26 Burst results for "Ai Technologies"

"ai technologies" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

03:43 min | 2 months ago

"ai technologies" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"Samsung has managed to pack all of these improvements into an even smaller package. For example, a 512 gigabyte UFS 3.1 module measures 11.5 by 13 by one millimeter. In contrast, the maximum size of a UFS 4.0 module will max out at 11 by 13 by one millimeter for one terabyte of storage. Samsung says it will begin mass production in Q three 2022, meaning UFS 4.0 could appear in phones as soon as late 2022 or early 2023. Twitter has begun testing Twitter circle, a feature for sharing tweets with up to a 150 people rather than everybody. It's similar to Instagram's close friends sharing option, quoting Mac rumors. With Twitter circle Twitter users can share their tweets with up to a 150 people rather than sharing their content publicly. Each user will be able to create a Twitter circle that consists of people who will be able to see the users, Twitter circle tweets. It's similar to the close friends story sharing feature on Instagram, which allows users to select a group of people to share stories with in lieu of publicly sharing stories with all followers. Twitter says that some Twitter users will be able to create a Twitter circle starting today, those who have the feature available will be able to choose up to a 150 followers to add to the circle after being prompted with the new circle interface, and only people selected for the user's Twitter circle will be able to see and reply to circle tweets. Twitter circle participants can be edited at any time. There is no word yet on when this feature will see a wider rollout end quote. I learned about this feature this morning when friend of the show Nemo OG included me in a circle. I share a link to it with you, but of course I can't. And that's exactly the point, right? You have to be in nema's circle. Meta's AI lab has created open pre trained transformer, a language model trained with a 175 billion parameters to match GPT-3 size, and it's giving it away to researchers for free. Quoting silicon republic. The social media giant said it is sharing access to both the pre trained models and the code needed to train and use them. It added that this will allow for quote more community engagement and understanding this foundational new technology, access to the model will be granted to academic researchers. Those affiliated with organizations in government, civil society, and academia, along with industry research laboratories around the world, meta AI said in a blog post yesterday, large language models are natural language processing or NLP systems that are trained on a massive volume of text. These models are able to answer reading comprehension questions, solve basic math problems and generate text. Meta said full research access to large language models is usually restricted to a few highly resourced labs, which hinders efforts to increase their robustness and remove issues such as bias and toxicity within the models. For AI research to advance the broader scientific community must be able to work together with cutting edge models to effectively explore their potential while also probing for their vulnerabilities at the same time. The company said meta AI believes that collaboration across research organizations is critical to the responsible development of AI technologies and quote. The social media company said it designed its model called OPT a 175 B to be energy efficient and it was trained using roughly 14% of the carbon footprint used to train OpenAI's GPT-3 model end quote. Our.

Twitter Instagram Samsung meta AI Meta civil society AI technologies
"ai technologies" Discussed on VUX World

VUX World

01:56 min | 3 months ago

"ai technologies" Discussed on VUX World

"The last mile is the hardest thing to overcome. You can have a really fancy assistant that's working in a prototype on a stage and environment, but getting it into your content is incredibly difficult to do. Most organizations will actually host it on a different phone number. And with that, you miss out on a whole bunch of context. You miss out on dear to the organization has on the caller, a whole handover between agents, get a really clunky, and there's a whole bunch more that you can do if you integrate properly into your course. And so I'm going to be covering some high level strategic tips that you need to be taken on board when you're thinking about ultimate and calls in your call center. And Elon Avnet will be showing you how to actually go about doing it. Any bot framework integrated into any call center really, really simply, and you can do it yourself. So join us next week. It's going to be on Tuesday. And I will put the link down here in the chat. If you're tuning in, live and also it will be in the show notes, obviously. When this podcast is published on the various channels. And lastly, last thing I'll see is that we're also running another webinar. The second video works world webinar, which is going to be on airport 20th with core AI and we're going to be talking about agent assist use cases. The title is, is AI coming for your job. And the reality, as we find out today, is that no, that's not actually the case. AI is helping organizations and helping agents and call centers be more productive and some more productive cars. But when they do that, how can you use AI technologies to empower agents on the phone, give them next best action, help them understand and find the information that they're searching for. And that's what we're going to be talking about on April the 20th. So please do join me and Raj canary CEO of core AI on April 20th and the link to that is on our event page view X dot world slash events. Now, without further ado, we are going to be climbing into the mind of Charles golf just now who.

Elon Avnet AI technologies Raj canary Charles golf
"ai technologies" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

05:11 min | 7 months ago

"ai technologies" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

"I mean, cell phone you can actually afraid it. So, I mean. That is so with the logistics that goes on right now. I don't even know how to container works, you know, with a shipment. So I would say that. Yeah. Maybe a year or so. And they're all probably stuck right off the LA bay right now. Yeah. And I think that by the time you by the time they start shipping, Intel will still be at 14 nanometer. Well, you know what, speaking of the processor once again, specifically, this is a question that I thought of while you were presenting, I wanted to ask it during the thing, but it's okay. We have you here. So the pentatonic 2000 with all of these high end specifications that it supports. The thing is not all TVs really support that just in case of their hardware. So it might be a 60 hertz panel, for example, or it might be not even a four K panel. Do you have other processors? Or is it just this one that then gets downscaled based upon what the OEM provides? Do you have other, let's say mid tier pentatonics that are out there in the wild or going to be out there in the wild? So today's depend on 2000 is the first member of the family of the pentatonic families. But going forward, we see that actually, we see this increase in CPU performance pervasive all across the entire next generation of TV associates. We do not understand how a software developer actually to motivate a software developer to develop software, they don't want to optimize the software across the entire course range of the TV. Because they want to run one software running on four K 60, four K one 20. Same CPU performance, same graphics performance. So we have to make that drive. I think now it's like 65 70% of the market. We need to make that move to give the platform for the software developers to actually enjoy the platform with scalable performance without a deal with all this cost optimization. And of course, it means a lot of the technologies that Alfred introduced with the pentatonic 2000 whether it's the picture quality enhancements, the AI technologies. We will be migrating those down to different tiers of products. Video pipeline might be a four K video pipeline, not an 8 K video pipeline or a CPU GPU performance might scale whatever. But the idea is yes that we already ship products in all of these tiers. We will, of course, be introducing new products later. Got it. Okay, yeah. That was my question. Because whether or not the one 2000 is going to be in everything, and it just is up to the Ohio. It's really a flagship. This is really a flagship. This will be on the high end, the highest entity. Perfect. Listen, I'm glad here's the thing. I'm glad it will be because the TV in my bedroom is 5 K it's a $5000 television. And I have, all right, it disconnects from Wi-Fi all the time. It's just that. If I'm going to pay that amount of money for a television, I want that thing to talk to me. I wanted to make my coffee. I wanted to treat me nicely. AI technology will only get us so far so good. Here's the thing. I mean, the fact that you're the fact that all this horsepower will enable AI capabilities from how I'm assuming that because of how AI can improve photography on a phone today, I assume that that's also going to play a major role in picture quality for the television, correct? Absolutely. Okay. Because for me, it's that. So I guess it's not just the horsepower. You also have the AI engine and the G picture quality improvements, noise reduction, super scaling, all that kind of. So we use AI in many different fashions, picture quality one. We use AI in audio, how many times you go to a TV to listen to news and all of a sudden, somebody advertise cars, and the volume just go pick out. Oh my God. So we can use AI to detect that and also balance the audio volume, for example. For the audio impair, I mean, people that, you know, in certain age, they can not actually listen to a dialog and an Aussie environment. We can actually sort out call voice dialog operations and actually danton customize the background audio so that you can actually hear the dialog. There are a lot of technology that we use AI to explore, but we haven't deployed, but you can see that there's a lot of stuff to come, searching. Basically, to search contents, and only just limit by Netflix or CSP OTTs, but also linear TVs, right? And also contents related to a particular topics, including YouTube user generated contents. So make search of contents more useful. More easy to use. It's all about making a TV useful to you. Personalized to you. You would say that pentatonic would enable much better smart TVs than what we know. Instead of just considering the typical smart TV that we know we could say that this will enable super smart TVs pretty much. Like you have all the power. I think that, first of all,.

LA bay Intel Alfred Ohio danton Netflix YouTube
Upstart Announces Second Quarter 2021 Results

BTV Simulcast

01:54 min | 11 months ago

Upstart Announces Second Quarter 2021 Results

"Just went public in December there now out with earnings in a full year forecast, which topped analyst estimates Shares of the Fintech company reacting positively at one point up 15% Now 17%. After hours almost 18% for more on the report and the future of Fintech. I'm joined by upstart CEO Dave Gerard, who just joined us after the company's earnings call Dave look investors like what they see. What do you think they're reacting to their All right. Thanks. So, Yeah. I mean, it's the combination of super fast growth combined with profits. I mean, fintech companies are known for growth, much lesser known for profit, So when you can put those two things together, I think people get excited. So you're not just a lending company. But you know, the key feature is artificial intelligence and how you're integrating that into the process. Talk to us about how companies are leveraging this technology. Yeah, sure. So we operate and not as a bank or lender, but as a partner to banks to let them use AI technology to originate credit. And that really means more accurate models that will unbalance approved more people at lower loss rates. And so it's It's just something When you put it together, it pretty dramatically increases or improves access to credit for consumers. But it also helps banks have more inclusive and more profitable lending programs. That's kind of the heart of AI as it's applied to lending Traditional lenders keeping up with the technology. And how do you know which ones are and which ones aren't Well, it's a good question. I mean, it's really hard to compare lenders and in the results of of lending is sometimes it takes a while to play out. So it's a little hard for the world to actually, you know, completely grasp what's real and what's not, because there's a lot of buzz words flying around for sure, but ultimately, you know, a strong business ends up in the growth. It ends up in the profits in the things that we've the ways we've measured businesses ad infinitum, and I think, ultimately that's what we're demonstrating here.

