35 Burst results for "Aguirre"

Retail: The Nightmare Before Christmas?

CNBC's Fast Money

01:20 min | 3 months ago

Retail: The Nightmare Before Christmas?

"Counting down to the most wonderful time of the year. There are fewer than one hundred fourteen days until santa comes to town but is christmas at risk this year problems piling up at the ports disrupting the global supply chain of massive labor shortage threatening retailers as aguirre for the critical holiday shopping season. And good luck getting that high tech toy this year. The chip crisis continues to cripple the industry. So with just one hundred fourteen days to go. Are we setting up for nightmare before christmas guy down. Me ball humbug. To that now. I mean nothing keeps the people from shopping for christmas. Quite frankly and i think this year is going to be another record year. You can talk about supply chain disruptions. What have you people will find a way nats. Just a question of what retailer is best suited. Obviously we've talked about williams-sonoma. I'm sure a lot of people wanna get that crock pot for their loved one. But that's a bit of a double top concerns me walmart. You can make a great case on valuation another situation where maybe we topped out a bit here. The one that sticks out like a sore thumb. Not that i suggest doing your christmas shopping there because i know you won't but costco jeffries just raised their price target. Today i think five fifty high in the street believe it or not costco and earnings in this holiday. Season is probably the one that shapes up the

Aguirre Santa Sonoma Williams Walmart Costco Jeffries
"aguirre" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

06:46 min | 3 months ago

"aguirre" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"Many new neurons create in some ways. We're we're getting close now to an explanation of why people you know who's quote unquote minds are more active later on seemed to also stave off some of the some of the memory decline that that happens with asia that happens even with alzheimer's disease. The idea was that they sort of have more resources to draw from. But there's also some evidence that if you're physically active and you do grow new neurons. Then in order to incorporate those new neurons into your brain you need to learn a new skill or learn something new otherwise those neurons like they. Just don't get that they're kind of useless to you. So this data comes from rodent work where yeah like you know. When the the mice were you know they. They track that they were. They were giving running wheels. But also an enriched environment in which they could learn something new than those neurons stuck around but if they didn't have an enriched environment than those neurons died right right so i mean all of this sort of suggests. It's gonna be hard to put this in a pill you have to exercise if you can. You have to eat right you have to use your brain. It just goes back to brain which i mean but all of these things. There really is good evidence that it will sort of put a cognitive reserve in your brain bank account that you can draw on you know as you age. I wonder now is since you've had this experience of the seizure and it having this kind of profound effect on on your your memory and sort of what you know about yourself if it happens again. Do you think you will have the wherewithal to not be as anxious. What what do you think that would be like. Actually i think it would make me very anxious Because it would make me wonder. We'll what has changed. So you know i for for a number of years. Had 'em are is really frequently. Like i've probably had a dozen maher is and i don't i don't have them frequently anymore because nothing's changed in there but if i were to suddenly start having seizures. It would suggest that that that abnormality was was changing and growing and then i actually would need surgery so besides writing this book. How has your experience changed your mind. Well it was very hard to write the book. So i feel like i did myself a service in terms of improving my cognitive reserve. That they say that you can't just sort of like do the crossword puzzle or do a lot of pseudo goes like you have to stretch your brain. An i definitely a stretch my brain a lot so it it changed me in that way but it also made me. You know more worried. Unfortunately you once you know all these things that that aren't good for your brain like like lack of sleep then you wake up in the middle of the night. And you say i- accumulating you know tau tangles in my hippocampus. Because i'm not sleeping. So those are the dark days but you know for the most part. It's really better to know you know what you can do to take care of yourself than to sort of focus on all the things that might might go wrong i also. I had kobe very early on in the pandemic. Like in in april of twenty twenty. And i i lost my sense of smell so now i try not to read those papers that you know suggest that that might also not be so good for your brain long-term. Yeah i mean yeah. There's still controversial about whether yeah and i think. Yeah so so. You mentioned that because the olfactory bulb has a direct link to your memories on this. There's this idea. Is this question of whether cova did you know the fact that we are of smell is that mean that it's crossed into the brain here. Well fortunately i did. I did it my sense of smell. I did get my sense of smell back pretty quickly so yeah good good good but yeah. There's definitely evidence that that People with with severe cove at least Do have all kinds of cognitive symptoms. And so it's it is. It is something that i think. We're going to have to touch upon again as we as we understand what's happening in the disease. But you know the other thing i'd like to say. Is that about losing your memory and how scary it is. This patient owen rivers. Who who. I focused on in the book and who wrote an essay for the end of it you know. His memory loss is almost certainly permanent but he still remembers his past. He's still has this executive function and ability to plan his life and the friendships that he had from before but he still has a meaningful life. It's not like his life is over by any means. And i think that's really important to remember also when people get a diagnosis of alzheimer's that you know they're still there for many many years they can still have productive lives meaningful lives meaningful connections And i just think it's important not to kind of lose sight of that. Yeah i think you're exactly right and thank you for pointing that out. Because i think sometimes when we see a patient like clive wearing who seems to be constantly he described himself as like. He's he's constantly waking up because he feels like he's just conscious for the first time we get the sense that you know. What's what's was happening in his life because it doesn't have a lasting quality that somehow is meaningless. And that is its own conundrum As we think about what does it mean to be alive. You can experience something in the moment but can't remember it. Does that mean that you've actually ever experienced it right. So i want to remind our listeners. That lauren gary's book the memory thief and the secrets behind how we remember Is available at booksellers everywhere. Lauren thank you so much for coming onto enquiring minds. And i'm going to send another email back to jed and and thank him for bringing your book to my attention as well as you know. His original work has just been really fascinating to talk to you. Oh thank you. I've really enjoyed talking to you as well. So that's for another episode. Thanks for listening and if you want to hear more. Don't forget to subscribe if you'd like to get an ad free version of this show. Consider supporting us at patriot. Dot com slash inquiring minds want to especially thank david. Noel harring chang shawn johnson jordan miller. Kyle hella michael gow goule eric. Clark yushi lynn clark lindgren joel. Stephan meyer awol daily master and charles while this episode was edited by daniel link. I'm your host in davis conscious time..

alzheimer owen rivers asia cova lauren gary clive jed Lauren Noel harring chang shawn johns Kyle hella michael gow Clark yushi lynn clark lindgre Stephan meyer david eric daniel link charles davis
"aguirre" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

07:05 min | 3 months ago

"aguirre" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"It's gone under the radar. I mean i think this is one of the things that's really scary and a in a real take home from your book is that this isn't something that is restricted. To people who are addicted to opioids. This is something that could affect anyone. Who's in an accident. And you describe a number of cases in which that isn't including a doctor at the memory and aging center butler who had his own experience there. And i should say that i was at the member nations that are as opposed dock. And that's actually how. I i became an editor on neuro ks. I worked with bruce miller for my postdoctoral fellowship. And so you know. I know a lot of the in your book personally and yet you know it wasn't until you. I read your book that it's sort of put all these pieces together and made me realize that this is. This is something that everybody needs to worry about. Because at any point we can be an an injury and opioids are so quickly prescribed for pain. These days that something that we need to think about. Yeah by the same token you know i. I don't want people to be unduly concerned. This absolutely should be studied. And i'm glad that finally will be studied. I think it's highly unlikely. That sort of you take opioids or you take your vicodin because you had your your teeth pulled and that there's going to be a problem there long-term but but it is a concern for people who are taking them. Long term high dose as prescribed for chronic pain. And as you know it's not even clear that that is particularly elite effective. But yeah that's something that should be studied. There's another big theme in your book. That i wanted to talk about. Because there's a lot of controversy in the science about this. And i think you you probably are better aware of what the latest researches than i am and it's whether or not And the rule in which new neurons in the adult brain might have so just to give some context to our listeners. You know there was a longtime in which neuroscientists thought that no new neurons were born once a person reaches adulthood and then it was found in rodents That in fact there are two areas of the brain one being the hippocampus and another being another area. The factory cortex Also in in and then ultimately a part of the brain involved in learning knew habits so two parts of the brain involved in creating new long term memories seem to have evidence of neurogenesis of new neurons being grown in adults and then a few years ago came a very kind of well researched. Study that call that into question That found little to no evidence of new neurons in the adult brain. And then now this controversy so there's a bit of back and forth about it and this is important because if we understand sort of want to understand how memories are formed understanding whether new neurons or born after adulthood is a big part of that. So can you tell us a little bit about you. Know the neurogenesis story and how that fits in with the signs that you're reporting. I actually spoke with those researchers. Who did that study at ucsf. And i know that Everyone i spoke with about the study. Also said this is this is really well done and it did create a stir. There was a a blog post. I read called. W t f no new neurogenesis which i cited in in my index. But i think that most of the evidence does point to the growth of new neurons. And it's very hard to study because you stain you know the person dies and it's not clear you know. How quickly do you get to preserve that brain and what has happened in between you know. It was several years ago. So it's a little too long. Oh for me to remember the exact critiques of the study. But i think since then more studies have come out showing neurogenesis so you know i think the consensus in the field is really that that it does happen. But what's interesting is what's the purpose it's also very clear that it's much more common. Early in infancy infancy and then it slows way down as people age which explains perhaps y little kids don't remember a lot of stuff or anything from before a certain age that in terms of sort of an explicit memory that they can share because of all these new neurons are coming in infiltrating the hippocampus. You know the connection patterns that were holding memories to start there anymore. They're sort of constantly being raced. So what is the relationship between neurogenesis and the sentinel memory story. Is there one. I don't know that they know that there is one. I don't think there's there's an obvious connection. It was certainly so the idea is that exercise enhances neurogenesis. So that's certainly one of the prescriptions. That monroe butler gave the patient who i opened the book with. Oh and rivers prescription for brain. Health is exercise to promote neurogenesis. And you know eat well sleep. Well reduce stress all the things that anyone should do to protect their brain. Health is what was prescribed for owen. What's interesting about him is that he had always been concerned about memory loss and always been very interested in in studying memory and studying the brain so he actually already knew all about neurogenesis when butler call them up and said you should exercise more to promote neurogenesis. They had sort of joked about it in the lab. Like what's the optimal way to learn something should you. Should you run before you learn so that you got all these new neurons coming up or after so. He was actually kind of disappointed by that advice. Kaz kazi already was doing it. I think that's what's really interesting. Is that leg. you know. We don't have a lot of ways in which we can help people who have profound memory loss including people who have alzheimer's disease in fact there's you know it's very controversial that this new drug recently has been approved by the fda because a lot of clinicians look at the data and just don't see any efficacy and yet exercise does seem to stay stave off cognitive decline in the and i think the the idea is that the may be there. Is this relationship with with kind of growing new neurons in the hippocampus Because you know when we look cats mice that run we do see Turns on neurogenesis and that you know. This can have a whole cascade of events. And i just think it's really interesting to think about the best we can do is say to people be and yet you know and even though we know quite a bit about sort of the mechanisms of how this works and be active early like like start. When you're young. It's it's always good to start any time but start when you're young because at a certain point if enough neurons have died in the hippocampus like where are you going to put the new ones. They have to integrate into structure. So if there's too much damage you know doesn't.

bruce miller butler chronic pain monroe butler ucsf Kaz kazi alzheimer's disease owen fda
"aguirre" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

08:38 min | 3 months ago

"aguirre" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"Alzheimer's disease. He tell us a little bit about the history of what people think are the mechanisms behind alzheimer's disease. And how new research is is shining a light in a different direction. The hippocampus is one of the first regions to be damaged in alzheimer's disease in most cases of alzheimer's disease and that's why The first symptoms are usually memory loss so of course In these patients the hippocampus is what's damaged in. That's pretty much where the damage ends and their their symptoms are limited to memory loss. But the sort of raining theory for many many years was that amyloid beta which is a protein that can accumulate toxic. Plaques was really the reason for alzheimer's disease so there are there are two kinds of proteins that accumulate an alzheimer's disease. One amyloid beta and the other are tau tangles but tau tangles kind of no one. Really particularly paid attention to them for for a very long time even though they were seen in the first patient and there are a number of reasons. Why amyloid beta really took the spotlight. So for starters. They made animal models mice animal models that created a lot of amyloid beta. They were genetically engineered to churn out lots of it. And those mice had problems with memory and then when they cleared the amyloid beta when they gave them drugs to get rid of the amyloid beta. The mice did a lot better. There were also the genes that were associated with early onset. Alzheimer's familial aunt alzheimer's all had to do with the processing of amyloid beta so the pieces of the puzzle kind of fit together and that started the amyloid cascade hypothesis and and pretty much that was the direction of of a lot of Drug research for many many years culminating most recently the fda approval of biogen's drug ads you helm but all along. There were some researchers who were saying. Well hold up. What about tau and amyloid beta really be fundamental problem or is it as one scientist put it to me is amyloid beta kind of like the fire. Alarm's saying there's something going wrong in the brain and it's like you call the fire department. They showed up. They turned off the smoke. Alarms and said you know job done. Were fine but they leave. The building still burning. So what's the role of towel and is that one of the proteins that we should really be going after not necessarily instead but certainly as well and one of the connections with the amnesic syndrome is that tau tangles have actually been found in the brains of deceased chronic opioid users in a couple of studies in europe in in one young man. He was only seventeen years old and he had a really abnormal accumulation of of tangles in the hippocampus. So there's an interesting link. Bear and another link is that hyperactivity we were talking about how opioid sort of shut down the inhibitory neurons which creates too much activity that hyperactivity is a phenomenon very early on in alzheimer's disease and that's only really in the last ten or so years been recognized as as a phenomenon that's pathological it's not sort of making up for dying neurons. It's actually interfering with memory formation in the first place and that's a phenomenon of aging and then it's worse than people with amnesic cognitive impairment which is usually the the precursor to alzheimer's disease. So there really are kind of a number of of converging lines of evidence that suggests that there's something about how opioids damaged the hippocampus. That could potentially be used as the basis for a new animal monitor fro for a new animal model for alzheimer's disease and it's also given rise to an idea that perhaps using anti opioids liked naltrexone or naloxone. Could that serve as a therapy to kind of stave off or slowdown memory loss in patients with alzheimer's disease. As you mentioned like this is what makes the story. So great is that now we have a bunch of these converging lines of evidence including kind of mechanistic one. Because i think for a lot of people and you kind of write about this in your book as well when individuals overdosed and they were found in the hospital they and they revived and then they had memory loss. I think a lot of people just attributed the amnesic syndrome. If there was one to lack of oxygen you know that that can be something that happens when a person loses consciousness. And so you know. And we know that because the hippocampus is particularly active sparky as i mentioned before it requires a lot of Oxygen to in order to survive like. It's we call it sort of metabolic costly at it. Needs a lot of oxygen to fuel it and to keep it going and so when you have Lack of oxygen to the brain the hippocampus is usually the first part of the brain or one of the first parts of the brain to be affected. But that doesn't seem to hold up in terms of what happened in these patients so so tell us a little bit about the discovery that was end in fact oxygen probation that was causing this syndrome in patients. Who are overdosing. were who who took sandstone. Well if i can. I just tell you about Kind of skepticism. Because it's interesting. I did find this pattern. When i went and spoke with other people and i probably interviewed about one hundred people and neuro scientists and doctors and doctors for the most part always expressed skepticism. At first they said oh. Isn't this just hypoxia. but you know after. I talked them through it. They're like okay. Yeah i could see that whereas neuroscientist like would sometimes finish my sentence before i even got through explaining it they say oh. Of course the neurons are excited. Toxicity themselves to death like they got it immediately and i just thought that was so interesting. The difference there depending on their backgrounds. But a one other really important line of evidence that that show that it's not just hypoxia. Which is you know. Clearly hypoxia would would exacerbate the situation but There is an anesthesiologist at the university of pennsylvania who who actually began to wonder about opioids in the context of anesthesia long ago in the late eighties and was concerned about their ability to cause seizures in people and could that cause damage so He did a whole series of studies over the course of twenty years both in animals and in people and found that even when he supported the rats so that there was no hypoxia they had damaged hippocampus and he also did experiments with people where he gave them a very fast acting dose of offensive all analog and supported them with their breathing and they also had this excessive activation. There was no damage. But the hippocampus was uniquely sort of activated and burning through a lot of glucose and then he took that a little further and thought. Well is there a connection with alzheimer's disease. So he did a larger study and some of the people in that study were a four carriers which is be major genetic risk factor for alzheimer's disease and they had more activation in the hippocampus and the others had less. So you know certainly. These were not large studies but they all sort of continue to point to some sort of connection so he was absolutely thrilled to hear from jed bearish who got connected to him. through jets. father is is an anesthesiologist. And said you know. I knew someone was gonna come along eventually. And connect the dots So bay continued to work together and actually kofsky just got word from the national institutes of health at there and i think it was actually neither that their proposal to look at opioid use in long term chronic users who are taking opioids as prescribed for pain. Are they suffering Subtle memory impairment and damage to the hippocampus..

