5 Burst results for "Ahmed El"

"ahmed el" Discussed on Science Vs

Science Vs

08:31 min | 7 months ago

"ahmed el" Discussed on Science Vs

"Chapter two. This is big. So here's where Ivermectin enters our story. Pierre had known about Ivermectin as a drug that kills worms in humans. It's also used for cattle and horses as a dewormer. And in the past, there had been some lab studies that showed it might be able to kill viruses. So Pierre, start looking into it. And the first thing he came across was this lab experiment from Australia, where Ivermectin destroyed the coronavirus. But it's in a test tube. This is just cell culture, which usually doesn't send us because not everything makes the leap from the bench to the bedside, right? So we had a question mark on it. We didn't recommend it. We didn't use it. We just had no data beyond that cell culture model. But after a few months, studies in people start trickling out. Human trials. And they were showing that sick COVID patients. We're getting better on this stuff. Like in November of 2020, there was this one big and very impressive paper. It came out of Egypt. It was put on a server for preprints. So this meant that it wasn't peer reviewed, but during the pandemic, lots of academics had been putting articles on these kinds of servers. It was to get information out fast. So, the paper said that they had studied 400 people with COVID. Some were given Ivermectin, some not. And they reported that it worked. Really well. In the patients who had severe COVID, they said that 94% of them got better after taking Ivermectin. And that was a lot better than the patients who didn't get it. And that meant that according to this study, if you were really, really sick with COVID. You were all but guaranteed to survive if you were put on Ivermectin. The lead author of that paper was a professor called Ahmed el Gaza. And so Pierre calls it the el Gaza paper. And literally el gazar was like this really powerful result. It looked really good because it was randomized. It was relatively large and it had this massive magnitude of mortality. I thought it was a great study. It just made everything even more convincing than it already was. At this point in the pandemic, towards the end of 2020, he is working at a different hospital. And things are really Blake. And Pierre stops thinking. Damn, if we started using Ivermectin on these patients, we could really help them. Like all these people that were going to hospitals filling ice use didn't have to go anymore. Like literally, because the other thing about Ivermectin, right? So here's where really get me like almost gave me goosebumps. Is that Ivermectin is one of the most widely available medicines, one of the most inexpensive medicines. So like if you were to try to dream up a solution to the pandemic, you'd want it inexpensive. Widely available, ridiculously safe, right? And highly effective. As just a compound to combat a pandemic, you can't think of a better ammunition than I ever met in it. Pierre had been putting all these trials he was saying into a review paper. And he posted it in November. But I remember when I uploaded it, I was like almost trembling because I was like, this, this is big. Soon after, he told me about this one email that he got from someone who had been sick with COVID for two weeks and saw his paper. She showed it to her doctor, who was like, sure. I'll give you a prescription. And she took it. As you woke up in the morning, this after two weeks of fevers and high harsh, she woke up in the morning, and she felt really good. Like she hadn't felt in weeks. And that was my first personal experience with someone who'd been treated with Ivermectin. For COVID, and then obviously so many people around me were sick, my network of friends, friends and friends, friends and family family and friends, everybody was suddenly calling me. And I just started treating everyone. Pierre started firing off prescriptions for Ivermectin for his friends, for his family members. And in early December of 2020, he got invited to speak at a Senate hearing. Arguments over COVID had become super political. And this hearing was organized by Republicans who were looking for alternative solutions to COVID-19. Staff besides masks and quarantining. And Pierre being at the Senate hearing is kind of what took Ivermectin to the big leagues. I think the only reason why the world is talking about Ivermectin at this point was that they went viral. But what happened was is I was insulted before I started to speak. One of the politicians, a Democrat called Gary Peters, said that this whole Senate hearing was about politics. Here's some of what he said that day. We have a responsibility to follow science, the follow facts, not conspiracy theories, and not disinformation. I was really angry because I've been, I mean, I've been doing nothing, but researching and treating and doing everything for a while. And here he is kind of calling me like a political hack. And I started off just in this, I don't know. I think I showed a little temper. And then I just kept firing. We have a solution to this crisis. There is a drug that is proving to be of miraculous impact. And when I say miracle, I do not use that term lightly. And I don't want to be sensationalized when I say that that is a scientific recommendation based on mountains of data that has emerged in the last three months. The idea that the government was holding back a drug that was miraculous really hit a nerve. And video of that testimony racked up thousands and then millions of views. Pierre quickly became the face of Ivermectin. He told me that he now regrets saying that I have a mechanism like a miracle. There really is no miracle cure for anything. I know that, right? There's a cure, everybody? No. I mean, I've had people fail Ivermectin. And so, I mean, you never want to know doctor everyone's to say this is a miracle cure. And the thing is, that at this time, while Pierre is going whole hog for Ivermectin, other scientists were showing interest in it too. I talked about this with doctor Roy golik. He's an infectious disease researcher who was working with patients through the pandemic. And on top of that, he works with the national Institutes of health to come up with guidelines on the best ways to treat COVID. When it came to Ivermectin, one paper that stood out to Roy, was this review that had put together around 20 randomized controlled trials on Ivermectin. And one researcher wrote, quote, the results are compelling. Here's Roy. They concluded that Ivermectin was associated with over 50% improvement in survival. And for an infectious disease, like you, how is that that seems impressive to me, but for you? Very impressive. So 50% is a whopping mortality benefit. We're talking mortality. We're talking depth here. If you can reduce your risk of death by 50% by doing something in this case taking Ivermectin, we'd recommend it. You should do that. And that got everyone's attention. Of course. Including yours, including yours no doubt. Including mine, including all of us. If Roy's mates at the NIH had recommended Ivermectin. Doctors all around the U.S. would have started using it. So we wanted to be cautious. Some of those early studies were from desperate doctors who were just saying if there was anything here, and Roy knew that better, more well designed studies were coming out soon. So we figured, let's wait for those. The World Health Organization also held off. But with the pandemic raging, none of this made sense to Pierre. Patients would dying. And by now, countries across Latin America had started using Ivermectin, giving it to hundreds of thousands of patients. So.

