17 Burst results for "Ailsa Chang"

"ailsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:45 min | Last week

"ailsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Ailsa Chang and I'm Scott Tetro, deadly flooding, wildfires, heatwaves and droughts. These have been the headlines all summer in the U. S. With similar disasters around the world to visiting New Jersey earlier this week to survey the damage from Hurricane Ida president Biden said. We're at an inflection point. Every part of the country is getting hit by extreme weather. And we're now living in real time. What the country is going to look like, and if we don't do some, we can't turn it back very much, But we can prevent it from getting worse. The Biden administration is pushing bills, which would be the most sweeping climate change policies ever enacted in the U. S. But right now They're still facing major hurdles in Congress here to talk about this with us is President Biden's national climate adviser, Gina McCarthy. Welcome back to all things considered. Thanks, Scott. I know you often talk about the fact that you are optimistic and even more optimistic than you've been before about enacting big climate policies, but it's been a really frightening summer. And a lot of people see these disasters and they wonder. Is it just too late to prevent the worst of climate change? Why is that view wrong Because a lot of people have it. First of all it having these disasters happen and be experienced personally by one out of three people in the United States, which is what's happened over the past just few months. It's not the way I really wanted people to get familiar with climate and get active on it. I certainly would have liked action earlier, but this is a tremendous opportunity We have and I don't want people to give up hope. And I'll tell you why. I'm not giving up hope. Number one. I think the president is on target in what he's asking Congress to support. I think we'll get it over the finish line..

Scott Gina McCarthy Ailsa Chang New Jersey United States Congress Scott Tetro U. S. one president First three people earlier this week Hurricane Ida Biden President Biden
"ailsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:45 min | Last week

"ailsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Ailsa Chang and I'm Scott Detroit, deadly flooding, wildfires, heatwaves and droughts. These have been the headlines all summer in the U. S with similar disasters around the world, too. Visiting New Jersey earlier this week to survey the damage from Hurricane Ida president Biden said. We're at an inflection point. Every part of the country is getting hit by extreme weather. And we're now living in real time. What the country is going to look like, and if we don't do some, we can't turn it back very much, But we can prevent it from getting worse. The abiding administration is pushing bills, which would be the most sweeping climate change policies ever enacted in the U. S. But right now They're still facing major hurdles in Congress here to talk about this with us is President Biden's national climate adviser, Gina McCarthy. Welcome back to all things considered. Thanks, Scott. I know you often talk about the fact that you are optimistic and even more optimistic than you've been before about enacting big climate policies, but it's been a really frightening summer. And a lot of people see these disasters and they wonder. Is it just too late to prevent the worst of climate change? Why is that view wrong Because a lot of people have it. First of all having these disasters happen and be experienced personally by one out of three people in the United States, which is what's happened over the past just few months. It's not the way I really wanted people to get familiar with climate and get active on it. I certainly would have liked action earlier, but this is a tremendous opportunity We have and I don't want people to give up hope. And I'll tell you why. I'm not giving up hope. Number one. I think the president is on target in what he's asking Congress to support. I think we'll get it over the finish line..

Ailsa Chang United States New Jersey Gina McCarthy Congress U. S one First Scott U. S. three people president President Biden earlier this week Hurricane Ida Biden Detroit
"ailsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:45 min | Last week

"ailsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I'm Ailsa Chang and I'm Scott jetro, deadly flooding, wildfires, heatwaves and droughts. These have been the headlines all summer in the U. S with similar disasters around the world, too. Visiting New Jersey earlier this week to survey the damage from Hurricane Ida president Biden said. We're at an inflection point. Every part of the country is getting hit by extreme weather. And we're now living in real time. What the country is going to look like, and if we don't do some, we can't turn it back very much, But we can prevent it from getting worse. The abiding administration is pushing bills, which would be the most sweeping climate change policies ever enacted in the U. S. But right now They're still facing major hurdles in Congress here to talk about this with us is President Biden's national climate adviser, Gina McCarthy. Welcome back to all things considered. Thanks, Scott. I know you often talk about the fact that you are optimistic and even more optimistic than you've been before about enacting big climate policies, but it's been a really frightening summer. And a lot of people see these disasters and they wonder. Is it just too late to prevent the worst of climate change? Why is that view wrong Because a lot of people have it. First of all having these disasters happen and be experienced personally by one out of three people in the United States, which is what's happened over the past just few months. It's not the way I really wanted people to get familiar with climate and get active on it. A certainly would have liked action earlier. But this is a tremendous opportunity We have and I don't want people to give up hope. And I'll tell you why. I'm not giving up hope. Number one. I think the president is on target in what he's asking Congress to support. I think we'll get it over the finish line..

Ailsa Chang United States New Jersey Gina McCarthy Congress U. S one First president three people U. S. President Biden Scott Biden earlier this week Hurricane Ida
"ailsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | Last week

"ailsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Ailsa Chang and I'm Scott Detroit, deadly flooding, wildfires, heatwaves and droughts. These have been the headlines all summer in the U. S with similar disasters around the world, too. Visiting New Jersey earlier this week to survey the damage from Hurricane Ida president Biden said. We're at an inflection point. Every part of the country is getting hit by extreme weather. And we're now living in real time. What the country is going to look like, and if we don't do something, we can't turn it back very much, But we can prevent it from getting worse. The abiding administration is pushing bills, which would be the most sweeping climate change policies ever enacted in the U. S. But right now They're still facing major hurdles in Congress here to talk about this with us is President Biden's national climate adviser, Gina McCarthy. Welcome back to all things considered. Thanks, Scott. I know you often talk about the fact that you are optimistic and even more optimistic than you've been before about enacting big climate policies, but it's been a really frightening summer. And a lot of people see these disasters and they wonder. Is it just too late to prevent the worst of climate change? Why is that view wrong Because a lot of people have it. First of all it having these disasters happen and be experienced personally by one out of three people in the United States, which is what's happened over the past just few months. It's not the way I really wanted people to get familiar with climate and get active on it. I certainly would have liked action earlier, but this is a tremendous opportunity We have and I don't want people to give up hope. And I'll tell you why. I'm not giving up hope. Number one. I think the president is on target in what he's asking Congress to support. I think we'll get it over the finish line..

Ailsa Chang United States New Jersey Gina McCarthy Congress U. S one First Scott U. S. three people president President Biden earlier this week Hurricane Ida Biden Detroit
"ailsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:35 min | Last month

"ailsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Ailsa Chang in Los Angeles and I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington. While the entire world is going through this pandemic, different countries and regions are experiencing it differently, and we're going to talk now about what the situation looks like in a few different places. South Africa, Brazil and Israel and the Palestinian territories. Like the U. S. They are dealing with the more contagious Delta variant, and while the vaccine is successful at preventing serious illness and death Many people can't get vaccinated. We're joined now by NPR's Daniel Estrin in Jerusalem. Peralta in Cape Town, and Philip Reeves in Rio de Janeiro. Good to have all three of you here. Hi. Hey, Ari. Thank you. To start with you. Phil. Brazil's reported the second most covid deaths of any country right behind the U. S. The death toll there is above half a million. So what is happening in Brazil right now? Well, things are slightly better than they were. For example, back in April, when on one day the Brazilians recorded more than 4000 deaths in one day. Now the daily averages just over 1000. But that's still high. New cases are going up, and there are a lot of them more than 40,000 yesterday. So it's serious, especially as the vaccination program here is stumbling along and has in some cities have to be temporarily suspended because of logistical problems with supplies. And the Delta variant is here. Not many cases at this 0.170, according to the health Ministry, But it is here. Brazilians getting angry. They're getting angry about The way the government of President Jair Bolsonaro has responded. In particular. You remember he was a denial ist at the beginning of this thing that angry over the way he has bungled vaccine purchases of allegations of government scams in vaccine purchases as well, and tens of thousands of them four times in the last few months have taken to the streets to protest. You say less than a quarter of Brazil's population has been vaccinated in South Africa. The rates are even lower eight or what are the trends there Right now, Look right now we're seeing lots of deaths 3000 over the past week, but we are just coming out of a third wave that was driven by the delta variant. Just last week, the government lifted some of the toughest restrictions. But there are still reminders everywhere that this pandemic is ongoing. There's still a nighttime curfew here. Gatherings are restricted masks are mandated. Every public space seemingly is spraying you down as you come in with hand sanitizer, and they're taking your temperature. Uh, luckily, the vaccination effort seems to be finding its footing. But it's Clear that it's going to take a long time to get back to normal. Daniel, you're in Jerusalem and Israel was ahead of the curve on vaccines. What impact is the Delta variant Having their now? Well cases are on the rise. Serious infections have more than doubled just in the last week, and that is happening even with the majority of Israel vaccinated. So we know that overall, you're better protected with the vaccine them without, but the rising number of cases here is concerning. So now the rule is that everyone must wear a mask indoors. And then you have a million Israelis who are not vaccinated yet, and Israel is trying to pressure them to get the shot. So starting Thursday, if you're not vaccinated, he will not be allowed entry into events into movie theaters, even houses of worship unless you show a negative covid test. So that's in Israel than in the Israeli occupied West Bank and the Gaza Strip. The thing is, is that vaccines are available, but most eligible Palestinians have not gone to get vaccinated. So the International Committee of the Red Cross has social media influencers spreading messages trying to teach about the vaccine. Officials are even bringing vaccines. Two mosques. Daniel mentioned that Israel's vaccines success and it's interesting because if you look at most of South America, uh, you know that stands in strong contrast to that most nations here are not very far ahead with the vaccination programs, but there are a couple of star performers. Chile and Uruguay. Chile is a particularly interesting case. Both these countries now have 63% or so of their populations fully vaccinated. But if you look at Chile back in April, they had about a third of the population fully vaccinated, and they were getting international plaudits for their program. And yet 97% of their hospital's intensive care units were occupied. That place was awash with new cases and the health system was struggling and in some cases collapsed. Now, however, they are reaping the rewards. Yesterday they recorded their lowest daily new infection rate since October. The number was well below 1000. Phil, You've described some of the challenges to vaccinating people in Brazil. But I'd er tell us why it's been so difficult to get vaccination numbers up in South Africa and other parts of the continent. Yeah. I mean, look in South Africa, less than 5% of people are fully vaccinated. Um, but here this is the case of a country that has badly managed this pandemic to it's just the opposite. South Africa reacted very early and effectively and they have tried to buy the vaccines. They've tried to make the vaccine. But rich countries have hoarded much of the supply and there's just not enough for South Africa. But this seems to be changing. Big shipments of vaccines are starting to come in, and South African made Johnson and Johnson vaccines have just started rolling out of a factory not far from where I am but again talking about global pressures. Um even some of those vaccines that are being made here will have to be shipped to Europe. So the bottom line is that South Africa is a perfect example of just how hard it is to compete for these vaccines. When you're a middle income country, and there is great demand for vaccines here, vaccination sites are mobbed. There are lines around the block right now of people are waiting hours for their job right now in many vaccination sites. It's such a contrast with Israel, where the vast majority of the population has been vaccinated. And Daniel, I understand they're considering whether to offer booster shots. That's right booster shots for the general population, starting with older people. They're already giving booster shots to people with weak immune systems. But this is posing a huge dilemma in Israel. Um you know, Israel was the first to vaccinate most of its population. That means it's also the first facing this question of whether boosters are truly needed. It's been about seven months since the first Israelis were vaccinated with Pfizer, and some studies here suggests that the vaccine's protection Has waned over time, so Israel faces this alone. No other countries have rolled out booster shots on a wide scale. The data is still preliminary. But leaders are under pressure here not to force more lockdowns. And so there's a lot of pressure to approve booster shots, and health officials are meeting tonight to discuss this, So I think when you look at Israel throughout the pandemic, it's been a case study first. It was looked at as an example of vaccine disparity, with Israelis getting shots early and Palestinians being very far behind, and now Israel could show us a glimpse into the future. Of what other countries If they do manage to vaccinate their populations, what they'll face it might not be enough. That's NPR's Daniel Estrin. Jerusalem, Ada Peralta in Cape Town, and Philip Reeves in Rio de Janeiro. Thanks to all three of you, thank you are.

Ari Shapiro Philip Reeves Ailsa Chang Daniel Estrin Washington Ari Los Angeles Rio de Janeiro Daniel 63% South Africa Jerusalem South America Cape Town Thursday Gaza Strip last week Brazil 97% Europe
"ailsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:51 min | Last month

"ailsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

"Considered. I'm Ailsa Chang and I'm Audie Cornish. There are all kinds of places where new parents can get advice. Books, advice, columns podcast, but none of them quite explain what is happening to the unnamed mother and Rachel Yoder's new novel. For instance, her body's changing. There's a weird hair. There's sharpened teeth. Perhaps we're not quite sure her habits are changing to this desire for raw meat and insatiable hunger. The mother is turning into a dog, and then it kind of is off to the races. After that, Once she realizes what's going on, can't resist it any longer and then is sort of out. Roaming the neighborhood at night, and the novel gets much wilder from there now the title We want to pause and warn you because it contains profanity. It's called Night Bitch. It's horrifying and frankly hilarious Look at the beautiful and infuriating experience of motherhood and what happens when a mother literally howls in protest. Rachel Yoder told me it came out of her experience. Like the mother in the story. She quit a dream job to stay home with her new son. I really wanted to Explorer what I was going through an early motherhood, this sort of Rage at where I found myself. Um, this rage at the structures of society that I felt had kind of led me to that point. Were you surprised that you were angry? Um Yes, yes, To a certain extent, I was because that that had not been my vision of motherhood. You know, I thought it was going to be this endeavor. My husband and I did together equally. It was going to be modern. I was going to be able to Feel fulfilled in my career and in my art and also have a child. And when I found myself in this position, a stay at home, Mom my husband on the road every week. I thought to myself. How did I arrive here? It sounds like you thought you were entitled to it. You expected more. I expected more. And I felt I think the biggest feelings that I felt tricked. You know that Somehow the stories I had been told were false. And part of the work was to say. Okay, Well, what's the truth? How can I tell the truth? What's the truth of what happened? And is there a story that I can tell to sort of transformed this rage into something productive? An empowering rather than something that's sort of eating me up inside. It's interesting when I think back to other stories I've read in this vein there often about puberty. They're often about the transition that comes right with moving from childhood to adulthood. Yeah, and I really do. Consider the story a sort of coming of age story. I think we have a lot of coming of age is in our in our lives. And this is really about the mother moving from her girlhood into her womanhood and doing it. Perhaps not all that elegantly. It's it's messy. It's complicated, but it is a sort of coming of age. How how do we come into our Womanhood into our mother hoods in a way that is empowering, rather in a way that feels like we're abandoning ourselves, and I'm surprised. I haven't seen this analogy more often, because obviously when it comes to Being pregnant to giving birth. And what happens after your body goes through so much transformation, right? Right? I mean, like it's been the province basically of Ridley Scott and alien. Yes. So far. It doesn't seem like more of us have approached this. Yeah, exactly. I mean, why is there not more sort of body horror written about pregnancy and motherhood? But I wasn't interested in this just being. Sort of pure horror book because I thought there was a lot more possibility in the body horror trope for moving beyond horror into something that is ultimately hopeful. And I notice um Fundamentally, this character is incredibly lonely. Yeah, I mean, she's she is quite literally a lonely animal and I was I was struck at some moments where I thought like she She does something that I actually don't like that women do, which is to dismiss connection with other moms because they're busy trying to basically distance themselves from the idea of motherhood. Yes, absolutely. Um And that was that was an instinct I saw in myself and also didn't like as I kind of moved into stay at home Parenting. Um it was really hard for me to connect with other moms. And I think I had as its that sort of like I'm not I'm not a mom. I'm cool like I am. It's an extension of the cool girl. I think exactly, And it's sort of like an internalized misogyny in a way, right this thinking that you're I was kind of buying in to the story that motherhood is, you know, not. It's nice. It's great that you can be at home, but it's not really Of that much value. Moms aren't that interest een and so in the book, I really wanted a way for this mother to overcome that. How could she kind of start looking at the moms as her pack as opposed to women who aren't cool enough for her to hang out with I wasn't sure if I wanted to talk about this, but it feels like it's a very important part of the book, and that's something that many people will have experienced in their partnerships in the last year, especially because of the pandemic. Which is that the workload is not split equally. Yeah, That's something that has come up a lot over this past year in the pandemic, and we should say in the book, it's not set up like you're the woman. You're going to stay home. It is a conversation that I think probably plays out or has played out recently for a lot of people, which is who makes more money. They're going to keep working. And the person who maybe makes a little less which, of course, is often women is the one who's going to stay home and then you can't afford childcare and all of a sudden you're in a position you didn't expect right? But I do think what we have seen in this past year is that the negotiation of those roles needs to go beyond just this simple sort of you do this, and I do that, But it's this constant, ongoing. Conversation, and I think you know in the book. This mother is unable to have that conversation for a long time until it you know, something finally opens up for her, and she's able to start talking about it. With her husband and and come out of this sort of rageful silence. Um, Finally, there is a wildness fundamentally that this character learns to embrace What does that look like? For those of us who are not going to end up aware, Wolf? I mean, I think it looks different for everyone, obviously, um, For me, The question is what happens when we turn toward That sort of wild, perhaps rageful feral part of ourselves and move into relationship with it move into negotiating some sort of understanding with it, rather than suppressing it and pretending it's not there and sort of pushing it to the back like what happens. When we explore that part of ourselves that I think in motherhood can really flourish. This really wild, creative, powerful self. Well, Rachel Yoder. Thank you so much for sharing with us and congrats on your debut novel. Thank you so much. Her debut novel is called.