alzheimer's disease Alzheimer's familial aunt alzh biogen fda europe hypoxia university of pennsylvania seizures jed bearish jets national institutes of health
"aguirre" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

01:47 min | 3 months ago

"aguirre" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"They go out of commission things get out of control so they kind of time things and tell other neurons to stop talking so fennel shuts down those inhibitory neurons rather than turning them on so suddenly. All the bouncers are asleep and it's chaos and then the Excited tori neurons. Firing too quickly. There is no one to control them. This person also might very likely be somewhat oxygen deprived since sentinel suppresses. The drive to breathe so they're basically having little mini seizures and the brain can't keep up in the neurons. Don't get enough energy and some of.

"aguirre" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

07:44 min | 3 months ago

"aguirre" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"A little harder. Yeah so we'll talk about that in a in a minute. But i i want to get back to that experience that you had of jami view and the sort of the the deja-vu that came before that. And do you think the deja-vu were more common in your case. Because they were sort of maybe either many seizures or precursors auras or do you think. That's just unrelated. Oh no i think they almost certainly were or as you know. I think a lot of people don't realize that it's not normal to have deja vu frequently. It happens to people but it's it's not a normal thing for it to happen a lot and it was happening increasingly more frequent. I just didn't kinda pay attention until i had this sort of reverse phenomenon but it's probably really the same thing which is just your brain. Neurons aren't firing in a coordinated fashion and so in the second instance and it was clearly a much more extreme experience. Because i also felt kind of nauseated and that's also a classic heart of auras and auras jason name for something before it becomes a full blown seizure and i felt really scared and some of that. Fear was probably just because well. It's scary to not know where you are but also that sense of impending. Doom is also a classical sign a seizure so it's hard to disentangle all the pieces. It's so interesting to me that this that this one brain region you know we know it's part of the network we know that it's doesn't act in isolation and we know that it has all of these connections but that it could have a such a specific experience. You know one that we consider so close to our very essence of who we are right. Like your sense that you've been in a place before that you've seen something before the you know your name and you have a personal history. I mean all of that seems to have been disrupted for you. Buy these seizures and yet like what else are you rather than this kind of essence of like you know your lauren and you gone through these life experiences. Yeah i'm just grateful that it only lasted a couple of minutes because there are people like hmo or like another patient club wearing who had even more damage than than h. m. who truly. He had like a thirty second memory so for him. It was all gone the past and the present and the future. Just a further complicate matters though. Yeah i i think he's still alive a he is still alive yes. I spoke with his neuropsychologist. But i was gonna say just to. Further complicate matters like my abnormality is not in my hippocampus. So i can't explain what's going on there it's actually in my right frontal lobe. Oh really yeah oh interesting. And oh that's interesting Ha and yet at had like very like canonical hippocampus symptoms only see. It's even more complicated. Yes it's always more complicated than you think. And of course the campus has yeah lots of connections to the frontal lobe. So let's talk a little bit about the core of the cases that judd Sort of talk to me about or sent the the case studies about on the review paper. And that you start your book with actually So i think the the first case is a twenty five year old man. I believe named owen rivers. Am i getting that right. Yes so actually. i do. Open the book with his case because he later went on to become sort of the canonical case. Study because they had enough information about him before and during an after. But then i backtrack two thousand twelve. Which was when the first patient came to attention. At lahey hospital where Jed was a neurologist and several other neurologists saw him so this young man came into the hospital first winchester and they didn't know what to make of him. He had overdosed on what he thought was heroin and couldn't remember anything for more than thirty seconds so at winchester they sent him over to lahey and he had this very bizarre pattern of damage to the hippocampus just the hippocampus which as you say is unusual and you know a thirty second memory. So they didn't know what to make of it. Maybe it was a stroke and so they sent him home without a diagnosis and thought that that would be an interesting case report but of course doctors are are really busy and it didn't happen and then a little over two years later. A patient came into jets office From new hampshire for a second opinion with his wife and his mother and he had been left alone or her decided to stay home alone over weekend and when his family came back he liked the first patient. couldn't remember anything new and eight weeks later. It was the same thing now. The radiologist actually hadn't like pointed out anything unusual on the scan but when he came into jets office it was clear he was very amnesic. And then when he put the scan in it looked exactly like the first patient's brain scan with damage to the hippocampus on both sides. So at that point. Jed said well. What's the connection here. because he's also Has training as an epidemiologist so he sort of looks for these patterns and the Second patient had also had a history of of heroin use but people have been using heroin for many decades so why all of a sudden at the same hospital a couple years apart with this be happening but at the same time this was happening sentinel was beginning to infiltrate the drug supply and so that seemed to be the new event. So jet took it to the department of public health in massachusetts and The state epidemiologist. There's al di. Maria said interesting. If you find a few more cases let me know. And he also approached the cdc who said you know baby but could be a coincidence and then within about nine months to more patients showed up at lahey so then there was that cluster four which is what he submitted to neuro case. And that's when the department of public health said okay. There's something going on here. Let's try to figure out how common this is. Are there other people out there. So they put out an alert and within minutes. They started getting emails. Back from neurologist questions was saying oh i think i've seen this so it was happening to other people and it's just it's just not been reported. So can you describe a little bit about sort of what we know about. What's happening in is it. You know it seems like fence and all is the the kind of missing link here but as you mentioned like people have been using heroin for centuries and hasn't seemed to have been reported what is different about fennel and and it's a fact Here and and how it seems to have these long term effects on on these patients brains well sentinel is is just much more potent than heroin and it does have a different structure but it's not clear that different structure is what makes a difference. It's just that it's more potent and it's a class of opioid that docks onto a certain receptor called mu opioid receptor and there are two classes of neurons in the brain. I'm sure you know this. Inhibitory neurons and excited tori neurons. Most people think about the executory neurons. Hey we got a signal pass it on. you know. they're kind of stupid. And then there are these inhibitory neurons which are the real brains of the system and they are kind of like one scientist described to me as the bouncers at the bar and if.

seizures owen rivers lahey hospital department of public health Jed lahey hmo jets jason lauren judd al di winchester new hampshire cdc Maria massachusetts
"aguirre" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

06:34 min | 3 months ago

"aguirre" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"Thousand sixteen. I got an email from someone named jed barish. It was in my capacity as an editor for journal called neuro case and he warned me that the paper that he was submitting was a bit odd. It was about people who had taken opioids and then become amnesic and that it had somehow affected the hippocampus. This was odd because after all for my graduate work. I studied the hippocampus. I thought i knew about as much as most people who spend a lot of time. Decades events studying hippocampus new and i never heard of an nest syndrome that came from using too many opioids but sent paper out to reviews and more reviews and they all came back really positive. People were intrigued. It seemed like something that hadn't really been well discovered before. But that's something that it was real a few years later. He wrote a review paper in the same journal that we published of several more of these cases so it wasn't just a single case and then i got an email from him just a few months ago and he told me that a science journalist had written a book about these cases and that i should read it and he was exactly right. Lauren gary wrote a book called the memory thief. All about these odd ways in which our memories can be hijacked by the things that we do including the drugs that we take lorna gary welcome to inquiring minds hi. I'm so happy to be here with you so you also met jed. Tell me about your first encounters with him. Well it wasn't my first encounter but it was a maybe the encountered that set me on the path to writing this book because I had my own experience of of bazaar memory loss In my case it started with these brief episodes of of deja vu and not like many people think sort of like. Oh have been here before. But no i have been an exactly this spot doing exactly this thing and you know that can't be true so you know it's weird but i didn't think much of it and then one morning i had an episode of what is called jamais vu which is a feeling of. I have never been here before at never seen this before. So all of a sudden you know. I was in a room that was completely unfamiliar to me. Nothing made any sense. And i didn't even know who i was so if you'd walked into the room and said hi i'm injury i could not have told you my name so i lay down because it was so scary with my face on the floor and my eyes shut and then when it passed i took myself to the doctor. And she said oh. That sounds like a seizure may be you. Have a brain tumor. So i did have a brain abnormality and i was told by the chief of neurosurgery at a boston hospital that i should have surgery and i didn't like that idea so i asked for a lot of second. Opinions and one of them was an informal Opinion from jesse barish who was a neighbor and he came over. He looked at the scan and he said i this is. This is a nothing burger you know. Take your medicine in. You'll be fine and he was right. So i take an anti-seizure medication every day and i. I never had another episode like that. That definitely left me with an appreciation. For how bizarre the brain can be and an appreciation for sort of how pragmatic and reasonable. He is so we sort of shared that that fascination with strange brains so that when this syndrome came up i started talking to him about it. I have to say that. You know in my capacity as as an associate editor neuro case which i did that for over ten years i'm not Just recently stepped down. And i would get a lot of bizarre cases sent to us and we had a pretty high rejection rate because oftentimes you know a single person's anomaly doesn't really advance the science forward and we can't always really understand what's happening from a single case and i remember i. You know reading some of this work and thinking. Is this going to be another one of those things where it was just like a weird coincidence that you know if people had had this history of opioid over us and they also happen to have temporal lobe apple apps or something like that. That somehow went undiagnosed. And it wasn't until. I really sort of del more deeply into his work and also you know just recognized that he he seems very practical he seems like not the kind of person that would take an anecdote and make all these grand conclusions from it and so anyway it was. It's really interesting. It's rare though that we have you know a few of these cases that come in that that really change a very well established view of how memory works and especially in the hippocampus. Because you know the hippocampus is actually a part of the brain that got me. I interested in neuroscience because there is a very famous patient named h. m. henry mollison in the nineteen fifties who had epilepsy and had surgery to remove his medial. Temporal up so that is the part of the brain that includes the campus on both sides and it was found that even though he could still say learn a new skill she couldn't learn any new facts or remember any new events. He had this profound amnesia. And i was the first time that we recognize that memory is compartmentalized in the brain and that the hippocampus specifically has a really important role to play. And so it's really interesting for me to hear your experience and we'll get to a you know science you describing your book because you know you're really great science writer and there's a lot of science there but i'm also just. This book is so special to me. Because you've had this experience and as a memories there's a part of me sometimes that you know i can never really understand what it must be like to lose a sense of yourself just because this one area is offline. No i mean it was definitely memorable and because i have epilepsy. This syndrome is actually a particular concern to me. Because you know the hippocampus is there is a region very susceptible to seizure. So you know. I definitely want to protect my brain not not. That i'm an opioid user. But opioids are prescribed frequently and used in surgeries every day around the world. So it it does it. It did me make.

jed barish Lauren gary lorna gary jesse barish jed journal brain tumor henry mollison boston apple epilepsy amnesia
"aguirre" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

02:12 min | 6 months ago

"aguirre" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

"Help us to prevent so many of these chronic diseases that we talk about weekend and week out here on the show. The very ones that shiro was discussing today. We want to help those. Who need it the most. So let's get this information to them and you can help us do that by subscribing to the exam room podcast physicians committee on apple. Podcast or spotify wherever you get your shows and when you subscribe please also leave a five star rating. Because every new subscription and five star rating helps us climb a little bit higher in the podcast rankings and the higher we climb the easier it becomes for those who need this information the most those who are struggling with their health and think that they can't do anything about it. It helps those people find this information become inspired and hopefully change their health fortunes for the better and for today. That's all the time that we have. I want to say. thank you one. More time to the incredible joyful delicious vegan sheera aguirre and for everyone here at the physicians committee. I am the weight loss. Champion chuck carol. Thank you so very much for listening and remember as always keep it plant based.

five star shiro spotify today apple chuck carol Champion room sheera
"aguirre" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

01:53 min | 6 months ago

"aguirre" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

"It forward and that is what it is all about paying it forward and making the world a healthier place one person at a time. Let's go ahead and switch gears and head on over to the exam room news desk. We have new data today showing the effects that diet can have on covert nineteen. This is a big study. A study of frontline healthcare workers in six different countries. Finds those who ate a plant based diet were seventy three percent less likely to develop moderate to severe symptoms of in nineteen infected in contrast the odds of becoming moderately to severely ill from the virus. Where nearly four times higher among those who ate a high protein low carb diet the data was collected from frontline healthcare workers. In france germany. Italy stained the uk and right here in the us from july through september of two thousand twenty and researchers say the results held true even when they accounted for things like obesity and other pre existing medical conditions as well as lifestyle factors such as smoking and exercise. The study also finds the diet did not play a role in the chances that someone could become infected only the severity of the symptoms. If they did researchers concluded quote our results suggest that a healthy diet rich in nutrient dense foods may be considered for protection against severe kofi nineteen. And you can find a link to that study right now that was published in the british medical journal in the episode notes. How would you like to take part in one of the biggest nutrition conferences of the year..

france july uk seventy three percent september two thousand six different countries today Italy british one person nineteen infected four times twenty one of the nutrition conferences nineteen germany
"aguirre" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

05:44 min | 6 months ago

"aguirre" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

"Absolutely in fact. I got it from rip ethelson. Who you know of their young at that he. That's his his trademark but but it it really conveys exactly what which is sad that stress you know. Sometimes we think that strength has to mean coming from Force coming from a lack of compassion. Being talk and really strength is was more subtle than that you know. I think the outward way that we show strength which you know a lot of the cultural icons are the guys who go out there and hunt and kill it and bring it back on and at one time. That's human history. But i think that we are moving toward a more compassionate stage. We realize that there's a better way to live in an Do it in a way that honors a life in our so clients drawn beans. Instead of using farm land to raise cattle for protein. They get their protein from plants. We can just get it directly from the plants and be a lot more compassionate. You know about how we treat other animals on the planet. Our final question. We've talked about your story. The phenomenal book. your family. just all great. But i think that the people who are watching this the people who are listening to it. The exam room is. They're like yeah but what is in her pantry. What are you. What are you staples night. I belong to. I'm in houston so That belong to a farm of essay. It's a community supported. agriculture Vegetables abdomen grows growing season week. So i've got fruit. I eat a big player. Fruit every morning. Whatever's in season whatever's in my fridge. I have a huge play. That breakthrough asbury melons oranges. Apples pears whatever's in season. You know that's what i eat. And i'll have some granola with that in a plant based milk i also do like I love pumpkin seeds again. That's how i get my fat. Don't do oil anymore. That's really important for people who are trying to prevent reverse heart disease But but you need healthy fats. So flaxseed math lexi. I mix it with some pumpkin..