Pierre COVID Ahmed el Gaza el Gaza el gazar Senate Egypt fevers Blake Gary Peters Australia Roy golik Roy national Institutes of health government infectious disease U.S. World Health Organization
"ahmed el" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"ahmed el" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Countries so it goes longer term contracts We're getting calls about those continue to supply that out on the spot basis Particularly in our fertilizer side we can supply from those three different points So we have a pretty good discussion to some of the large customers Prices on fertilizer I was looking at the U.S. contract and have a look at some of the European ones How much higher does this tight market deliver in price rises acme Your phrase is a tight market Translate that to I'm going to see your rear prices up by 3% for 10% You tell me what is the tight market deliver going into 2022 No I think we've gone up quite a bit in the last several months So you know at this point the thing about fertilizer urea is you have to buy nitrogen every year to get the kind of yields we need to continue to do the world So they're quite strong right now margins are very strong for critical as a producer But it depends on just what's the marginal consumer willing to pay You know hopeful that we won't see pricing continue at these high levels for too long I think that they're very robust right now And we're happy we don't necessarily need to see prices go up One thing that went through my mind was we often talk about when we talk about the oil markets demand destruction the risk of demand destruction You're saying to me you could type markets in strong demand and you're filling the gap Are you seeing any evidence achmed of demand destruction more so in the states I'm curious Where is the possibility of that hitting So you have some marginal acres where a farmer decides that I'm going to continue to produce for example nitrogen intensive products like corn and wheat if they decide not to use that nitrogen in the form of urea or ammonia because it's too expensive then they can go to the left side of the product So I think some of the marginal takers where they may be renting land instead of owning the land it could be you could see some of that But that being said I think the man's quite overwhelming India Ethiopia Europe United States are all relatively underbought left town is still catching up as well So it would be more that the product actually not available for them why they wouldn't apply it And that goes well for the longer term outlook because if they don't apply it in 2022 that means that in 2023 they're going to need to plant it so that we can continue to recover in a global corn socks to use ratio which is very low right now Wild message in terms of we've come out of a four year slump Ahmed So you get the sympathy vote there You have an activist investor Jeff ubon on board Have you spoken Has he told you what he would like to see Have you had a conversation about strategy Absolutely I mean I'd say activists was one when Jeff had created a value act But I'd say he's very constructive and his team is very constructive They join us actually as a cornerstone investor In the protocol of IPO And he's now joined the board of vertigo So I'd say that we have a very good dialog and a lot of that dialog is about what we can do as further globe to basically decarbonize our own production and decarbonize our customers and new customers that we don't have today So think inclusive capital is joined our capital stack because it has that firm has a strong belief in jobs team has a strong belief that we're in a very good position as an incumbent in ammonia for example to decarbonize our existing industries and a lot of new industries that we can move very quickly on it So that coupled with what we're seeing today when we just talked about our strong free cash flow profile allows for strong dividends as well as this growth opportunity on the ESG driven side And let's just round off can you update the market on your plans for exporting blue ammonia How long will that be So we already did a few exports East Asia over the last couple of months but we're rapidly ramping up production with adna as a strong partner not just as a shareholder but also as a leader in carbon sequestration we have the ability to ramp up blue ammonia production significantly and we have two projects on going a million fund plans and a 70,000 fund expansion And so we think that the outlook looks very strong because ammonia delivers hydrogen that's chemical construct is NH3 without carbon So if you can produce that ammonia with low or no carbon you can deliver hydrogen unlike a hydrocarbon without basically emitting steel two on combustion So we're very excited about that for blue as well as in the future green ammonia which we announced the project we're doing in Egypt with one of the largest electrolytes in the world last month We wish you with that project some good news good news there Have a good day at depict that is the CEO Ahmed el jossy of 30 globe for joining me this morning Plenty more ahead On this Monday edition of daybreak Middle East this is Bloomberg The market's in focus every business day.