Fintech Dave Gerard Upstart Dave
"ai technologies" Discussed on Telecom Reseller

Telecom Reseller

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"ai technologies" Discussed on Telecom Reseller

"This is the green and I'm the publisher of Telecom reseller and today I'm with Brad Taylor who's the vice president of AI Technologies at until appear red? Thank you for joining me today right back. I'm happy to be here. Well, this is a going to be an interesting podcast. We're going to be talking about current and future Trends in voice automated, artificial intelligence Ai. And we're supposed to be talking about how C pass and a I strengthen Enterprises of all sizes to deliver, first-class customer experiences. I think these are topics that are going to be interesting, not just to the Enterprise but also people that serve the Enterprises and many other people as well. But the first bread, what is Intel appear? So until. The company has been around fifteen years, providing a cross-section of business Communications and capabilities. Uh, we're about serving about 2 million plus and years through our, you know, offering start clients and we have, you know, several thousand, customers across many verticals and are offering is a communication platform is of service where we built on the the capabilities that are omnipresent. So to speak in the Telecommunications off in the sense that it's a strong Foundation that we have already being, you know, having these telecommunication partners and then we've provided the best choice of cloud until like vacations. In the platform that fulfills a number of needs and uh, voice messaging workflow, I mentioned analytics. So you can create a delightful dog. Ami Channel Flash. Let's talk just about that. You're creating a delightful customer journey and using AI to do that. And let's begin with maybe one of my favorite questions. I always save a lot of people, no wrong things about it. A given topic and AI is probably really up there. You're either maybe a little scared of it because you feel, you don't know enough or you may be thinking those thoughts something, but maybe, you know, not correct things. So what would you say are the common misconceptions about AI conversation with people? What we really find is the fact that they have in their mind is at one end sort of the malevolent Terminator View and it's at the other end which seems appropriate for the amount of voice interaction, that we're focused on its own. No idea that they're going to get seat, 3 p.m. right. The, the many language translation and protocol bond is going to handle everything. And you know the reality is evolving toward that you know as we see virtual assistants move into the homes and of course you have your smart phone, which is ubiquitous now but I think he just put it really well. She said with the finer Luke Google she talks about the fact when he when you talk to a human, there is never an unrecoverable error state..

Brad Taylor AI Technologies Intel Google
"ai technologies" Discussed on Podcasts – Telecom Reseller

Podcasts – Telecom Reseller

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"ai technologies" Discussed on Podcasts – Telecom Reseller

"This is the green and I'm the publisher of Telecom reseller and today I'm with Brad Taylor who's the vice president of AI Technologies at until appear red? Thank you for joining me today right back. I'm happy to be here. Well, this is a going to be an interesting podcast. We're going to be talking about current and future Trends in voice automated, artificial intelligence Ai. And we're supposed to be talking about how C pass and a I strengthen Enterprises of all sizes to deliver, first-class customer experiences. I think these are topics that are going to be interesting, not just to the Enterprise but also people that serve the Enterprises and many other people as well. But the first bread, what is Intel appear? So until. The company has been around fifteen years, providing a cross-section of business Communications and capabilities. Uh, we're about serving about 2 million plus and years through our, you know, offering start clients and we have, you know, several thousand, customers across many verticals and are offering is a communication platform is of service where we built on the the capabilities that are omnipresent. So to speak in the Telecommunications off in the sense that it's a strong Foundation that we have already being, you know, having these telecommunication partners and then we've provided the best choice of cloud until like vacations. In the platform that fulfills a number of needs and uh, voice messaging workflow, I mentioned analytics. So you can create a delightful dog. Ami Channel Flash. Let's talk just about that. You're creating a delightful customer journey and using AI to do that. And let's begin with maybe one of my favorite questions. I always save a lot of people, no wrong things about it. A given topic and AI is probably really up there. You're either maybe a little scared of it because you feel, you don't know enough or you may be thinking those thoughts something, but maybe, you know, not correct things. So what would you say are the common misconceptions about AI conversation with people? What we really find is the fact that they have in their mind is at one end sort of the malevolent Terminator View and it's at the other end which seems appropriate for the amount of voice interaction, that we're focused on its own. No idea that they're going to get seat, 3 p.m. right. The, the many language translation and protocol bond is going to handle everything. And you know the reality is evolving toward that you know as we see virtual assistants move into the homes and of course you have your smart phone, which is ubiquitous now but I think he just put it really well. She said with the finer Luke Google she talks about the fact when he when you talk to a human, there is never an unrecoverable error state. But as we think about a, I guess it's still going through a maturity state, where there's a lot of smart people who have to be involved in, delivering a stainless solution for your customer Journey. So what are some of the current and future Trends in voice? Automated AI. I think I think the biggest thing is that if you look at the interaction and and voices, obviously one piece of this but really what our customers are looking at for us, it's just dropping capability on omni-channel that we can offer, the not ripping replaced. And the reason they're looking for that is in many cases, they've perhaps worked with web Bots. They they looked at maybe a stand-alone chatbox capability that they could add in to a contact center process..

Brad Taylor AI Technologies Intel Google
US Senate Approves $50B Boost for Computer Chip and AI Technology to Counter China

WGN Programming

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

US Senate Approves $50B Boost for Computer Chip and AI Technology to Counter China

"Headed to the house after the Senate approved it. The U. S Innovation and Competition Act would invest more than 200 billion in American technology, science and research. The bills Keystone is 50 billion in funding to raise semiconductor production in this country. A new report has found that

U. S Innovation And Competitio Senate
The race to build AI that benefits humanity with Sam Altman | The TED Interview - TEST

TED Talks Daily

03:36 min | 1 year ago

The race to build AI that benefits humanity with Sam Altman | The TED Interview - TEST

"Just this sort of shallow feeling of hope. Optimism is a search. it's determination to look for a pathway. Forward somewhere out there. I believe i truly believe there are amazing. People whose minds contain the ideas visions solutions. That can actually create that pathway forward. If given the support and resources they need they may very well light the path out of this dark place wherein so these are the people who can present not optimism but a case for them. They're the people. I'm talking to the season. So let's see if they can soit us now than the place i want to start is with a i artificial intelligence. This of course is the next innovative technology that is going to change everything as we know it for better or worse today was painted not with the usual dystopia and brush but by someone who truly believes its potential. Sam altman is the former president of y combinator the legendary startup accelerator and in two thousand fifteen he team launched a company called open a dedicated to one noble purpose to develop a it so that it benefits humanity as a whole. You may have heard by the way recently. A lot of buzz around. Ai technology call gp three that was developed by improve the quality of the amazing team of researchers and developers. They have working. There will be hearing a lot about. Gp d three in the conversation ahead but sticking to this lofty mission of developing a i for humanity and finding the resources to realize. It haven't been simple is is certainly not without its critics but that goal couldn't be more important and honestly i found it really quite exciting to hear sam's vision for where this could lead. Okay let's do this long. So some almond welcome. Thank you for having me some here. We are in twenty twenty one. A lot of people are philippe future this moment and what history. How would you describe your attitude to the future. I think that the combination of scientific and technological progress and better societal decision making better. Societal governance is going to solve in the next couple of decades. All of our current most pressing problems. There will be new ones. But i think we're going to get very safe very inexpensive carbon free nuclear energy to work. And i think we're going to talk about that time. The climate disaster look so bad and how lucky we are. We got saved by science and technology. I think we've already seen this with the repeatedly that we were able to get vaccines deployed. We are going to that. We are able to cure or at least treat a significant percentage of human disease including. I think we'll just actually make progress and helping people have much longer kids longer health. Men's and i think in the next couple of decades that will look pretty clear. I think we will build systems with a and otherwise that make

Sam Altman Y Combinator SAM
IBM's Watson Illustrates Why Applying A.I. to Healthcare Is So Hard

WSJ Tech News Briefing

04:27 min | 1 year ago

IBM's Watson Illustrates Why Applying A.I. to Healthcare Is So Hard

"About a decade ago. Ibm rolled out watson. One of the earliest artificial intelligence systems out. There watson was a big deal for ibm. You might remember that even went on and absolutely crushed the human competition it was a milestone in how we think about our relationship to computers and ibm wanted to take that technology and apply it to helping doctors diagnosed and cure cancer. But things didn't exactly happen that way and last week we reported that ibm was exploring a sale of its watson health unit. So what happened. And what does this tell us about the challenges of applying ai to healthcare for answers we turn to our digital science editor daniella hernandez hate mail. Thanks for joining me. Thanks for having me. So whereas watson now and what happened well i mean the struggles at ibm with watson. Been around for a little while. We reported in two thousand eighteen that the technology was really not getting the market share and adoption that it needed to make good on all the investments in all the acquisitions that ibm made in order to make watson a leader in the ai in healthcare field and so three years or so later it signals that you know the technology maybe wasn't working as well as they would have hoped. I think more. Broadly points to the fact that you know just having data or collaborations with leading scientists around the country. That just isn't enough and the reason is you know. Healthcare is complicated. So there's a lot of human issues at stake here. You know people do things differently. Like depending on which hospital you're at louisville depending on which doctor you're you're you're seeing but also the data in healthcare is messy for some of those same reasons you know you might input into a medical chart differently than me and for an i i might as well be two completely different things and so just that standardization of the information is really critical but also really hard and so when ibm started making these huge investments in watson they started buying up all these companies that had a lot of seemingly great data and the data might have been perfect but those data were basically styles from each other. They couldn't talk to each other and they never quite figured out how to meld them together. So they were cohesive data set of product. That really could make good on the promise that they that they saw. Fortunately has never materialized. And of course we should note here. That ibm says that watson has had some successes and that they're still believers in that technology we've been talking about. Ibm's new ceo. Arvind krishna on the show and following. He's been trying to of revitalize this legacy company how the sale of watson health fit into his efforts. Well i think one huge thing that has changed since the birth of watson. If you will is that you've had these other huge not legacy players come into the field. You've got google facebook amazon even microsoft right which you might consider a legacy company but they really rebranded themselves to. They weren't as big when watson. I came on the scene. And so now you've got this against storied legacy company competing with these new players. Who when they started making investments in. Ai were a lot more nimble and so they made investments in what at the time seemed like really experimental ai technology and now looking back like deep mind. Google investing hundreds of millions of dollars in that that technology just basically took over the world and ibm didn't really invest in that technology at the time and now is behind because all the talent is has been sucked into google facebook amazon apple And so they're they're behind.

IBM Watson Cure Cancer Daniella Hernandez Arvind Krishna Louisville Google Amazon Facebook Microsoft Apple
"ai technologies" Discussed on Rusted Culture Podcast

Rusted Culture Podcast

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"ai technologies" Discussed on Rusted Culture Podcast

"We we. We know it. We know this into their credit many are doing what they can to prevent that spread from happening i. mean there are many. Universities many schools were to be honest doing what they can to prevent that spread. However However. Florida's governor seems to have another way of preventing the spread folks by allowing the Florida Department of Health. To keep the number of Covid nineteen school infections confidential. Well that works right just don't ask us how many infections there are, and we won't tell you don't ask don't tell will according to news four out of Jacksonville first. Full Week of school and Devout County school officials say they are still counting how many teachers and students test positive for the virus. But they cannot in will share the numbers because they're confidential per state law. And Healthcare. Law experts who spoke to the Jacksonville. Station have denied the statute actually e even applies to school systems. It's a smokescreen. It's a way to keep the information from now. To method of control. Again, we're simply talking about how many people are infected numbers here we're not talking names and addresses. But that's how Florida's trying to control the spread by simply suppressing the information good work governor to Santa's good work like I say folks if Biden were president right now the pandemic would be over. This flash briefing was brought to you by the Rusted Culture Podcast, and you can find us on Itunes stitcher tune in spotify in Google play or wherever you find your podcast. Thanks for listening..

