35 Burst results for "Afro American"

How Spanish Composers Influrnced Latin America

Classics for Kids

02:03 min | just now

How Spanish Composers Influrnced Latin America

"After christopher columbus made his first trip across the atlantic ocean spain and other european countries began to colonize the americas. Spanish music had a big influence on latin american music. And so did the music of the enslaved people who were brought over from africa one of the first places columbus landed in fourteen. Ninety two was cuba. Nineteenth century violinist. Jose white lafitte had a spanish father and an afro-cuban mother whites composition that they yaqoob ana the beautiful. Cuban uses dance rhythms from haiti and the dominican republic on the island of hispaniola twentieth century. Cuban composer and missile. The owner was a pianist. That's lik wound up performing his most famous piece. My leg ania which is a spanish dance. Kunas family was full of musicians including his great nephew. Leo brouwer leo. Brouwer was guitarist until he hurt his right hand even after he had to stop playing. He kept on composing in fourteen. Ninety three columbus landed on the island. We call puerto rico spanish for rich port. The taino people who originally lived there called it. Land of the great lords in their language voted ken. Which is the title of this piece by. Puerto rican composer. Roberto ever

Jose White Lafitte Yaqoob Ana Christopher Columbus Atlantic Ocean Americas Kunas Columbus Spain Leo Brouwer Hispaniola Cuba Dominican Republic Africa Haiti Brouwer Puerto Rico KEN Puerto Rican Roberto
How Are the Latinx Community Represented on TV

Latino USA

02:00 min | Last month

How Are the Latinx Community Represented on TV

"Latino and latina representation in film and television is an age old conversation topic and despite some recent milestones. The numbers are still pretty disappointing. According to a recent study by the la times latinos and latinas are underrepresented across all aspects of television and film productions despite making up nearly twenty percent of the us population that dino's and latina's constitute only six percent of main cast members less than nine percent of writers seven percent of directors and six percent of senior executives. The presence of african and indigenous latinos in the industry is even smaller but statistics can only tell us so much how latino individuals and communities are portrayed. Onscreen is another part of the conversation. That's why today we're taking you behind the scenes with two award winning latino creators were breaking stereotypes about how our communities are depicted on television. Stephen canals and linda evatt charges. My name is steven canals. I am co-creator executive producer writer and director of the f. Extra series pose. The category is hosed centers. The black and latin queer and trans individuals who are part of the new york city. Underground ballroom community as they are navigating the difficulties of the hiv as and crack epidemic of the eighties and early nineties. Stephen was born and raised in the bronx to an afro. Puerto rican mother and an african american dad. He made history when posed premiered in twenty eighteen featuring the largest cast of transgender actors in tv history

La Times Stephen Canals Linda Evatt Dino Steven Canals United States New York City Bronx Puerto Rican Stephen
What Separates Peru From the Rest of South America?

Travel with Rick Steves

02:17 min | Last month

What Separates Peru From the Rest of South America?

"With rick steves with an insider look at how peru stands out from the rest of south america. It's where author and journalist. Marie arana grew up before her bicultural family moved to the us. She writes about her identity in her book. American teacup read. Thanks for joining us. Thank you so much. Rik good to be here. I'm just really excited for you to be my tour guide because is country. I know very little about before we get into this discussion about the people of peru. Just give us a quick one paragraph description of your homeland you know for a country that's the size of roughly the size of california not much bigger. It's an astonishing place because it has just every kind of land form you can imagine. Rick it has the coast it has the desert it has the jungle it has the mountain has the planes. It has all of that and if you fly over peru this is amazing to me you go from one land form to another land form just in the course of a few seconds. It's it's really astonishing place geographically when you compare peru to the other south american countries. How would the people of peru see themselves Compared to the countries that surround them. Well you know we are an andean nation and the andean nations are of course colombia and ecuador and bolivia these are the the spine of the andes of course runs through the whole continent. But we are. We call ourselves and ian people because we are a mix honesty so mix of indigenous and white and black in a very different proportion. Shall we say to. The people of venezuela which are are less india less indigenous more more black and the colombians as well which has a much larger population of blacks than we do improve we do have afro peruvian along the coast who have been there for hundreds and hundreds of years but we are distinguished. I think by our indian ness. And i think that you know the people of argentina. The people of that people are why they come. They come up to peru and they're they're struck by the truly indian culture that we have okay so when you say

Peru Marie Arana Rick Steves RIK South America Rick California Bolivia Ecuador Colombia United States IAN Venezuela India Argentina
The Year In Hip-Hop (So Far)

Rolling Stone Music Now

02:24 min | 3 months ago

The Year In Hip-Hop (So Far)

