at the beginning. Well, you know, what you'll have to listen when this eventually comes out and see I'm not even gonna send you you will listen you will enjoy the Melih fluid voice of. Rebecca sugar who we all know from work with venture time. And of course, our own creations Steven universe, which has been on the Cartoon Network for five seasons now and for those who haven't seen it. This is probably a good time for me to tell you about it. It's an incredibly charming ongoing story about a number of aliens who represent the harnessed powers of certain gemstones, one of them along with human has created a hybrid child named Stephen. And while they're trying to stave off whatever dangers are being flung at earth from the outer reaches of the universe. They are also trying to figure out what it means to be family, and how to raise a conscientious compassionate human being who may wind up being extremely powerful. And it's my impression that they're trying to prepare him. So that when he comes into his power, he will in fact know, how to use it. And when you have listened to us discuss all that and more and just for the sake of clarification, you meaning you me and the audience us, meaning you. And Rebecca sugar, then you will see if any of that, Amy man praise content gets left in the episode. I'm just just making sure that the people know, you know, on the on off chance that you have a heavy hand in the know. Are leaving tape on the cutting room floor. I hope you're proud of the adult that you've become. I'm going to go put a scarf on my head now and then come back, and we'll talk to Rebecca sugar. Welcome to you Rebecca sugar. And I want to jump on something we were talking about before we began recording, which is the broad appeal of Steven universe and it being mainly geared toward young people. But also designed at the outset for adults to find something in or is it just that it winds up being smart and funny enough, and I'm not just I'm not just saying that that adults find something in it..

Rebecca sugar Steven Ted Stephen Cartoon Network Amy
"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

"And record. Can we do one two three again heart to one two one two three? I'm I'm trying to watch that does not gonna that will at the same time. So don't use it to. Yeah. Three. Welcome to the art of process. This is Amy man. And I'm Ted Leo. Maybe it's twenty nineteen. Sure is Ted we walk into the mirror. Little to say about twenty nineteen. Did you honest question for you? Did you ever picture living in twenty nineteen? Now, let's just feel back to curtain for our listeners. We're both of a certain age, we weren't born. You know, we're twenty nineteen was at least in the frame for me. If I mapped it out. I would I would say, yeah, I'll probably live through twenty nineteen but it's not something ever pictured. Yeah. I couldn't picture. I mean, numbers wise the year two thousand sounded so crazy to me. But you know, that circle Ted, and it goes around. I'm not sure what time is a flat circle is supposed to mean. Does anybody know what it means? And we're all pretending. I feel like I knew what it meant in the moment that I heard Matthew mcconaughey as say that you feel like it means something, and then you've examine it and you're like, I don't right not show. Singularity time is a point is appoint not the same singularity. And the one one is the universal saw flat circle is two dimensional a point. It is one. I've just told you all know about the dimensions. I'm sorry. I can't I lost her connection again. Well, I kept talking about dimensions, man. And it was pretty cool. Good. I'll go back and listen and use it. Then I tell you one thing about the year two thousand for me that I've just feel like you might find interesting when I was younger pictured myself in my thirties. Do you know that I always pictured myself with long curly hair? Nah. I don't know. Why? That's weird. Yeah. I pictured myself like deep in some grad school somewhere in some library at night with the light on. I had like seventies long curly hair. And how you my sleeves rolled up, and I was digging into some large tome of some letting your freak flag. It sounds a little like the seen it all the president's men where they're going through the library of congress card catalog. Maybe I somehow saw that before I was old enough to legally. I mean, not not that. I couldn't handle it. This is this is your idea of what being grown up was like being a grownup FINA. Grownup lady to me, probably look like what's her name in the Thomas Crandall fair Faye? Dunaway. FA Dunaway in the Thomas crown if it out right scarves. Nice scarves. Yeah. I'm gonna wear scarves coats..