Florida Jacksonville Devout County school Florida Department of Health Covid Biden spotify president Google Santa
"ai technologies" Discussed on Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

08:42 min | 2 years ago

"ai technologies" Discussed on Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

"That road is very not fun. and what a beautiful example of the power of combining technology with story and communication. That's really powerful yet. Is People often bucket us into just video? But it's visual messaging having software that can pull pieces apart and drop others in over the top. You've put infinite testing So then what are the benefits that you're saying from some of these examples so for example the university project and having that tailored on boarding experience for each student depending on what caused that? We're going through. What's the feedback from that? One of the goals who is actually one of the lead characters in when we interviewed her afterwards she broke down cried tease out. She actually thought this was the best thing she's done in her life right. Why what was what's the power of this. She was so scared coming to uni. She hated school. It was more important to her uncle that she went to university. She didn't think should see anyone that she that was lacquer there. She had this cultural background. She was really really anxious so when we showed what the top stories we're GonNa Right. She was like I'm one hundred percent. I needed this and why she needed. It was because we could use a couple of data points but we could also make a few assumptions so we could adjust the b-roll so if we knew a little bit more about them which is just all normal daughter enrollment data so there's nothing no third party nothing further than that just what we knew from their enrollment. We could actually show people in the be roll that were similar to her and we could choose The more she watched all this also the story line adjusted to be more suited to her. And the person telling the story was one year ahead of who also resonated and said you know what? I didn't really WanNa be he thought and then took them on the journey And so you know why. Why do you think there's a benefit in personalized tailored content to that degree? Because that's what they watch on their channels we all we all have a channel or a host or someone that that resonates with us and there's as many as Like podcast and Youtube channels. There's so much out there but we watched the ones we watch and those people resonate with us and when you find them urine there tribe and then you share that with your friends so doing anything. That's different We always try and test. We always looking to push the envelope but this was just resonated really well. Let's get a kid who looks similar to what they talk about what they're going through and a really up close I find like phone style storytelling and one of the reasons I talk about what podcasting has become I think more and more popular is it's part of the self curated content capacity so nick is built on that as well you know I can watch what I want when I want when I want how I want and it's the same with podcasting I can listen to what the WHO win wherever I can listen in the car and then finish it at home is that freedom of choice so what you're talking about is taking that video content and dispute dispersing in that way yet correct and just like the experience I said at the start with my dad is that I knew by choosing those and if we could use data points eat like net flicks a county wholesome soda a bunch of things like that so Netflix wanted to curate and create a personalized trailer. For what's on tonight or this weekend. How is that? They know so much about what you like to watch. So dead could not look away. He kept glancing back straight at it again because I knew that part of that minute. There's something in there that he had to keep watching. What do you know I would quite like a personalized Taylor trailer for Netflix? Because there's so much on there I'm like how do I choose? So you could do that. I would quite appreciate that they would be a benefit to me. It'd be benefit for me to. We can actually use this software for that. So the software has we've adapted it from a broadcast quality version that channel nine and seven news so we've just made it We've atomised the contents instead of like a series of shows like twenty thirty minutes sort of thing would down two points of seconds So you marketing background. Yes but this to me seems very thick. How you typing with the transition all my life. I've used the collectively meaning. We are who we are with so I am. I surround myself with interesting creative people beautiful minds who wanted to good so I am not a tech person. Got a good grasp of what's possible But more so where to find that person to help And so what would be your advice then? Like how do you go out and find the right people to connect with on on predictive? This sort of scale you come to pause. This is actually my first pause. I've wanted to come many many many years and when I spoke to George last year he said. Would you like to be as yes please? I love meet UPS So I'll go to probably four to six main ups a month. 'cause I know people who want to share you have to be where they WANNA share. I'm really interested in this. Is By you know. There's a mix of reactions to it you know. Is it going to take jobs? Is it going to be a new sort of touched on these invasive into our privacy but what you're talking about is really value? Add you know some of these things like helping emergency response information but also helping make new university students feel more comfortable. Starting they cost like these benefits. I think everyone can go. Oh that's really great. So what would you say to people around? I and using that in these types of solutions we the ethical boundaries. Are they come up all the time? Who are you to say what's good and what's right? And so we we. We try to draw on the sand regularly And we look for clients where the intent is positive You know and I think that's the only place where we can start their cy much. Good that it can do. And there's so much harm So I try to surround ourselves with people who are in like social entrepreneurship Because People who are just trying to do make make life. Newell Better And I bounce the ideas off them and they usually challenge and open up positive that we hadn't thought of ultimately it does come back to the software and the client because it's their software that's doing the progressive profiling. It's Al Software. That's matching to that. So we do have we always. We're always gonNA be learning Well thank you so much Nathan for sharing your story and this exciting communications take mixed Matt Mash Up. I look forward to seeing that and get onto the netflixing. That'd be great in conclusion though it could you share with me. Nathan's beat the drop tip. So that's your top T. Four communication that motivates and Inspires A. Really feel that it needs to be progressive. It needs to our communications. Need to understand velocity for consumption if we're just browsing slow it down if we are hungry for that content make it really snack and fast. And that's where I think in the future will assist because it'll have.

Netflix Nathan Youtube Al Software nick Taylor George Newell
"ai technologies" Discussed on Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

08:45 min | 2 years ago

"ai technologies" Discussed on Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

"Nathan. Thank you so much for joining me for next episode of Bay. The thanks for having me too now. We hear live at pause fast and your presenting later this afternoon. I am actually closing so I'm bit nervous. People may have. I'm hoping to say around I'm sure they will. It's been very enthusiastic crowd so I'm sure maintain it through right to the end. Now you've got us a mix of a story slash autumn of significance to get started and set a little bit of the same about you and what you're doing. I should like most of us. Are Parents Really? Don't know what we do did they. Just don't get it so my parents don't know what a podcast is. So my dad turned seventy last year during December and we were organizing a massive. Like kind of like a really cool experience for him with a National Geographic kind of bent to it so I asked the host. Could you do a little video for me of course mate? So he did then. We used our software to make personalized TV channel. March always using augmented intelligence. Things that I knew dad would really like. Oh my gosh. I couldn't look couldn't look away from the screen so we invited the family over for early. Do Not Dad came in gave them to be looked at you. Know just caught a glimpse of the screaming. Oh look at that that crocodile. Wow and all that and all that and then he's kind of like sat down and I knew I had him. No one else in the family knew what was coming and then out of the screen. After a couple of minutes comes the host of the TV show and says get Arab might seventieth birthday. Why don't you in the lads jumping applying to Darwin only there and we'll go feed some crocks and my dad. He just burst out newly tease. The whole family was just like wow. How'd you do this and I said that's what we do. We create amazing personalized experiences. What a great story I can leach Lee. Pto Dad and his response. How lovely so then explain more? What is this personalized tailored experience? That you'll creating so one of the things. We started to notice several years ago. Is that marketing automation? Systems will getting really good adobe. Ibm The other big expensive ones. But then you can go down to something small like near. Mail chimp. They're getting good at creating personalized profiles. Progressive profiling understanding when to send what to send time of day. That sort of thing. We thought you know what? No one's adjusting. The content of the videos are the visuals photos. Change a little bit but really it was just sending out the same personas and we looked on went when we shoot something often we deliver thirty seconds or the minute the whatever the output is but there's a terabyte of amazing footage that never get saying what if we would have metadata enrich that and then have a look at near who that would be interesting to. What's the personality and tone of that clip? Where would that fit in? And then from that we could look we discovered we could do hundreds if not millions of personalized videos from that one. Shoot a so. Obviously that you mentioned that is an element of AI in these. Because that's a massive database to try and manage and lots of different elements to crossover and and linked together. How does that work and is that the spice is hard to get your head around? What person was involved in that? I've got a really simple whiteboard that I did several years ago and I titled in the middle like a user behavior exchange and what I what we really need that code like cognitive. Api's it's like little connected on the whiteboard it's a red line and Green Line it's info in and out of tiny moments and what we want to look for is significant moments and on information that would create some sort of like inside. That goes all despite. This person needs to see next so in tourism. A lot of that can be done before you get to the hotel at the hospital where you're going and it can be like quite fun. It can be really really short. It can show you what what's on the introduce you to some of the stuff you know. If if they know that your male female to kids the be roll can be a family with young kids. If it's you on a business trip then you don't want to say the kids in the clip so we can remove those things can come in and out We can add in your rooms. We did a really cool one for university. Where every single kid got a unique on boarding told to them by kid who's one year ahead of them doing their course. I mean that kind of my mind is Li- boggling. I mean we've been involved in in video editing and it's a big versus but so. I'm not quite sure that I can understand how you edited that many different ways. My mind is reeling in Montauk. I'm actually going to show the first excels I hate spreadsheet but to do something like this way introducing a programmatic effect. You have to really accurate. And then the editors have to shoot as really have to understand that. This is not a single story. we're looking for moments that could be gender-based cultural based than it in the case of the university its cost. Campus backward equal And Stop picking things up. So it's it's a large amount of pre-production Post getting it ready and then metadata enriching the content into a cdn a content delivery network. say like an Amazon or the lack where then you can use a little script piece of code. That runs across and goes. Oh okay so we've got someone say that. Look going to this campus. I could doing this. 'cause this faculty this compile that story and it only compiles at that moment So it's like editing on demand. It's pre edited but prohibited. It's it's produced on demand so I mean how many parameters can I mean? Obviously you mentioned that. There's a lot of pre production that's required for that. Help biggies these you know. How do you go you how do you because I mean often marketing we talk about a by a persona so this is like giving yourself a really good? Brit of Bio Personas you know. How many can you deal with the union was? We broke adobe. Sensei one million variable storylines really is really cool. I CAN'T BELIEVE IT I. I've got a link for pause Share things in the one hundred percent. Yes pleasing inside that it starts this. Show you what it looks like. How compiles it got most examples so from the tourism aspect We've also looking at how we might be able to help people in states of emergency so this summer has been the most devastating summer fires we've ever seen in Australia. I'm basing the Adelaide hills. We were surrounded by them. Yeah it was awful so one of my favorite places we have. My family has a small little place in woollen by which is low hundred valley and I love going just across the way to Yengo national park which got wiped and it's has a really significant aboriginal. Dreamtime storytelling past there. And there's this beautiful rock that has engravings in a thousands years old that tell you the law of the land so all visitors would come past and stop them this rock the locals would meet them interpret tell and share the story and welcome them on so I love going and then I started seeing the devastation of what occurred anyway. I like sharing things about pain but what we can do now. Is that the reason people don't take action. Fast enough is they. Don't believe the information they getting so if we can design experiences which can reach people just at the right moment with imagery that is actually from that area. At that time they can see what it's like so we presented at the mocks tin. Us light loss you and asking for video tech guys to help And we'll be presenting again in about two weeks..

