7 Burst results for "Aileen Lee"

"aileen lee" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:58 min | 7 months ago

"aileen lee" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Very flexible in its investments and I give them an a plus for client service A fund may be opened with a $5000 contribution of cash or appreciated securities and can be used as an alternative to a private foundation at any time you may suggest which charities you would like to support and in what amounts choose from the menu of high rated investment options and your charitable fund can earn tax free income It's a very client centric organization They have a very user friendly website and I find they make my life easier Let the Jewish communal fund be your personal connection to charitable giving open a JCF fund now to lock in this year's tax deduction call two one two 7 5 two 8 two 7 7 two one two 7 5 two 8 two 7 7 or visit JCF NY dot org This is a Bloomberg money minute like the creatures of myth and legend a unicorn company supposed to be something rare and special and so it was for a few years after venture capitalist aileen Lee coined the term in 2013 to describe the few dozen startups to be valued at $1 billion Then starting in early 2020 the unicorn population exploded The pandemic has inflicted so much pain on all of us but it's also kind of like cemented this opening for software and technology to become a bigger part of the scaffolding of our life Now there are more than a thousand unicorns And the three largest ByteDance SpaceX and stripe have valuations above or approaching a $100 billion Well you still think unicorns are a good way to describe the $1 billion startup It's still super rare and very hard to achieve Rarer still is the unicorn with a female founder Women led startups secured only 2% of venture capital in the U.S. last year Tracy junkie Bloomberg radio What is dedication The thing that drives me every day is a day is very we call them day to day for short Every day.

"aileen lee" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:28 min | 7 months ago

"aileen lee" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Pages Everyone wants to look cool on Instagram but not everybody can afford what the bloggers can afford So I think thrift stores are a great alternative Hear more wherever you get your podcasts Just search finding your good today or visit finding your good dot org to listen shop and be inspired Is the heart of your family and he taught you our history He helped you fix your first flight He was the best backyard DJ around and every time you tell a story he'd own the room but now more than ever he may feel alone Today older adults and their loved ones are struggling to connect and a time when connection has never been more important But there is something we can do embrace our older loved ones through story core connect with connect you can honor seniors remotely with an interview about their life Every interview will be archived at the Library of Congress becoming part of American history so that years from now future generations can listen in All right grandpa What's one piece of advice you have for me Just three words sweetheart live with courage The man that had the best stories still has plenty of stories to tell So connect virtually and share the conversation of a lifetime and story core connect dot org slash AARP Connect honor share story core connect a message from AARP StoryCorps and the ad council This is a Bloomberg money minute like the creatures of myth and legend a unicorn company supposed to be something rare and special and so it was for a few years after venture capitalist aileen Lee coined the term in 2013 to describe the few dozen startups to be valued at $1 billion Then starting in early 2020 the unicorn population exploded The pandemic has inflicted so much pain on all of us but it's also kind of like cemented this opening for software and technology to become a bigger part of the scaffolding of our life Now there are more than a thousand unicorns And the three largest ByteDance SpaceX and stripe have valuations above or approaching a $100 billion Well you still think unicorns are a good way to describe the $1 billion startup It's still super rare and very hard to achieve Rarer still is the unicorn with a female founder Women led startups secured only 2% of venture capital in the U.S. last year Tracy junkie Bloomberg radio And JIT makes innovation happen It also makes entrepreneurs like Anya o'dwyer founder of innovate a tech driven.

"aileen lee" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:44 min | 7 months ago

"aileen lee" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is a Bloomberg money minute like the creatures of myth and legend a unicorn company supposed to be something rare and special and so it was for a few years after venture capitalist aileen Lee coined the term in 2013 to describe the few dozen startups to be valued at $1 billion Then starting in early 2020 the unicorn population exploded The pandemic has inflicted so much pain on all of us but it's also kind of like cemented this opening for software and technology to become a bigger part of the scaffolding of our life Now there are more than a thousand unicorns And the three largest ByteDance SpaceX and stripe have valuations above or approaching a $100 billion Well you still think unicorns are a good way to describe the $1 billion startup It's still super rare and very hard to achieve Rarer still is the unicorn with a female founder Women led startups secured only 2% of venture capital in the U.S. last year Tracy junkie Bloomberg radio President of the Jewish communal fund zoya reigns and her husband Robert Friedman Jewish activists and philanthropists Talk about why they chose the Jewish communal fund for their charitable giving As very busy working parents we wanted to focus more on the charity part of it and wanted to focus more on our children and less on the administration The two's communal fund is one of the oldest and largest donor advised funds but at the same time they are totally up to date and have state of the art systems for us to access and manage our contributions online The assets in our funds at the JCF grow tax free So we can generate more charitable dollars to support the charities that we care about most Let JCF minimize your taxes and maximize.