Jeff ubon United States Ethiopia adna Europe India Jeff East Asia Ahmed el jossy Egypt Middle East
"ahmed el" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"ahmed el" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Kind of reached enough for a long time because when what's happened when the price is too high then there is the last consumption It's not that people can spend a lot of money Some of the news headlines come in there from a cloudier discount It was years of come out in At the adipe gathering in Abu Dhabi So you can hear the full conversation with Claudio in terms of what he thinks demand hitting a 100 million barrels at the moment but will that endure as really what you want to know for the oil markets Well let's pivot to another conversation They're also an Abu Dhabi based company Fertile they went public last month and just a few weeks into trading the company's already raising the dividend guidance with fertilizer prices booming demand is on the up Will it endure the CEO Ahmed el Jose joins me now Thank you so much for joining us Congratulations on the IPO We've been ready to speak to you for a while You know you've up the guidance twice as many months $240 million is where we last saw an upgrade Is this as good as it gets in terms of the narrative or can we expect bigger jumps in dividends to come I've made good morning Good morning and thanks for having me on Yeah in terms of the guidance we upped it because of the visibility we see in Q four and into the beginning of next year on the strength of the fertilizer markets and ammonium markets In terms of potentially getting better we do see that over the next few quarters The market looks tight going into the spring season towards the middle of the year So let's start to the year But ultimately some of the drivers behind that like natural gas will start after the winter coming down a bit And we do see sustained strength in our ability to generate free cash flow through that So hard to guide what it looks like going forward but we're just trying to come to the market with updates on the dividend guidance as we get better visibility for the second half of 2021 Okay now you talk about the tightness of markets there Let's pick up on that Are you picking up demand from some of your European markets perhaps that are under pressure to cut production because of power outages Yeah so we're seeing demand definitely continue on the fertilizer and the ammonia side downstream so we produce this particular urea pneumonia The biggest cost produce ammonia and urea which is a product that's pretty low is natural gas or coal in our case we just use natural gas that heats up So European producers have not been able to generate positive margins to keep their plants running So they've turned down or shut down production And so definitely vertical to the ping has been filling that gap with its trading activities and its production with long-term feedstock contracts out of the Middle East particularly at Algeria and in some cases Egypt The more these interviews will do you'll know that to throw me a line like that It's tantalizing You're filling the gap What does that mean Demand man I'm filling the gap I've got a 5% boost to 10% boost in demand Benchmark it for me No so let us I think I'd say the demand growth is anywhere from in an average year on 2% It's a bit higher this year because you're recovering from a slowdown in COVID driven last year on some of the industrial demand So I'd say demand is quite strong let's say two to 4% overall And from a supply perspective we're really feeling a big supply shortfall because every year with demand growth you need more supply and we just come out of a 6 year downturn So people haven't been building enough plans to supply this growing demand during this downturn People weren't signing up for a $1 billion blast understandably So the question is what's going to happen the next few years Because it takes 5 plus years usually to build a new plan So it's not like you can react quickly and bring that supply back and that's what gives us pretty positive outlook on further globe and OCI one of the shareholders So I mean when you put in those new clients and you pull in that filling the gap demand how do you make that demand stick How do you make those clients say yeah do you know what We're back to fertility for the next batch order So we're seeing for example pneumonia which is a contracted product more basically confidence invertible to supplier So discussions around contracting for next year and years out are easier at this point People are saying you know fairly low has multiple supply points It can provide urea and ammonia from three different.