adobe Nathan. Us leach Lee Yengo national park Montauk Adelaide hills Ibm Australia Li Amazon Sensei
"ai technologies" Discussed on Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"ai technologies" Discussed on Be The Drop - Investigating Brand Storytelling

"Appearance really don't know what we do. So I'm like dad turned seventy last year and and we were organizing really cool experience for him with a National Geographic kind of bent to it so I asked the host. Could you do a little video phony then? We used our software to make personalized TV channel. We invited the family over for dinner. Dad came in gave him a big looked at just quote a glimpse of the screaming. That that crocodile. Wow and then he sat down. I knew I had him and then out of the screen. After a couple of minutes comes the host of the TV show and says get I welcome to episode one hundred ninety one. Be The drop a weekly interview. Podcast sharing stories from inspirational people to help you learn how to tell your story. I'm Amelia View Director Narrative Marketing and firm Believer in the superpower of storytelling. I've been passionate about the power of video content for a long time being visual. It's possible to achieve strong emotive connection however with high volumes of video now used in marketing. It can be hard to make your video stand out one answer maybe to utilize advanced software to create extremely personalized video messaging. We tied content produced in real time. Nathan Meson is found of EMU media which has developed solution to completely personalized video. Content through the footage and content is selected and edited using the view a specific profile information using personality behavior and intent elements the software creates programmed storytelling videos delivered at mass scale. In this episode of be the drop recorded live from pause fist ninth and blows my mind with examples of personalized video content that the software has created Nathan also shares valuable insight into the power of personalization. This.

Nathan Meson Director Narrative Marketing EMU media firm Believer
AI and New Tech in Orthopedics

The Voice of Healthcare

07:05 min | 2 years ago

AI and New Tech in Orthopedics

"Phoenix surgeon. The Nice thing about incorporating technology into our work today is that there's many different facets we can utilize it one area that I would say in regards to reduce provisions that we talked about is how do we make our practices. Smarter Redo His from Radiology Perspective. So I definitely use. Ai and clever was some individuals to look at media graphs not just that the hip and knee which we look specifically but other areas around it but also using a. I the diagnosed utilize ai to identify implants which we can't do as well with the human eye. An area of interest for myself and Thurston is infections and so we're using technology tech infections earlier because we know that earlier detection is earlier treatment which is outcome for patients. So this is done with sensors. Sometimes you the placement skin placed inside intense themselves and when it comes to technology another area that I'm interested in investigating is when do implants fail so when we look at technology today when I can tell implants? Failing my biggest indicator is a patient coming in with pain after getting an implant placed in. It's not a very sensitive indicator by far so people are developing who we call smart implants where you're putting in technology into implants themselves that can detect these problems of loosening beforehand. So we can utilize those regular everyday practices. Hossan M I. I couldn't agree with you more. I think the The future really is in technology and algae via from numerous ways You know the I think the idea of implantable smart. Implants has has huge potential. Identifying you can start off the bio mechanics. Amazing why they fail. You also can monitor patients much better. We're going to be doing much of our Care has to be much more cost. Effective way to be a monitor them from afar That would be far superior. We can identify patients who need more. You would know much more about this than I do. Because you're the infection grew as here but I could imagine implants that someday. We'll be able to pick up infections before we know they're infected. Maybe self diagnosing type implants also if you look at it. There's some areas that that are so fundamental if you think of what we lack in and there's such a need for technology were just beginning to scratch the surface on that we don't balance a knee until maybe more the last five years any differently than John. Insult did it thirty years ago. It's I think this is good. And we don't know what we think is bounced stays the same balanced two months later two years later which patients loosen which patients don't loosen. We don't we haven't had objected ways. I think with the sensor technology with robotics we will gain insight to know how we should treat various different patients and really go to individualizing the patient. And then you begin to say using the data that we are deriving could derives law all these technology. This is torsten and I think I agree with both of you guys and and I think Antonio spot on if you look at the use of I in in healthcare. I think the area that we're most advanced is the imaging area. They are advanced algorithms available. That disappoint even read at an accuracy that succeeds ever trade yards. So I think this is a huge area. If an orthopedic surgeon that uses x Ray every day to follow patients to diagnose patients determine their readiness for surgery to say that. Hey we're reaching this point where you probably going to be candidate for for total joint replacement and you can incorporate dad on the Tele Medicine Platform. You can get x-rays anywhere and I read it and then refers the patient A personal interest of mine where I use. Ai and machine learning is in predicting outcomes We have been for the past three years. I've been working on projects trying to predict length of stay cost overrun in a in a bundled episode Predicting adverse events such as readmission Divas it's Or DISCHARGE DISPOSITION. The challenges there. Is You machine? Learning models depend on the accuracy of the data that you feed into the model also accurate coding and ended event trade for this especially orthopaedics. Elective surgery is fairly small. So you need large numbers to get. Akron models But I think that that has a tremendous Opportunity in that area when it comes to a If you talk about technology and orthopedics and I don't think I think Steve mentioned going as like I think one area that we really have come a long way and that we're making rapid improvements. It's using robotics sensors. I I to balance the using robotics to do the cops. Think these areas Extremely fast growing areas with companies diving into it and rapidly releasing new technologies reducing revisions conference. We talk a lot about this kind of edge of the circle research. The things that you all just mentioned and what you're excited about what you discussed. What would you say to those listening? patients providers technicians. Do you think is the most tangible rate Just right on the circle of we'RE GONNA. This thing is about to be across the country and available in all markets. Why are you excited about that? Particular piece of technology. I think what is middle available at this point in most of the hospitals I would say the market penetration close to fifty sixty percent. Now is some type of robotic technology or navigation technology. It's available implant placement. I think that that is something that patients can have a conversation with the provider about the benefits and risk without. But that is Fandy. Well penetrated an orthopedic market. And then if you if you go and shift to value based environment and look at what is available there. Several companies smaller companies platforms that offer. Ai Technologies or communication technologies to provide us to interact with patients and that goes as far as as using tell them visits and Ritual follow ups and I think Dole Todd technologies that in my opinion they bay exciting something that comes in handy during this code nineteen crisis as

AI Ai Technologies Thurston Phoenix Dole Todd Technologies Fandy Torsten John Akron Antonio RAY Steve
Practical AI Procurement with Shane Zabel of Raytheon