"You're going to talk about the year in hip hop so far. Were actually half way in to the year so we can look back. We already ran a list overall of the best albums of twenty twenty one so far but it seemed like a good time to look back just at rap stuff. Macher for you specifically. Maybe we should start with your two picks. Your personal picks for song of the summer sure. Yeah and interestingly enough. The songs that have really started to define my season is getting out a little bit more feeling a little bit safer to be out in the world those two songs. I'm hearing the most and hearing the most excitement. Abou- have actually been out since october their essence by whiz kid featuring thames who is A lot of folks newt know whiz kid as sort of afropop star from nigeria. Thames is the burgeoning star from nigeria. As well other song is quicksand by marais who is from north carolina stern driving around more hearing them on the radio and seeing debates on twitter about dj's not playing essence at parties as much as they should and both of them are really capturing sort of the levity that comeback for some people you know. Yeah i saw a dj saying that in three months people were going to be saying like can you please stop playing essence. Because he's playing it so much so it's definitely it's definitely out there. I mean what is it about those those two songs for your well with essence i think it s body right like it's laid back it has afro-caribbean feel to it feels very summary intil. Quicksand is a little bit more uptempo. It's fun but it has these guitars. That have the summary field and marais is like singing rapping in this really interesting cadence and has a really strong beautiful voice and it's just a really cool ballot of storytelling and whenever i'm at cookouts are at parties kickbacks like those are the songs i know want to hear

Macher Nigeria Abou Marais Thames North Carolina Twitter Caribbean
In The Heights and Colorism

In The Thick

02:17 min | 3 months ago

In The Heights and Colorism

"We're gonna talk about colors in latino and latina communities and yes. It's a conversation that was brought to the forefront last week after the release of the film in the heights. It's a movie. Adaptation of the broadway musical of the same name written by yada allegria hueys of politic prize winning playwright and the playwright enactor. Linneman will meet under so in the heights takes place well in washington heights were actually of course alexis joining us from it's predominantly dominican neighborhood. It's predominantly afro latino neighborhood but you know. I actually spent three years in washing deep from one thousand nine hundred eighty three to nineteen eighty six eighty seven. Those were interesting times most. Definitely i mean. I was on one seven one in fort washington and it was very dominican. Mind roommate was dominican but he was also. I was like i mean. Our parties were massive. Highway wait are parties were massive. Oh yeah i was hanging out with like letty. No phd's academics from columbia from city college and refugees and activists so people from inside by from nicaragua from cheer from tina from coup. All of these people were living in washington heights at the time. What i'm saying is that it's a community. What was incredibly vibrant and yes diverse in the sense that lengthy knows were staking their claim. They're predominantly dominicans better. They must felt safe living in that community. It was a latino community predominantly right right and we know even beyond washington heights. The afro latino population in this country is actually pretty significant. According to the pew research center in twenty sixteen when this came out approximately twenty five percent of all. Us latinos identifies afro latino afro-caribbean or of african descent with roots and latin america. So if you think about twenty five percent of sixty million people that's a pretty significant population and in another pew study from two thousand and nineteen five percent of all black. Americans identified as for latino which was a figure that doubled since two thousand

Yada Allegria Linneman Washington Heights Fort Washington Alexis Letty Nicaragua Tina Columbia Washington Pew Research Center Caribbean Latin America United States
"afro american" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

03:12 min | 4 months ago

"afro american" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"Robot with the explosive device in and detonated it. I was amazed at the chief came out and told the community what they did and why they did it. anywhere else. I think if if if you'd heard that police department strapped an explosive device drove it in a row a robot it with enclosing discipline and detonated it and killed the suspect. There would be outrage over that yet when the chiefs sat down said this is what we did. He was in a secure position. No off could get to him without risking the chance of being shot and this is what we came up with. There was no outrage about it. I was amazed that there was no outrage in in the dallas community Over something like that. And they saw it as valid as a as a valid approach Where if today. If you find out that boise police explodes a device in killing a suspect. You're going to have all kinds outrage and it it all depends on the relationship Chief has with the community and that chief happened to have a very good open relationship. There's another chief that i saw Afro-american gentlemen and it was in someplace in the south and when he got the position he said as far as i'm concerned the community is like a Bank in the police department is like a customer if we do not make consistent deposits in banks on a daily basis when a major incident comes up and we can't give you and we ask you to trust us You'll be more likely to do so. Then if we don't make those kind of emotional deposits in the bank so when we need to make a withdrawal it becomes less painful than when when that kind of relationship is built in the community by its police department. Yeah that was a that was a monster. That we always had is making those deposits. I don't know who the first person who started saying that but it certainly is something that caught on a with us and that was something we always tried to do with our police activity league Cook community meetings and things like that just trying to make sure that we had Just make sure that we had Some transparency and made those deposits. We talked a little bit about to this day in this town we're living in it's a rough time For for to be in law enforcement. We're having problems recruiting not just african americans recruiting across the board What's what's your thoughts about that. And how do we get more people to sign up to become part of that is is the. We've got to change our image in applete fire departments. I used to say you know a fire department will come into your neighborhood. Cut a hole in your roof until your house full of water and walk away and you'll be thinking thanking them shaking their hands. I can walk in..