Ted Leo FA Dunaway Matthew mcconaughey Thomas Crandall Amy president Faye
"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

"But we don't really have those conversations of what if we took a different approach and focused on helping provide job opportunities to an underserved area, and helping to make sure that there are the educational opportunities. But also that there are buses that are running on time. So that people could get to those jobs that the subway is. Is serving them in a way that we would expect it to serve people on the Upper West side. And that like, even as a thought experiment feels like what if we tried and just in this city alone. There is a training facility for the NYPD that cost almost a billion dollars. And you have to wonder while New York has the biggest police force in the country is a billion dollars is that what we're putting the value of training for safety and security is it worth a billion dollars. And is that then the standard by which we should measure safety, insecurity across his country that it should be somehow comparable to a billion dollars in every city. And so I think yeah, there's something about that that feels like that can't be the only option, and if the all that billion dollars had been spent to create opera. -tunities and social programs and resources in east New York in the time at the build that training facility if that billion dollars had gone to a community like Brownsville, I'd be curious to know in three years, if we looked with the crime rates be the same that they are now would the median income be the same as it is right now would the homeownership levels, the those various things would they be the same. Or would we be looking at Brownsville and saying, oh, you know, what from a crime statistics standpoint? It's now not that different than Chelsea this root causes question that there are Jason similar conversations happen at maybe it's just in my bubble. But I'm I'm interested to see what happens with younger people eventually getting elected into offices at all levels, cities state federal. At least again, maybe just in my bubble. But these stories that are meant to be feel good about like all these people on the plane chipped in because they overheard. This teacher talking about our school was underfunded end people are at least starting to like what will like this isn't a feel good story. This shitty story, we need to we need to talk about the root causes of. Yeah. People are just have this persistent feeling in this country that whatever happens to you is somehow your own faults. Let in they keep handicapping people. So as to prove somehow that that's right. You know, when I was ten years old. I was bused to school that was ninety five percent black and huge classroom with five books for thirty five people. And you know, I saw how the kids who were there had come from others elementary schools where they were also the same conditions existed, and it was constant stress and at the age of twelve I was like, I don't know what you're talking about. This is not an equal situation because I've come from school where everybody gets a book, and it's quite in the classroom, and you know, it's happening, and there's some kind of regimentation, and when you look at neighborhoods that changes have occurred in, you know, we we talk about the effects of gentrification, and you can look at parts of New York that people say, oh, I remember twenty ten years ago. Like, you couldn't walk down the street there. And now the schools are better. But it's a capitalist driven model of revitalization. And we never have the conversation of what is the actual cities role in both revitalization. But also in making sure that those communities don't deteriorate in the first place. Whether it was redlining weather industry, leaving whether it was governmental discriminatory practices budget cuts. Whatever it is. What is the city's role in that? And why is the idea of neighborhood revitalization?.

New York Brownsville NYPD Chelsea Jason billion dollars ninety five percent twenty ten years three years ten years
"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

05:26 min | 3 years ago

"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

"Wherever you get podcasts tied. You were asking about the show and just dedicating ten episodes to a subject again goes to this idea of like there's enough interesting things in this subject, and in this idea that we don't have to just crumple it up and throw it away after five minutes, we can live in it. We can dissect it from a bunch of different angles and perspectives and find so many fascinating things in a subject, and the hope of all hopes is that. Yeah. Audience appreciates it and his in engaged, but even in the process of doing it. I felt like as we were making it. We were all very much engaged and thought, oh, yeah. We do fifty episodes on on the subject of policing in America and still have another hundred that we will. Like how we wish we could have done those and for the people who it isn't immediate concern for there is work that they are doing there's work that they would like to see get done. And they oftentimes have the most interesting perspectives and ideas, and those often aren't rising above the polarized conversation. And so you wanna highlight those voices, and when you get somewhere on the ground, and you are talking to people who have real skin in the game. So to speak. They still have hope and they are not hopeless in the way that sometimes the large angry conversation can present hopelessness and a bleakness to it. And so to me, that's I think the interesting part of it in the first episode. We went to just out side Saint Paul Minnesota where fl. Custodial was killed by police officer. And one of the fascinating things. There is his uncle has joined the volunteer. Police department in an attempt to try to both be a constant reminder of what happened to his nephew. But also better understand how this operates and do something within to create change. And then there are people outside of that who whether they knew flannel steel, personally or are just residents who are finding other ways working to create community programs that help people who like flannel, custodial might have been the victim of a lot of pretextual traffic stops over, you know, minor fines and things like that. And so there are all these people who are doing this work where when you look at it in that very focused way. It feels like there. There's a reason for some hope because there is change that is while it's incremental it is still happening. It's just not getting attention over the shouting. And that's at least shifting the conversation towards trying to make change and trying to do something beyond simply shouting at one another finding that nodes of hope in focusing on them, those women who said something in the rope episode the community policing leasing episode which I thought was really profound in. She was asking a question, you know, working on community policing labor working on having police be an integral part of this neighborhood. But what does safety really look like would actually is safety is the solution. Police right. And I wonder if after the end of this first season, if you have a if you have a different sense of that than when you went in. It was really is. Opening to go through the season. One just to kind of hear different people talk that woman that you're talking about that was genetic l z and yes, she lives in Saint Louis area in Ferguson believe what she had said as yeah. Like, what is safety main wide? Is it always have to mean, the police, and I think there is something to be said for that. Because you can talk about putting police neighborhood or you can talk about how resources get allocated and just when you start looking at resource allocation, the levels of crime that exist in more affluent neighborhoods versus the level of crime that exists in low income neighborhoods that don't have the same resources, it's starkly different. And you know, we never society have the conversation of instead of it being just police, let's put those resources into Mang. Sure that there are. Streetlights making sure that there are schools that are at the same level of of quality that we expect throughout the city. Let's make sure that there are the proper social services whether it's social workers interacting with homeless mentally ill people like why does that have to be a police officers responsibility. Even just dealing with a homeless person in general, why is it that falls on a police officer when perhaps a social worker might be more helpful brab someone who can help with job training and job placement..