Rachel Yoder Ailsa Chang Ridley Scott Audie Cornish last year this past year past year
"ailsa chang" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

04:35 min | 2 months ago

"ailsa chang" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"I'm Ailsa Chang and I'm married Louise Kelly. We speak to the foreign minister of Lithuania about the flow of migrants entering his country from Belarus criminal organizations just actually using these people as a sort of a weapon against my country against the European Union, also, the director On or from his territory as well. So this is a test of seriousness on this issue and re examining the five stages of grief. Now this news Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Louise Schiavone. Former Trump advisor Tom Barrack has been ordered released pending trial by a federal judge in Los Angeles. Under a deal struck with Baruch and the government. He is posting $250 million bond. NPR's Ryan Lucas has details. Tom Barrack was indicted on seven counts, including making false statements. And acting as an agent of a foreign government, prosecutors say Baruch, a billionaire investor who chaired the inaugural committee of his longtime friend, Donald Trump, used his tight relationship with the Trump White House. To promote the interests of the United Arab Emirates. At his bail hearing, Barrack was ordered released on a secured bond of $250 million. The conditions of his release include a curfew travel restrictions. And the wearing of an electronic bracelet with GPS monitoring. America, said through his attorney that he is not guilty. He is scheduled to be arraigned in Brooklyn, New York on Monday. Ryan Lucas NPR NEWS Washington European regulators have authorized Moderna's Covid 19 vaccine for the immunization of Children between 12 and 17 years old. NPR's Sidney Lumpkin has more European teens between 12 and 17 will now be able to get the Moderna Covid 19 shot. Thanks to the decision by the European Medicines Agency in the United States. The company is waiting for a similar authorization from the Food and Drug Administration in the US The Moderna shot has only been authorized for people 18 and older, but younger teens have been able to get the Pfizer vaccine since May. European regulators say that for 12 to 17 year olds, the Moderna vaccine has the same common side effects as it does in people, 18 and up and in a study with adolescents, the vaccine produced a similar antibody response to the one seen in people 18 to 25. None of the Children in the study who received the vaccine developed Covid 19, compared with four who received a placebo. Sydney Wilkin NPR news Tremendously subdued open to the Summer Olympics in Tokyo today, with restrained opening ceremonies unfolding before a fraction of the usual number of Spectators at the World Games. The curtains went up against the backdrop of the city in a state of emergency. Still struggling with Covid 19, NPR's Mandali del Barco reports there were fewer than 1000 Spectators in the stadium that seats 68,000. They watch toast country, Japan put on a show of visually clever minds, Kabuki performers and drones in formation above the stadium. There was a moment of silence for people who died of Covid 19 and a rendition of the John Lennon's Song. Imagine After the Parade of nations, the Olympic flame was lit by Grand Slam tennis champ, an Olympian Osaka, Naomi in the streets of Tokyo, though, were protesters. The city is still under a state of emergency due to the pandemic. Mandali del Barco. NPR NEWS Tokyo Strong into a week that opened with a wobble on Wall Street. The Dow closed up 238 points the S and P 500 gained 44. This is NPR. 88 degrees at 404. Good afternoon. I'm Alba Lara with W B E Z news. Many parents in Chicago say they're happy that the public school system will require even vaccinated staff and students to wear masks when school starts in person in August. WBZ Sarah Carp reports. Suzanne Mettler says she's been nervous about sending her on vaccinated seven year old daughter back to a classroom full of Children, she says it gives her some peace. That mess will be warned. If we're going to take a bunch of kids who are already little Petri dishes like in the best of times. Seems like master the least we can do to try and keep Community rates low lunch still concerns Medlar she does. Children at her daughter's Northside School will have the space to social distance. Some Chicago suburbs are making masks optional, appeasing the parents who don't think their child should be forced to wear a mask. Sarah Carp WBZ News Illinois will become one of.

Louise Kelly Suzanne Mettler Tom Barrack Donald Trump Ailsa Chang Louise Schiavone Sidney Lumpkin Ryan Lucas Los Angeles Summer Olympics Chicago European Medicines Agency Food and Drug Administration European Union 238 points Washington NPR Monday $250 million US
"ailsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:42 min | 2 months ago

"ailsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

"Kelly and I'm Ailsa Chang. Researchers say the latest covid 19 surge could worsen throughout the summer. Also, an investigation into the Pegasus spyware finds it was used to hack smart phones belonging to journalists and activists. This spyware can so Sell suntan lotion as well as umbrellas, because you don't put all your eggs in one basket. Now there's Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Louise Schiavone, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Republican leader Kevin McCarthy are still trading jabs over the select committee investigating the deadly January 6th attack on the U. S. Capitol. NPR's Claudia Chrysalis reports. The latest salvo comes one day after Pelosi rejected Two of McCarthy's GOP picks for the panel, and McCarthy responded by pulling all five. The House minority leader is not letting up on Pelosi or the Select committee itself from what the speaker has done. That puts a great deal of Downton and Speaker Pelosi is not letting up, either, saying she had to reject McCarthy's quote. Ridiculous pics of representatives. Jim Banks and Jim Jordan from the panel is my responsibility as speaker of the House. Make sure we get to the truth on this, and we will not let their antics stand in the way of that. As of now, the eight member committee has made up of seven Democrats and one Republican Liz Cheney, all appointed by Pelosi, who is not ruled out, adding other members to the panel in the future quarter. Carrizalez NPR news, the capital, surgeon General Vivek Murthy says, with the Delta variant accounting for most of the new covid cases in the U. S. Boosting vaccination rates remains an urgent priority as NPR's rosemary Miss dairy reports, Murthy says areas with low vaccination rates remain at risk. The delta variant is at least 50% more contagious than the original virus, and Murthy tells NPR with new cases and hospitalizations on the rise. Getting vaccinated now will save lives. We do have millions and millions of people vaccinated. That's the good news and as a result, we're not seeing death rates nearly as high as your case rates as high as what we saw in January, But There are some millions more who are not vaccinated, and as a result of that we are seeing spikes in cases driven by the delta variant where unvaccinated numbers are high, Murthy says. While hundreds of thousands of people get vaccinated every day, those numbers need to be accelerated. Rosemary Miz Dairy. NPR NEWS Washington New unemployment benefits claims moved up unexpectedly last week. NPR's Scott Horsley reports new State claims for unemployment benefits jumped sharply last week to 419,000 claims for help under a federal program for gate workers and the self employed also rose. Those numbers may be distorted by seasonal adjustments since ordinary work patterns at auto plants, for example, have been thrown off this summer analyst will be on the lookout, though for any sign that a fresh surge in coronavirus infections is putting a lid on job growth. As of early July, some 12.5 million people were receiving some form of unemployment assistance that's down 1.2 million from late June. The drop reflects both people going back to work and the early termination of pandemic benefits in about two dozen states. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington The Dow closed up 25. This is NPR. And at 304 on a Thursday July 22nd. This is KCRW and Larry Peril or one in five positive covid tests reported last month in L. A county were among fully vaccinated people. While that may seem jarring county public health director Barbara Ferrer says, if you are fully vaccinated, you shouldn't be too worried. Yes, we had a significant increase in the numbers of people who Fully vaccinated and tested positive. The vast majority of those folks, um, only experienced E. There are no illness or very mild illness. Well, both here and in Orange County data shows. Those who end up in the hospital with Covid are overwhelmingly unvaccinated and data shows. The current vaccine lineup we have is highly effective against even the troublesome, more contagious Delta variant even with the Delta variant, which is, you know, definitely a wrecking havoc across our country and others. There is still so much protection for people who are fully vaccinated, especially in comparison to those who have no protection at all. Well, nearly 4.9 million Angelinos have been fully vaccinated so far, and Ferrer may be happy to hear this. After weeks of lagging demand for vaccination, there has been a recent slight uptick. Nearly one in three California families are struggling to cover their daily costs for food, housing and transportation. That's according to a new study out today. Cap radio. Steve Milne has more about 3.5 million households in the state earned income below what researchers for the United Way called the real cost measure. The real cost measure to us is a decent standard of living. That's what we're saying. Pete Manzo is president and CEO of United Ways of California, which released the study. Of those 3.5 million households. Nearly all 97% have at least one working adult. That's a key point of the study is that these are overwhelmingly working households. So the answer for them isn't Hey, go get a job. They have a job, and they may have you know more than one job. Very low income households report spending up to 80% of their income on housing. The report also looks at race of the households that don't earn enough to get by 51% are Latino, 41% black, 28% Asian and 20% White. And the study is based on US sense of Bureau Data. Census.