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

10:10 min | 2 years ago

Practical AI Procurement with Shane Zabel of Raytheon

"On the topic of buying procuring. Ai How how. How do you think you know? From a vendor perspective. I think could be a big consulting firm it could be a hot silicon valley startup. Whatever the case may be could be? IBM How should business decision leaders. Here's a decision makers think about screening vendors deciding on vendors. What a good ways to think about that? One Way I think of that is the standard make by it kind of decision. So if you've if you've got a business strategy in AI technology strategy and you've broken that down into the elements and you kind of understand what what type of capabilities in technology we need to develop. You're going to make a decision in terms of what should you build in house and what you outsource. So that's where we're really starts is understanding within the I field. What are the parts that that you want to build internally? Where do you think your your key? discriminators are going to be. And what are the parts that You do not want to invest internally and you may be better off outsourcing to vendor so then at that point there's a there's a lot of vendors in the space right now and there are you know and which is a good thing it gives you a lot of opportunities but you have to be able to filter through it and so it can be challenging to even understand understand what the entire market is who are all the players typically if you have an ai organization that you've spun up that would be one of the roles that they should have is understanding understanding what the commercial market is And vetting going out meeting vendors understanding the vendors and doing the initial heading for it and that should be aligned because the the market space is so big that should be aligned to that original discussion. About what parts of the market are you looking to partner with. and which ones are you you know building internally and and so that that kind of decides what companies that you want to go after and then it's just your standard vendor vetting process that you'll go through typically you'll be. He introduced to accompany. You'll set up an initial discussion Sometimes it helps to get some type of non disclosure agreement in place if you if they passed the first test of back and then then you can go into more technical details and and typically both your business teams in your Engineer your technology teams can have those further discussions wins. And and then it's you know goes from there depends on whether you're looking at us a supplier or whether it's a partner and I don't you know to some extent of that that whole make by question isn't really different than the AM L. World. It's just the technologies a little bit different. I think yes. There's still does you have to be the the the context on the technology but I've definitely heard a lot of takes on. He build by side of things certainly have our own opinions here But I'd be interested. Sit in your thoughts. It sounds like for you. There's there's maybe sort of a core way of thinking about that. I doesn't necessarily vary you kind of brought it up very briefly mentioned you know. Is this really your key distinction. You know something you want to build in houses a core capability. That's going to differentiate you and be what your your business really leans on as like a critical capability ability so to speak on. This is something you don't want to invest in. Maybe you could put a little bit more color around that you know how you think about build versus buy at a high level and why it's not that different from from other technology. Yeah so I guess the way to the thing about it is if your business strategy and you're a technology strategy figuring out where you fit in the market Arken space and and what is it that. What part of that market space do you WANNA be mortgage leading in? And there's a lot of components to ai and machine learning and you may not want to tackle the most so so one example would be your data strategy If you are not in if you're selling some type of marketing product or you're selling some type of you know Engineering Service or something like that. You don't you don't WanNa be in the development of a data lake Business right you. Don't WanNa go off and build your our own daily technology. That might be a great place to partner. Because that's not where your core discriminator is. It's an enabling technology that you have to have but it's not something that you're going to go out and build you know from a data. Data Lake frameworks perspective. You'RE NOT GONNA go build a business around it so that might be an area that you would want to start thinking about. Maybe I need to go find a supplier partner on the data lakeside. Whereas you know in some other areas that you might look out with you look at the end to end a I? Kind of chain. You'll focus in on on a few of those areas that you might Might WanNa be a discriminator and you and you may not from technology perspective for some organizations you you may not you may WanNa partner for all of the technology and that you're discriminators maybe as some type of integrator or maybe you're up your packaging peace so it's hard to say specifically typically you know it really depends on the specifics of your business. What are you going after? What do you want to be good at and then going out and finding partners that provide the capabilities that we need to pull together in order to provide those services so sort of Hugh you mentioned just? I'll put a little bit more color on this pivot right into the next question is around. What do you want to be good at is that is that a retake that to to understand that sort of if something is something that we want to be good at all? We really want to be good at. Let's say understanding Customer's preferences for these fashion products that they're they're kind of related correlations of sort of what people purchase when they like this thing like this other thing. Are you saying. There's a shot that that might lead us more in the direction of developing our own kind of recommendation and customer understanding models versus leveraging recommendation. I'm in Dacian Vendor X.. Or wires said is that sort of a potential leaning based on on on what you're saying. I JUST WANNA make sure I'm digesting the idea. Yeah I think that's that's a good analogy. So if we take that case if your if Your Business was understanding customer preferences you might want to be very good at understanding. The psychology of the customers is. You don't really want to be very good at understanding products You might be one be very good at having the data scientists who can do the modeling around that at that point you may go off and develop develop specific algorithms for it potentially if the if the open source algorithms aren't good enough for it and in that case. Maybe you don't want to your. You're you're focused purely on cloud infrastructure right. That's that's not where you're going to add value to so you might go off and partner with a company that can go off and handle your cloud part of it. That's an enabling the technology that'd be required for you to go do machine learning towards customer market preference. But you'd outsource that because you want to focus your energy research and development. What's your talent development around those other algorithm ICK areas around those data understanding areas around the customer understanding areas and those maybe would be areas that you wouldn't want to go off an outsource because that's court here company and that's that's where you want to build your core discriminators at so that's kind of that that that what does the term discriminators actually just something? I haven't heard people use that particular word but I now am sort of understanding and context What you what you meant by that and I guess that tort takes us into our second major question here which is around getting into the proof of concept a lot of Peo sees in the enterprise world right now are not really leaving? POC THE OC land. They're not leaving the sandbox on kind of coming into reality. Maybe sometimes it's because to your advice. They haven't they haven't yet built that internal Lehai capability that you mentioned. That really understands the market knows who to talk to who not to talk to. What would be worthwhile or a waste of time but if you were to talk about maybe going about? POC's the the right way. Let's just say maybe I do find a partner. Maybe it's it's somebody works on fraud models you know I'm that I'm that online fashion retailer. I don't really want to get good at detecting fraud and it's not my business. My business is selling you know necklaces and earrings. Let's say in that case. Maybe I I go into a POC. There's clearly a raw kind of kind of a right. It says to have Sarong set of steps or right understand wrong way to understand it about setting up a POC for success so we have our best chance of turning into something real. How would you explain doing doing it? Well as opposed to the common pitfalls you see I typically when I look at P. O. C.'s. I almost don't think of them as being a direct path to production auction. Ai and machine learning to put it into production requires a whole infrastructure. It requires process. There's a big gap between companies. He's they can build prototypes or individuals. That can prototype on a laptop and companies that can deploy that and maintain those models in operation yet. Yeah that you've got it you have to have your business processes around it you have to. You have to understand model testing. There's there's a whole series of capabilities that that are required for production machine learning that are not required there for so so what. POC's are good at is a couple of things right. They're very good that Education and understanding getting into the data and understanding what you really have. And where's the real potential business benefit. They're very good at use case. Space exploration right towards that business side. But at some point you're going to make a decision. Do I want to transition to this and ops into into operations and with the understanding that there is a there is potentially a significant investment of time and resources that's going to be required to Redo the POC or or leveraged bridged POC and extended into a production model and so at the end of a POC. You I would recommend that you have your your profit and loss people all your organization take a look at it. Have your technology team make an estimate. Here's what it would take in order to put this into production and then make a return on investment decision. Asian at that point is is this something worth putting into production and maybe halfway through you should have checkpoints in your pse should be continuously asking this question is this worth continuing wing or not and you may have to do multiple. POC's before you find that one killer use case that you really wanted to pull into ops and but when you get it right there's there's potentially actually a great great benefit to it. That's why everybody is going after this but it's it's hard it's it's a super hard. Yeah

Partner IBM Lake Business Fraud Engineer Engineering Service Dacian Am L. World Hugh P. O. C.
Patterns of AI  Autonomous Systems

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

04:13 min | 2 years ago

Patterns of AI Autonomous Systems

"Think this is important because many organizations want to implement AI technologies but they're not quite sure where to start and they wanna see what others have done sometimes they look to other our companies and industries as guides to see what they've done so that they're not starting from scratch and we've seen hundreds of thousands of implementations of projects through all the stuff that we've done here at Cog Melinda and you've heard US talk about many of them through the use cases in our use case podcasts and a lot of the writing that we do for tech targeted for Forbes and also our training and a lot of our customers put us into contact with a lot of implementations and despite all that diversity of all the many different varied ways that people are using AI machine we found that generally they fall into roughly seven patterns at the beginning densify these patterns and say Oh that's interesting this application this implementation is this individual pattern a combination of patterns that helps to make that system work and so we've identified these seven patterns and we talked about that are seven patterns of Ai podcast and much of writing and for those of you that have not heard that before basically in no particular order these seven patterns are hyper personalization autonomous systems predictive analytics and decision support conversational slash human interaction systems patterns and anomalies recognition systems and of course goal driven systems and any AI project or implemented nations can have one or more of these seven patterns as part of their solution so each pattern requires its own machine learning and cognitive process but they can be combined and together to form an AI project and so we wanted to spend some time on this podcast taking a deeper dive into the autonomous systems pattern yes so one of the seven patterns that we see come up repeatedly idea of machines that are able to do things on their own with little if any human action basically he kind of set it in forget it right and of course you might be thinking about autonomous vehicles and robots but there's really lots of situations when you might want have a machine in self control of its decisions and aware of its surroundings and all of the applications that basically hinge on this pattern is what we call the autonomous systems category of AI application right so the objective of this pattern is to minimize human labor now that means that this system needs to be pretty darn good if we're not having a human in their examples of this are autonomous documentation and knowledge generation autonomous processes and cognitive automation autonomous business process where you're able to navigate through a system autonomously find bottlenecks optimal paths for documents to flow things like that this idea of collaborative robots are co bots where they're robots that are able to work in conjunction with and next a to humans autonomous vehicles of course and then proactive decisions as well right so we I should probably define what I mean by autonomous because autonomous doesn't mean something and generally it means in a physical or virtual systems software systems or hardware systems that are able to accomplish some task or achieve a goal for interaction surroundings and performed objective with minimal or any human involvement and so when we think about autonomous obviously we think about these things systems that are self trolling and of course this is where we need machine learning and intelligence because in order for a system to act on its own has to be very much aware of surroundings it has to be able to predict what will happen next and a half to plan for how to actually deal with the reality of the universe and that's what makes us autonomous systems pattern so interesting so of course you know one of the first things you might think about with autonomous systems are autonomous vehicles right right and so they're six levels of autonomous vehicles and we'll talk through them very quickly so level zero just is a car that has no autonomous features and that's actually more cars on the road than you would think today they're just you know your basic car that gets you from point. A. TO POINT B. in human needs to be in control the entire time level one is where the car can start to handle one task at a time like automatic breaking so it's useful it's Safety feature more than anything else but human still needs to be in control

"ai technologies" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"ai technologies" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"A fierce defender of the first lady that's why the announcement today came from the first lady herself and so now in addition to working for the first lady she's also going to be not only the press secretary but the communications director for president trump as well fox's kristen fisher took him if you got them next year in illinois give it her jay pritzker in a signing ceremony tuesday said that illinois spent more money per capita on cannabis possession enforcement than any other state illinois have had enough they know that what we're doing isn't working they know that criminalization offers nothing but pain disrup- option and injustice marijuana legalization goes into effect recreationally january first state that's also i in profits has way to help with its hundreds of billions of dollars in debt box jeff but also a jack callaghan this is fox news Why from the heartland, the crossroads of America? It's Tony cats today. google sensors it's what they do google manipulates that's who they are to go wants to tell you what it is you need to know based on what they decide you need to know what it is you search not what it is you look for not what it is you want to engage The latest proof. Comes from Project Veritas. The undercover reporting that they do. Yeah. I know some people don't like him. But some people need to answer for their crimes. Yes, I called it a crime. Here's dougal. The head of their responsible innovation team. Which works with AI technologies. Describing to reporters from Project Veritas. How they are going to work. To train the algorithms to prevent 2016 from happening again. you're not frightened by that you're not bothered by that you're not infuriated by that my goodness what is it that moves you tony cats tony cats today eight three three got tony eight three three four six eight eight six six nine now full disclosure i have donated to project veritas past i will probably donate project veritas in the future the issue here is not james o'keefe the issue here is whether or not there is an effort at google To manipulate elections. this is some of the audio now they've got it manipulated they've got voices manipulated i'm not saying the deceptively edited that's what they're claiming they're claiming that much of this has been deceptively edited well if you know anything about The, the people at Project Veritas. They will. share some of the video then they'll have people yell and scream then they'll drop the full video that proves the people yelling and screaming are full of crap let's get into it what is it that google trying to do Birtles. To know what's going on? join you gotta love the way they do it you gotta love the way they do it make it sound that creepy not necessarily creep here than this Furnace teams. To be. That.