aileen Lee Tracy junkie Bloomberg Bloomberg zoya reigns Robert Friedman U.S. JCF
"aileen lee" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:39 min | 8 months ago

"aileen lee" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Technology I'm Emily Chang in San Francisco big tech making a big comeback Let's get an update with our creedy Gupta Katie what do we see Yeah Emily one of the big questions I think in the market is is the bottom end Is that selling that we saw at the start of the year Is it over Well maybe take a look at this chart you are actually seeing This is the S&P 500 information technology sector after a 15% drop It's actually paired back some of those losses with halfway back in that one of the big drivers of that is of course going to be your big tech names And I really want to take a look at what that performance looks like not just in the last three weeks One of the last 6 months because there is a clear outperformer even in the big tech space and it is Apple It is Microsoft This hardware companies outperforming the social media companies the ones that are essentially more exposed to the economic cycle to that business spending alphabet in the green but only about two and a half percent over 6 months And of course meta platforms the real laggard here losing 36% of its value in the last 6 months at least according to its stock price But let's talk about what else is impacted by these big tech moves It's not just these companies It's semiconductors as well and I love to look at this gauge because that means to me kind of show a magnified approach of what you're seeing in big tech of semis where you bound big tech kind of follows its lead So semi is actually the socks the next had hit a bottle out before the broader index in and for me that was a big kind of gauge of whether or not the bottom is in And for now looking at those technical levels bouncing off of its 14 day RSI it does actually look like some have paired back some of those losses too So Emily things are looking good for now Let's hope they stay that way for the bowls All right pretty thanks for the update Meantime software tool maker product board is the latest company to hit prized unicorn status becoming number 1000 But what does it mean today to be one in a field of 1000 unicorns That phrase emerged nearly a decade ago when startups worth a $1 billion were rare and treasured but with startups and investors looking to give the next successful company its horn we may need to revisit what is and isn't a true unicorn Joining us now the investor who coined that term aileen Lee founder and managing partner of cowboy ventures aileen great to have you back with us So curious how that number 1000 unicorns Now strikes you when there were only 39 unicorns back in 2013 and when you coined that term I know Well thanks for having family I'm super happy to be here Now I guess I will point out that when we did the analysis in 2013 it was just a U.S. based list So the thousand list is about half U.S. half international so it's really maybe like 500 to 39 but still it is quite an amazing growth in the number of unicorns Should a unicorn still be a $1 billion company or do we need to raise the bar Should it be a $2 billion company I know this question comes up a lot Look it's still super rare and very hard to achieve So yeah I think what's exciting is that kind of the ceiling has been lifted So I mean when the first analysis was done there was only one company worth over a $100 billion Now there's a bunch of them right So I think the markets for tech companies have gotten bigger their global sadly you know the pandemic has inflicted so much pain on all of us but it's also kind of like cemented this opening for software and technology to become a bigger part of this scaffolding of our life So I think tech will continue to grow as a sector and the composition of the list has changed and I think that's really good for tech But it's still really hard I mean the probability is still extremely rare if you start a company that raises venture capital for you to achieve evaluation of over a $1 billion And it's also harder than ever to keep it there And to keep it I mean just look at all the terminal going on in the market right now The sustainability of staying in that zone for a long time is hard Does that mean you don't think that private markets are overheated 'cause I hear over and over again that