today first Afro-american dallas african americans boise league Cook
A Rising Tide of Violence Against Environmental Activists

Short Wave

01:52 min | 5 months ago

A Rising Tide of Violence Against Environmental Activists

"Want to start today's episode with a speech from francia marquez. An afro colombian environmental activists indian in two thousand eighteen. She won the goldman environmental prize for central and south america and that's the biggest prize out there for grassroots environmental activists. Yeah it's sometimes called the green nobel's sucralose audio's don't they move quilon talking about her community in columbia letaba francia pauses to collect. This is a place where illegal gold mining was booming. A few years ago where miners were coming in and polluting local water sources with harmful chemicals and in response fronts organized eighty women to march in protest bogota the capital a journey of three hundred fifty miles. I mean that's a three hundred fifty miles. That's far that can help us. But through theon delo rio's francios as someone who has tirelessly fought illegal mining on her industrial land. But at great personal cost she says we are taught to love and value our land and to fight for charter. Podcasting includes poignant. Andrea's going mr appropriate even if it means putting our own lives at risk. That's the sentence i wanna pay attention to. Because the lives of environmental and land activists are increasingly at risk. An international ngo global witness has documented a rise in the murder and disappearance of environmental and land activists. In recent years they documented two hundred twelve murders in two thousand nineteen and one third of those murders. Were in colombia. Where fancy lives

Francia Marquez Letaba Francia Theon Delo Rio Goldman South America Bogota Columbia Andrea Colombia
Exploring Gender With Dr. Gee

Therapy for Black Girls

02:00 min | 5 months ago

Exploring Gender With Dr. Gee

"Thank you so much for joining us today. Dr g and q. It's a pleasure to be in conversation with you. yes it is. I'm so glad that you were able to squeeze into your schedule. And i would love for you to start bunches telling us a little bit about yourself as well as your practice. And what brought you into the field of psychology. Sure allegra-d delight to warm first generation afro-caribbean gender queer being and i am a writer. I'm a psychologist public speaker of british chaplain. I always tell people if it's something to do with women as if it's about liberation than that's what i center and that's what i do so. My clinical practice focuses much on the liberation of by poc and lgbtq mines and so that will look like somatic work. Existential work afro-centric work when i do a lot of trauma or work and they've been doing backer last over fifteen years at this point. We just stopped counting after ten. Yeah so a lot of people who find their way to me seem to be change. Makers activists men people who really appreciate the process of growth and transformation in their own lives but intergenerational. You know i'm always so inspired by how people in psychology how to just make their own spaces in like figure out how to use what we've been taught but then transform it you know we're communities that are not typically what we're trained on so i would love to hear like how you've been able to kind of do continuing education or other work that has allowed you to like expand your practice in this way. I feel like a was really blessed for the school. That i went to i went to the chicago school professional psychology and chicago and they were so community based and so from there. Learn to just go to the community to learn about whomever and what what wasn't covered in school.

Dr G British Chaplain Caribbean Chicago School Professional Ps Chicago
"afro american" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:49 min | 5 months ago

"afro american" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"I'm naomi lewin. Welcome to classics for kids. Today we're going to play musical hide and seek with the symphony number one. The afro american symphony by william grant still for his first symphony still wanted to compose music. That reflected the america. He knew one of stills earliest jobs was with. wc handy's famous blues band so he wanted to put the sound of the balloons into his symphony. You may have heard people say that they feel blue. When they're sad. Musical blues are about feeling sad and also have to do with blue notes in music. The word blue means changing certain pitches in a scale which changes the mood of the piece. William grant stills afro. American symphony is based on the blues e little melody. You just heard here. It is again. This time played by a clarinet when the composer takes a bit of melody and builds a larger piece around it. The bid of melody is called a theme in the afro american symphony. The theme sounds different sometimes. Very different in each of the four movements or sections of the symphony now for the hide and seek. You know that when you're playing that game sometimes people are easy to find. And sometimes they're hard to find the same thing with teams in the second movement of the symphony. The theme is easy to find. I the oboe plays it then. More instruments get into the act. But the oboe has the last word the third movement of the afro american symphony is much livelier than the first two and it starts off with a completely different theme. William grant still has an unusual instrument for an orchestra playing in the background a job. He was the first composer to use a banjo. Innocent penny speaking of background finding the main theme in the third movement of the afro american symphony is kind of tricky. So far it's always been out in front as the melody. But in this movement it's hiding composers loved to play around with themes and do different things with them to find the one we've been following remember background and listen closely to the trombones and trumpets. Would you hear it. If not listen again the bup bup bup bup bup path that the trumpets and trombones play in the accompaniment is the original theme. Finding that theme in the fourth movement is much easier. It's out in front again. Played by flute and oboe here. It is a little higher and the last part of it sounds really different by the end of the movement which is the end of the symphony still has stretched out the theme so much that you almost can't recognize it. Isn't it amazing. What a composer and do with a simple bit of melody. Next time you listen to a piece of music see if you can pick out the themes and all the different things composer does with them. William grant still did another interesting thing with his afro american symphony. He attached a bit of poetry to each movement of the peace next week on classics for kids. More about that poetry. And about paul. Laurence dunbar the man who wrote it. I'm naomi lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it for wg uc cincinnati. Please join me next week. For more classics for.