Project Veritas google Tony illinois jay pritzker kristen fisher jack callaghan press secretary cannabis fox marijuana America AI technologies james o'keefe president Birtles director
"ai technologies" Discussed on Big Data Beard

Big Data Beard

08:29 min | 3 years ago

"ai technologies" Discussed on Big Data Beard

"Right. So it's, it's about enabling folks, like Schneider Electric and others to build the system. Very cool. So how does this help us get closer because one of the areas of tech, that I think is important as in these complex systems transfer learning? I think is something really cool. Right. So if you build a model and it's good at one thing. How do we get at the transfer? Do you see this as an enabler to actually get in models to be more transferable? Yes. Absolutely. So one of the benefits of machine teaching is that you get the this explain ability level that David was wasn't talking about. So it's not magic. So let let's start there. It's not magic. Okay, if you have a neural network underneath the hood and just like today where you have an unroll network and you want to go to it and say, well, what is the neural network doing like that's hard? The people struggle to do that. And there's research that's working towards helping make that more transparent. But, but at the end of the day, it's kind of, it's kind of black box. What is what is it doing? Met machine. Teaching doesn't magically solve that problem for sure. But it puts a layer on top. That is explainable. So it's not that you can say the, the neural network is doing X, but what you can say is because I taught the system and I taught it these core concepts. I can now explain what's going on in the context of those concepts. So go back to the intuitive analogy. So my son is learning to hit a ball. He can come back, and I can say, well, you didn't work so well that time. What do you think went wrong? And you can say, oh, my grip didn't feel quite right or whatever. And I you know, my, my staff was off balance with my stance, or whatever it happens to be okay. He can explain it in those terms because I've taught him those concepts, and that is really empowering, not just for explain ability. It's empowering for building trust into the systems. It's it's impairing for being able to reuse the concept. So you talked about transfer learning machine teaching because you teach at those core concepts those. Become reasonable software blocks just like anything else. So I've, I've taught at a concept now I wanna go use that same concept somewhere else. I take the code I built for that. I moved into the other application, I can leverage that in other ways where their concepts are similar. So it gives you this higher level. To think about it as opposed to. The analogy I would draw here is people don't piece together transistors. Right. They, they have like very log in via sigh. And you put those pieces together you're not gonna you're not gonna like wire gates as a. Why would you do that? Same thing. It's the same thing this is just this is the set of obstructions that allow you to get that reuse. And explain ability and start to build trust, and audibility and all these things into the system. So one of the things you hit on, there is this idea of trust, and explain ability, how, how do you think we're going to approach a see that as one of our biggest like limiting factors or barriers that we have to overcome not only as a as technologist, but I think, as a society in order for organizations to truly adopt a in meaningful ways, we're going to have to have this level of trust, and excellent ability. How do you think we're going to get there? Like, is it? Is it more legislation? Is that more trust in the technology? Like, what do you think of the ways that we're gonna, we're gonna create this trusted belief that he is doing something good, and useful for us without being a black box yet. So I in that. The first thing that, that I would say here is that we know what it shouldn't be. And it shouldn't be just one company deciding what is the responsible way of developing a right? So even us. So we don't believe that we should be the one saying how everybody should do does. That's the first day. So definitely connected to what you say, is broader conversation, not even on technology companies. And he's brother than that, not even across industries is brother than that is involving governments eczema, regulators, a communities absolute dot com recession. Now as we get their eighty is very important. And we were very clear from the very beginning as we were addressing we were started this yearning on a Microsoft. We went out there and we were very transparent that. Hey in that. Meanwhile, we these are our principles. So we come when he gets to the external our six principles without. I mean, we sues them from the very beginning, we go when he gave get, like, maybe two years on how three years ago where we say, hey, this hour of the six hundred. We're following interesting. Microsoft, and what you're seeing more and more on this, this event was good example of that, is that not only we follow those principles internally with governor processes inside, Microsoft, but we also want to help other companies to do the same so they can build the that can be trusted by their customers. So, for example, yes, just this week, we announce as part of our, Azure machine learning service were, including out of the books, tools that enables organizations to be responsible. He I in this case, transparent AI directly into their Emma lops process. Right, unlike that many others would yes. Release on AM business. Cool, where we have a whole model that is basically explaining companies that are now facing that challenge of, hey, I want to address a on a responsible winner. I want to make sure that I implemented, right? Processes to avoid virus to be trespassing to be accountable to be private. So all of that we are at the very least sharing our learnings as we. Have been going through this yearning so other customers can go through that to very cool. So how do people consume these these, these capabilities that you guys started talking about are they part of the cognitive services, kind of offering, sorta, how are these autonomous systems and machine teaching capabilities come into market Thrasher, or through, Microsoft? So we've been working with a select set of customers, I give you a few examples earlier what we were announcing build is a limited preview program, so people can go to just a website, aka dot MS slash AS for autonomous systems. That will take you to a landing page where you can learn a lot more about a Thomas systems start to dive into scenarios, and use cases and went, but there's also this limited preview program where you can describe the kinds of applications, you're thinking about building, and then we're going to be taking a set of customers through the same process that we've been going through with this with, with these private customers. We've been working with already on. So if people are interested, I invite them to go and visit and sign up and really for. We're about empowering people to do stuff. So we, we have to get their hands on the tools, and where we want to start actively working with more and more people to do so very well. That's one thing that's away from our time of the Bill has been this alignment. You talked about it early that she the team everybody we've talked to across Microsoft is about how do you bring the power of AI technologies that developed internal develop through acquisition, right? The experiences. How do we bring those to ever want to make an accessible? And I think that's awesome. Well, thank you. Both gentlemen, for joining us for the big that of your podcast. We've learned.

Microsoft Schneider Electric David AI technologies Thomas systems Thrasher three years two years
"ai technologies" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"ai technologies" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"E V. I S dot com and it's all about getting started was with apple products. In fact, sections to to'real specifically to help people who are new to this. That's fantastic. It's doable. And he was talking about the problems with putting bumps on the phone with touchscreen. Yeah, there's actually companies that make overlays that have dots because one nice thing about apple is that everything's consistent in Iowa. So there that line up with certain buttons even have overlays lineup with all the letters on the keyboard, so you can slide your figure out cool. A lot of stuff out there. And I just felt really bad for the guy felt that he's had no about this because he sounded frustrated, and yeah. A very powerful tool. It will give him all kinds of abilities that he never thought he'd be able to have again, once he lost his vision, and it's not the case, I can only imagine how hard it must be to lose your sight especially as a visual artist, and especially as an adult, but that's good news. That it's, you know, there's hope and it's just take a little work research. And I think a good place to start as your as you in tech JV dot com. So you called in to talk about because I, I think I've talked to you before I talked to many people before who have sung the. We've been to your studios. Nice. Oh, great. Well, I'm glad we met, and you're in the LA area, but all over the country, there are places like this. I think it's. Another tip if and he's with the people there chapters of the national federation of the blind, and the American Council of the blind, and you look them up, and call up and say, hey, do you guys have a tech guru who, who knows that stuff? Maybe I could take them to lunch or living. Yeah. Lots of ways you can get information. They'll be resources for him. They website for the dots. I think is speed dot stuck com. Correct. Yes. Yup. Yes. Thanks to echo Stephen an IRA room. He says we put those on my uncle's phone speed dots dot com. Well JV, I'm so glad you called. I appreciate it. Yeah. Yeah. It's, it's gotta be hard. I have every bit of understanding and, and I can only imagine what I would be going through. I don't think I'd be very good patient or client, I be cranky tech. But at some point you sit down and you say, okay, let's figure this out, it is I mean I is really important. Understand that as we move towards touch screens, that this is going to be a particularly challenging technology for people who can't see, but technology is kind of like the human brain. It is very adaptable and given the desire to do it. And I do really think the all these big tech companies have a huge interest in doing this some real skill and smarts in the people who are creating the hardware and software. I think it's possible, and I, I have to say that it should have asked Julian about this. But I have to say, I think force is going to be a really interesting technology going forward for people who can't see and for people who can't hear. Here as I mentioned. I think there's some very interesting technologies AI technologies coming along that will help one of the videos that Google showed at their developer's conference at Google IO was a video just amazing video about an Indian woman who never learned to read. She was she's a literate. Imagine going through life. She said, I have to ask people. What is that sign say, well, you know, how do I buy these tickets? What's so much of what we do? We have to read instructions. We have to be able to read, and she was using Google technology, which would work for blind people as well, by the way that you could point. It's Google's building it into all their phones called lands that you'd point at assign. It would it would it would translate it. And it would say it out loud to you. It would it would it would read you the signs. And she said my life has changed the videos. I'm sure at the website of a finding Lincoln, the shadows, because it's the most touching moving thing she says I got my life back because I can now read, even though I can't read I cannot get around. I can buy my own tickets. I can read instructions I can take the bus. That's pretty exciting.

Google apple Iowa Stephen LA American Council national federation Lincoln Julian AI technologies developer
"ai technologies" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

23:01 min | 3 years ago

"ai technologies" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

"Out while I'm here, there's a company called and Sierra celebrating its hundredth anniversary and the secret to that success is leveraging best in class technologies such as adobe to help brands orchestrate personalized and contextualized customer engagement to drive superior business results. I also discovered it they one of a handful of companies that have earned three adobe specializations from an analytics, experienced manager and campaign. So I wanted to find out little who book elope and hold on tight. So I can is all the way to Vegas. So we can speak with Kelly Joe sand. And Suker Ma mature who's going to tell us all about and Sarah. So massive warm. Welcome to the show. Can you tell the listeners Alabama who you are? And what you do. Absolutely. Will. My name is Kelly Joe sans. I'm on the executive team at in Sierra. We are a marketing services and technology firm that really used technology like adobe to help her size contextualized orchestrate and building customer experiences for our brands and clients with Aaron customers, I'm a Sukumar with Yellen. So I work in lead of the marketing technology team within cajoles organization. I have a team of technology strategist audience, we help our for our customers Bill technology solutions and implemented on this Lucians Televisa's, not facial laughing should wish you a happy burst night because I believe I'm sorry. Celebrate his hundredth year anniversary is marketing services firm continue little bit more about your history and the role of technology, and he's continued success. Absolutely. I will be a hundred. Years this year just kind of amazing to think about about one hundred years ago. It was a family owned business. How we started. And if you remember the days of like madman is how I describe it to my friends at events such as the tear sheets where advertisers would run out in the newspaper. We're over indexing. No EM auto as vertical for us. So you think back to those days of Ford ran an ad in the newspaper. They'd have to prove the dealerships have to prove to the end that that ad is run that it was compliant meant brand standards that it actually was run in the newspaper to the specs that they get reimbursed funds for. So our firm started really as a tear sheet company tearing, you know, advertisements out of newspapers to prove to brands advertisements were run to release this op dollars into the channel and their partners. So I'm over the years, we've definitely diversified and expanded our service offerings as technology grew as marketing just in general and transformed. Our service offerings did as. Well, so we had a number of different acquisitions going from a private family owned business through the years. We're still a product would be back, but a very different mix of services and offerings. So leveraging technology like adobe to continuously kind of reinvent our service offerings and how our clients engage their customers. So what is she? If you mentioned adobe their way is your relationship with OBI various specializations in adobe products, which is adobe analytics at obese experienced major and adobe campaign vegeta- feud on our absolutely. So I'd always a great partnership for us definitely falls into what we call the strategic alliance here and of the partnerships that we have in Sierra on if you think back even ten years ago, as we were kind of growing as an agency really looked at the technologies that are brands and our clients used how to augment that how to integrate that very rarely did you find a client that had an all in stock, and as the marketing clouds of evolved, and as they started kind of their activity in buying other technology companies in the marketplace leaders emerged on Salesforce adobe oracle IBM, they all kind of formed their own marketing cloud. And so as we really looked through the years to narrow in on our strategic partners adobe is hands down one of the top tier for us. A lot of our clients have a lot of their tech. So that's nice be. They are just very innovative company. So there continuously pushing their products forward. And so as you leaned into that we looked at kind of the core components of what really drives customer engagement in at the core of it. It's data. It's content. It's you know, insights and kind of this were now in the machine learning aspect of it. But it's really that intelligence layer that you put on top of it, and then the outbound engagement so the channel kind of aspect to whether it's a website or an Email or an SMS or push message. And so as we started to look at activating our practice over the past couple of years, we really honed in on these kind of core components within the experience cloud, and we're really excited about this. Brief specializations we have who's very unique in the Martin marketplace indefinitely within the partner network for people out Sean of marketing listening all over the world. How do these specialized? Nations that help you to help runs orchestrate personalized and contextualized customer engagements actually drive business results accurately, so the adobe technology, very innovator. It's best in class. Absolutely. In a lot of a lot of the activation of the platform. Sometimes lay in the details of how the brands are going to use them in the end. So the specializations for us do a couple of things it definitely kind of validates our agency. Our technology kind of chops. If you will in the technology that we're talking about more implementing so that it's installed correctly. But more than that, it's configured and activated in a way that will really help brands realize the vision, and the the plans of student plans that they have that they want that technology to enable so the specializations for us really kind of activate our our resources so that they're certified both in the technology and the application, and then the specializations layer top of it the agency. Proficiency to implement the technology configure and ultimately drivers outs for clients emotional freshener, inbound juice, how much technology is Trump's full the world of marketing over the last full via shook you tell me a little bit more about how you'll mock gene technology teams of expertise in disciplines, his data integration events on a logistics technology enablement and customer experience. Yeah. Absolutely. I think, you know, the the whole marketing technology industry is just growing rapidly many many fascinating place to be in. If you just see the marketplace in general in the last five years just the solutions has grown over sixty seventy percent component annual grocery, so which means customers have lots and lots of options to choose from. You'd think of anything within marketing that is a solution. That's available today. Right implementing those solutions people have done it. And they've done it in independent silos. So the true marketing success Israeli allies. By collecting all this data together. And making sure that venom of the customers are interacting with the brand in many many channels. So we should be able to collect the data. So we have to have that expertise built within the organization to be able to integrate collect the data not only in in the batch Mawr. But also in real time as the interactions are happening. I'm collecting the data, and then I should be able to actually consolidate data build intelligence in the data. Right.