Jim Jordan Claudia Chrysalis Jim Banks Steve Milne Pete Manzo Louise Schiavone Ailsa Chang Scott Horsley Kevin McCarthy Pelosi Murthy Kelly Larry Peril Barbara Ferrer January Liz Cheney 1.2 million Washington McCarthy Orange County
"ailsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:47 min | 2 months ago

"ailsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

"Considered. I'm Ailsa Chang and I'm Mary Louise Kelly. Fox News has been one of the most prominent platforms for skeptics, even critics of the covid vaccines and yet in recent days, several Fox News personalities seem to have gone out of their way to affirm the importance of getting the vaccine today, White House press secretary Jen Psaki told reporters that administration officials have engaged Fox News execs over the matter. We understand also the importance of reaching Fox's audience about the covid 19 vaccines and their benefits and like we are with all of you here today we, of course, are in regular contact. We are in contact right now with NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik. Hey, David. Hey, Mary Louise. So if we flipped on Fox News right now, and they're talking covid. What's the kind of thing we might hear? We'll take what we heard last night. Sean Hannity is bitten a big fan of former president Trump an advisor as well as anything else. That's skeptic of this administration. But he went as you suggested out of his way to say, Look, let's pay attention to the science. Let's pay attention to what doctors have to say. Your doctors have to say Here's a brief clip of what he shared with viewers last night. And it absolutely makes sense for many Americans to get vaccinated. I believe in science, I believe in the science of vaccination. You heard similar things from folks like a news anchor Bill Hemmer. Yesterday afternoon You heard stuff on Fox and friends, which has been a place where you know has been hospitable to all kinds of conspiracy theories in recent years in some real skeptical stuff about the vaccine, Steve Doocy Got into kind of a push and pull with his co host, Brian Kilmeade on Fox and friends do you see? Said Look, this saves lives. You know 97% of those who are getting, uh The the disease now seem to be those who are not vaccinated their deaths anyway. Let's make sure that people get that and as Kilmeade say, Well, people have to make choices Do see, really drilled down and say, Let's do that. So you could find these messages on Fox, which isn't always what you've been hearing on. Well, exactly. I mean, just to point out quite what the contrast is here for people who aren't maybe glued to Fox all day. What's been the more typical message from Fox News anchors. Well, early on, You heard a lot of folks including Sean Hannity's questioning the severity of the pandemic in the past, even using the questioning whether it was a hoax. Tucker Carlson to this day says, Look, I'm not telling people to get it. I'm not telling people not to get it and really is yet it seems to be soliciting people to come in and question the efficacy of vaccines themselves. You know, Hannity and Doocy have periodically shown up cropped opened and said vaccines are important seemed to work. And yet it's in the context of you know what a media matter study, for example, it's a left wing media watchdog found that over a recent two week period 60% of Fox's segments cast doubt on the vaccines, even segments like candidates where they acknowledge it. It's wrapped in total anger against elites against public health officials and against the administration for really urging people strongly to do it. So what's going on? Why the change in tone? I think there's a change in what's been happening at the nation at large. You've seen this huge spike this latest wave, particularly in Red states, where folks are often loyal Fox viewers You've had a lot of folks calling Fox News. Uh Host incredible hypocrites. Given what's happening at their parent company. What's that? Well, Fox Court, the owner of Fox News has itself its own policies that are pretty specific, encouraging people to get vaccines and precautions. It's a lot like what you get the airport If you subscribe to the clear program, which is that you get whisked in, and you don't have to take a whole slew of precautions that you otherwise have to do. If you can show that you've had the vaccine and real quick, do we know anything more about the White House role here? Well, you know, CNN reported that there had been high level discussions repeatedly in recent weeks, and both Fox the White House kind of cast out on that, but clearly jump sake, the press secretary in the White House are trying to engage Fox folks. They did so in May at the Washington bureau level to say this is something that we really think the public messaging is important on and periodically Fox swings back to Serving its audiences less and serving the public interest a little bit more. NPR's David Folkenflik. Thank you. You bet. Women's gymnastics competition is one of the most anticipated events of the Tokyo Olympics. American Simone Biles is again at the top of her game, and she is the heavy favorite to defend the all around title from the 2016 Rio Games. Eric Schmidt of ST Louis Public Radio reports that the world's most decorated Jim Nist is approaching the sport's largest stage a little differently this time. Simone Biles enters the Tokyo Olympics as the greatest gymnast in a generation if not all time. Biles hasn't lost a competition since the middle of 2013, and she wins them by full points in a sport where competitors are usually separated by 10th, or 100th of a point. The world's best gymnast, says she wants to savor the Olympic experience. This time around. 2016 was such a blur. Once we got over there, everything happened so quick. This time we get to relax a little bit and kind of enjoy training and enjoy the process, Biles will still compete hard, showing off the range of skills she's developed that were once considered impossible. Chief among them a triple twisting double back flip on the floor exercise and the Yurchenko double Pike, a vault that launches her so high, she completes 2.5 flips before landing. She's the only woman to ever land it in competition. Bios acknowledges how her performances have pushed other athletes to up the difficulty in their own routines. We have reached a point where two masks is getting more difficult and more difficult and a little bit more dangerous, So we're kind of walking on eggshells here. Like with her latest vault routine, Biles hasn't always been rewarded for pushing the boundaries of the sport. The International Gymnastics Federation, undervalued her.

Brian Kilmeade Eric Schmidt Mary Louise Kelly Ailsa Chang Sean Hannity David Folkenflik Mary Louise Steve Doocy Jim Nist David Bill Hemmer CNN Fox 97% Tucker Carlson Tokyo Olympics Kilmeade 10th 2016 Rio Games Hannity
"ailsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:20 min | 2 months ago

"ailsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Kelly and I'm Ailsa Chang, NPR and member station KQED have obtained never before heard tapes from the investigation into the police killing of Oscar Grant. These tapes provide new details about the missteps made by investigators in the early hours and days after a Bay Area rapid transit police officers shot grant on New Year's Day in 2000 and nine It was one of the first times that cell phone videos of police shooting went viral. Millions saw the footage of officer Johannes Mehserle e firing a single gunshot into grants back as he lay face down on the train station platform. But until KQED sued the transit agency to force the release of the files, no one, including Grant's family had heard how the shooting was investigated. We want to figure out what happened. We are not heaven. I know exactly who shot him. He was obviously wait. It won't be no questions not be in jail. NPR and KQED took a deep look at this case for the final episode of the podcast on our Watch. Sukey Lewis hosts the show and joins us now. Hi, Suki. Hi, Elsa. So what were the big questions in this case that you were hoping to find answers to and these recordings? What were you looking for? Ultimately, So there were actually these two different investigations that Bart did into the shooting of Oscar Grant one was their own criminal investigation to see if officers were criminally liable. And there was another one that was done later that was under immense pressure from the public. They hired this outside law firm called Meyer's novel to do an internal investigation and look at policy violations. And out of these two investigations. We've got about 60 hours of tapes and have been going through them trying to understand how they were done, and also how they were different. We've known for years that there were significant issues and how the agency itself went about its initial investigation. And we found that they missed all these opportunities to really clarify what happened Early on, you know, they failed to ask the officers difficult questions and make choices that limited the scope and the outcome of the accountability process. And we also found that the investigation that was done later by that outside law firm really did ask much more. You know tough questions and interrogated systemic issues within Bart in a way that the agency itself didn't do. And so they focused not just on Johannes miserly, the officer who shot Grant, but they also focused on another officer who was named Tony Peroni. Right. Oscar Grant's family has been pursuing charges for Tony Peroni. What do these tapes show about Paro knees role in the incident, So Tony Peroni was the first officer to respond to the platform. There was this call about a fight on the train. It was New Year's two o'clock in the morning, The train was completely packed. And once Peroni arrives, things just keep escalating. He's very aggressive, he hones in on Oscar Grant's group of friends. He starts swearing and using force in a pretty brutal way in the crowd also reacts and gets involved. And when he goes to arrest Grant for resisting arrest. Peroni is the one who hold Oscar grant down with his knee and his back near his neck, and Grant was shouting to his friends into the officers that he couldn't breathe. Now measure early is behind him, and he's trying to handcuff Oscar Grant. And that's when miserly can't get Oscar Grant's hands that he stands up and he fires the fatal shot. And this comes up in the tapes that we obtained. And here are the Meyer's novel investigators from that outside law firm asking Peroni about this very moment. Do you know if Officer measuring was ordering him to take his hands out? I remember measure early, saying a lot of things exactly when and what he said at that time. That's when we started yelling that I can't get his hands can't get his hands. In his waistband. Can't get his hands. Okay? Did you ever Think that your weight on Oscar Grant may have inhibited his ability to get his hands out. I don't know. Okay? So the outside law firm Mayer snobby found that Peroni is wait actually did prevent Oscar from giving up his hands, and they found that his erratic and aggressive behavior set the stage for the shooting. They also found that his story about what happened that night kept shifting and changing. Peroni was ultimately fired. But that report was still kept secret for 10 years. And once it finally came out under a 2019 police transparency law, Oscar Grant's family decided to make a new push for the D A to bring charges against this officer and what happened when the district attorney took another Look at this? So, she said, You know, she looked really closely at this case from every angle. You know, multiple lawyers in her office worked on it. But they found that the only thing that Peroni could have been charged with was assault under color of authority, and the statute of limitations had run out in California. If a police officer abuses their authority to beat someone up, it's just a misdemeanor. At most, they'd get a year in jail. The D A. Said her office made a strategic decision not to charge him back in 2009 because they wanted his testimony in order to try and get a murder conviction for the officer who shot Grant Johannes Mehserle e Um, but this is also something that we found over and over again in our reporting is that it's really rare that police officers face criminal charges even for criminal misconduct. And measure early, the officer who was criminally charged in this case. The theory in his defense was that he actually meant to use a Taser, not his gun. Do these records give us any more insight into measure? Lee's claims well, the fact that measure Earley's defense is still somewhat in question also comes back to choices that were made by bark command staff and First of all, they let Mr Lee and his lawyer view bystander video of the incident before they interviewed him. After watching the video, he refused to talk and invoked his Fifth Amendment rights. Now his bosses could have still ordered him to do an interview. Um, that's not admissible in court. But these kinds of interviews are done all the time. And instead in this case, he said, he was tired and smart leadership. Just let him go home. He resigned shortly after that, and he never gave that statement. So his explanation that he mistook his gun for his Taser didn't come out until a month after the shooting. At his trial. The jury believed measureless explanation and they convicted him of involuntary manslaughter rather than they murder convictions. Sat by the D A. He spent 11 months in jail. Yeah. Well, I'm wondering Suki. What was it like for Oscar Grant's family to to hear these tapes For the first time? It was really emotional and intense. You know, we played selections for them. You know, we don't want to overwhelm them with the 60 hours of tapes that we went through, But I think that they felt very vindicated that a lot of this stuff was things that they had suspected for a long time. But it felt like proof. And while it doesn't change their outcome in their case, um Wanda Johnson, Oscar Grant's mother says, it's really important that these things come out. Maybe not for me or my family. But what it can do As if people hear the tapes. Changed the perception. Of how they may have Phil concerning policing. So what Wanda is saying is that transparency is really bigger than any one case. Now that we can at least start to see inside the system. It better allows everyone from advocates to policymakers to average citizens. Understand the legal protections that police officers have and how secrecy and self protection act as incentives against accountability. Sukey Lewis is the host of on our watch, a podcast that examines the shadow system of police Accountability in California. The final episode examining new details into the shooting of Oscar Grant. Is out today. Thank you. So much for your reporting. Suki. Thank you..