one time houston
"aguirre" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

02:40 min | 6 months ago

"aguirre" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

"The reason diets quote unquote don't work. Is that if you've ever talk to anybody that's on a diet. They just talk about what can happen anymore. And you really defeat yourself because the first thing that you do when you come off that is. That's that's the thing you can't wait to devour so you can't look back and you have to look forward and that's why diets don't work and so i talked a lot about focusing forward about the new energy. You're going to have the health you're going to have but also you're going to take all that flavor and you're gonna it love you back. Ooh i love that. love you. Pack yes ma'am welcome to the exam room. Podcast brought to you by the physicians committee. High i am the weight loss. Champion chuck carroll. Thank you so very much for raising your health. Iq with us. This is episode forty eight from season ford number. Two hundred forty three overall and today we will be joined by shira aguirre. She's a woman who proudly boasts about being well into her senior years but she's also more fit and more flexible and healthier than she was in her thirties. And with that good health comes more energy and it's the kind of energy that is contagious. It is impossible to speak with shira and not become excited. You just kind of get lost. And what it is that she's saying. And then you're so revved up. You're ready to go out and find your own way back to health. Even if it's a journey that you never thought that you would be taking. And her story is one that began many years ago when she was a fast food creature of habit.

shira aguirre shira thirties today first thing many years ago Two hundred forty three one eight season ford number episode forty
"aguirre" Discussed on Plant Strong

Plant Strong

04:38 min | 6 months ago

"aguirre" Discussed on Plant Strong

"Shera aguirre. Well you know everything you just said is so true. It's amazing how right since since we we come out of the you know since we're birth are trillions and trillions trillions and trillions. I think we have right around forty trillion cells that make us up. But you're right. They want us to be healthy. That's what they're striving for and we do most of us do everything we can to basically bash them and try and abuse them and not not take care of them and and so. I think what you've described here as well as you know. You had the high blood pressure that was affecting you and a myriad of of ways probably the beginnings of of heart disease. And when you turn in you're able to turn the ship around but it's amazing when you eat the right..

Shera aguirre forty trillion cells trillions and trillions trilli
Active-Duty Marine Arrested for Role in Capitol Riot

AP 24 Hour News

00:19 sec | 7 months ago

Active-Duty Marine Arrested for Role in Capitol Riot

"Marine Corps officer seen on camera scuffling with a police officer and helping other members of the pro trump mob forced their way into the capital on January 6th. Is charged in the riot, Major Christopher Juan Aguirre, says the first active duty service member to be charged in the insurrection. I'm Tim McGuire. AP News

Marine Corps Major Christopher Juan Aguirre Tim Mcguire Ap News
Nuclear and Multimodality Imaging  Coronary Ischemia

Cardionerds

04:44 min | 10 months ago

Nuclear and Multimodality Imaging Coronary Ischemia

"Welcome back everyone. It's time for car. Dealers go nuclear with today's discussion about the multitude of clinical utilities of nuclear cardiovascular imaging within the broader context of multi modality imaging. We are just so thrilled to be joined by our imaging nerds colleagues doctors. Eric hut elbow skinny and wild jaber erica. It gives me so much joy heavy back on our audience will remember you from our cleveland clinic. Cnc are episode episode number. Seventy six on our patient with spontaneous. Pap ruptured related to vascular. Eller donald syndrome so for everyone. Erica was born and raised in costa rica where she received her medical degree from university. Costa rica she trained in internal medicine at the cleveland clinic. Where fortunately for us. She couples matched to stay here for cardiology along with mr dr. Eric hut aka jose. Aguirre truly power couple. Erdo will be staying here for cardiovascular imaging fellowship at beyond being clinical and a research powerhouse. Erica is a leader within the program as her classes fell representative erika. Thanks for joining us high. And it's a pleasure to be back. Thank you for that very kind introduction. I gotta say that. It's thanks to my mentors family and friends that i'm where i am today and i'm more than excited to introduce one of those individuals. Although skin on the cardiovascular imaging fellow at brigham and women's hospital he obtained his medical degree from Willing willingness swallow and completed his internal medicine residency including chief year at cleveland clinic and then moved on to cardiovascular fellowship at this institution although not only a spurt clinician and a researcher but also an exceptional mentor and a friend. And i actually met all during my interview at ccf when he was achieved I blame him. For recruiting me and six more latin americans to my residency class all of which actually became very close friends on one. My husband so thank you all for guiding my steps and really molding future so got. Thank you for those kind words. We have great times back into clinic. Both control mason in the work hard to try to you to the clinic somber. Happy that's the case. You're following through the path of of imaging so an amid. Thank you for the invitation diseases. Great session we're looking forward to do these for some time. So he's my to pressure to actually introduce the doco alligator book. Java's attended cardiologists at the cleveland clinic. He's director of new collapse. And director of the core lab. For the cleveland clinic. But beyond that the jerry's is is a friend of father to me as a person who has been all the way through. My journey in cardiology now could imaging in half neural networks expressed Grateful i am to have him in my life. We call him l. hefei just as a way to show him respect and gratitude and show him how we like him hale. Thank you so much for these kind words. now thank you for having a Show in guys is basically. There's no better time to spend your saturday this except of course watching boss place football but again. It's you know you look at these at yourself and you hear these words you think of yourself thank you all feel old inspect only comes with age and thank you guys old florida or not. Only keeping us always up to date but fighting us and You started shows again how you can change the way. We actually learn medicine. Cardiology from an up down up down way of delivering information. What everybody's waiting for the people in gray hair sitting in now. Beautiful offices in universities threatening us web to waiting for them to come up with a verdict every four or five years guidelines versus you taking this down to the level of practicing and cardiologists toward actually in training or early career and disseminating information. Because you can reflect. Shine the light on. The most important issues is face every day clinics and in the hospital home floors globally with the pandemic and then you can also actually at transcend all these rigid structures. We developed over the past. Maybe thousands of years cardiology and make these structures louis invade democrat. So thank you so much that and there's nobody that person actually reflect this new method or way of learning than erica. Erica is amazing amazing. Amazing human being an amazing physician. And i for the feel fuelling vitals of had in my life over the past two years have been at the cleveland clinic. It's such a pleasure to spend after

Cleveland Clinic Eric Hut Jaber Erica Eller Donald Mr Dr Eric Hut Aka Jose Erdo Erica Brigham And Women's Hospital Aguirre Erika Costa Rica Cleveland CCF Hefei Mason Hale Jerry Football
Former Houston Police Captain Mark Aguirre Charged For Allegedly Holding Man At Gunpoint To Prove Voter Fraud

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Former Houston Police Captain Mark Aguirre Charged For Allegedly Holding Man At Gunpoint To Prove Voter Fraud

"The former houston police officer accused of holding a man at gunpoint to expose alleged voter fraud. Scheme missed his first court appearance after testing positive for covid former. Hp captain mark aguirre is charged with aggravated assault. Prosecutors say aguirre held an air conditioning repairman at gun point because he thought the man was transporting thousands of phony ballots. Terry yates gary's attorney as a very complex case. We look forward to present this. It's going be interesting and fun. Trial it really will be a. Gary is expected to appear in court during online hearing tomorrow. Investigators say there's no evidence of voter fraud scheme

Mark Aguirre Terry Yates Gary Houston Aguirre HP Gary
Uber, Lyft and the sharing economy

Future Tense

09:45 min | 1 year ago

Uber, Lyft and the sharing economy

"What used to be referred to as the sharing economy. Let's quickly remind ourselves what sharing actually means if i give you a ride in my car and don't expect anything in return that's sharing if however aguirre rod in my car and you have to pay for the privilege. Well that's cold commerce and that's why when we talk about uber and deliver ruined task. Grab it and even airbnb. These days we now refer to them as gig economy companies. Juliet shore has been researching. Why the sharing ideal ended up as a form of anti regulation capitalism. Her new book is called after the gig. How the sharing economy got hijacked and how to win it back. So the sharing economy launched in the midst of the so-called great recession of two thousand eight nine and it emerged with a series of could've wonderful promises about all the good things it was going to bring an call that the idealist discourse so it promised it was going to give people a whole new way to work without a boss if people independence and flexibility autonomy that it was going to provide income for struggling middle class people and that it was inclusive because it was so easy to join these platforms and it would reduce discrimination and help low income people. It also promised that it was going to create social ties connections. These were what we call appeared appear person to person exchanges. Somebody in their car. Someone who needs a ride someone with a room. Someone who needs a place to stay and that those exchanges would yield truly personal intimate relationships and then finally it claimed that it was going to reduce carbon footprints. Because airbnb would make it. So we didn't have to build hotels and ridesharing would make it so people didn't have to own their own cars anymore so it was a pretty hefty set of claims and sort of idealistic hopes which we heard from ordinary users. And of course from the platforms themselves as well as the many consultants who were touting the benefits of this new way to run an economy. What does it suggest that flexibility is really the only regional virtue of the sharing economy that still touted by the big gig companies today when whenever they come under attack for their methods and actions. Well flexibility is still at least in principle a key part of gig work in the sense that people can choose to go on the app and go off at any time. They can work as many as few hours as they want in practice. What we do find though. Is that for people who are trying to make a full time. Living on these apps they lose almost all the flexibility they lose a great deal of it. Because there's not enough work too many people chasing too little work so they have to pretty much stay on the apps. Whenever there's any work to be had we know that very quickly. The sharing economy co opted by silicon valley venture capitalists. But we're those original ideals. Plausible could have worked. I think some of them weren't some of them weren't so the environmental idea really warrant for much of the sharing economy. That's because the two biggest sectors which are lodging and transportation are both really carbon intensive activities travel and you know both long distance travel and local travel and these sharing platforms made these services available much more cheaply which meant that more people were gonna use them. So more people getting into private cars as a result of ride hailing because there was so much less costly than taxis. Many more people travelling as a result of the fact that airbnb offered cheaper accommodation so environmental claims weren't laws above the social. Claims are a little bit more mixed. We do find people on airbnb if they're staying with someone who's present in the home rather than renting out a whole place. They are making social ties there. Few sharing platforms like blah blah car in europe which is long distance ridesharing where connecting with someone is really relevant but as far as the claims for the labor side of things economic claims. I think they were feasible. Wall if you had a decent business model and you didn't let too many people on the platform but second the companies started out with pretty decent compensation for the workers in the early days people were pretty happy with many of these platforms but over time because the companies weren't making money kept cutting what they were giving to the workers and this was most prevalent in ride help and the bakeries and they weren't making money was they priced the service too low so uber and lift subsidizing the rise by about forty percent. It's the only way they could get such a big market so if they were less greedy. I think the answer to your question is yes. There is a way to do this. That actually takes advantage of the technology is still a reasonable deal for consumers. But isn't you know giving them crazy. Low prices and also is sort of feasible from platform point of view. Your book is called after the gig and the subtitle is how the sharing economy got hijacked. Which is what we've been talking about and how to win it back looking at the how to win it back do see the. The basic model appears structure augmented by digital technology. Do you see that as having potential to expand or to create genuine sharing economy models. I do think that there's tremendous potential here. So there other more out of the box kind of innovative ways that we can think about using this technology and changing the social relations of production basically in ways that would really benefit users and workers in particular so i studied what are called platform cooperatives and these are platforms. They use many of the same technology so they use the matching algorithms. They use the ratings and reputational data. They use the payment systems but instead of being owned by wealthy investors owned by the people who are actually doing the work so i studied an artist's platform of photographers platform that sell stock photography over the web and there are about a thousand artists who are members of this cooperative. They're much much happier when they they used to work for that quote unquote of stock photography. Which is a company named getty images and two longtime industry insiders started. This new company called stocks a united and photographers flocked to it. They're much much happier. They get a much bigger fraction of the sales and they can govern themselves so they have control over what the company does so. I think it's a fantastic model. The reason i have a lot of optimism for it is that the technology obviates a lot of what management does it takes care of the quality control. It does the matching. it does the finance. You know you really don't need much management and you can see that by the fact that many of these companies have very few employees and that means that it's just that much easier for workers actually to own those companies because there's really not so much that management is providing. Can you bring those types of platform co to scale or in trying to grow. Do they risk going down. The path of what we know has happened to some of the big companies. It's an interesting question. Because i think the question of scale is somewhat misunderstood in the gig space many of the areas where you've had rapid growth our in services that are person to person services and are primarily local ride hale and delivery errands and tasks and so forth so these are personal services and people who provide them are locals and they're providing them to local so for those you actually don't want them to get two big. There's no reason that they should all you really need is what we can think of as interoperability in the apps. So let's say. I use a ride hailing app in my city and that's most of the time that's what i'm using it for but occasionally go somewhere else. I wanna be able to open that app and get a ride held. They're all that means. is that those. Local co ops. Have to all be part of a network that platforms where scaling to a large. You know market makes more sense are the online platforms and the accommodations platform. So those make more sense to scale up. We have seen some other kinds of structures at least in nonprofits and so forth not necessarily always a co op structure. But you know something similar where we have some of these platforms that are actually operating more globally and the one i studied stocks is global platform. So yeah they can scale. I think the question is how big do you want them to scale. And i think that really varies by the service. Were talking about

Aguirre Rod Juliet Shore Airbnb Europe Getty
"aguirre" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"aguirre" Discussed on Pantheon

"That's that's really important that you are able to shut off the left side of your brain and it becomes a system and if you systematically go through this checklist it's going to work. Yeah it says proven scientific theory. Yeah it's a universal theory right. Yeah yeah the systems will get you to the. I heard this really cool phrase and it was. It was a guy who was talking about schematics right and as guitar players we all know that at the end of the manual that comes with our guitar amplifier. Or any piece of outboard gear that we bought over the years you pre-empts or whatever for engineers and stuff like that. There's that last page to where you can fold it out and it has all these weird squiggly lines and weird numbers and that we don't understand but a smart engineering person would and and basically. That's the schematic of that piece. Aguirre's shows how the signal goes through it right. So schematic what is the short. A schematic is just the system right. What is the what is the root. Word of schematic scheme. We always hear like. Oh get rich. Quick scheme get rich. Quick scheme. And i heard this guy one time say he goes. He was kind of basically saying stupid. Phrase because scheme is a schematic. It's a system that gets you from one point to the other and you have to ask yourself what's better a get rich quick scheme or stay poor slowly scheme i thought. Wow that's brilliant. Brilliant so really if we can put together. A schematic that gets us from here to here quickly. That's the goal right. It's great and so of course guitar player always practicing and getting better. It was always like this is what i'm going to work on this month. This is what. I'm going to work on this week. And you wanna see results quickly. You know and so systems work. That's what to me. Licensing became this thing where it just became. Well this is great money. This is a great way to you know..