Ahmed el Jose Claudio Abu Dhabi pneumonia Algeria Middle East Egypt
"ahmed el" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"ahmed el" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

"Welcome to the monitor the coast. Choose thanks for joining us. I'm stephen humphreys. And i'm april often on saturday. The big van. Beethoven's new symphony will premiere in bonn germany. Technically speaking german composes. Ten symphony is a co. write his collaborator. The computer. beethoven left behind fragmentary sketches for the follow up just simply number nine almost two hundred years later team of ecologists and computer. Scientists have total artificial intelligence how to predict which notes beethoven might have chosen for the missing pieces. When you write your email or text. You'll computer or phone suggests to you what he would right next says team member. Ahmed el gamal. Drexel the odds and ai lab at rutgers university in new brunswick new jersey. This kind of predictive model is very similar. The eighteen month project was an iterative process. Computer programs to recognize patterns in beethoven's creative process by examining his own symphonies. The i also had to figure out which instruments to use the arrangements which will be performed by the beethoven orchestra on mr l. Happy office a preview but humming a few bars on the twenty five minute piece side. Note schroeder the peniston peanuts comicstrip will finally have something. Newt play by his hero. The program knows that critics will question whether computers can replicate beethoven's genius yet. He believes there's plenty of joy in this ode to the beloved composer is basically a way to show the world. Would i can do says to algal. Believes it's a tool akin took creative assistance. It has a major role in the way off will be created.

stephen humphreys beethoven Ahmed el gamal bonn Beethoven Drexel germany rutgers university new brunswick new jersey Newt
"ahmed el" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

Behind the Bastards

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"ahmed el" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

"I think history will prove it to be true even though it history did so by early. Twenty twenty one nearly all of the studies that purported to show a benefit from vermont and were small there was one hugely influential exception. November study published by dr ahmed el-gazar of been high university in egypt. It claimed to be a randomized control study that had found early. Ivermectin use not only reduce transmission of covert but reduced mortality by as much as ninety percent. If true this would have been huge world changing news. This would have meant that. Each cheap widely available anti-parasitic was as effective as the best vaccines. The fact that this study was so large again. There's like four hundred. People i think in the study had impacts. That rippled out foreign bite because most of the studies are smaller in cases like ivermectin when researchers are analyzing a bunch of far-flung little studies to try to determine whether or not something works. They liked to bunch all of those studies together in. Do something called a meta analysis to explain what a meta analysis is. I'm going to quote from a write up by epidemiologist gideon meyrowitz cats who is an epidemiologist. And who like an a scientific studies for living and is thus the kind of person you would go to for information about this as opposed to a random pulmonologist anyway quote to solve the problem of multiple small trials. We conduct things called systematic reviews and meta analyses. These are scientific aggregations of research that pool all of the known studies on topic and then combine them into a statistical model so we can see what the overall effective a drug might be. Instead of dozen small studies. We get one big aggregated estimate. Which in theory is the final word on whether or not a treatment is effective. The only problem with these analyses that if a single study has a large enough number of participants or a huge effect it can sway the overall trend into something positive. Even though on the whole the studies have not found a result now..

dr ahmed el gazar of been high university gideon meyrowitz vermont egypt