Tony Peroni Wanda Johnson Johannes Mehserle Elsa 2009 Sukey Lewis Ailsa Chang Grant Suki 11 months Tony 10 years 60 hours Kelly Oscar Wanda California Earley KQED NPR
"ailsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:55 min | 2 months ago

"ailsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I'm Ailsa Chang in Los Angeles and I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington, the U. S. Supreme Court today sided with rich donors and their desire to remain anonymous. By a 6 to 3 vote along ideological lines. The court struck down a California law requiring non profits to file a list of their large donors with the state. The court said the law subjected donors to potential harassment, chilling their speech in violation of the First Amendment. NPR's Domenico Montanaro joins us to explain the ruling. Hi there. Hey, Ari. What were the details of this case? Well, at issue here was a California law. It's similar to laws in other states. It requires tax exempt charities or non profits to file a list of their large donors. Anyone who gives over $5000. It's the same as what these groups would provide to the IRS every year. Now, some of these groups Use this status as a way to influence politics in California wanted to crack down on the prevalence of some of these so called dark money groups by following the money and looking for malfeasance and other problems, But Because of these groups statuses. Under the law, The names of the donors are supposed to remain private. The problem is that California at one point inadvertently made the names public, and that led the Americans for Prosperity Foundation, a group founded by the billionaire Koch brothers. To bring the case to court and others join them. They said that the risk of a leak, intentional or not, would create a quote chilling effect on donors and has subjected them to threats and harassment. The court agreed and said California's law violated these donors. First Amendment Freedom of association, right. And what has the reaction been so far today? Well, you can imagine the reaction is largely fallen along partisan lines, but not entirely. You know, Senator Sheldon White House, a Democrat from Rhode Island, called it a dark, dark day for democracy. He referred to the Supreme Court as the court that dark money built. That's a callback to the courts. Citizens United decision, which largely took away restrictions from corporations being involved in elections. On the other hand, Obviously, the Americans for Prosperity Foundation and the Thomas more Law Center Christian Conservative law firm that was also party to this case, applauded the court's decision. But it's also notable that groups like the AKP Legal Defense fund. And the Council on American Islamic Relations, praised the decision to the argument before the court, in fact, rested on a 1958 Supreme Court decision that struck down in Alabama law that required the AKP to publicly disclose its membership list Care noted that governments can sometimes improperly used bulk collection of data. A target disfavored minorities. This obviously has implications beyond this one. California law tell us what the broader repercussions might be. Well, absolutely one major piece of this. First of all is in the states and how they regulate charities, nonprofits to try to root out wrongdoing, self dealing and other problems. It was already a pretty tough task. California alone has about 115,000 of these kinds of groups, and this decision makes it even harder. More broadly, there are now questions about what it will mean for campaign finance laws. Take a listen to Rick Hasen, a law professor at the candidate at the University of California, Irvine. How we put it. Think it calls into question both campaign disclosure laws as well as campaign contribution laws. It's going to be much harder for states and Congress to justify some of their campaign disclosure rules and campaign contribution rules. I mean, this case in of itself doesn't affect how money is raised for elections. But alarm bells are being rung by pro disclosure watch groups, watchdog groups in dissent, by the way, so Justice Sonia Sotomayor says the ruling marks reporting and disclosure requirements with a bullseye. The big question here is what does the court What does what do the courts conservative? Do if a case is brought that challenges the constitutionality of federal and state campaign finance disclosure laws. NPR's Domenico Montanaro, Thank you. You're welcome. We're nearing.

Ari Shapiro Rick Hasen Ailsa Chang Los Angeles Washington Congress Domenico Montanaro Ari 6 Rhode Island Council on American Islamic Re IRS Koch U. S. Supreme Court Citizens United Senator Sonia Sotomayor Americans for Prosperity Found AKP Legal Defense fund NPR
"ailsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:13 min | 3 months ago

"ailsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ailsa Chang in Los Angeles and I'm Audie Cornish in Washington. Homicide rates have been soaring, especially in big cities. So President Biden today announced a new plan for dealing with the increase. There's concern from a number of quarters about whether this is the right approach. His plan includes more money for police departments and community programs. It comes as the nation grapples with policing and as Congress continues to try to reach a deal on police reform. White House correspondent Franco attorneys is here. Welcome back. Hi, Audie. Can you give us more details on what the president is proposing? Yeah, so there are a few measures he's announcing summer new. Others are not. He said state and local governments could use some covid 19 relief money to hire police officers and pay overtime. And some of that same money can also go to community programs like job plans for teens and other programs that put vulnerable kids on a different track and away from violence. Another part of the plan involves cracking down on gun sellers. That's something Biden talked about today with Attorney General Merrick Garland. You know, they met with a group of mayors and advocates to discuss the issue at the White House. And this is, I will say becoming a major political issue for Biden, As NPR has reported. We're on pace to have the most violent year and two decades in May, there was a 28% increase in homicides in Philadelphia. 23% in New York, and Republicans are blaming Biden for the rise in crime rates in some of these cities. We're also talking about cities where there were very public protests over police misconduct or police brutality. How is the White House kind of balancing these concerns? Yeah, Congress has been working on a bill with reforms since last summer, when George Floyd was killed. Republican Senator Tim Scott has been negotiating with Democratic representative Karen Bass on this And today, Scott said they were hoping to work out final language as soon as tomorrow. Now a key part of Biden's plan to address the increase in crime evolves more funding for police. But there is concern among some progressives about that being the focus. And one of the people in today's meeting was Eddie Bocanegra. He leads a program in Chicago run by Heartland Alliance. You know he's pleased the White House is taking a comprehensive approach to addressing gun violence. But he told me he wants to make sure that alternatives to policing are part of the plan. It's good to hear that there's gonna be more investment in training and development of technology around law enforcement. But let's make sure that the same efforts in the same level of funding right that we see increases in other places on law enforcement that we see that in our communities as well. When you reach out to law enforcement groups, What do they say? Well, there is concern from one group that the right people are not being consulted. For instance, the mayor of Miami Dade County she was there. But the Miami police chief Art Acevedo was not. And he leads up a group that represents dozens of police chiefs from the largest cities in the country. Now, these are the places that are seeing these increases in crime. He said on CNN today that he was disappointed that he was not invited to the meeting. And what we want to hear from the president is a commitment to look at what's going on with our criminal justice system with court systems that are shut down with judges and prosecutors that are absolutely coddling violent criminals. Now. I asked press secretary Jen Psaki about this, She said the White House was looking for a diverse group of stakeholders in the meeting today, and she said there will be more conversations to come. What about the money? It's supposed to come from the Covid aid package. How does that work? Yeah, so the package included money for state and local governments and gave them the latitude to spend some of it on policing where needed The budgets of local governments were hit really hard during the shutdowns as you know, But you'll also recall that some states and local governments also wanted to use this money for other things. Such things as including infrastructure, and the Biden administration has said no to some of these requests. So you know, there has been some inconsistency here, at least in the messaging. From the White House. NPR's frank Odor news reporting. Thank you. Thank you. More and more workers are saying I'm done a record four million people quit their jobs in April, just as employers are facing labor shortages. NPR's Andrea Hsu looked into why this is happening. Jeremy Combi. Esky got his first restaurant job at 16 as a dishwasher at a big boys. He's worked his way up over 26 years. I love being a host for people, you know, I love Giving people food making people happy. But the pandemic took the joy out of his job as the general manager of a breakfast place in San Diego. There were days when just he and the cook. We're handling all the takeout orders, and when indoor dining resumed every hour or so, I would have to argue with somebody in the front who didn't have a mask. Sure enough. Last October, he got Covid. And then brought it home to his whole family. I'm pretty sure that I got it from arguing somebody at work. In December, California went into lockdown for a second time, and he was furloughed. The time away, opened his eyes to what life with the family could be like if he didn't have to put in 50 to 60 hours a week at the restaurant or work on holidays, especially Thanksgiving and Christmas. You know, I want to see my one year old and my five year olds faces light up when they come out and see the tree and other Presence that I spent six hours at night, assembling and putting out so so when he got called back to work last week, Gumby Esky quit putting an end to his unemployment checks, which had been a cushion. He and his wife figure they have enough savings to last a month or two. So she told him. Let's find something you're happy with. He's open to jobs in retail, maybe data entry. But one thing's for sure he only wants to work 40 hours a week. I think that this is clearly a real phenomenon where more workers are quitting than we've ever seen in the past. Daniel Joe is a labor economist with the job site Glassdoor, he says. In normal times, high quit rates are a sign of a healthy labor market. They signaled their workers. Feel more confident in order to actually leave their jobs and find a new one. But right now he thinks there are all kinds of reasons people are quitting. Some people may have just waited out the pandemic to leave a job that wasn't a good fit. Some people are quitting because they can make more money elsewhere. Professor Saddam Neely of Harvard Business School is focused on yet another factor. Thanks to the pandemic, she says. Workers now feel empowered to speak up about when how and where they want to work. We have changed work has changed. The way we think about time and space has changed. And for a younger generation of workers, that could mean entire careers that look nothing like they would have before. Take Jonathan Caballero, a software developer working out of his basement in Hyattsville, Maryland. This is kind of way. Set up with screens. He has four screens in his home office, also a white board and a guitar and I'm tired of looking at the screen. Just pick it up, and.