Aguirre
Simone Biles Makes 'Vogue' Cover Debut

Ringer Dish

04:41 min | 1 year ago

Simone Biles Makes 'Vogue' Cover Debut

"Move on. Let's talk next. About Simone biles on the cover of Vogue. this is the August issue I believe crowd, yes, correct, and it was timed up for the Olympics which did not happen as you probably are not going to happen as you're likely aware. Yes, I wanted to talk to you about this just for a couple reasons. I was like pretty moved by the story and I just WanNa say so that their profile was written by Abby Aguirre. Who I believe is the same writer who the world, and also we gave a bit of a hard time to you. Because Riana surprised her with her interview a few months back, and we weren't super prepared for. She wasn't super prepared for it, and there was a little pushback there I she was prepared for this and I. This is A. I found like a moving piece. And some of it is the timing there. The reporting begins in March, and it is before lockdown has started for covid nineteen, and before the Olympics have been canceled, and so she's watching Simone biles. Who is the greatest gymnast of all time like? Asked process the this like major personal setback that Olympics what she's been training for. You know Simone biles twenty three years old, and which is on the older side for gymnasts, which is mad Jim. That brass unforgiving. An unforgiving sport in a lot of ways and so having the Olympics post be postponed a year. In addition to you know the training schedule because it her level. There's a level of optimization that we can't even begin to understand but. That has serious consequences for her and her ability to compete, so she's wrestling with all of that. And on top of that if I If you've been following gymnastics at all, then you are aware of just the absolutely horrific crimes committed by Larry Nassar, the former USA gymnastics doctor, who is now serving up to one hundred seventy five years for the sexual abuse, gymnasts and Simone. BYLES has spoken out about being survivor of his abuse and continues to be just a incredibly outspoken. Advocate she isn't an advocate, but she is really trying to hold USA gymnastics accountable, because it is obviously like a much larger problem in organization, and she is doing that while at the same time trying to be the world's top gymnasts. Yeah, it's like so unfair that she has to hold them accountable while also being the best like, can't she just be the best i? It's like it's like yeah, and there is and the. The piece does a great job of putting about all in context, but there is one line which is Simone. Biles is explaining her reaction to the postponement of the Olympics, and she talks about it for all of the athletic and physical and reasons that I just described, but she also goes another year of dealing with USA gymnastics I don't know if I can do it, and because of everything that she's been through and I. was really moved by that and by the whole story, and I mean she's obviously just inspirational and tremendous success. So I. Recommend reading it I think it is exciting that she is on the cover of vogue, because vogue as we know has historically I'm not been representative especially of. A black people and it's pages, and certainly behind the pages as well and so it's great to see on the cover. There has been kind of a side conversation about the photographs. Were taken by any bits and quite frankly are just not great. They are not the standard that they should be for someone on the cover of Ogan ally. The problem is because it does not appear that they are. Let for a black woman they. Don't have the technology and this is a continuing. This has been a long problem in TV and movies, which is just that? Many of the photographers and camera, people and lighting technicians just have not learned how to light for people of Color. And? It's a long term problem, but I think. You know if you're gonNA put smiles on. The cover faded out. Learn like earn it doesn't it doesn't matter just learn how to do figure something out and. You know there's there's another question of. Should any of yeah as I say like? The photographer look I understand she's famous, and like maybe in some ways that gives the story some attention that maybe it wouldn't get but like how about putting some literally putting Simone biles in the best possible. Yes, exactly exactly and if you're going to have an elite, do it then. Make sure. She learned how to do it.

Simone Biles Olympics Abby Aguirre Riana USA Larry Nassar Writer Representative JIM
Journalists of Color

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

37:15 min | 1 year ago

Journalists of Color

"Before the interviews I wanNA share my theory. For why all of this exploded for journalists of Color Right now? It goes back a few years. So many of us went from covering the first black president to covering Donald Trump. And ever, since trump came down that escalator, announcing his campaign back in Twenty fifteen, when he denounced Mexicans as drug traffickers rapist. When he was that he would build a wall at the border and that Mexico will pay for it. Those journalists were told to avoid using words like racist or lie to describe some of trump's worse behavior. That kind of self censorship, especially on race for a lot of us, it became untenable after we had to cover the death of George Floyd and report on that video of a black man, being choked to death for eight minutes. On top of that we are now dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, which is laying bare racial inequities across this country. And Corinthian has given a lot of us time to sit and think. Notice what's going on in the world and in our lives and in our newsrooms? You have black journalists and other journalists of color who think of themselves as truth seekers in the same way that their white colleagues, too, but very often when they tell the truth about racism when they tell the truth about. Bright, white supremacy. They're labeled as activist. Highs! They dared to bring their blackness across the newsroom threshold. PSORIATIC McDonald's has been thinking a lot about race and the news. So I asked her as a black journalist in this moment. What does she want to see change so I would say what I want is actual structural change within newsroom leadership? I do not want the equivalent of painting black lives matter on a street in yellow letters, but in a newsroom. It's visible. By that doesn't really solve anything when it comes to pay discrepancies between. White male journalists and black female journalist who do the same job have the same level of experience and one is making thirty thousand dollars a year more than the other. The other thing is that. You cannot have. Newsroom leadership that is completely made up of six Cheddar straight white men. Even. Under straight white women. Zicklin or gender straight Whiteman that power needs to be distributed more equitably. You know the other thing died. I want to see I wanNA see US cover. Race honestly. right? Race isn't just something that black people, experience or something that non white experience, attempting that everyone experience and says and so. There needs to be a baseline of literacy rate when it comes to how we talk about race with an America how it operates within American history, and how that informs. President and what world. News media has played in that way. We have to consider that. The last time that we had a pandemic, the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. We need to recognize that. The paper of record in Chicago the Chicago Tribune. Is Basically scapegoating black people who are fleeing the American south, basically saying Oh half a million darkies are basically invading Chicago. If that's objectivity as not the kind of objectivity that I want to participate in them. Yeah, yeah, I WANNA get personal a little bit You ended up being quoted in New York Times. Article about this reckoning talking about how you didn't have a great time at the Washington Post. You've tweeted about your experience as a black woman in newsrooms. What does this reckoning meant for you? And what have you been trying to get off your chest and this moment about your experience? In some of the newsroom's that we've been talking about my hope for this reckoning. is that. There is not one more class of you know young. Ernest! Twenty two year old coming out of journalism school I'm who basically have to go through this really damaging gauntlet. We're constantly sort of questioning yourself and your own worth and I think there are a lot of really talented journalists who have been driven from the field. Because at some point, they feel like they have to make a choice between their own mental health. Or being journalist. And they just self-preservation and I cannot blame them. and that is really a shame, because think about the people that those journalists now think about the stories that they could have told. The access they could have had picked the access to walk into certain spaces at their white colleagues cannot exactly and you know one of the ways, and this is not the only way that this is important, but one of the ways that this is important is. We need them to trust us. Our job is to tell their stories and to tell them accurately and to tell them fairly. And if people are are always getting pushed out the folks who might actually be able to empathize with them who know where they're coming from right I? There's a quote from their lake when I fall where she basically expresses the you know, she's probably the only person who covered public housing who's actually lived in public housing? That, yeah, that is. Expertise right that is. Valuable knowledge so I just I want us to be able to practice our profession with humanity. Yeah, and also it's like in this moment where it seems like more than ever before. At least in my lifetime, there is such a deficit of trust. Americans don't trust institutions. They don't trust journalism. They don't trust facts. Worst argument about whether or not mask can prevent the spread of Corona virus like in this environment if newsrooms don't act in fix some of this stuff. is going to create more mistrust in the media and these news outlets will become less relevant in a moment in which I would argue. They are needed more than ever before. Yes, and you know the thing is is and I've said this repeatedly at that American journalism does have a credibility crisis. The the credibility crisis that we have I think. Actually bears a lot of similarities to. Our current sort of Voter disenfranchisement problem. Being. In Journalism, we have not spent enough time. with the very same folks who are often disenfranchised when it comes to media coverage as well right. And when we think about the press and freedom of the press is an instrument of democracy we have to think about. enfranchising everyone, we have to think about making sure that they do find us credible. The folks. If they look at the newspaper, even look at a website or they listen to the radio and their conclusion is. That these entities are not telling the truth about them in their lives and held their lives are. For them yeah for them. That's a credibility issue for us. Yeah we can fix. It failed them. That means that. We have to develop far better relationships with folks who have historically been shunned or shut out of district of media coverage are only allowed to participate in very limited ways. You know I still very much believe in that adage, the journalism exist to comfort the afflicted and afflict comfortable. Thanks again to riot, not at McDonald's the culture writer for the undefeated and also this year. She was nominated a pilot sir. My mind. I wanted to hear from other journalists of color about their newsroom experiences. And they wrote in. Here if you, my name is Lavi Cima Guy side. I'm a naturalized citizen who came to this country as a young child. I worked at a bare he a newspaper for a long time and have fond memories of my time there. I had mostly white editors, and in fact, I've only had one non white supervisor in my over two decades in journalism. My name is John. Sepulvado, I mixed. I have Mexican Irish indigenous and Black Ancestry I worked in public media for fifteen years. There are tons of horror stories. There was the white woman editor who asked me if I like dog-fighting because she quote hurt. Might People like dogfighting? There was another white woman editor told me to smile more around the office because I quote have dark features and those dark features, scared herself and other white women around the office. One time a headline I, wrote for one of my own stories, led to a newsroom wide, meeting an emotional one, where a bunch of US had to persuade top editors to let us call the president's racism what it is! The most frustrating part was that I and others had to explain to our colleagues. Why our voices were important. And partly because they reflected the communities we covered. argued. Repeat, a thousand more stories like that. But at. A point I realized. That no matter what I did no matter how good I was no matter how hard I worked. I would always be seen. As something that is not. White. And my mobile was the leave the industry. All right time for a break. When we come back, we will hear from Latina, trailblazer who refused to leave the news business. Instead. She started her own media company to tell the stories that she wanted to tell. Hey another reminder asking you all to fill out that survey for us. Okay, it is anonymous. It is short and the link for it is NPR DOT org slash I B. A. M. Survey. All one word I BAM SURVEY NPR DOT Org. Slash IBM. Filled out I'll be really happy if he do thanks. This message comes from NPR sponsor discover. Sometimes, food is more than just food. It's an integral part of the community so this year discoveries, giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Barbecue in Charleston post office spies Birmingham back in the day bakery, and Savannah and hundreds more places in your local community all across the country. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Whenever you face a choice. It helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer. School will start off our course in economics within workout for your brain how to decide what something newly costs for? Planet money from, NPR. People still find it really interesting salmon like I'm like no. No I. I was the first Latina in the newsroom at NPR ever to step foot. WHO WASN'T CLEANING IT? That was me right that that was that. Was this Latina? That is Maria. She's had a long career in media, not just here NPR but also at CNN NPS in two thousand ten. She founded her own company for total media. And she has a memoir. It's called once. I was you that comes out in September, but most of you probably know Maria. As the host of a very long running public radio show turned podcast from NPR and through media. It's like new USA mighty. Hossack Latino USA has been around since the early nineties. It is attributed by NPR. which is why you hear NPR in the credits, but that will be changing USA is moving. As distributor. It means nothing's GonNa Change for you. Our listener that our audience is going to get way way way bigger. We're very excited. Announcement might have been confusing for listeners, but don't worry like. She said you'll still be able to hear the show. But the Journal of Color, especially in public radio that move meant that NPR was losing a hugely influential show dedicated to covering Latino stories in the US. And from its founding NPR has been well bad on race. More than seventy percent of NPR's newsroom is white and of the sources you here on NPR's air, those voices they are more than eighty percent white. People of Color who work in public media? We have been saying for years. Fix this including Maria Hosa. We're asking the question. Are you listening? Are you hearing? And that his own ready a power dynamic that is wrong. This notion is the assumption that they the they will always have the power I. Ask Maria what Latino USA leaving NPR means for this network, but I I asked her about blazing trails. One could see your path to be one of color who found her own company as a shining success, but one could also see your path as proving that the conventional spaces in media can accommodate of voice like you the way they should you know like. I'm so proud of what you're doing, but also the fact that you have to make your own production company shows at the NPR's and the PBS's and the CNN in many ways. Don't get it and can't help people like you tell the stories that you need to tell. I was thinking about that as I was thinking about our interview Sam because. My husband calls me Aguirre, a warrior, and then as I was thinking about our conversation, Sam. I was like well. That's great i. like that, but you know what I don't want. Journalists of color to have to be warriors at into order to be able to work as To work as journalists of Contians, who can bring their entire cells into the news room? Who are going to be seen who are going to not only be seen and heard but actually. Put into positions of power to be the ones who are listening and making the decisions about. Yeah, we want that story on the front page and the headline is going to say that exactly. I want you you know everyone has been using it. Everyone's been going to twitter sharing their reckoning story, the slight the knocked in that promotion. The being told you can't do this do that. Give me one of your reckoning stories from your career when I when I come to this country, I'm born in Mexico. My whole family's born in Mexico. We're raised on south side of Chicago. You know sixties and seventies, but as Mexican immigrants we also understood the essential nature of journalism and American independent journalism and so. My father was watching. Meet the press every Sunday and we were watching the today show and we watched sixty minutes, and because of the fact that it was so American in holding people accountable and I was like that's what journalism is so long. Story Short is many years later actually a decade ago go to sixty minutes when I'm out of work and needed a job actually and. They basically like look, can you Can you come back and talk to us? When one of the old white guys get secret is really and I, said and I just remember like. Like am I supposed to laugh? It's funny. Is that a joke as being? and. As we do in the media's people of Color, 'cause we're really good at laughing things off. Like. Yeah. Banter you know the the the the the we're so smart. On. Exactly Racism! Exactly. And I got into the subway at fifty ninth street onto my apartment in Harlem and I cried on the train. and. I was just like, but I am not. You know I'm knocking to let this take me down. And that was the moment that I decided to create food. Media Winds Rams history. Takes over Latino, USA. And Expands Latino USA grows the show and let the USA's audience twenty seven years in. Is in a continual upward trajectory. You love to see it. As I. Want to ask more about what needs to happen. We are in this moment now. Where so many journalists coming forward with their stories? But it's still unclear what newsroom leaders will actually do to fix this stuff you have been on all sides of media for profit nonprofit. Give me like a checklist of the big three or four things that mass media should do right now to effectively respond to the issues raised in this reckoning. Feel like this is a moment to be having that difficult conversation, which is pushing this reckoning that we're talking about to another level. I'm going. Give you an example, Sam it brings me joy, it brings me no joy to have to ask white men in senior editorial positions how they consider my role as a Mexican immigrant woman journalist. In relation to a president who insults every single one of those things that I do? And and And basis a lot of that on his white supremacy. Which is very challenging word to even use in our newsrooms right, but yeah. I don't feel comfortable saying it. I want you to feel uncomfortable having to answer that question. Because his white supremacy does not impact you in the way, it impacts me, and I am a journalist just like you. I am an equal journalist just like you so now. You helped me to figure out. Harmon handle that because that that impacts our might quote unquote objectively, you have to be able to recognize that you do not have an ownership of activity or an ownership of the media or an ownership of public media, or it's not yours to share yeah. Did any of the issues we've discussed about. In diversity and Unfair situations that journals of have to deal within this industry. Did those factor into your business decision. To leave NPR ex. Look I've had you know NPR's my family? IF NPR calls I'm going to say when you I was absolutely and Bureau Sam he's my family. You know we hung out once, but he's. He's my brother. Because we're digesting PR so NPR's my family Mi. Familia was my first job. But You know I started a company. And I have a team of very savvy business and media executives journalists. And when they said look, we have an opportunity here in in a competitive marketplace A. Somebody PR X.. Who wants to really go big? Yeah, I will say you know they are all of these. Underground email channels and slack channels and discussion boards were journalists of color are coming together to talk about all these issues and there's been a lot of chatter about your show. What says about NPR yeah? Why am I so disconnected? Oh my God. I thought I. Thought I was like connected because I'm on twitter and I got a fat. And what folks have been saying? People who love your show Oh my goodness. They're saying well. This speaks to the larger problems. NPR has always had with content may for people of Color. They don't market it enough. They don't support it enough. You have these program. Directors at various stations put a show like yours on at not great hours. This is the stuff that people are saying. Do you I mean like to the extent that you can elaborate on it, you know. Did you feel like NPR? Neglected or didn't promote enough your type of show. So of these issues at play with the race and diversity in space like NPR. Again. Let New USA right now is growing an audience at kind of extraordinary numbers I think we're one of the few public radio programs or previously distributed by NPR. That is growing an audience at these numbers. And so the fact that. We made this decision. Says everything about. WHAT NPR. Kind of thinks. About letting USA. Now having said that I don't know you know I. Don't know the internal finances at NPR. Maybe NPR's is is really facing a a real financial challenges that I'm not privy to. And so you know, but but when you're thinking about AH, show, that has this kind of. Audience Commitment There was a point not long ago. When one of your colleagues called me up, actually she works in. She's a Latina colleague at NPR in the newsroom, and she called me up and she said. Do you think that Latino USA has been this incredibly successful because of NPR or despite NPR. And no one had asked me that and I kind of like. ooh And I said well actually despite. Despite NPR, do you think you know 'cause? There are a lot of shows not produced by NPR. Distributed by NPR. Do, you think other shows like that in your same boat that were hosted by white people or felt to maybe India leadership more mainstream. Do you think they got more support than your show did pound for pound? Yeah How does that make you feel? Like I said, that's why. I didn't. See I've been feeling this for a long time, my love. News, so Gimme a word for the emotion. Well right now I'm glad that I'm with a partnership with Pr X.. That's not gonNA units not on the table so I'm like I'm looking to the future. That's why I'm like yeah I'm all about like? It's all about the dodge this morning, boxing teacher. was making us do the we've the. We've the constant, which by the way is really really hard, and that's just how I feel is a journalist of color in a survivor Mexican immigrant woman in this like it's always like whoo. Okay well and so. That stuff that you're saying like. How does it make me? That's rolled off me a long time ago, and it is a central part of what has moved me as a journalist as a woman of color in this country is that. Is like. Oh, you're going to try to silence me or tell me that I'm not objective or tell me that I have an agenda or tell me that is not going to be successful or tell me. Okay I might go home and cry. But I'm not GONNA give up. Thanks, again to Maria Hinojosa. She's the host of the Tino USA. We asked NPR for a response to what Maria told us and they gave us this statement. We have the highest respect and admiration for the Latino USA team and from Maria Hinojosa. We are proud. That Latino USA originated at NPR member station, K. U. T., and that since nineteen, ninety-four NPR has been the program's national distribution partner today, hundreds of NPR member stations bring the show to their listening communities. We are grateful. Maria entertain who are produced a consistently wonderful show and nurtured journalist who have gone on to work all over the public radio system. We are glad public radio listeners will continue to hear Latino. USA on their public radio stations across the nation. All right now. We're going to have a chat with someone who just began working with NPR Kelly. McBride NPR's newest public editor. I WanNa talk with her. About one particular part of this entire debate, the way in which we've been taught as journalists to do our jobs that most fundamental level leads to systemically racist outcomes. I am talking specifically about the idea of journalistic objectivity. This idea that reporters only report the facts. They keep themselves out of the story, and they eliminate all biased in their coverage. A lot of folks say well. That only works if you're man and straight. And White. I wanted to find out. Why are journalism so entrenched in objectivity and whether or not this standard is fair, so I went to one of the top journalism at experts in the country I am the senior vice president at the POYNTER institute. I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center Ethics in leadership at the Poynter Institute and I am also the public editor for NPR that Kelly McBride. Kelly has advised newsrooms about difficult journalism ethics problems for years, so it made. Made, sense to begin by asking Kelly for her definition of objectivity in journalism, it really means that you will objectively pursue the facts in order to determine the truth, and there's all sorts of things that go into that right like there's how you frame the story how you identify who you're going to interview, and then really important is who else is involved in the story. So who edits it because that the the safety nets that are created in newsrooms are meant. To help an individual program against her own bias now the problem is if all the safety nets have the same biases that that doesn't happen right and that's. That's exactly what's been happier. Also objectivity has come to mean certain different things for different journalists. There are some. Who say well objectivity means that you have to. Pretend! That kind of you don't exist, and you have to just simply say what these powerful people are saying doing. You don't provide context you don't provide analysis. It's a kind of. Totally taking yourself all the way out of it to the point where you won't even tell people if you vote or not. And I think. This is the thing for me like there's so many different interpretations of what objectivity means, yet you know that's actually kind of a confederation of two different principals in journalism, so one is the principle of objectivity in this idea that that we are pursuing the truth in spite of our own biases, and that that we actually promised, swear to God that we're going to get it right because we have all these safeguards in place, even though they've failed numerous times in the past. But the other thing is is that in American journalism in particular? It was built on this business principle of aggregating A. Politically diverse audience, and then selling that audience to advertisers, so in in Europe you see much more you see much more of the journalism coming through a political lens because that's just how the business model grew up over there, but over here especially as in different markets, you went from multiple newspapers to a single newspaper. There was this motive that was really a business motive that you would bring in the entire political spectrum and if you were going to do that, you needed to convince that audience that you in the newsroom didn't have. Any particular biases it is refreshing to hear you as a leader in the industry acknowledged that some of this is about the principles and bedrocks of our journalism, and some of it's about business, and at the end of the day for whatever reason we have ended up with a definition of objectivity. That is as much about business as it is about telling the truth and I think what frustrates so many journalists, somebody younger journalists, journalists of color or women require journalists as at newsroom leaders are resistant to acknowledge that I read NPR's social media policy, and it's couched in terms of ethics and morality and idealism. But I also know that part of it is the bottom line is. Not Do anything of the public facing person at NPR. That would possibly damage NPR's revenue streams. And I mad. They don't just say that. Yeah? They don't mean to say that they. Don't I mean that's the thing is they? Don't. They really do believe, and I actually believe also that there is. That there is a line somewhere that we shouldn't cross, and maybe it is way up the continuum on just. If you're a political reporter. You can't help people who you're voting for. Maybe the line is all the way over there. Right, because of imagine that like if you were a political reporter in you were covering. Trump's campaign and you again. I'm voting for Biden though I was that guy. Did you tell people out loud. I didn't tell folks voting for in two thousand sixteen, and I wouldn't but I think gets. Those are the ones where I think everyone can agree, but there's there's there's other things like how much of me do I. Bring to a story when I'm covering police violence against black men. Am I allowed to say that's racist. Because I know what racism is experienced, it trust me and don't make me say racially tinged. Like those, and that's where it gets murkier well. You know you know where I. I experienced this. Yeah, so when gay marriage was was a hot hot issue, right? They were different cities or states that were making gay marriage legal. The Supreme Court hadn't yet decided in San Francisco the mayor of San Francisco. made it legal and a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle on a Saturday after weeks of covering it, the City Hall reporter went down and got a marriage license, and she was taken off the beat. Wow, and as in as an ethicist, right is a journalism ethicist. I was like wait a second. That can't be right. because. She was exercising in San Francisco. What was a legal right? You don't mean you didn't tell people who'd been divorced. They couldn't cover this issue because they'd you know somehow. Defiled the sanctity of marriage by? Getting divorced. So that was, that was where realized that you cannot penalize people for who they are. That's not fair. Yeah, because you end up with the only people that are untainted enough to do all the work are people who are only straight are people who are only men are people who have only gone to college and has a certain pedigree people who are an the deaths a problem, so bias is to right. It's just that we don't well. That's the thing, but these leaders aren't seeing those. Yeah, because they look just like them. I think now what is required to speak to the Syria. Systemic issues being raised in this reckoning. Going to have to be an acknowledgement that the movement toward writing these wrongs. It's going to be in some ways painful and you should do it anyway. From your conversations with newsroom leaders across the country. Do you think they're ready to accept that idea that this might hurt that? It might not just be. A statement and everyone shakes hands, and says sure good now now I mean nobody wants to voluntarily sign up for something painful. You do it because you know that what comes on the other side is worth head. There's individuals in every single newsroom who are part of the problem. Then somebody has to tell those people that if they want to keep their jobs, they have to stop being part of the problem, and that means that they're either going to have to be quiet. Or they're going to have to change or leave. Just leave well. That's I mean if they want to keep their job right like. Yeah and I've seen people. Who are these problem, people? I don't think I've ever seen any of them. Actually chain, but I've seen some of them. Learn to be quiet and let other people lead. And then they actually become the beneficiary. Of what comes after yeah. And then I. Think also so many lessons of me too I. Think are applicable to this meteoroid. Me To kind of work. Because a lot of folks were just literally canceled and they had to go, they were shamed. They were fired. And you said you can't be here anymore. And it was painful for them, and probably all the folks that liked them in love them but like. Sometimes, it's just that yeah. So my last question for you back to these two ideals that butt heads this idea of objectivity. But also this business idea of needing to be somewhat neutral to appeal to a large audience. And reworking probably reassessing, what objectively means a newsroom? What advice would you give to newsroom leaders? Writing up that next ethics guideline for their journalist about quote, Unquote Objectivity Post reckoning. Yeah, so this is where I'm supposed to come through with something really profound and I mean I. I am I. Am humble enough to say. That I don't have the answer yet. But I'm also arrogant enough to say that I believe after working through lots of really really hard ethics problems with newsrooms that I think we are going to find the answer and I think it's going to start by. Recognizing that there is a difference between. Revealing political bias. and. Revealing lived experience. And we need to start there and say your lived. Experience should not count as political bias. Thanks again to Kelly McBride joining us and thanks to everyone who, over the last week or so shared very very personal stories about life as a person of color in the newsroom. I heard from colleagues as well. And one thing one of those colleagues told me about all of this. She said so much of this work is convincing journalist. who think they've been doing it right for so long that maybe in some ways they've been doing it wrong. And then she said to me. This phrase really stuck with me, she said. How do you argue with the fish about the water there's. I. Don't know just yet how to do that. It's pretty difficult. It seems frustrating,