valuations are just too high And there's so much money that flowing in It's both I think the yes I mean I remember a time when companies traded at 5 times revenue right Sass it's like hasn't happened in a long time So the multiples are pretty big relative to where they have lived but a lot of the companies have grown into the valuations because the markets are so big I mean when you I mean I know meta has been having a really rocky start to the year but just look at the revenue that that company drives I remember when people laughed at Facebook raising at a $100 million valuation Because people were like how will they ever make money It's free No one will buy ads on Facebook I mean the amount of revenue they drive is incredible So we're looking at some of these private companies that are striped $95 billion SpaceX a $100 billion still haven't gone public Do you condone the use of the word deca corn Is that good for the next phase You know it's funny like in that piece that we wrote we used like mega unicorn I think and deck of corn I was reading I think sent a corn Yeah Crunchbase was using like tricorn and quadri corn things like that Whatever people want to use this cool with me The first place so it's kind of I know it's annoying to some but it's useful I guess A whole breed of corns have been born I gotta ask you you're also the founder of all rays you're one of the biggest champions for getting more women into VC more women entrepreneurs funded We just got a really honestly kind of a depressing statistic that women founders got just 2% of VC funding last year Why is that Given all of the momentum the talk the work that you and always have done to change this Yeah we've got a lot of work to do When we covet when we found it all rays we said this is a marathon And we can not let up because we have centuries of bias to undo and not just tack and not just finance but pretty much in every sector of the economy in healthcare and law and government in advertising There's just a ton of disproportionate power held in the hands of institutions that have a lot of embedded bias So I think we are making progress on the funding side in terms of changing the composition of the VC industry We have grown it and I'm hoping that that's a leading indicator and that founders will follow But yeah we are not making as much progress from a dog in the background sorry All right meantime we're not making as much progress as we need to for female founders And so I think everyone in whatever job they have to examine the ways that they can make a positive difference with who they hire how they have one on ones how they promote who they give projects to There's ways that everyone can have an impact on making it more fair So let's talk about having an impact What trends are you doubling down on in seed these days Are you excited for example about the metaverse Or is that overhyped I think the metaverse is just like what does that mean really If you mean the metaverse like are we all gonna be wearing VR's headsets and staying in our houses all the time I think that's if we're lucky enough to emerge from our caves after this pandemic I think at least for the next three to 5 years people are going to be more excited to engage in real life than ever before Restaurants hospitality travel fashion I think that's people miss real life experience I think actually the experience economy and the access economy is going to boom Now where people are going to live both like the unicorns of the future what countries they're in what cities are and that's going to change So I do think that the software that actually scaffolds ability to communicate with each other And the ability to collaborate and work wherever we are that is going to continue to grow like crazy And also vertical software whether it's in healthcare and EdTech where I think those are categories that if you look at the original uniform analysis even FinTech was a tiny component of the list of U.S. based unicorns and now it's a huge component I think we're rebuilding the infrastructure and kind of the rails of all the major categories of our industry and I think Larry from BlackRock made a comment about how he thinks a big component of the next set of unicorns is going to be energy talk I hope that's true too All right we'll be watching Eileen Lee We're gonna let you get back with your dog who's been hanging out there Cowboy ventures that I'm.