adobe partner Sierra Kelly Joe Sukumar Neal Hughes Tecnel ROY Bill technology Sarah Vegas writer Suker Ma Alabama Ford executive WI
Adobe Summit - AI Technology for Marketing With Ansira

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

07:29 min | 3 years ago

Adobe Summit - AI Technology for Marketing With Ansira

"Out while I'm here, there's a company called and Sierra celebrating its hundredth anniversary and the secret to that success is leveraging best in class technologies such as adobe to help brands orchestrate personalized and contextualized customer engagement to drive superior business results. I also discovered it they one of a handful of companies that have earned three adobe specializations from an analytics, experienced manager and campaign. So I wanted to find out little who book elope and hold on tight. So I can is all the way to Vegas. So we can speak with Kelly Joe sand. And Suker Ma mature who's going to tell us all about and Sarah. So massive warm. Welcome to the show. Can you tell the listeners Alabama who you are? And what you do. Absolutely. Will. My name is Kelly Joe sans. I'm on the executive team at in Sierra. We are a marketing services and technology firm that really used technology like adobe to help her size contextualized orchestrate and building customer experiences for our brands and clients with Aaron customers, I'm a Sukumar with Yellen. So I work in lead of the marketing technology team within cajoles organization. I have a team of technology strategist audience, we help our for our customers Bill technology solutions and implemented on this Lucians Televisa's, not facial laughing should wish you a happy burst night because I believe I'm sorry. Celebrate his hundredth year anniversary is marketing services firm continue little bit more about your history and the role of technology, and he's continued success. Absolutely. I will be a hundred. Years this year just kind of amazing to think about about one hundred years ago. It was a family owned business. How we started. And if you remember the days of like madman is how I describe it to my friends at events such as the tear sheets where advertisers would run out in the newspaper. We're over indexing. No EM auto as vertical for us. So you think back to those days of Ford ran an ad in the newspaper. They'd have to prove the dealerships have to prove to the end that that ad is run that it was compliant meant brand standards that it actually was run in the newspaper to the specs that they get reimbursed funds for. So our firm started really as a tear sheet company tearing, you know, advertisements out of newspapers to prove to brands advertisements were run to release this op dollars into the channel and their partners. So I'm over the years, we've definitely diversified and expanded our service offerings as technology grew as marketing just in general and transformed. Our service offerings did as. Well, so we had a number of different acquisitions going from a private family owned business through the years. We're still a product would be back, but a very different mix of services and offerings. So leveraging technology like adobe to continuously kind of reinvent our service offerings and how our clients engage their customers. So what is she? If you mentioned adobe their way is your relationship with OBI various specializations in adobe products, which is adobe analytics at obese experienced major and adobe campaign vegeta- feud on our absolutely. So I'd always a great partnership for us definitely falls into what we call the strategic alliance here and of the partnerships that we have in Sierra on if you think back even ten years ago, as we were kind of growing as an agency really looked at the technologies that are brands and our clients used how to augment that how to integrate that very rarely did you find a client that had an all in stock, and as the marketing clouds of evolved, and as they started kind of their activity in buying other technology companies in the marketplace leaders emerged on Salesforce adobe oracle IBM, they all kind of formed their own marketing cloud. And so as we really looked through the years to narrow in on our strategic partners adobe is hands down one of the top tier for us. A lot of our clients have a lot of their tech. So that's nice be. They are just very innovative company. So there continuously pushing their products forward. And so as you leaned into that we looked at kind of the core components of what really drives customer engagement in at the core of it. It's data. It's content. It's you know, insights and kind of this were now in the machine learning aspect of it. But it's really that intelligence layer that you put on top of it, and then the outbound engagement so the channel kind of aspect to whether it's a website or an Email or an SMS or push message. And so as we started to look at activating our practice over the past couple of years, we really honed in on these kind of core components within the experience cloud, and we're really excited about this. Brief specializations we have who's very unique in the Martin marketplace indefinitely within the partner network for people out Sean of marketing listening all over the world. How do these specialized? Nations that help you to help runs orchestrate personalized and contextualized customer engagements actually drive business results accurately, so the adobe technology, very innovator. It's best in class. Absolutely. In a lot of a lot of the activation of the platform. Sometimes lay in the details of how the brands are going to use them in the end. So the specializations for us do a couple of things it definitely kind of validates our agency. Our technology kind of chops. If you will in the technology that we're talking about more implementing so that it's installed correctly. But more than that, it's configured and activated in a way that will really help brands realize the vision, and the the plans of student plans that they have that they want that technology to enable so the specializations for us really kind of activate our our resources so that they're certified both in the technology and the application, and then the specializations layer top of it the agency. Proficiency to implement the technology configure and ultimately drivers outs for clients emotional freshener, inbound juice, how much technology is Trump's full the world of marketing over the last full via shook you tell me a little bit more about how you'll mock gene technology teams of expertise in disciplines, his data integration events on a logistics technology enablement and customer experience. Yeah. Absolutely. I think, you know, the the whole marketing technology industry is just growing rapidly many many fascinating place to be in. If you just see the marketplace in general in the last five years just the solutions has grown over sixty seventy percent component annual grocery, so which means customers have lots and lots of options to choose from. You'd think of anything within marketing that is a solution. That's available today. Right implementing those solutions people have done it. And they've done it in independent silos. So the true marketing success Israeli allies. By collecting all this data together. And making sure that venom of the customers are interacting with the brand in many many channels. So we should be able to collect the data. So we have to have that expertise built within the organization to be able to integrate collect the data not only in in the batch Mawr. But also in real time as the interactions are happening. I'm collecting the data, and then I should be able to actually consolidate data build intelligence in the data. Right.

Adobe Sierra Kelly Joe Bill Technology Vegas Suker Ma Ford Alabama Sukumar Sarah Batch Mawr Executive IBM Lucians Televisa Aaron Donald Trump Partner
"ai technologies" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"ai technologies" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"First AI robot designed to carry out unbiased job interviews, so they'll eliminate the unconscious bias or. Just spitballing here. It could get really really really awkward if it acts like the Microsoft. Hey, I did that one time on Twitter. Can you imagine? Those job interviews. Does sit down and doing the interview. And then it dawns upon the that the guys Jewish. I don't know the story. And that there's no context they're allow me. Basically Microsoft decided to put an AI on Twitter that would learn based on interactions that people have on Twitter. Well, have you ever seen the interactions that people have on Twitter? So literally within sixteen hours the Twitter. A I the Microsoft created was denying the holocaust down. They didn't for another day at least. And calling people the N word and also so yeah, yeah. You wanna put that as the the face of HR, please just let me know that you're gonna film it because I'm going to have to watch. Tanqueray brainchild of for hat, robotics, an AI and social robotics company born out of research done and stock homes KT h Royal Institute of technology. The firm said they spent the fast four years building a human computer interface that mimics the way we speak, but does not bring along with it the bias that is implicit within. Humans. This is the same company, by the way, that's also working on a gender neutral, AI technology. So it's like a robot you won't be able to have sex with I guess or you will or you won't I'm unclear do. We know what that means. We'll have options when they say, it's gender neutral, or will it just be like a Barbie doll? Where everything's just putted. Well, I don't know the answer to that. But I do know that if that AI actually Microsoft saying, I could be a very uncomfortable job interview going forward. Okay. All right, good. So check this out. Reporter got triggered. In fact, she got so triggered. I think we're going to have to whip this bad boy out right here. The the indicator of..