NPR United States President Trump Maria Chicago Donald Trump Mexico Mcbride Npr George Floyd Washington Post New York Times Kelly Mcbride FLU Bureau Sam Chicago Tribune Scapegoating Mcdonald
Julia Roberts 'was first choice' to play black abolitionist Harriet Tubman

Ace and TJ

02:00 min | 2 years ago

Julia Roberts 'was first choice' to play black abolitionist Harriet Tubman

"The number four trending topic this morning. Julia Roberts because you know the movie a Harriet that came out earlier this month. It's like an autobiography biographic. Auto Oh biography. Ra of the lady who was a train conductor she built a railroad autobiographical movie about Harriet. Tubman obviously But the movie's been works for a long time and apparently the news just broke yesterday. That the president of a studio suggested that Julia Roberts play Harriet Tubman in the original version not understanding understanding that Harriet Tubman was in fact an African American woman. Just didn't know he's that stupid. He's he said he just didn't know however there was one black woman in the meeting when this was brought up and she says Harriet Tubman was a black woman and the guy goes well. That was so long. Nobody's going to know that. This is the president leave. Leave a movie studio and tell you a little bit of insight into the fact that a lot of them are not brilliant and be they really. Don't give the public much credit. They think most people are stupid. Well and it shows the complete wherever that person went to school to complete Failing school system that he that he attended to not know who Harriet Tubman was. Yeah I think that's what I would put that more on him. Aguirre your failure so you should have picked that information somewhere. It was so long. Nobody's GonNa Different. Who's it's amazing? But I mean what grade we learn about Harriet Tubman. I'm thinking second grade third elementary school early early early Um Though people stupid people can make into the top. Clearly you take a walk through this building.

Harriet Tubman Julia Roberts President Trump
Tess Daly on Sleep Deprivation and Feeding Her Kids

Scummy Mummies

05:30 min | 2 years ago

Tess Daly on Sleep Deprivation and Feeding Her Kids

"Daly argue a scummy mummy. Yes I probably am I am I try my best. We all do Glenn keeping all the balls in the trying to be the best that I can possibly pay apple to goes wants ten one very soon to be fifteen. She keeps telling me slush warning me. We'll be driving in two years. taunting is about you know. I sort of I I do love. It and I love talking parenting because for me. It's an endlessly fascinating conversation because we're all just trying to do the best job we cannot for me. I am fascinated by how everybody else makes it work and makes it look easy because I've always looks like and I'm I'm into discussing it with other. Moms the challenges we fight because you the universal the challenges and them whatever it is. It's it's an interesting topic that I just lot talk about. You Know Oh yeah that's my. DVD strategies of you found a use for coping with the stuff you don't with strategies in Columbia kindness. The low point is challenging because I'm apparent Patina agent now and that has its challenges. I rolling alone. You know it's hot awed is sort of like you've got. You've replace where they're just trying to get to grips with. All these hormones run the hormonal arrest and they're just trying to work everything in their own minds and they just need to know that often whenever you you know you're being authored. You're doing it from a loving place yeah. It's for the greater good so yeah I enjoy a book talk about parenting early on when my little one was what might throw when my eldest was she was three and a half four and I wrote a book about parenting for the baby diaries because she didn't sleep three and a half offiah's those new to the second one at workup every forty five minute. Oh well for three and a half years I on she'd wake up three times a night. I remember when I took it to sometimes I had to throw myself off the bed and crawl on all floors down the hallway to throw myself delve into the shower wakeup dot right then full-fat coke before speak. I mean it was desperate time. I couldn't sleep deprivation was Absolu- Salou held and when we afforded off years between our children because you can't even consider another child when one's not sleeping. I can't even consider doing the thing you'd have to do to get the trump. What exactly so yes we she didn't sleep for three and a half years and we had another child. She's she was almost four years old and a second child slept. I would say from literally through the night from week. Twelve stops then she's ten years old twelve hours a night. It's like an off button. Get Record Aguirre today. She rolled from inside closes. Arise and Jannik face falls asleep. Thank God because couldn't because we against that we sort of we learned the secret of self teach into self settle. Don't drop them to sleep because when they wake up in the middle of the night as babies and you're not there they will cry in protest. The rephrased smiling wave woke up the room and they will often they fall asleep some by themselves comfort with key or domain. Don't whatever you do so confident in a toy and then if they wake up for the night they will fall back asleep without yelling for you because you were bad cappella sleep magician. She's a magician away. Is the secret sleep. Oh yes never go sleep. Deprivation makes you inside. It really does it or not. You should know I just yeah and you do see that thousand yard. Stare the new mom who's pushing pushing the button and you can't go out to the at this one was a massive bag of marshmallows and she was just Kinda guy on own with one hand pushing the buggy because the sugar is anything anything that can keep me awake so I can everyone dry the cliff. It's just it only any means necessary. Its survival absolutely absolutely I'd wet hair leaving the house clean Matisse Verse Three Months. Just SORTA workouts boggy open. Get the baby food. Are you a fish finger and chicken nuggets cameras at all. I'm not it's not all organic but I try and get as many by whole foods vegetables into the food is love I and you know and it's it's a former loveth giving kids nutritious food as much as you can practically swap you French fries frozen sweet potato fries. They're a little bit better for your interest and I'll make about you know making sort of something off raise up and do a little bit. That's music nickname make Turkey burgers and all rounded up and mixing the Virgin Dude double the amount of freedom for next week so I do try and give nutritious food because I feel guilty if I don't you know whole foods mostly but the cost of course weekdays unfortunate they've inherited. It dot like putting fourteen as well so it's not. I'm not saying I'm on Djelic by try. I do try give them coped of whole foods wear wear