Eddie Bocanegra George Floyd Ailsa Chang Andrea Hsu Jonathan Caballero Daniel Joe Jeremy Combi San Diego New York Harvard Business School Scott 50 Los Angeles Philadelphia April NPR Washington Karen Bass Heartland Alliance Last October
"ailsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:30 min | 3 months ago

"ailsa chang" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Ailsa Chang in Los Angeles and I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington. It's hard to guess quite where President Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin will start when they meet face to face in Geneva next week. The list of friction points between their countries is long and it keeps getting longer by the day. New cyber attacks keep coming to light and the hackers, according to US intelligence are sitting in Russia. Then there's the Russian troop build up on the border with Ukraine. The dissident journalists snatched off a plane by a Russian ally Belarus, and that's probably just page one of the list. We thought it might be useful to check through one by one, what is likely to be on the summit agenda kind of a cheat sheet to follow along next week. Our guide is diplomatic correspondent Michele Kelemen. She's at the State Department and she's with us now. Hey, there. Hi there, Mary Louise. Okay, Before we get into chewing over what these two presidents are going to be chewing over, just take us big picture. Former President Trump was all about these one on ones. How important actually, are they in shaping the US Russia relationship? Well, The Biden team has pointed out that nothing really gets done with Russia without Vladimir Putin. I mean, it's a centralized system. He calls the shots, and President Biden knows that when I spoke to President Putin, I expressed my belief. Communication between the two of us personally and directly. Was to be essential and moving forward. You know, Biden has been involved in U. S foreign policy for decades. Me as a senator as vice president and now president and Putin, of course, is on his fifth US president here. Okay, well, let's dig in on the substance of the talks, and I actually thought it might be handy to divide this into buckets. So let me introduce as bucket number one. Cyber from solar winds to colonial pipeline to the GPS meat processing plant. This the attacks just keep coming. What will President Biden's message beyond this? You know, it's one of those areas where the U. S and Russia often talk past each other. Um Putin always denies responsibility. But these attacks just continue. This is front and center in in our focus in budget hearings this week, Secretary of State Antony Blinken seemed to indicate kind of a new approach to this, he said. Biden is going to raise the recent RANSOMWARE attacks. States cannot be in the business of harboring those Who were engaged in these kinds of attacks. The U. S. Is trying to build up norms and rules of the road and work with other allies and partners on this to give that United message to Russia. Of course, as you and I have noted in past, it's one thing to deliver that message to Putin and another thing to actually stop the behavior from continuing. We'll watch what actually emerges on that front. Bucket number two human rights. This is a big bucket. And it of course, includes Aleksey Navalny, the poisoned now imprisoned chief political opponent of President Putin. I should note there was a significant court ruling in Russia. This week that fits into the crackdown on dissent. Explain what's going on there. Right. So the Russian government has effectively declared, um these organizations related link to navalny as extremist groups, you know, just like Isis or Al Qaeda. Um, So you know, they're really laying down the marker and trying to, uh, they're effectively outlawing political opposition in Russia, and that's what it boils down to. Right. And you know, I should note that there are elections coming up for the Duma, the lower house of parliament in September. So this decision to label these groups as extremists will mean that their supporters won't be able to run and it really could Up in their strategy to try to push for any candidates that oppose Putin's United Russia. So what's the Biden message here are going to be Well, you know, I was talking last night to, um, an aide to Aleksey Navalny, who's in Washington to try to get the State Department and U. S lawmakers do. Really push for more targeted sanctions on Putin's inner circle and to make sure that have only cases raised now. State Department spokesperson Ned Price did put out a fairly strong statement this week on the latest moves against Navalny's political movement. And he also often says, you know, human rights are a key element of Biden's foreign policy. Human rights broadly will feature in the summit as well as the Attention of various individuals, so that's two buckets down cyber and human rights bucket Number three, which I'm going to call Russian aggression towards its European neighbours, notably Ukraine. What message are each of these presidents hoping to send about Russia's military interventions? Ambitions in the region, Putin is is determined to show that you know, none of this works. The pressure the outrage statements coming from Europe, the sanctions that this is his region and He's going to do what he's going to do. The Biden administration has been looking for ways to deter the Russians We've heard from Biden. You know this reconfirming America's unwavering commitment to Ukraine's sovereignty and territorial integrity. Those were the words of a White House statement recently. And Biden has invited Ukraine's president to come to the White House this summer. I should also say that he's you know, he's made a point of going first to NATO and meeting with the G seven leaders and and talking about this as an alliance that the the Western Alliance has these kind of norms, and this is how they're going to try to present it to the Russians. That's a key point is this whole trip has been choreographed so that Biden will be landing in Geneva with but the winds of NATO at his back and of the full weight of the alliance behind him. Let me let me dangle one last bucket. Michelle, and this might be a small bucket. But any areas where these two see eye to eye There are I mean, you know, look, relations have been spiraling down for years, and I think one of the hopes is that they can kind of put a floor under this. The Biden administration has talked about Once a more predictable and stable relationships, So you think about areas like the Arctic region, For instance, that's an area where they can work together. Climate change. Putin attended Biden's climate summit. That was a virtual summit, of course, but you know that's an area. These two countries have the largest nuclear arsenals in the world and one of the first things that Biden did when he came to office. Was extend the new start agreement that's the only one left. That place is caps on the U. S. And Russian nuclear arsenals and U. S. And Russian diplomats are part of the effort in Vienna right now to revive the Iran nuclear deal that that's the one the Trump administration left. Those talks are heading into 1/6 round. So there are areas where they are working together or could work together, but they really need to put a floor on this spiraling relationship. NPR's Michele Kelemen giving us a bucket list there as it were to get us ready for the summit next week. Thanks, Michel. Thank you, And by the way, I will be there. We've got a team headed to Geneva to be on the ground as things unfold, and you can hear our reporting.