Twitter Microsoft KT h Royal Institute of techno Reporter sixteen hours four years
Some tech employees don't want their work used by the military

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:16 min | 3 years ago

Some tech employees don't want their work used by the military

"A group of Microsoft employees have published an open letter to that company's leaders, titled hollow lens for good not war Holland's is Microsoft's augmented reality headset. The company signed a nearly five hundred million dollar contract with the army to use the headset to train service members, Google and Amazon have also faced employees backlashes over military contracts. So we asked a former military leader what he thinks Robert ladder was a US Air Force, Major general and author of the book future war, preparing for the new global battlefield actually think that there is a lack of understanding. So if we were asking the people at Google or Microsoft to build a bullet that exploded inside a person and just ripped them to shreds. That would be one thing what we're not. We're not asking do that. We're asking them to bride data. Information make things better more, accurate and. At least a small group doesn't seem to be able to make that distinction. So they they've you every piece of defense work as killing babies so use a phrase from when I was coming up through the military, and there's no fine distinctions. They're all or nothing. So then why do you think there's been this sort of recent outcry? Well, it's a different kind of thing. So if the DOD for instance, wants ten thousand computers, they'll go to Dell or whatever company it is in by the computers in this case, they actually asked the company to do something for them research or an adaptation, which would provide a military capability. What is the alternative or what do we stand to lose? If these companies don't modify the signal to for military, use or go forward with these contracts. So tech the Google cache of. Even on the surface. The DOD was asking Google to help them with using artificial intelligence techniques for looking at photos with the idea that we're going to make their targeting more efficient. And of course, the engineers at Google said, absolutely no way. We don't want to be involved in the drone missile strikes program. If you dig one level down, why wouldn't you want the department of defense to be more accurate? Would you rather? The department of defense would be killing innocent civilians by accident. So while on the surface, it looks like at least a reasonable complaint from some engineers. I think it's wrongheaded one of the things that Cairo's dial over on marketplace and my co host I'm make me smart often talks about is the. The way that the degree to which. Americans are sort of increasingly uninvolved in the operation of the military. Like, you know, most Silicon Valley engineers don't know anyone who's in the military. And I wonder if some of this speaks to that separation. Oh, it absolutely. Does. I spoke about this in my book at quite some length. The American public loves its military. They don't know anything at all about it. But yes, there is there is a distinct separation between the public and military. In. Honestly, this group of engineers both at Microsoft, and in it Google, it's a relatively small group of people. When you can show to the size of those organizations. And so I think they probably also represent a relatively small percentage of the public opinion. Robert Latiff is a former US Air Force Major general and author of the book future war, preparing for the new global battlefield earlier this month. President Trump signed an executive order making AI technology a priority in the US and the Pentagon released an unclassified document calling for quick adoption of AI across the military, but both of those initiatives rely on working closely with private

Google Microsoft Us Air Force DOD Robert Ladder United States Army Holland Dell Robert Latiff AI Cairo President Trump Amazon Executive Pentagon Five Hundred Million Dollar
"ai technologies" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

This Is Only A Test

04:52 min | 3 years ago

"ai technologies" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

"Now, it said for a moment of science. So a few stories this week one is I'm gonna start with what I thought was one of the more interesting technology related science stories of the week. There's a class of diseases that are typically called rare diseases, and they there's a class of about seven thousand season they are all over the spectrum some are caused by viruses are developmental conditions are genetic. They're really wide ranging some of you may have heard of some you haven't like Indy, and they can be really bizarre. There's like one called decorative disease where people have a genetic condition where a big burst fatty tissue will will grow. But it causes the severe pain or a there's one disease. I'm forgetting the exact name of it where developmentally somebody prematurely ages in their appearance. And so these diseases while they're called rare diseases, and there's a lot of them. It's prevalence is actually pretty common. Estimates say there's about twenty five to thirty million Americans that have a rare disease, well, some kind and because they're rare they're not common, and they're so many of them treatment regimens for them, and diagnosing them can be really difficult. Well, a number of these diseases have developmental routes in them. And so really. Searchers actually started applying AI photo technology to try to detect these diseases purely from photos of children, and if you're able to a diagnosis, the the children at a young age, it doesn't mean that the disease can be cured or treated or any of those things, but it does lower the burden and the that kind of period where you're trying to figure out what the heck this is. And so they took a number of of photos. I think seventeen thousand photos that were trained on images related to two hundred rare diseases and it produce ninety one percent accuracy at diagnosing the children's conditions based on this library. Did we did we previously know that they were visual visible facial indications of these these a lot of these diseases do have pretty clear, okay effects that you can see like, you know, manifest physically as obvious as down. Syndrome. Yes. Well, I mean, there's a lot that are more subtle than that. But you have to also look for a number of different factors. So looking at you know, sort of proportionality even one photos that actually have sort of like, I our heat maps overlaid on it could have some interesting. I think this is just one of those. Well, there's so many stupid AI stories out there right now. And I think CS was loaded with everyone being like, this is an abled or neural network. This this seems like a really common sense usage. And but because it's rare diseases it oftentimes gets overlooked so school. I love that story. To if you started playing the Pink Floyd album at the beginning of the podcast reaching a perfect moment. Now as we discussed the dark side of the moon that was hard. We've got your backwards. Oh, yeah. You just hit that right moment. In clips where they talk about the dark side of the moon. The moon is tidally locked to earth. Meaning the same faces always showing to US China sent a a a craft to the moon, but to the dark side of the moon, one of the far I sent all the time. Yeah. That's the thing. People call it the dark side of the moon, but it's really just the far side of the moon. How Centric and sent some images back, and it shows that it's not entirely dark. It's kind banish. I'm starting thought. So we have never made. This is less about like, I there's less of a being scientific win. Here. We figured out the dark says it's dark, but it's more of a a. Move for that for that space program in China. But to be able to successfully launch and land a a craft on the in that area of the moon, and we confirmed no transformers were present. Or they're known Ono. I didn't even watch that movie. But it's still got that which I feel bad about it was that is that apparently in Chinese media. This was big deal for sure, but it was not like the biggest story their interest for people monitoring social media in China and shown that like it's it's it's a new stories news worthy. But it's it's not the raw NASA moment that we've had. Oh, really? No that that's interesting. All right..

China US Indy NASA Pink Floyd Ono ninety one percent
"ai technologies" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"ai technologies" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Because illegals can't receive services if they say no to that? That means there are if they say yes to that. That means they're clearly not illegal because a legal can't are not allowed to receive services. That's the system that's one of the ways that they decided whose legal and who's not that's three kinds of dumb. Right. A we all know that there are plenty of illegals getting all kinds of government services court rulings that you can't deny it. That's that's bizarre. It is meanwhile, top congressional Democrats are saying President Trump has chosen feared is drive to build the southern border wall and called on him to reopen. The government Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer looking stone-faced telling America, no president. Should pound the table and demand. He gets his way or else. The government shuts down hurting millions of Americans who are treated as leverage seems like the government shuts down every nine months. What are you talking about it? But that's the weak part of his argument. Just because we've had enough shutdowns now that people don't react to them in the same way. I remember the first shutdown that came along when I was old enough to be paying attention. Oh my God. This is China invade. It's just not having much of an effect on people on another note in American Cancer Society report says US cancer death rates have been falling for at least twenty five years reaching the milestone in large part because of advances in early detection and treatment, and because of lower smoking rates, less smoking is a lot of it. Nation's cancer rate fell twenty seven percent between nineteen ninety one in twenty six teen. And is pretty amazing. Yep. However, despite the gains ups obesity related cancer deaths are still going up, including cancer of the pancreas deliver. That's not. That's not good news. There's a new artificial intelligence technology that can reportedly identify several genetic diseases by looking at the patient's face, the a I call deep gestalt was to of outperformed doctors and a dentist buying syndromes. In three separate clinical trials a team trained the learning algorithm by giving you. About seventeen thousand facial images of patients diagnosed with over two hundred genetic illnesses, it shows the correct syndrome over ninety percent of the time. That's amazing and charges may be filed in Georgia against Rb singer R Kelly following lifetimes docu series surviving R Kelly the Illinois state attorney urging anybody with claims the sexual assault.

President Trump America cancer American Cancer Society R Kelly Chuck Schumer Senate China president assault Georgia Illinois attorney twenty seven percent twenty five years ninety percent nine months
"ai technologies" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

05:02 min | 3 years ago

"ai technologies" Discussed on Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

"If you will this extended consciousness, we have head transplant strong AI, genetic engineering. Are we going to have iphone app for the spirit world? And I say that somewhat facetiously the real question is what is the role? What is the relationship between technology in spirit relationship is that there it is magnetic and electrical enough that they can utilize technology to communicate with us. We don't really need an app, but just remember everything that's an app is created by man. And what you know, ma- men. What do we have we have egos, right human, humans have ego? So we're going to be creating the app by that and their apps out there that you can like, you know, it will you can see fear at walking around or deem, and there's there's most ridiculous thing, but spirit can actually manipulate technology to communicate with us at one hundred percent, no different VP's. You know, I've I've listened to a fifteen minute. Voicemail. Message from spirit that was after they died. I mean, I've had phone calls from spirit. I mean, they can manipulate all of that. Except that from what I've encountered in researched, and I guess a related question to that is when it comes to ET, and it comes to civilizations in species that are more technologically advanced than ours. Are we seeing in some cases that advanced technology intersecting with the spirit world in terms of people are having screen memories people to having, you know, shape, shifting time travel all that stuff. I mean, are there entities in a love how you said ego based because I think that's kind of an important element of this are the ego based soul manifestations that have this ability technological ability to manipulate things in a really really advan. Danced way. I mean, the question are ET's on other planets more advanced enough. Absolutely. I think that sometimes we're still in the stone age, they are more advanced. There are other species that are more advanced than us. But then they also can cross over to to our environment to observe. I think that we've gotten a lot of our technology from ET presence E T contact or even channeling that information is God in all of this is the don't mean that in a real Cherchi kind of way just made it in this kind of hierarchy of consciousness from my investigation seems to pop up. I mean, people do seem to reach the other side and say, well, I'm at this level on the other side. But I know there's this next level up. And I know there's this next level up, and it seems to be pointing towards something. That's sounds a lot like God. Where do you come down on that whole thing? I it's really interesting when you're talking about level and people reaching levels, the first thing, I heard was I apology, and it was almost like, you're it's like a Scientology base go I've gotta get so the next level. But there aren't I don't believe there are levels that are soul is trying to elevate to level, you know, ABC or de God, I may not ever have the answer like the rest of the human race. I don't think sciences ever gonna figure out God. I just know God, I don't believe is one person. God does not choose who has cancer who dies this or that. None of that guy is not calling the shot. I do believe that there is an energy based creator. But can I tell you who or what that is? No. Koontz from the indie ears, the near death experience people. That's what I was really kinda referring to where they say, you know, one it's about love. Right. That's the first thing that comes through. It's about love. It's about this connection. Even the the life review is about a my gosh. Now, I see things from the perspective of these other people that I was in countering and the my love, and compassion empathy is causing me, both pleasure and pain. You know, as I see what I've done, but they do point towards there being this higher being of intelligence is higher order of spirit. And I guess I just want clarification on that. I'm not trying to jam you in any one direction. But I understand I understand completely what you're asking. And my take on it from spirit that on it's not necessarily like there's a hierarchy exactly or there's not like a panel or a government on the other side that God kiss or anything like. That it's all about experience. There's no religion on the other side..

ma VP Koontz ABC one hundred percent fifteen minute