Glenn Aguirre Daly Apple Absolu- Salou Columbia Jannik Forty Five Minute Thousand Yard Three Months Twelve Hours Four Years Ten Years Two Years One Hand
Ep. 257 - Gabrielle Bernstein on Self Development

Almost 30 Podcast

13:03 min | 2 years ago

Ep. 257 - Gabrielle Bernstein on Self Development

"Hello welcome to almost thirty podcast. My name is Chris. Williams and this is my co host. Thick what's up. How are you never know if you're going to say my name or if I should say. Actually actually it's like. I weighed on bated breath. I'm like should I be ready. Do you ever had a for almost thirty started as a conversation. Can you guys started talking about the transition from our twenties thirties now. It's so much more than that so much more. we just. WanNa make you feel a little less alone wherever you are. Dr And so you don't have to be almost thirty to listen. We get that he and we'd like to debunk. It can't wait. What are you GonNa do when you turn thirty now my thing is as I say we're GONNA end it. That's it. We're done little. Do they know little. Do they know I freaked my the cry out. The Guy at Crow Studios Get freaked out when I told him I was thirty. We're like friends. We've we hung out and he wanted anything younger younger twenty six he's like Oh. I thought we were the same age I was like. They gave myself away. He's like must be all the Kreil aging. I was describing like it's always funny. When you meet someone new UH and they're really interested out the podcasting is base and so I was describing into someone the other day and like how we started and they they were just they were blown away by like the beginnings of it and how we didn't give up which is a good reminder area. which is a good reminder you know because I'm just amazing this? Is Our story a new lake. How did you they're like? I don't know like I wouldn't go to my closet every week and just like do that and not knowing not knowing what's going to happen anyway. Maybe that's your problem man. He was also living on the street. No you don't know much but I'm GonNa tell you about your life just kidding but it is true you know and that's the thing is doing something with joy away because you're doing it not because of the outcome yeah which is rare. I it's very rare. You know it's so much easier to stay. Hop Hop on a track can be like. Oh after two years. I'm going to be promoted to this and this is going to be my life and then I'm GonNa make this amount of money. When I'm thirty five and then I could buy a house and then propose it was literally people think I was just thinking about that with like a younger generation of millennials think they're track as like expedited sided with the growth of entrepreneur the entrepreneur totally wave and how the democratization of information so that everyone now has access to a lot of information as much as people did previously so. I wonder how that changes their perspective perspective with that. I want to say stuff but I need to. My brain was just like I need to be nice. I'll hold on what do not work but aren't we millennial yet. Are we talking about Gen-x. Yeah I do what are they. I Love Them. You know we were talking about this. The other day mothers again today with someone else yeah. I think it's like how you know and you know we can complain about it for a second but it's also like how do we uh-huh and encourage and help them to level up and I mean in a sense where they understand that there there is work and kind of time spent that is necessary to invest into something that you want to pursue for the rest of your life like they're so oh impatient and I'm like I've been invasion in my life but more and more as we do this work. I just realized how how this is like the rushing of it you skip over so many really good good. Things good steps that really teach you a lot so chew with your first job. You know you gotTA. I'm not saying they should accept people that are rude or people that are negative or people are speaking. Ill too but he couldn't eat shit. I completely bullshit. You just do bullshit. You will learn you know you're given more responsibility as it's earned earned and it's just so challenging at times to see this inability to operate in this space in a way that is just like St. I don't think you know the be self. Development world has a negative effect. Sometimes on this like new you know younger generations because it's like but I deserve the respect and I deserve to take care of myself myself. I deserve to have two hours from much in the morning and you're asking me to come to work like I can't do it. You know you know what I mean like. I just I think there is a there is a lot of truth to taking care of yourself but I do think it gets a little bit muddy. When it's taken so to extreme I agree with you. I guess that's probably you know. This is what I guess I will say is that I bet it's a confusing message in narrative for them if they're seeing so much should the focus on the self care the prioritization of self the prioritization of health and wellness and taking you know doing the morning routine and then they're also seeing the images of people working talking by the pool on their laptop of you know being in whatever industry they are making money making one hundred zillion billion figure taking eight fakers empowering making eight billion. Hey everyone we just want you to hold us accountable. If we ever say to you Aguirre's eight figure income you can you can just unsubscribe. We're not gonNA guarantee figures yeah so it's probably confusing narrative to be within those two spaces but I don't know if that should be more transparency with the difficulty of the process or the unknowing of the process and that's what I think were trying to do and I'm trying to do but it's just it's not all easy and it's not all it doesn't always make sense and it's really important that you if you are somewhere that you are somewhere and you're putting in the work to be there and you're putting in the work personally to get the most for yourself and energetically for the commitment that you make doing whatever it is that you said you're going to do. You're not helping yourself if you're not you know putting the best infra situation and those challenging moments that really make you wanna give up are or literally by moments where your call to like level up and it'll change your life. That's the whole thing with like you know my brother's a part of that generation to where you know there is this avoidance of the hard and painful and I get it because of what you said about you know the narrative because they're told like we just WANNA be happy and I've heard him say I just want to be happy and I take that seriously but I also you don't think a life without challenges like a happy life. I do think there's a way to approach the challenge that could really help you to see the the joy and the potential every moment Yep Yep. I mean completely. I think that's exactly what I wanted to talk about and that was was something I learned when I was in Patagonia for that month or so and you know didn't have access to anything and had to have on my food with me and my Kayak whatever so within the moment you know you assume okay. You're in Patagonia. It's beautiful. You're with these people in nature. All of these things it's beautiful but there are a lot of moments that aren't fun and it's actually they talk a lot about that within that and even within the silent retreat and even within a lot of these different things. It's not fun in the moment and that's okay. It's okay to be a little uncomfortable. It's okay to for it to be a little painful. It's okay for you to not be super cozy all the time and that's where growth happens so the happiness comes later and it's not like the appreciation and gratitude for for your life now because you experience pain but but it's the recognition of what that discomfort has shown you and I think that's where the challenge comes is that because everyone has a voice with with the Internet and online fine and you know I would be the same like throughout my discomfort in the corporate world at the beginning. I was so vocal about it and there was so much that I learned that I wish I would've given recognition to and I wish that I would recognize that. It's not super comfortable throughout the process of its entirety ready but it has moments and it has parts in it has flow yeah completely completely agree. I don't know that's so true with yeah. I think that's so true. It's like I hope I it makes me just think of the narrative that's going on. It's like where instagram is a place where it's the highlight so they're people aren't seeing those moments you know aren't seeing the hard moments aren't seeing the in between so. I just think that's why will ability and just transparency is so important. If you choose to be more of like a quote unquote public figure you know have a voice out there air like it really is that important on only four your growth but for the people around you who look to you you know that's it's a concert reminder for us to you. Just you know not sugar coat. How things are going and what's happening. We're going to celebrate the really good things but there's also some things that are really hard and it's not to say oh so this is hard. It's just to say that like this is happening in real time and were trusting that it's just a a growth spurt you know Um and that's the number one thing too. It's like the phone is the number one cozy. WanNa get cozy. Take a fucking our on your phone on that'll Coz if I your brain and your body you know that's the number one get out of an uncomfortable moment conversation. I even noticed that sometimes with you know justice my man my boyfriend Justin with we're having a conversation that feels a little hot. He'll get on his phone. Yep kind of divert that energy up my brother does to Yemen. I mean it's it's make crutch and I'm not perfect. You know I'm definitely not perfect at all but it's just an interesting thing think about where you're trying to shift and dilute that and you're looking for that cozy you know if you're on your phone. There say you know we're talking today about you know the homeless situation in l. a. and an across the United States and almost man comes on the subway. You get on your cozy your phone number one you know that's the number one diversion of human interaction human feeling human whatever and that is the the thing. I guess when I think about the younger generation has more access to that that more of an awareness around that in it's more like built into their psychology of their of their physical it's physical body at a point and I think about to like the kids now that are given and granted no shamed parents parents who give their kids screens to kind of give them a second. I will probably do that too but it's also just training on that like okay this is this is a comfort for this. Is You know what I mean to not. Be In the moment and learn how to be here rather. It's just this thing that helps them to behave so so. It's just interesting that it's starting earlier and earlier and I wonder how it's going to be in like twenty years when they are thirty year. Olds know you think about that. As a last is point on this as the rewiring of the brain that would need to happen if you think about a chemical dependency to something you know it involves in the altering of the chemicals of your brain and the way that we react towards what happens on our phone through through the dopamine and Serotonin and all the things that that happened chemically. It's occurring without the without the drug just the thing that it's almost like you know part of when I think about eating disorders or eating addictions or binge eating and stuff.

Patagonia Williams Chris United States Crow Studios Dopamine Instagram Yemen Aguirre TA Justin Twenty Years Thirty Year Two Hours Two Years
"aguirre" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"aguirre" Discussed on 710 WOR

"This morning, officer hab Aguirre jewel. Was I? On the scene. And says they heard some sounds coming from the back of the home. Molly. Officers assisted the piece of wood where we got. To get him out the house, avid avenue was completely leveled when it exploded about eleven thirty A, m fire ficials are getting whether there was a gas leak prior to the explosion governor Cuomo has announced the deployment of some five hundred officers to the city subways and buses with a goal of cutting down on a salt on MTA workers and commuters as well as fair beard its own fair to where everyone you just increase the fair on riders, and people are exploiting, it by not paying the fear at all that has to win New Jersey. Governor Phil Murphy is speaking out after fellow Democrats in the legislature today rejected his proposed tax millionaires. Murphy express concerns about revenues after his thirty eight point seven billion dollar budget was approved without the tax in several committees, this ahead of a plant full vote on Thursday. He says the loss of funding will force New Jersey to dip into its reserves, but he says he's willing to work with lawmakers to come up with something better New York state law. Makers reach to deal the day to legalize e bikes scooters, but a special exemption has been carved out from an Hatton. So Manhattan-based lawmakers expressed concerns that if the vehicles were legalized, there'd be too much traffic on the sidewalk. The compromise apparently is a scooter share program in which riders would have to get a comet through mayor de Blasios office. The scooters and e bikes are popular with delivery workers, and some chief complaints have been that they've been used illegally at high speeds, and in violation of traffic laws. The expectation is the law gets pushed through sometime before the end of the legislative session. I'm James flippin. W O R news ants are being blamed for playing that was taken out of service. Passengers complained that the and started crawling around on a United flight from Venice bound, for Newark kinda gross. A United Representative said the ants were related to a passenger's bag in the affected areas were wiped down fashion, and VDI. Con Gloria Vanderbilt his dad at the age of ninety five Vanderbilt the glamorous. Manhattan socialite from one of the nation's wealthiest families who was well known for her jeans as well as her jeans died this morning, after a battle with stomach cancer. The Gloria Vanderbilt lines included clothing, jewelry, perfumes, shoes and home furnishings. She is the mother of CNN anchor Anderson Cooper who called his mother the coolest and most modern person he knew Gloria Vanderbilt dead at the.

Gloria Vanderbilt Phil Murphy New Jersey hab Aguirre Vanderbilt mayor de Blasios governor Cuomo officer Manhattan Molly James flippin Anderson Cooper CNN New York MTA Venice Representative Newark
"aguirre" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"aguirre" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

"Everyone welcome to the mindscape podcast. I'm your host sean carroll and today we have cosmologists on the show not just myself another cosmologists anthony aguirre who are not gonna be able to say this is giving you a typical view of what cosmologists think about because anthony i actually are much more sympathetic with each other in our view of what are the important cosmological questions than we are with other cosmologists out there but that's okay. It's my podcast. <hes> anthony's recently written a wonderful book called cosmological cohen's where he tries to introduce some of the mind bending features of our cosmological universe through the device device of telling little zen cohen's if you're familiar with the idea of a co on it's a little story that is supposed to bend your mind a little bit right. Make you think about things that are apparently paradoxical. This is how the world works. The world itself is not paradoxical but it can seem that way sometimes so thinking about those paradoxes drives as you to interesting places and as malla gis that drives you to think about things like entropy and information and what happened at the big bang. Do we live in simulation elation questions like this so those are the kinds of issues that anthony and i discussed in the podcast and we get to interesting places because entropy and information are behind things like the existence of life in the universe why you remember the past and don't remember the future so do we live in simulation. <hes> these become interesting in questions for human life as well as for studying the universe and at the end we mentioned the fact that anthony has gone beyond studying the universe to actually found some organizations that worry worry about human life and where it's going so it's a very fun conversation. We had to sort of bite our tongues because we wanted to rush forward because we know our common background around but i think that we did a pretty good job of explaining things <hes> let me remind everyone that <hes> this is a podcast you can review it on itunes which we always loved you can support it on patriots fan and you can go to the website to find all the show notes and transcripts and things like that.

anthony aguirre cohen sean carroll patriots
Australias first Indigenous Minister for Indigenous Australians