Vladimir Putin Mary Louise Kelly Michel Mary Louise Ailsa Chang Aleksey Navalny Los Angeles Washington Michele Kelemen Putin Michelle Al Qaeda Geneva Ned Price Navalny September next week Isis White House Vienna
"ailsa chang" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

05:33 min | 3 months ago

"ailsa chang" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"I'm Ailsa Chang and I'm Mary Louise Kelly this hour how the Electoral college is wrapped up in the debate over vote counting. This is the essence of the minority role position, right? You don't have to convince the public that the system is fair. You just have to convince them that it's not so unfair they should overthrow the system. Also leaked IRS data shows how little many of the wealthiest Americans pay in taxes and consumer prices are rising as the economy rebounds from pandemics. Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. President Joe Biden is expected to announce tomorrow The U. S. Has purchased 500 million Pfizer vaccine doses and plans to donate them to the world's poorest countries. NPR's Tamara Keith reports. It comes as Mr Biden is set to meet with key allies in Europe. The announcement is part of an effort by the Biden administration to reassert US leadership on the global stage and to push other wealthy nations to follow suit. A source familiar with the plan, says 200. Million of the doses will be delivered this year with another 300 million to come. In the first half of 2022. The vaccines will go to Kovacs, an international effort to vaccinate people in low and lower income countries, as well as to the African Union. This is on top of 80 million doses the administration announced it would be sharing this month. The endeavor is earning praise from global health advocates, who for months had complained the U. S. Was hoarding vaccines. Tamara Keith NPR NEWS A Census Bureau says it is finalized plans for protecting people's privacy and the detailed demographic data it's set to release for the redrawing of voting districts. As NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports. The state of Alabama has been challenging those plans in federal court. Under federal law, The Census Bureau cannot released personally identifiable information from the national headcount until 72 years after its collected Here is putting in place privacy protections to try to keep people anonymous in the data about race, age and other demographic characteristics That's expected to be out by mid August here says its final privacy settings will ensure quote the accuracy of data necessary for redistricting and voting Rights Act enforcement. But in a federal lawsuit, Alabama's arguing the plans would make the data unusable The cases currently before a three judge court and is expected to be appealed to the U. S. Supreme Court Hansi Lo Wang, NPR NEWS NEW YORK An environmental group is marching with picketing Exxon workers at a plant in Beaumont, Texas. Today, Houston Public Media's Florian Martin explains the unusual alliance members of the Sunrise movement or joining with Exxon workers who have been locked out of their plan since May. 1st. The group's Roshni Khosla says the support oil and gas workers Even though they're calling for a transition away from fossil fuels. We want to highlight the fact that the protections afforded by union work and health care and good wages will be a part of that and will be prioritized in that transition. Exxon and the United Steelworkers union are clashing over seniority policy and pay. The company says it's locked out union workers to prevent a strike and that it is committed to negotiations for NPR news. I'm Florian Martin in Houston officials say the White House This is now dropping a trump era executive order that attempted to ban the popular apps Tiktok and we chat officials, saying the administration will conduct their own review aimed at identifying national security risks with software applications tried to China. On Wall Street, the Dow dropped 100 and 52 points. This is NPR. It is 504. It's 87 degrees. I'm Lisa Lobbies with WBZ News. The family of a Crystal Lake man says he should be allowed to fight his deportation while at home with his family, W. ABS Odette Yousef reports. Cesar Eliza Ramirez has been held at McHenry County Jail since late 2019. His partner, Kristen Glockner, says there's no need for that. She wants him home with her and their five kids. While he fights his removal order, the little ones has been more aggressive and angry and often cry themselves to sleep because they want and need their dad. Immigration and Customs enforcement says Eliza arose is a felon who also illegally re entered the U. S. After he was deported to Mexico once before. But his fiancee and immigrant advocates say all that was more than 20 years ago. They say he is not a threat to public safety. Odette Yousef WBZ news Chicago White Sox will return to 100% capacity at guaranteed rate field, starting with its game on June 25th against the Seattle Mariners. This announcement comes five days after the Cubs said they are moving to 100% capacity at Wrigley for the June 11th game against ST Louis. The Sox say the June 25th game will be followed by postgame fireworks season ticket holders will return to their regular locations. Seeding pods will be eliminated. More than half the 30 teams in the major league in Major League Baseball have announced returning to full capacity. Pedestrian traffic is climbing in the downtown Chicago business District. The main monthly report by the Chicago Loop Alliance shows foot traffic has improved to about half of normal levels, Hotel occupancy is reaching nearly 40%. Yesterday, we reported about a commission of citizens. It is ensuring Chicago's next ward. Remap is equitable. We incorrectly reported the number of members on that on that group. It's 13 people, not 15. Out in San Diego. The Cubs and Padres are tied bottom of the sixth one apiece. White Sox hosting Toronto tonight at 7 10, the Chicago sky tipping off at seven.

Mary Louise Kelly Kristen Glockner Ailsa Chang Hansi Lo Wang Tamara Keith Florian Martin White Sox Exxon Jack Spear San Diego Roshni Khosla 100% May. 1st Mexico Chicago White Sox 87 degrees five kids mid August Seattle Mariners Houston
"ailsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:22 min | 8 months ago

"ailsa chang" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"We are in Phase one name, which includes the vaccination of health care workers, paramedics and workers, A correctional facility hospitals, among others. Phase one B is next and that will include people over the age. Off 65 those in sectors like education and agriculture. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ailsa Chang and I'm Mary Louise Kelly. You meet a lot of people in a 40 year reporting career. That is how long Patty name and has worked for NPR, much of it with our science desk. As she retires this month, she looks back on one person who stuck with her a young woman named Jenny Langley, who was paralyzed from the neck down. Her fight with the state of Georgia in the early nineties made a difference for countless people with disabilities like hers. Here's Patty's reflection. I've always felt that as a journalist, it's a privilege to be allowed into people's lives and hear their stories. Especially stories like Jenny Langley's. I Met Jenny when she was 28 living with her sister's family in Atlanta, Georgia. Jenny takes long breaths from the ventilator, so she has enough oxygen to speak. E brought in him. My family and friends I wouldn't have the will. Go on and have fun and do what it They might life friend for me. The day I met her. Jenny was seated in her wheelchair. The dining room table with her sister. Jenny was all smiles, joking that she sounds like Darth Vader when she breathes. Then she tells me about the diving accident that paralyzed her from the waist down at 14 and 10. Years later, the car accident that paralyzed her from her neck down. And left her dependent on a ventilator. Four years. Her parents cared for her at home, but the costs were overwhelming. Eventually they went bankrupt and lost their home. Her sister, Cheryl Langley, wanted Jenny to move in with her and her family. I could do the physical on do the love. Do every bit of it. Can't come up with the money. Jenny is a very expensive young lady. There no fault of her own. Jenny had no choice but to go on Medicaid, which only paid for long term care in the nursing home. And that scared her. She knew her roommates could be decades older and maybe demented. I would have laid in the bed all day with them. No contact with the outside world. Nobody to talk to you. And if I did get up, I wouldn't have let me go outside. And most favorite things in the world to me. Just to go outside and sit in the sun, Jenny and her family decided to fight the state's Medicaid policy. They partnered with the Shepherd Center, which specializes in spinal cord injury and cared for Jenny after her accidents. Together, they built a case to prove to the state of Georgia that it was cost effective and more compassionate to allow Medicaid to pay for long term home care. At the time. Mark Johnson was director of patient advocacy for the center. He took Jenny to the state Capitol, where she boldly approached and talked to lawmakers. Her willingness to tell her story encourage other people to tell their story. And ultimately that led some policy change in Georgia. It took two years, but Jenny was victorious. In 1992, the state of Georgia changed its laws. It gave Medicaid recipients a waiver, a choice to pay for long term care in an institution or at home on Li, about five other states offered such a choice. But since then, Johnson says, A lot has changed if you think about Jenny's story was almost 30 years ago to the efforts of more people advocating every state has some form of waver. Jenny was able to move in with her sister. The family cared for journey until she died in 2002 at just 40 years old. Sara Morrison was Jenny's physical therapist. Today, she's president of the Shepherd Center and says that now quadriplegics can have a normal life expectancy. Thanks to advances in technology. For me the most poignant advances, one that could have helped Jenny a diaphragm.