Emily Chang Gupta Katie aileen Lee cowboy ventures aileen Emily U.S. San Francisco Microsoft Apple Facebook
"aileen lee" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:43 min | 8 months ago

"aileen lee" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Gonna talk about what it means to be a unicorn today in the ever expanding club of unicorns cowboy ventures founder aileen Lee who came up with that term 9 years ago We'll join us This is Bloomberg There are a lot of ways to look at the world right now Interesting that you've got an overweight on Hong Kong and the more of them you can access the better What has to be his strategy Perspective Who's doing school best clarity How do we get it so that the benefits get to everybody Expertise He seems to have exactly the right combination It's character plus policy Bloomberg radio the Bloomberg business app and Bloomberg radio dot com Bloomberg the world is listening Economics All this doom and gloom is out there finding Do you see this as a technical correction What are you looking at to give you some sort of compass through this period The Bloomberg surveillance podcast lots and lots of talk about what the fed should and shouldn't do Lisa everyone's in the names that shaped the world's markets Speak with professor schiller of Yale University Bloomberg surveillance Listen today at Bloomberg dot com the Bloomberg business app or subscribe on Apple podcast.

Bloomberg unicorns cowboy ventures aileen Lee com Bloomberg Hong Kong Lisa Yale University Apple
"aileen lee" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

04:03 min | 8 months ago

"aileen lee" Discussed on This Week In Google

"It in its wild. In fact, I have my trainer said, did you see last night? There were UFOs who were like 60 of them in a row, going across this guy said, yeah, that's Starlink. When they launch them, they're in a daisy. They're like a bracelet. I didn't know that they peel off. Yeah, it's really cool. And they're like that in all the astronomy pictures. Yes, exactly. Isn't that nice? All right. See, I wouldn't know, because every time I look up at night, it's such a hazy sky here in this area. I never get to see them search cigar smoke. That's a country guy saying, oh, I'm in the big city. Oh, you're right. Is the sky brighter and north cacao lackey? Well, I mean, it's just always hazy here. It's a little hazier here than it is. Yeah. Even trying to get photographs of the moon is difficult because I just don't see it sometimes. It's three in the morning. There are now more than a billion unicorns. Don't tell your daughter, Stacy, there are now, boy. More than a billion unicorns. No, no. No. They're now. Like, how many orders of magnitude is that, you're off? There are now more than a billion companies worth a $1000. Oh, no, I got backwards. All the audio. Just blue. There are. Thousand unicorns. That's companies worth a $1 billion or more, which used to be a rarity. That was a big deal. Oh, they're unicorns, right? Uber. Inflation. Is it inflation? Or is there a lot of venture capital money? So much. I was just when I was at fortune in 2015, they did a list of unicorns for the first time. And how many were there? It was ridiculous. It was like. Yeah. Here it is. Let me find it. Fortune. All of this comes from raising enough money for a small portion of your company that the total if you were to sell it all, which you will haven't would be more than a $1 billion. So if you raised $10 million for a 1% valuation, then you're a unicorn. So that's part of it also, you know. Yeah, I was hoping they would tell me how many unicorns they had. They were like 25 or something ridiculous. I mean, it's your valuation evaluation is just the evaluation is just a hope and a prayer. It's made up, yeah. The term unicorn dates. This is from Bloomberg businessweek. Dates to a 23 haven't heard that in a long time. This week, the term unicorn dates to a 2013 article by aileen Lee a venture capitalist who had just started a firm called cowboy ventures, writing for TechCrunch, which had just started up 2013. Is that all? No, TechCrunch. When I joined Giga om in 2008, TechCrunch was already our competitor. So I misread this. I thought it said news site. It said news site. Her article was about lessons, investors could take from examining the few U.S. based tech companies that had reached a $1 billion valuation. Looking at private and U.S. public U.S. companies, finances, 2003 shit. And if I had 39 unicorns, this is in 2013. Arab D and B Dropbox Facebook groupon LinkedIn tumblr Twitter YouTube Uber singha you know all the names. But now, now there's thousands. But the best part of this, what are you laughing at?.

Stacy TechCrunch aileen Lee cowboy ventures Bloomberg businessweek Giga U.S. tumblr LinkedIn Facebook YouTube Twitter
"aileen lee" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