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:35 min | 2 years ago

Australias first Indigenous Minister for Indigenous Australians

"Significant moment in social progress are usually celebrated and quite rightly, it is a fine thing when I given country or society decides it's going to cease imposing handicaps on particular demographic on the grounds of their gender sexuality tribe cast in whatever in prejudice. You'll have in yourself. Excuse far. But it's nevertheless worth pausing. The exuberant observances long enough to reflect on the question of what exactly the heck have we been doing before now? The time has now come for the nation to turn a new page. And you page in Australia's history by rotting the wrongs of the past, and so moving forward with confidence to the future, such mixed feelings have attended to recent promotions in Australian politics last week conservative, liberal party prime minister Scott Morrison, having been returned in the federal election. Nobody himself expected to win appointed as minister for indigenous Australians Ken Wyatt, who is himself. An indigenous. Australian noon Garman from Western Australia. I. The people in the office of municipal. This week the opposition labour party's new leader, Anthony Albanesi appointed a new shadow minister for indigenous Australians. She is Linda Burney, who is herself, an indigenous Australian, a were jury woman from New South Wales. Bang Nang Lang, now do the up you can hang now. Well to recap thin Australia's minister for indigenous Australians is an indigenous Australian. And so is the opposition shadow. And this is the first time this has been the case that fact in itself tells you a great deal. Little of good as does the fact that it took until nineteen sixty eight for the role, even to be established and indeed until nineteen sixty five for the last official barrier to indigenous people voting in stray to be lifted. A key reason why there has not until now been indigenous minister for indigenous Australians has been a lack of available options string Lear adopted it system of government from the United Kingdom, including the convention that cabinets can only be appointed from the people's elected representatives win. The new indigenous Australians minister, Ken Wyatt won to to sit sit election in in a a to stray stray federal Leah's Leah's parliament house house of of in representatives representatives two thousand and ten. that that He year. year. Again, Again, became the first two two thousand thousand indigenous ten ten Australian the the decision decision at at the the has has collectors collectors has has immortalized immortalized them for creating a historic moment in a strategy is history by electing the first aboriginal member for the house of representatives for his maiden speech. Wyatt war, a Booker a ceremonial kangaroo skin coat decorated with cockatoo furthers any one thousand and ninety three people have been privileged to be a member. Of the house of representatives. It is with deep in mixed emotion. That is an average man with Yamaji and one guy. Heritage San before you in the members of the house of representatives isn't will on the opposite benches. Linda Burney is also overdue pioneer before becoming the first indigenous woman ever elected to federal parliament in two thousand sixteen. She was the first indigenous person ever elected to New South Wales state parliament in two thousand and three that's two hundred and fourteen years since governor Arthur, Phillip plan to the Union, Jack in Sydney cove, one hundred forty seven years since the crown colony of New South Wales established a parliament and one hundred and two years since New South Wales became the most populous state of a unified, stroller, They They wouldn't wouldn't for for some some not while while at that point indigenous indigenous that anyone people people was bothering were were I I to included included count the in in indigenous stray stray people. leeann leeann census. census. Indeed. In In nineteen nineteen seventy seventy one one Joe Joe the the white. white. Body Body painting. painting. Then Then we we will. will. It It should should be be noted noted that that a couple of indigenous Australians, have sat in the federal Senate before this decade, the first Neville, Bonner, age Aguirre man from Queensland was appointed to fill vacancy in nineteen seventy one and returned at four subsequent elections. How dare you? I repeat how did you told my people that your system was best? We have come to accept that we have come to believe that some indigenous destroy looms VO certainly not enough have been elected to state or local governments, most notably for for much much in the of of northern the the nineteen nineteen territory. nineties nineties by by Morris Morris The northern really really territory the the legislative former former champion champion assembly Australian Australian seat of rules, rules, era, footballer footballer Fuhrer was who who held had had previously previously been been a a Pathfinder Pathfinder for for indigenous indigenous Australians Australians in in Australia's Australia's nationally nationally going. going. The promotional of kin Wyatt. And Linda Burney is a heartening development and a more heartening aspect still is that the pair appear to get on. Well, personally political differences, notwithstanding white reacted to Bernie's appointment by congratulating her in a tweet that referred to her as my friend and said that why it was looking forward to working with her and her colleagues to forge a better future, for our people as neither white, nor Bernie knee telling the is much to be done on this front. And it can only be hooked that they enjoy the goodwill. They plurality of their fellow Australians as they set about doing it because as the always is at such moments, they will be bleating from seething talk radio bloviating and purple faced fulminate is determined to miss the point where the claiming that the elevations of Ken Wyatt. And Linda Burney somehow means racism has been fixed. Or dismissing it as tokenism these people should, as always be altogether ignored.

Linda Burney Ken Wyatt Australia New South Wales Wyatt War Bernie Knee Prime Minister Leah Bang Nang Lang Western Australia Labour Party Scott Morrison Morris Morris Joe Joe United Kingdom Anthony Albanesi Lear Parliament Yamaji
News in Brief 29 May 2019

UN News

03:23 min | 2 years ago

News in Brief 29 May 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations tobacco use claims about eight million lives Aguirre, and governments need to do more to tackle smoking, and it's enormous health social, environmental and economic costs, the World, Health Organization or WHO said, on Wednesday in a press release WHO's said that inhaling tobacco smoke just once begins damaging the lungs because the structures that sweep mucus and dirt out of our Airways are paralyzed allowing poisons in tobacco smoke to make their way into the lungs. More easily. The statement comes ahead of world, no-tobacco day on the thirty first of may which will highlight the damage that tobacco does to smokers and non-smokers alike. WHO is calling for an Hans public awareness strategies such as creating more smoke free indoor public spaces banning tobacco advertising and significantly increasing taxes on tobacco products. China's creative economy, which includes books film, music, and video games is growing faster than other countries making it the world's driving force in the field over the past fifteen years, says a new U N trade report. The study from the UN conference on trade, and development or UNCTAD tracks national performance in the trade of creative goods and services between two thousand and two and twenty fifteen and shows that China is the biggest single exporter, and importer with trade growing exponentially over the period. China's performances describing the report as remarkable because of its sustained growth over three decades its dominance of the world market for creative goods and services and its role in sustaining the regional and global creative economy speaking to you a news, Amy Louise shelving from Ted said the report shows that the view of China is simply the factory of the world is now outdated. One dimensional view of what is actually happening in China of China's growth over the last twenty six years fittingly being based on its performance as a factory of the world. And that's what you kick starts at the condom subsequent to that has been a massive widening or broadening of China's Gooden is offering and it's important to see it as a multidimensional economy, not some manufacturing and losing the United Nations decade of family, farming in Rome, on Wednesday to UN agencies have lauded family run farms, which account for over ninety percent of the sector as key drivers of sustainable development that play a major role in ending hunger, and malnutrition, the food and agricultural organization. If a you and the international fund for agriculture development, or IFAD also announced a global action plan to upgrade support for family farmers. Particularly those in developing countries with detailed guidance for the international community, although farmers produce most of our food, they are vulnerable to poverty, especially in developing countries and the plan highlights the needs to increase access to social protection for farmers, as well as finance training and opportunities to generate income color Lennon, U N news.

China UN United Nations Ifad Aguirre Unctad Hans Lennon Rome Gooden Amy Louise TED Twenty Six Years Ninety Percent Fifteen Years Three Decades
"aguirre" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"aguirre" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"You know, go to a package store. Why are they selling nips in there? And pint of I know not selling them in four they're not selling them at four o'clock in the morning. Steve. Yeah. But who cares if you're driving drunk at four o'clock in the morning or they're driving drunk ex Vickers. Seven o'clock at night. Right. I is not right. But just because it's not right at seven o'clock doesn't make it's right at four four AM. No, no one saying, it's right. But at you know, people who are in their gambling. You know, usually aren't well, I'm not saying they're not drunk because there's drunk all the way around. Good chance that people are staying at the hotel at the casino. You know in Vegas. You can get a free room out there pretty much. I'm not a big gambler either. And I went there for years ago. They cut me a room for four nights. And I haven't been there in twenty years. And I not as I'm not a big gambler. But they wanted me there. They wanted me. Steve I want to thank you. I wanna get one more quick call in. Okay. Thanks. Thanks. Steve Jeanie Jeanie him. You'll late Aguirre about twenty seconds. What do you got? Well, I agree with Steve I think it's our an arbitrary choosing of time you're building bars on highways and you're selling nips and package doors, and people are drinking and driving at whatever time. So it's an arbitrary choosing the time. And Secondly, I think if people are concerned that people are going to drink alcohol and commit illegal acts. I think the the issue is two consenting adults one wants to sell alcohol. All right. Okay. We got your genie. We our audience was kind of split. Thanks, jeannie. Call early. Give you much more time audience kind of split on this one. I'm surprised I'm surprised we may talk about this more on the other side, right? Here comes dawn in the ten o'clock..

Steve Jeanie Vickers Vegas Aguirre twenty seconds twenty years
Jussie Smollett Walks

Whiskey Tango's Run Down

04:59 min | 2 years ago

Jussie Smollett Walks

"I'm hearing all kinds of conspiracy theories. I'm hearing, you know, bomb it's this. It's that whatever the case may be. But I wanna sit down talk about this from a different angle. 'cause I think some people are missing part of the story now as you heard some of the clips there was some kind of deal that was brokered everything has been locked down. The we didn't get to see all the evidence. In the case. We only got to see parts of it. That's just the way these things work. That's the way it is. An all these cases you don't ever get to see all the all the evidence. And apparently now because they have decided wipe the charges clean. They are not going to take it to trial, and they have locked everything down. We're never going to see any of that evidence. Now, you so. Aw. The police department is upset the mayor is upset a lot of people were shocked a lot of people are upset and a lot of people wanna know what the heck is going on. Like, I said, I'm hearing all the conspiracy theories about it. I'm hearing, you know, it just a lot of his our stuff. However, I wanna take you guys back to Monday. And this is part of the story that I think everybody is missing. And I kinda thought about it as soon as I heard the story this morning. I kinda thought about this because they immediately said that there was some kind of deal now when there's a deal made I know jussie smollet is still saying that he's innocent. Maybe maybe he isn't. I think there's about five people at still believe he was actually innocent. However since he's not being fried. Maybe he is maybe he isn't. We just don't know. Unfortunately, they didn't tell us one way or the other the police and the mayor seem to think he's guilty. But what can you do? Now. Like, I said he is still proclaiming his innocence. But. What I'm seeing coming out of the court is not a innocent play. Okay. They aren't even saying he's innocent. As was stated in that one quote. They are not saying that he's exonerated. They're not saying any of this stuff. He's the only one that saying he is what they're actually saying here is that some kind of deal was made. We're not going to end up finding about the facts of it. We aren't gonna find any of this stuff out because all of this has been locked down. And like the police chief said all of this is being done in secrecy. So we are ever going to find out what any of these details. Are he was not exonerated? He made a deal. Now, I wanna go back to Monday because I think this was going to maybe an again, I could be wrong. This is kind of I guess my own conspiracy theories. So I could be wrong. But this was the first thing that popped into my head go back to the big news for Monday. This is from CNBC. Stormy daniels. Ex-lawyer Michael Nadi arrested for alleged twenty million dollar extortions game against Nike embezzling clients money. Defrauding bank. Now, what the hell does that have to do with Jesse smollet? Well, if we go over to the Washington Examiner. We have got CNN analyst, Mike gara- goes. I hope I'm pronouncing that correctly as well. I'm really bad with names said to be ovens alleged co conspirator. So now who is this? Shady lawyer. Who is this guy? Well, let's take a look at what we've got here. The alleged co conspirator and store in case against celebrity lawyer, Michael Nettie is believed to be CNN legal analyst, Mike era. Gos- Dera go sixty one was not named in the criminal complaints against Nettie. To people familiar with the matter told the Wall Street Journal that the co-conspirator referred to the document as C one a California attorney known for representation of celebrity and public figure clients was garra goose it is not known whether garra goes has been charged or is cooperating with investigators. A CNN spokesperson told the Washington Examiner on Monday afternoon that gara- goes is no longer CNN contributor one of the best known criminal defense. Lawyers in America Garrett goes clients have included football player, Colin cabernet, the late singer, Michael Jackson. Actress went on a rider. Former congressman Gary Condit jailed Clinton associates. Susan McDougal murderer Scott Peterson former hockey player, Scott Barney and actor Jesse small. So let's see. On monday. We find out that Nettie has been arrested and charged with an extortion plot against Nike later on that day, it is alleged that this Mark Aguirre goes is also the co-conspirator it's being alleged. Okay. That he's the co conspirator. And then today suddenly in a surprise twist. And in a stance before the judge that lasted less than five minutes. Jussie smollet sixteen felony charges were wiped away.

CNN Michael Nettie Washington Examiner Analyst Nike Mike Gara Jesse Smollet Stormy Daniels Cnbc Michael Nadi Susan Mcdougal Mark Aguirre Gos- Dera Scott Barney Gary Condit Wall Street Journal Extortion Michael Jackson Garra
"aguirre" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