officer Saint Paul Minnesota America Saint Louis fl Ferguson five minutes
"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

"I have a question is sort of go further back were there people that you imitated or that you took things from that you can sort of still hear in your voice like that cadences reminiscent of so in. So I think when I started out there definitely a lot of comedy specials that I would watch and look at and study, whether it was someone like Chris rock taking a social issue or political issue in breaking it down or looking at someone like Alan too, generous where she had such a great sense of play with the audience where she kind of start something go on a tangent and come back to it. And it all felt both in the moment that she was a little scattered, but also fully in control or Richard Pryor's ability to tell stories, and so there's definitely a lot of that that I feel like I was looking at. But I think I was also trying very. Hard not to emulate. So oftentimes if I was writing jokes, if I found myself veering into someone's voice, it Ben became a how do you get it out of there? And then I think for me than the question becomes why do I find this interesting? What is it about this that specifically matters to me an how then can I personalize it for myself when I first started doing stand up I went to a standup class. I think it was maybe like a ten week class in I dropped in and out of the first class. But the one the one thing that I feel like the teachers said that did stick out was if you make something personally, yours, no one can steal that. That's your story. And so maybe I should have done all the the other nine weeks because that was actually very profound thing to share week. Wow. One. I was kinda like all right? Got it. Yeah. But I it was it was very meaningful thing to here as far as yet. If you're just writing jokes, very easy for someone to just steal a joke. But if you can somehow personalize it and make it yours than it has your DNA on it. And it becomes a much more challenging thing. Why do you have a memory of the first time where you were on stage? Rely on my God, I can really do this. I'm really good at it. I don't know. I feel like there's a moment that I can think about where I didn't have knots in my stomach anymore. I remembered anytime that I would go to a venue. I never been before. I would get knots in my stomach, but the places I'd performed three or four times. Like after the first time, it was, okay. I feel a little more comfortable here. And so there were places like the Hollywood improv. I did a lot of shows there. And so after a while, I got very come. Trouble just going on that stage. And then somebody would say, oh, hey, do you wanna do a show the comedy store, and it'd be like sure? And then I would feel. Yeah. And it was like this very odd thing of ally. Now to get comfortable in this space, or hey, there's a show at m bar in the first time, I think I did something there was like my stomach hurts. And then the moment that oh, I don't feel this anxiety going in to me that felt more like, okay, you can do this. If you're not feeling that anxiety with every show that you do and I feel like it was like those little moments of less. Okay..

Richard Pryor Ben Chris rock Alan Hollywood nine weeks ten week
"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