Jenny Langley Georgia Jenny Medicaid NPR Darth Vader Patty Shepherd Center Mary Louise Kelly Ailsa Chang Sara Morrison Cheryl Langley Atlanta Mark Johnson Li director
"ailsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:43 min | 10 months ago

"ailsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Ailsa Chang in Los Angeles. And I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington. The cold weather surge in Corona virus cases that public health officials have been warning about for months is here. How bad is it? Well. The U. S has just hit new record highs on all three key measures. New infections, number of Americans hospitalized and deaths Dr Bruce Siegel represents safety net hospitals across the country. This is going to be the biggest stress test of American healthcare in history. It is across the country. It is not just one region. Health reporter Will stone joins us to discuss where these trend lines are leading and what it will mean for the U. S Healthcare system. Hi well Hello. December is already looking bad. Is this because of the travel that we saw over Thanksgiving? Actually, What's so disturbing is that it's still too soon to even see the full impact of Thanksgiving travel and family gatherings, experts say. We are going to see that spike in cases But it's probably going to start showing up next week. But let's be clear. A cases were climbing very quickly before Thanksgiving. So those Thanksgiving numbers and when they do show up will be a wave on top of an even bigger wave of infections that's already happening and experts are really scared because that Thanksgiving surge will hit hospitals right around Christmas. Here's Dr Bruce Siegel, who we already heard from. He represents hundreds of safety net hospitals. Have that surge going into the third week of December mounting, mounting mounting and then you have Christmas. And we are all really worried. You'll see another event with me into people being exposed over the Christmas holidays. January could be a very dark month. So will it sounds like we're not even close to the peak here. But hospitals and healthcare workers are already so overextended. How are they preparing for what's to come? Yeah, Hospitals are in trouble. There are already more than 100,000. Americans hospitalized with Cove it right now. That's close to double what it was just a month ago. Hospitals in the Midwest have been hammered for months. But now it's hospitals all over the U. S. In the South Hospitals have almost as many patients as they did during the summer. The nurses and doctors are already exhausted, and administrators can't find backup for help. So hospitals are doing all they can to stretch staff and supplies in the Northeast states like Rhode Island and Massachusetts or putting up overflow field hospitals in New Mexico. The governor's talking about hospitals having to ration care because they're so full and California is reimposing very strict lockdowns in many places because it's ICUs could be maxed out by Christmas. All right, so record infections, record hospitalizations. And as we said, also, record deaths. Tell us more about those numbers and who the people are who are dying right now. Yeah. In just two weeks, Deaths have increased about 50% on average. And remember, these are people who probably got sick before Thanksgiving. During the last peek over the summer. Many more younger adults. We're getting infected. So even though cases were hitting highs, the deaths weren't as bad. But experts are telling me that we can't count on that anymore. A doctor Jennifer Nuzzo, is an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins. And here's how she puts it. Eventually, the virus finds its way into the groups that are statistically more likely to become hospitalized in to die. When that does happen, you will see the deaths start to climb, and unfortunately that's what we seem to be seeing right now. And just look at long term care facilities like nursing homes. These have some the most vulnerable people. And, according to the Cova tracking project, more than a third of all covert deaths are now linked to long term care. So that's more than 100,000 covert deaths that can be traced to these facilities either among residents or workers, and they're on the list to be first in line to get a vaccine, But it could be February or March before that even happens. That's will stone covering the pandemic from his base in Seattle. Thank you will Thank you. It has been two weeks since officials in Michigan certified the 2020 presidential election, but some voters just are not ready to let go, and they're going to extreme lengths to make their displeasure known. A few dozen demonstrators, some reportedly armed showed up at the private home of Michigan's top election officials Saturday night. Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson was at home with her family in Detroit when she heard people chanting and shouting obscenities, accusing her of quote stealing the vote. Much of the focus of that slogan has been aimed at Wayne County, Home to the largest concentration of black voters in the state Secretary of State Johnson Benson of Michigan joins us Now. Welcome. Thank you. Thank you for having me. So what exactly happened on Saturday night? Well was late in the evening, And so my four year old son and I were getting ready for bed and you know it's bedtime for him, and we were. We had just finished up decorating the house for Christmas. And we were about to sit down and watch how the Grinch stole Christmas is he got ready for bed and and then we began to hear a noise. Outside the home on and on. We had been, you know, um, always on guard and always prepared for things like this in this moment that we're in, Unfortunately, but as a mother, nothing really prepares you for You know that moment where you just focus on protecting your kid? How bad did it get outside? Used to could certainly here and there's video footage reflecting that demands being made outside of my home. The threats the you know, and knowing again that we We have security footage. We have security cameras on our property..

Dr Bruce Siegel South Hospitals Ari Shapiro Michigan Ailsa Chang Los Angeles U. S Midwest Washington Jocelyn Benson California U. S Healthcare Northeast Seattle reporter Cove
"ailsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:44 min | 10 months ago

"ailsa chang" Discussed on KCRW

"This is all things considered. I'm Ailsa Chang in Los Angeles and Mary Louise Kelly in Washington. Is there a precedent for where we find ourselves today? For a sitting American president, two weeks and three days after Election Day, seeking to overthrow the results of that election, we're going to take the long view on this now and bring in presidential historian and author Michael Beschloss welcome. Thank you very much. Mary Louise to flush out a little bit more this moment where we find ourselves. Donald Trump has lost the election. He has failed in court to prove otherwise. He has fired, among others, the election official who fact checked his false claims of fraud, Chris Crabs. And he is now asking his fellow Republicans to hand him the presidency. What with the founders make of this moment, The founders would be absolutely horrified because this is what they always worried about. You know, in 17 87 at the time of the constitutional convention, they were deciding what kind of a presidency there would be, And they were always worried that presidents would get too much power to the point. That Let's say they lost reelection. They would abuse the huge power that the president had to try to stay on, even though the voters had said We don't want you in office anymore. My point you back to another moment in our history because I gather his historian, scratch their heads and try to mix into this moment. A lot of your pointing us back to the presidential election of 18 76. Remind us briefly if you would what happened in 18 76 and why you see parallels? Well, there were two guys who were running for president. One was named Rutherford Hayes. The other was Samuel Tilden, who was a Democrat and there were electoral votes contested in at least three states, South Carolina, Florida and Louisiana. And perhaps a few more. And it was Florida was a challenging for Florida. Just sticks with us forever. Sitting 2000 later on. But the problem was that both parties said we disagree about these states they're contested will go to Congress. Congress appointed an electoral commission and the result was a really ugly compromised A horrible compromise, which Woz Democrats said. We'll let you Republicans have your President Hayes as long as you will agree to pull federal troops out of the south, ending reconstruction. Which effectively allowed Democrats to bring in Ah lot of Jim Crow laws and make the race problem in this country 100 times worse than it would have been otherwise, Ah, problem that we're still dealing with today. A lot of what we saw this summer. No, I mean another echo that you kind of nodded to their worth remembering that this was a moment when black men had only recently won the right to vote. There were efforts to suppress that right, which is the state of affairs. That may remind people of today when we are witnessing efforts to stop vote certification in Wayne County in Detroit, Michigan, which includes an overwhelmingly black electorate. It would be bad enough in itself to say in 2020 that there are people trying to stop the votes of black people in Pennsylvania and perhaps in Michigan, and perhaps elsewhere. But if you put that in the context of history, there is that ugly, horrible history of people trying to do that, for hundreds of years on black women supposedly were guaranteed the right to vote in 1920. At the time, there was a constitutional amendment yet for 45 years, they had a hard time doing that until the time of the Voting Rights Act. For some, it's still hard today. Well, before we leave the 18 seventies behind us, I was brushing up on my history. And I noted that right after the hollow below that ended up with Rutherford B. Hayes becoming president. Congress changed the law. This was 18 87. Yes. What did they pass? How might apply how How should it be applying to today? They passed a very complicated law that even in 2020, a lot of people disagree about and do not understand. They find it very ambiguous. And in a way, it would have been better had no law been passed because instead of saying, Let's do what they said in 18 87 each time this has come up, for instance, in 2000. It was a lot of legal controversy over what the law meant. And to this day, a lot of people don't know. So to circle you back to the question I started with. Is there a precedent for where we find ourselves Now? It sounds like the end of the short answer is not really absolutely not in a million years. Is there a President Donald Trump is in a category of his own. This is a case where a president doesn't like the result because he lost the election. They lost it by quite a lot. And basically this is a case of you know if I say that I'm the king of Romania doesn't make me the king of Romania. What he's saying that he won the election. He didn't This is something that bad loser could have done it any time in American history. Fortunately for us before 2020 that has not happened, I hope will never happen again. We just have a few seconds left. But what is that, like as a lifelong study er of the American presidency to find yourself in a moment. There is no precedent. The founders did not make this system perfect. They always depended on assuming that a president would come to office who have the goodwill and love of democracy, that he would not do this and here we're in a case where President just wants to get this done for himself. That is not the king of Romania. But whose historian Michael Beschloss, right. His latest book is Presidents of war. Thank you. Thank you, Mary Louise. Black man in Brazil has died after being severely beaten by security guards. It happened last night on the eve of Black Consciousness Day as NPR's Philip Reeves reports his death has caused a huge outcry. The beating was captured on video by an onlooker. The footage shows a black man on the ground at a supermarket. White Security guard Hold him down Another strikes. The man repeatedly in the face is quite Anton is more hell. The postal system can't death of 40 Roach. One freighters is making headlines on a day in which Brazil is supposed to honor its black citizens. It happened in the southern city of Porto, allegedly the supermarkets operators carry for are calling his death of brutal crime can afford canceled its contract with the security company. That's no consolation to black Brazilians and many others now flooding the Internet with messages of anger and despair or this crowd.

president Rutherford B. Hayes Donald Trump Mary Louise Congress Michael Beschloss Romania Mary Louise Kelly Florida Ailsa Chang Brazil Samuel Tilden Los Angeles Wayne County Washington Jim Crow NPR