11:36 min | 3 years ago

"aguirre" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Dysfunctional things going against them. Yada, yada, yada, Aguirre's alien Nick young was a mess. Change of scenery just goes to show. You mad changes scenery can do wonders in many forms of life. It's helping the Angela Russell in a big way because he's found homemade with the Brooklyn nets as they held on for Delyth against the Charlotte Hornets. Let's head to Connecticut. My key Jones says he's on a foul is Mike Powell. Hey boy. My what's happening, brother? It's good to hear. I lay down the law. This monday. I says there will be no music from three to six thirty this week. I want you to learn something this kid is this is a new start a fan on I want you to listen to he could talk about anything. That's really I really enjoy JJ. Glad you Mike. We had a fun. You know, when you're working with somebody new, and I have a relationship would have an obviously, we're buddies, but you never work with a guy. So you don't know what you're getting yourself into. And it was a ton of fun. We add good. It was a blast. I was like, wow. Five days, mid February full it. Absolutely. I set. It means a lot. Thank you. I wanna just talk a little college basketball. But one time I gotta just ruined JJ. I don't think behind tonight. You're right. It's it's all like it's the same that he did. But I just I don't think he should coach. I really think he should've took took a couple of weeks. I'll. Teach his own. You may handle a certain situation as far as grieving I may handle it entirely differently. I'll give you an example, my uncle past couple of months ago. I needed to get back to work immediately. I just need to get one of those things where for me when I'm here when I'm in the element. I'm breaking down the Yankees or the Syracuse Duke game or the NBA escape, and I'm sure for Jim boeheim, it's fault. It's the idea of trying to have some form of normalcy, then to the idea of being responsible like you said after the game for all those young men you have. And I know some would make the argument if they were playing cop and stayed if they were playing Ragner neukolln would chain behind be out to I don't know. But I'm sure he's realizing, you know, what this is one of the biggest games that my men that my young men are playing and I need to be there for them. So it's one of those situations by I never want to be in that situation. However in that situation, but I can just speak on experience from deal with tragic set of circumstances for me, at least I want to get back, and I want to get back to a normal routine as soon as possible. The point JJ. I got a couple good old were under somebody's Paul vote. We have time for that. I wanna you know, we liked about our shackled. So I wanna ask you something. I made I loved ocal to one at all. And I. Pretty good wager on Virginia and Kentucky. What do you think about them? Two teams avenue chance at all. Mike. I love the Kentucky bed. I think Kentucky is going to be a one seed look at the way they were able to play Santa. Browsing. One thousand one hundred that's true. Gods that might that's beautiful UC odds and even Virginia got at six fifty. And you know, they gotta be more motivated JJ after last year. Does I listen Virginia is a terrific regular season team. They are a very well coached team. And I have been critical of their style of play. Obviously they've had some brutal. Brutal losses. NC double A tournament. You go back to last year when they lost to a sixteen did not have de'andre hunter. They will have him. We'll make a big difference. They can shoot a basketball Mike data data need to play a game. No in this tournament where they get up and down to four and hit some shots. They're not gonna be able to win every game. The NCWA tournament fifty-one to Forty-five won't work, even even before your time, even while Sampson ain't never wanted and back then they had to play the whole four years. I it's it's amazing. Bitten team. Be mike. They will profile. Well, they're gonna profile well as far as the numbers go. They're gonna profile. Well, as far as the metrics Cal, I like it Kentucky value a lot more in your Virginia value. First of all getting better odds with Kentucky, I think can talk. He's more dangerous team and that day, June that bad history with Virginia would scare me and said it last year with Tony Bennett and company I'm going to say it again this year not this year with this group, then one. But went to Kings Park could buddy Carlo what's up Carlo? Are you doing my friend Carrillo? I'm doing well. Good, sir. What's happening? Definitely talk about some Yanks craft if I could. Yeah, let's do it for the Yanks go. I want to win that job. Only for the simple fact, look, he's left handed. Get definitely get definitely tattoo that porch if he's healthy. And if he's bright frame of mind that being said, look not taking anything away from what voice did was. Well, we for two months. He was unbelievable. But like you said, and like many said he could be the flash in the pan. And we don't know the thing is. Great great grand, Greg Greg bird, stay Opie. That's the big deal. Was there healthy and produce? I mean are two very different questions and one thing. Call even though spring training. I think probably will decide who you first baseman is going to be on opening day. And it may very well decide who's on the opening day roster and who's down in triple A. I think we can agree on the fact that you cannot look Greg bird spring training performance and let that be the determining factor is a fan and taking now this is going to be the breakout year because we've gone down this road before we've been there we've done that. And is the college one of those things where bird where I'm going to need to see him over full year live up a potential finally stay on the field day after day after day and simply go out and produce absolutely John. And and as far as the left field position goes. Look, I liked the fact that wanna give Frazier a chance. Now, look. On been a great Yankees. I mean, you know, he's been been a soldier for how long. Thing is. Field position. Is it really really scary position? Only for the simple fact of an injury to either one of them, and and they're up a creek. Well, remember, you do have the ability Carlo to take Giancarlo Stanton employees molest field. If you want to do that and D H somebody else, whether it's void or bird. Whether it's DJ LeMay you whether it's Quinn. Frazier day, they have options. Now, I think we're going to will be your opening day left fielder. I brought back Brett Gardner expecting him the play. Now, he's not going to have five hundred at bats. Like he's had in years past. I don't think he's going to lead off a good amount of times. I think Aaron hates for the most part is going to be a leadoff hitter. And I do believe that there will be a legitimate plausible scenario for Clint Frazier to get serious burn on this team. Confers, you know, is another one of these guys call I'm all about is upside a all about a potential Scottsdale field, absolutely John. And as far as as far as the craft situation goes, let's see how it plays out. But you know, Don. Well, if this was the jets or the giants or anyone else. This would not be swept underneath the rug the way, it has been well, I don't think it's been swept underneath the rug. I mean, you gotta you gotta miss them. It's not like call. And I saw a second. Was the front page of basically every newspaper in America on Saturday morning. It's getting a ton of media coverage. No matter where you go. We talked about a Friday when I was doing this show with Evan explained. To me this Carl how exactly this historic being swept under the rug? Let's face it, John. He's seventy seven years old. He can go anywhere in the world to get anything. He wants you to billionaire. He's a billionaire much. Look it's a bit. Look, I think that's very different though. I think it's very different than saying that bug crash should know better as opposed to this story has been swept under the rug. The Robert Kraft story. It's bizarre. There's no other way to put it. Bizarre. And we understand he had the loss of his wife. The guy is down in Florida. Call one of these polymers style keeps running the Paula. I'm not saying he shouldn't be using better judgment. But if you're asking me what the penalties alternately going to be for Robert Kraft. Remember Jim Irsay got behind the wheel of a car. Highs. A kite. Doing cocaine. Could have killed. Somebody could have hurt somebody. And what did I say get five hundred thousand dollar fine and six game suspension. Is this good for Bob Kraft? No is it embarrassing humiliating. Do you think a guy of his stature should be going into one of these low end places, of course, not? Do I think the Bob Kraft is going to lose the New England Patriots? Because of course, not. Do I think Bob Kraft is going to get the entire use suspension? Mo. Similar penalty different circumstances similar penalty. And on this before we get back to your calls human trafficking. Sick. Vile. You got seen a movie taken? The fact that something like that could go on in this country is shameful. Zaza? But it's not like Bob Kraft. Now is the guy, you know, picking the women that are going to be abused. And he's like setting it up. And you know, he's the orchestrator of this parlor. We know what was going on to spell Alfie paid customer. Donegal for. It's not gonna work specially when you're off craft. You know, you're not the average guy on the street. No, no, no, no, no. You see that story on Friday. And it's like I'll chase like this is where we'll be spending some time Abbott. We didn't do three and a half hours of it. I walked in Friday at around one thirty NAFTA. And I said, and we ain't doing three and a half hours at us. She was like el-amal is like Ali Holly. There's some things you just don't want to do three and a half hours. That's one of them live at that. Three fifty six here on this Sunday morning. It's JJ after dark, John jastremski. Right here on.

Robert Kraft Kentucky Virginia Mike Powell John jastremski Clint Frazier basketball Yankees Carlo Greg Greg bird Yanks Connecticut JJ Brooklyn Jones Angela Russell Aguirre Charlotte Hornets Delyth Brett Gardner
"aguirre" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"aguirre" Discussed on KTRH

"And I got to address the cops. So I had them do a backdrop for me like patent and I had a big flag. And I had them film it, and I stood up real straight. And I address the obstacles as my my opportunity to give the raw speeches very excited about it. I mean, you gotta understand 'em. Young city councilman is why you won't be a city council. Right. Get to go out with the cops on a raid for these punks that are driving one hundred miles an hour up now Westheimer and endangering the lives of all these people, and I get to give the speech now looking back. Now, they must have been going who is this little tired. Oh, he's one of the new councilman. What what does he know? He's the big holster sniffer those though so cabinet garrison Aguirre's half crazy too just because he let him talk. Let's see we've got to say not there's going to be good. We'll make fun of it later. I would. And that's probably what they said because cops are very cynical. And I wouldn't blame him today if they did. But at the time I thought they were really into what I had to say. So then. They stage there and what they were doing was their parking at the James Coney Island, and they were doing burnouts there. They do drag races and burnouts, and it was shut down the the restaurants in that whole center. That James Coney Island is is in their car wash. Immediately east of it. It's placed in their oddly. Right. Because it it face it when you drive in. It's like, it should be turned sideways. But I think that that whole center was probably retrofitted or maybe everything was built around it. And so it's not laid out perfectly. But anyway,.

garrison Aguirre James Coney Island Westheimer
Chilling Adventures of Sabrina a scarier version than the original

01:24 min | 3 years ago

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina a scarier version than the original

"Human half, which high schooler who lives with her witch aunts Hilda and Zelda and as has a boyfriend called Harvey, a cat named Salem. As Joe mentioned. It's more of a dark twisted horror series. Robert aguirre-sacasa who created the show explains almost everyone knows Sabrina from the ninety s sitcom with Melissa Joan Hart which used to watch. And I think at first they're surprised to hear that there's sort of more serious more horror movie, like take on the character. But then kind of when they see it. They understand it. And I think it's better than try to reduce something that was great. We're trying to do something. That's completely different. That'll be interesting. I wonder if she looks like the original Sabrina have you seen pictures of her shorter hair? Okay. I can't. Remember if it's darker light. Okay. Well, that'll be a big twist of people. Don't know. What's coming? Yeah. Yeah. Big twist, the devil is a big part of it, actually. Yeah. So it's it's it's not if you're looking for the light hearted kinda ha ha thing you saw on the family channel or whatever. It was

Sabrina Melissa Joan Hart Robert Aguirre-Sacasa Salem Hilda JOE Harvey Zelda
SpaceX launches Canadian satellite into orbit

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:33 sec | 3 years ago

SpaceX launches Canadian satellite into orbit

"There is something new at Arlington National Cemetery. New section that opened with a barrier last week of two soldiers from the civil war securing America. The remains are believed to be union soldiers who died during the second battle bull run. Karen Durham Aguirre with army national military, cemeteries said they were placed at the new millennium site, which will sustain active burial operations for the next twenty five years. Twenty seven acre development provides us with over twenty seven thousand interment

Arlington National Cemetery Fox News Karen Durham Aguirre Rachel Sutherland Trilby Lundberg Arlington Cape Canaveral Pacific Ocean Spacex Washington Analyst America Hawaii Paul Stevens Florida India
Boeing, SpaceX could launch astronauts next year

Steve Cochran

03:26 min | 3 years ago

Boeing, SpaceX could launch astronauts next year

"Marchers and the witnesses. Of the March that everything is impossible until somebody does lakeshore drive was shut down for about. An hour Livingston says the. Intent is to raise awareness in wealthy neighborhoods of shootings in predominantly, black neighborhoods in the city a, former Chicago police. Officer has sentenced to have been sentenced to six months in. Prison for income tax fraud that netted him, about three hundred thousand dollars Stevens Aguirre was sentenced yesterday by a federal judge who ordered him to repay the amount stolen prosecutors asked he'd be, sentenced to between, two and a half to two and a half years under federal guidelines prosecutors say you're created phony trust and filed multiple tax returns falsely claiming. Refunds in excess of one million dollars the tax and Bank fraud trial former Trump camp Chairman. Paul Manafort heads into its fourth. Day today ABC news correspondent Trish Turner has been. Following the, trial in Virginia on the fourth day of Paul manafort's trial we expect to hear more from. One of his former tax accountants while the. Defenses contended that their client was duped by his business partner Rick gates the tax preparer testified Thursday that Manafort was repeatedly told that he. Must report, foreign Bank activity to the IRS so on Friday we expect to hear much more about manafort's tax. Returns and what Manafort reported as income to the government Trish Turner ABC news that the courthouse in Alexandria Virginia SpaceX is going to be putting people onto its. Test flights in April of next year ahead of Boeing NASA revealed the schedule for manned flights yesterday. All the astronauts currently at the international space station have been taken there on Russian spacecraft since the. Retirement of the space shuttle in two thousand eleven NASA has, only booked seats on Russian spacecraft until November of. Next year NASA now plans to use private companies To ferry humans to the space station Dow WGN sports, here's Andy mazer been on many people's radar to start the year with Daniel polka certainly is now the rookie launching a pinch at three Ron Hubbard helped the white size to a sixty four win over Kansas City yesterday asked after the game about his approach I wanted. To hit a Homer those it Yeah yeah Wanted to get a ball up that I could hit. Out part he gave me one as third page. At home run this year tying with Oscar gamble in hundred seventy seven for the most in one season. In franchise history guy picked up on waivers for the twins, in November White Sox headed to Tampa on your pre game tonight, at five thirty five and DJ the first pitch, at, six ten a loss for the cubs in Wrigley, last night six to one to the Padres the loss, in, costume grounded the standings Milwaukee crushed by the dodgers in. Los Angeles last. Night twenty one to five dodgers had seven. Home runs so the cubs to lead the division by one game oath-taking tunnel will go for the cubs this afternoon against Tyson Ross for, San Diego finding a home at the big league sponsored by the diligent Bedford park building for the future. White Sox first, round draft pick dick Madrigal earning a, promotion yesterday he's going from, low economical you high, a. Winston Salem he's yet to strike out on his professional career and the second round choice steel Walker was elevated. From rookie great falls. Too low a capitalist bears lose their first preseason game of the year seventeen. To sixteen that's the Baltimore Ravens. At, the Hall of fame game yesterday and Tiger Woods, shoots an opening round sixty six the world golf championship, in, Ohio is best opening round of the year but in. Poulter managing a. Sixty two in the first Johnny has a. One shot lead heading into today's second round on the home of the Blackhawks northwestern Wildcats and Chicago White Sox baseball Andy mazer WGN sports, baseball is about stats and figures at.

Paul Manafort Chicago White Sox Nasa Cubs Trish Turner Andy Mazer Chicago Dodgers ABC Livingston Baltimore Ravens Stevens Aguirre Oscar Gamble Tiger Woods Virginia Boeing
Kim Kardashian's whirlwind day in D.C. isn't without 'kontroversy'

Chris Merrill

01:43 min | 3 years ago

Kim Kardashian's whirlwind day in D.C. isn't without 'kontroversy'

"At one on news talk fifty kfi you're listening conservative circus im your ringmaster james t hairs kim kardashian she visited the white house today and it was not received very well as a matter of fact a jim acosta from c n n well he just thought that this was the most absurd thing ever jemma kosta went off on kim kardashian let's hear from jim forget about the fact that kim kardashian is here at the white house today and what planet that is anything resembling normal because it's not she shouldn't be here talking about prison very nice that she is here but that's not a serious thing to have happened here at the white house why well why should she be there by shouldn't she bring her star power to the to the table here in this isn't it funny because when oba obama had all these celebrities rolling into the white house jay z beyond say you know brad pitt jim mukasa singing a different tune aguirre jim concert who was a singer he's talking to john wedgwood john legend went to the white house to talk to obama my here's what jim acosta had to say i'm going to push the president to get more involved in criminal justice reform i'm going to suggest some ideas that we think could help improve the situation if you change your mind about running for office give cnn scott oh jim so friendly than accommodating jemma sexist or is he is he racist.

White House Jim Acosta Jemma Kosta Kim Kardashian Oba Obama Jim Mukasa President Trump CNN JIM Brad Pitt Aguirre John Wedgwood
Bloomberg, Toronto and Atlanta Braves discussed on

01:35 min | 3 years ago

Bloomberg, Toronto and Atlanta Braves discussed on

"A check of sports from around the world here's dan schwartzman thanks bryan five inches the city players kevin dubai sergio aguirre how walker beat silva nicholas otamendi avenue to the premier league team of the year other notables on the squad include leading goalscorer mohammed salah of liverpool davi have manchester united and tottenham harry kane renaldo scores at the eighty seven minute mark to give row madrid a one all draw athletic bilbao volleying syria acl on plays torino till one all draw roma gets passed napoli to one hundred owngoal while you're venison crotone ended a one all draw meanwhile league at one killing a bobby schwarzer brace leap at saint germain for three to one victory ever kind elsewhere manchester united back to their winning ways after the stunning loss to west brom on sunday it'll trafford for the two nil win over board myth as chris smiling and ron lulu copy score for the red devils and you maintains a four point lead over liverpool for second place premier league table philadelphia seventy sixers big man joel embiid has been officially listed as doubtful thursday's game three the sixers first round playoff series against the miami heat as nbc continues to recover from a concussion and a fracture of an orbital bone suffered from a collision with teammate on march twenty eight the series is currently tied the game a piece six time all star jose bautista signed a minor league contract with the atlanta braves which turned into a one year one million dollar deal if batista's added to the forty man roster last season in toronto the thirtysevenyearold hit two or three twenty three home runs in sixty five rbi's i'm dan schwartzman that's your bloomberg nbc world sports update global news twenty four hours a day at bloomberg dot com the bloomberg mobile app and tick tock on twitter this is a bloomberg business flash object krizner.

Bloomberg Toronto Atlanta Braves Miami Philadelphia Ron Lulu Chris Smiling Saint Germain Bobby Schwarzer Napoli Syria Mohammed Salah Walker Sergio Aguirre Kevin Dubai Twitter Dan Schwartzman Batista Jose Bautista