"And I remember one of the first things when I came to New York, I got asked to host a show for Siham J. And it was a hip hop show and the performers that were going on at the start of the show, it it, you know, to see him Jay things. So they're all these industry people, but they were in the very back, and they're all just hobnobbing in you know, doing all that and their land and the show is ready to start and this guy. I remember I had to introduce me first act, and it was like all right? Everybody shows getting start. Nobody's paying me any mine. They're just talking and this guy who I'm sure was thrilled. He came from California to perform EM, Jay. And I remember watching him and he's wrapping. And so he doesn't even. Have a band with him or he's he really just he's got a backing track. And he's got his voice, and he's just trying to sell it and trying to sell it. As though all those people were not having loud conversations. And I just found myself thinking like, oh, man that is that is what makes being a musician so much more challenging is as a comedian. If I was in that situation. I could just comment on it or something, and he still has to do the music. And that's where I always feel like I have such respect for musicians the idea that. Yeah, you don't get to you. Don't get to pick. When to turn it off, or on will you there's something specific about hip hop with that too that I I would say it's even harder because I've certainly been in either at shows or like if you're playing like a college or some, you know, non traditional music venue with a hip hop group or rapper something in the sound isn't. Quite right. Like the tracks. Just a little too. More person trying to trying to sell this. If it's a guitar honestly in situations like that sometimes what I do. I'll get super quiet day will start to notice and Golic. Oh, we should stop talking now. And that actually got a works, and it's shaming right in kind of funny way. Sometimes. But if you're rapping, you can't really do that, you know, you gotta track. That's like at a set volume in tough. Yeah. Mostly I just plow forward. I mean, I think it's an advantage. Like, we're not dependent on a certain amount of attention. I mean, if people don't laugh like you can't like at least they sort of have to clap just a reflexively after a song. So, you know, I mean, sometimes I'm like whatever I'm just going to plow through its paid rehearsal. If it's my own show, and there's like one table gabbing. I've told people to be quiet, but that's not that fun..

Jay New York Siham J. California
"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

"So I don't seem like a weirdo muttering to himself on the sidewalk. You never know these days because of bluetooth headphones and things who's who's a weirdo muttering substantive rightness conversation. I do I did when I'm working on a song. I carry it around, and I sort of saying, you know, singing my head or try to listen to it as if it's somebody else's song. Like, what would I want that other person do? Try to get some perspective. Because when you're tired of you do this too. But when you're playing through a song, you tend to rights and to go back to core progressions or wherever just that my hand is used to play or ways amused to approaching song. So if I can just listen to my head, it's more like what do I want here? It do make sense. But I yeah, you walk around with it. And it kind of you know, no, will you walk away from it for a little while. And then try to listen to with fresh ears. It just depends on Keno. If I'm more coming up with stuff than I as long as I can. But if I'm stuck on it, you know, if I don't know where like the bridge should be kinda sing it to myself. And it's hard to get away from kind of like, that's what's in my world until it's done. The does come point where where I have to walk away from things I've had stuff that I've literally put aside for almost ten years like a hook that new. I couldn't completely trash, you know, couldn't. Out how to build something around as lingered. Yeah. For many many years in eventually found the thing that really works for me finding too. So Ryan songs for a record. For instance. If I say, I set a timer for fifteen minutes, I go I'm gonna work for fifteen minutes in that is my day's work. And because if you really start stressing in hammering and straining at something, it's I don't think you're you're gonna ever get anything. Good. And after fifteen minutes, if you come up with something then you're excited, and you want to keep working on it. So, you know, my measure of success is very very modest fee. Like, I did a day's work today. Like, I did it. We're gonna take a quick break. And we'll be back with our guest. Hello. I'm Oliver Wong, DJ scholar and journalist, and I'm Morgan relative music supervisor and stiletto devoting, and we.

Oliver Wong supervisor Ryan fifteen minutes ten years
"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