08:07 min | 8 months ago

"aileen lee" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Should never have chosen a monkey. That was a big mistake. So a stuff to daisy whoops a daisy. And what I would do is I would come in to the all hands, so a hundred plus people, and I would say, look, here's my biggest mistake of the week. I want to hear your biggest mistake. And the person who made the biggest mistake is going to get two things. They're going to get instant forgiveness, and they're going to get to keep this stuff daisy on their desk for the week. And it became just sort of a fun part of our all hands meeting. And it helps sort of reinforce this idea that no news is bad news and bad news is good news because we learn from what we do wrong. And that was helpful. When does feedback create an environment that actually stifles innovation and creativity, right? Because sometimes feedback isn't right. Feedback is wrong, like the things people give you feedback on and their perspectives are just not good feet sound smart. Helpful. Let's be honest. Some feedback's terrible. Yeah, yeah. Some feedback is really horrible. So the thing you can do is, first of all, you can identify the 5 or 10% of what the person said that you can agree with. Just to demonstrate that you're not shut down the feedback you're not automatically defensive. And then you have a respectful conversation with the person about why you disagree with the feedback. Again, this is counterintuitive. I think instinctively, a lot of us fear that a disagreement is going to hurt a relationship. But the fact of the matter is, what's really going to hurt your relationship is either ignoring feedback that someone had the courage to give you or saying thank you for the feedback. I don't know about you, but when someone says that to me, that is not what I hear, I hear FU. I want to call out some specific ways that feedback goes wrong. Sometimes feedback reflects unconscious bias. Gender bias, racial bias. Yes. Sometimes feedback actually reflects conscious prejudice. And sometimes it's not feedback. It's just bullying. And so the question is, what do you do when what you're getting is biased prejudice or bullying masquerading as feedback? That is hard. I mean, we're living in an environment now where it's becoming much clearer that certain types of managers and I don't want to stereotype, but let's just say white men may not have been as conscious of these things. Because how would they be? They haven't been the victims of them. Alan eustace, who's one of my favorite leaders, was one of my favorite leaders at Google, used to do this thing with his team, where he would stand up in front of a couple thousand engineers. And he would say, if you're underrepresented on this team, and by that, he meant if you're a woman, if you're black, if you're LatinX. If you're underrepresented on this team, and you have been harmed by workplace injustice in the last week, pretty much 100% of the underrepresented people on the team raise their hand. And then he would say, now, everybody put your hand down. Now, if you have been unjust to one of your colleagues in the last week, raise your hand. Nobody raced their hand. And so this is one of the things that I struggled with when I wrote just work. I hate to think of myself as a victim. But even more, I hate to think of myself as a perpetrator. And so sometimes where the person who is harmed, other times where the person who caused harm, other times we are the upstander and an upstander is a bystander who actually intervenes. And other times were the leader. And in each of these different roles, we kind of have different levels of responsibility. So aileen Lee told me a great story. She's the founder of cowboy VC. She told me a great story about walking into a meeting with two colleagues who are men. They sat down at a long conference table. And then the folks from the other side from the company whose business they were trying to win came in. The first guy sits across from the guy to aliens left. The next guy sits across from the guide to his left. And aileen had the expertise that was going to win her team the deal. And so she started talking. But when the other side had questions, they directed them at her two colleagues who were men, not at aileen. And once it happened twice. And eventually, one of aliens partners stood up and he said, I think a lean and I should switch seats. That was all he had to do to totally change the tenor in the room. Everybody realized what they were doing and they stopped doing it. So that was sort of a simple example of an eye statement. Working, no huge deal, but it worked out really well. But of course, sometimes it's not unconscious bias at play. And I think this is one of the reasons that unconscious bias gets met with some skepticism. Is that very often we assume everything's unconscious bias. But sometimes it's not unconscious bias. Sometimes it's quite conscious prejudice. But sometimes there's no conscious prejudiced belief going on. The person's just being mean. And that is what bullying is. And it's so hard in the moment to know how to respond to bullying. I think one of the many mistakes of feedback training is that it teaches us to respond to bullying as though it's biased. And this is a mistake I have made many, many times. In fact, when my daughter was in third grade, she was getting bullied on the playground. And I was kind of encouraging her to say, oh, I feel sad when you blah blah. And she banged her fist on the table, and she said, mom, he is trying to make me feel sad. Why would I tell him he succeeded? And I thought, gosh, you know, that is a really good point. That's fair. It's a very good point for a third grader. Yeah. Yeah, she's very, she was able to articulate her power, right? Yeah. Yeah. House a radical candor here. She was given me some feedback. But she was exactly right. And so I realized it used statement. If an I statement invites someone in to understand things from your perspective, that's a great response to bias. But if it's bullying, you want to use statement, which kinds of pushes kind of pushes them away. Like you can't talk to me like that. Or if that feels like it might escalate, say, what's going on for you here? Or even just like, where'd you get that shirt? The point of a youth statement is now you are in an active role because you're asking the other person, the question. You eventually left Google and went to Apple and you were hired to actually hire to teach a class about management at what was called Apple university that they're sort of internal school. And what I love about this is that you went in as sort of your own experiment. You said, I want to learn even more about management and I'm going to use my stories of success and failure to teach this class and then to learn. Yes, it was incredible, actually, Steve Jobs had decided that the management training that they had at Apple was not good. And so we wanted to throw it all away and start from a blank sheet of paper. And it was a big decision to leave Google actually. After I had kids, you kind of reassess what's important to you. And I realized I really didn't care at all about cost per click. I mean, that was doing really well at Google. But the thing that really got me out of bed in the morning was building the team, helping the culture of the team translate to 13 different countries. And helping the people on the team take a step in the direction of their dreams. And so how could I do that at scale, not just for one particular team, but I kind of wanted to shed the operating role.

Alan eustace aileen Lee aileen FU Google Apple Steve Jobs