"A longtime stand up comedian, host of night train, New York. He's got a show on HBO called Watson ex problem areas that had an amazing first season, which we talk about in this episode and this spring, hopefully, not too long after here. This the second season will begin. I want to say one thing about the format of these podcasts as well. I thought to begin recording before we actually said, let's begin because you never know what might come up a conversation something that might be useful. So this jumps in the middle of talking about Billy. Joel. I don't really remember. Why? Why? But it leads into some stuff that was relevant, and then becomes part of the logger conversation. So just go with us with Billy Joel, I think I think that was that we were talking about how is especially difficult for comedian to try new things because there's no pigeonhole like a comic pigeonhole. And so then we started talking about musician pigeonholes and pigeonholes general. Yeah. So onward. You know, you just can't imagine like Billy Joel would write classical music like that snow that second happen. I mean, maybe we don't want that to happen. But still like who's to say like, maybe it's classical music is amazing. I don't know why I was thinking about that with Stevie Wonder because he made the secret life of plants and it came after two or three really critically successful albums in. Everyone said, oh this record is tariff on. But what it was was a score to a documentary where he can't see the documentary. They're just explaining to him what's going on. And he's using that to then create music, and when you think about in the moment people like why would you do such a thing and what a failure? And the reality is, no, it's such a cool experiment. Let the guy the guy go off script for a minute to like, even if it didn't have the rest of that back story to it. Right. You wouldn't afford someone the opportunity to just try something. Yeah. You don't get to dip into the underground though. Once you're making people money. Next was by which you were going to be judge. Right. But what often gets lost in that is an album like InterVision would not have existed if he hadn't experimented that way. Right. No one else was making that records. So and it could have been a follow flat on your face failure. But the reality was people were like is it amazing album? We love it. And that's what I feel like oftentimes gets lost in the things that people wind up seeing as failures. When in fact, they were creative endeavors that the creator probably learned a lot of things from and it feels like as a musician. Maybe you're not as directly overseen by like networks and production. Entities. You may be have a label that to have to answer to. But at least from the outside looking in at feels like it's not as much. There's a development executive who wants to give notes on your thing and rights clearances. They have notes and your agent or manager has notes, but that's from the outside looking in. I think that's what makes it seem so attractive. I mean, I certainly experienced that when I was on a label, and that's why I'm not on a labeling more. It's a nightmare scenario. I mean, that's you know, you're a situation where there's several different tiers of notes. That's mad name. We let's jump that. We are recording. All right. Fortunately, so what's an analogous situation? Do you wind up bumping up against people wanting you to be your daily show correspondent forever? Oh, sure. When I first got on the daily show. I would then in hiatus go and do stand up, and you'd go you do the show and afterwards, there might be some interaction with people who would say, oh, we thought you were going to be the daily show, and well, I know how that would work. Yeah. So I do think there is that level of expectation that right all of these jobs you've done we want to see some variation of that. Or some version of that? If we come see you live, but also sort of mmediately after the daily show, I never got a bunch of movie parts or TV parts or any of those things..

Billy Joel Stevie Wonder HBO New York Watson executive
"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

03:23 min | 3 years ago

"aimee mann" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

"I'm Amy, man. And I'm Ted Leo. Welcome to the art of process, creative process in itself is kind of art form. There are a lot of structures that underpin creativity in a way that people don't usually talk about. And that's what we're interested in genus exists. But we don't care. That I guess that's our. That's our mission statement is if you're genius you got it covered. And you don't need us. We wanna know what happens when you're looking at a blank page looking at a task grown assignment and have to get down to work genius. Or creativity is comprised of a lot of different elements and the ones that really get short shrift, our organization practice learning from other people and imitating because you know, you can't control the other part. Like, I don't know a song just exists in ether. I pluck it out of the sky like a good for you. It doesn't work that way for the rest of Amy, and no you got some inspiration for this idea from some of your conversations with the poet Billy cons. That's exactly when this dates from we were invited to this poetry event at the Obama White House because the current White House would never have such a thing. There was a seminar with high school students, and these poets, and I was lucky enough to be included. But the high school students were asking questions like, you know, how do you find your own voices? Oppo it, and he said master the form because nobody knows who you are. Nobody will care what. You have to say yet. But if you mess to the form they will come for the form because if they love poetry that's part of what they love about it in just inevitably your own voice will emerge over time. And I was just really fascinated by that. Because if you're the kind of advice as the other way around my be yourself and believe in yourself, and who like I don't know what that means. Right. But everybody has antecedents and trying to figure out how to express your own individual voice. I mean, nobody's Nell walking out of the woods with a self created language. Was that like that Jodie Foster Nell, I didn't know I didn't say, but it's like the various Farrell will. Yeah. Yeah. Fear. All the fear of children is visit hero children of the world. Furor children of the world. So yeah, a podcast you, and I eighty were very smart in not getting in early on this game did not get in on the ground floor. Not got in on like that forty second floor. We waited until scaffolding erected the concrete of import regard been bent. All elevators were. And we didn't have to take the stairs and very happy to be part of the max fun family. I have yet to meet max. But I hear his son. I'm not entirely sure that it's not actually Jesse thorn under some pseudonym as anybody seeing them as long as it's max. And it's fun to the podcast fun town episode one if finding max. As a stupid. We're not going down this path. But we will be interviewing a lot of people over the course of the season full disclosure. A lot of them have already been done a one of our ways of doing this has been around our own touring and traveling. And so we brought our microphones to people. There's a little bit of scratchy microphone noise here and there, but guess what what you get kill it. Again. It's better than some no worse than others. That's that's our motto. No worse than others. And we kick off his first episode with Wyatt snack. You may remember him as a correspondent on the daily show. He's also been.

Amy Jodie Foster Nell Ted Leo Jesse thorn Obama White House White House Wyatt Billy Farrell forty second