naomi lewin Laurence dunbar William grant fourth movement next week second movement third movement first two four movements first symphony paul Today america each each movement william grant still American first composer afro american wc
William Grant Still: The Afro-American Symphony

Classics for Kids

02:13 min | 5 months ago

William Grant Still: The Afro-American Symphony

"Today we're going to play musical hide and seek with the symphony number one. The afro american symphony by william grant still for his first symphony still wanted to compose music. That reflected the america. He knew one of stills earliest jobs was with. wc handy's famous blues band so he wanted to put the sound of the balloons into his symphony. You may have heard people say that they feel blue. When they're sad. Musical blues are about feeling sad and also have to do with blue notes in music. The word blue means changing certain pitches in a scale which changes the mood of the piece. William grant stills afro. American symphony is based on the blues e little melody. You just heard here. It is again. This time played by a clarinet when the composer takes a bit of melody and builds a larger piece around it. The bid of melody is called a theme in the afro american symphony. The theme sounds different sometimes. Very different in each of the four movements or sections of the symphony now for the hide and seek. You know that when you're playing that game sometimes people are easy to find. And sometimes they're hard to find the same thing with teams in the second movement of the symphony. The theme is easy to find. I the oboe plays it then. More instruments get into the act. But the oboe has the last word

William Grant Jobs America
"afro american" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

02:13 min | 5 months ago

"afro american" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Today we're going to play musical hide and seek with the symphony number one. The afro american symphony by william grant still for his first symphony still wanted to compose music. That reflected the america. He knew one of stills earliest jobs was with. wc handy's famous blues band so he wanted to put the sound of the balloons into his symphony. You may have heard people say that they feel blue. When they're sad. Musical blues are about feeling sad and also have to do with blue notes in music. The word blue means changing certain pitches in a scale which changes the mood of the piece. William grant stills afro. American symphony is based on the blues e little melody. You just heard here. It is again. This time played by a clarinet when the composer takes a bit of melody and builds a larger piece around it. The bid of melody is called a theme in the afro american symphony. The theme sounds different sometimes. Very different in each of the four movements or sections of the symphony now for the hide and seek. You know that when you're playing that game sometimes people are easy to find. And sometimes they're hard to find the same thing with teams in the second movement of the symphony. The theme is easy to find. I the oboe plays it then. More instruments get into the act. But the oboe has the last word

naomi lewin Laurence dunbar William grant fourth movement next week second movement third movement first two four movements first symphony paul Today america each each movement william grant still American first composer afro american wc
"afro american" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

Slate's Hang Up and Listen

03:40 min | 6 months ago

"afro american" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

"I'm so grateful for all the stuff that you wrote. That has that that testimony has these stories. So thank you. I did it for me. I mean yeah. I was totally that. Because i'm a dc guy and again you talk to these we so many stories. I mean i'd have to go to microfiche in the ninety. S because the post archives the washington post archives the warrant. The stories enough of them in the mainstream papers weren't enough there so afro-american papers covered his exhibitions and would cover elgin's other stuff. Sam lacey the legendary sports writer of the afro american. Who worked until he was one hundred years old and saw an amazing. I mean this guy. He had a life he could tell tell some tales he was a organizer of these exhibition games against white players when after elgin senior year. When elgin wasn't voted on by the newspaper reporters to the all star game. They put together these games because only white players were voted onto the all star game. The all prep all high game. Which was the washington. Post put on sam lacy in an and others in a local promoter put on these games called mixed race battles to get him some claim in the area where he would play white teams and always always went and everything comes together america. America's history was changing. The way basketball was being played his senior year of high school at the same time The way school was structured in his hometown in america was being overhauled. The brown versus board of education came in the final semester of his senior year. A main plaintiff was a spotswood bowling. Which was a classmate of of baylor's at at spin aren't in another basketball player. Spin was like changed the world and definitely change. Dc like few supreme court cases. Ever did the convergence of of the changing worlds of sports and culture and race race in america. All come together with baylor which should dc due to honor elgin baylor memory right like i know you. I'm sure you've got some ideas. So here's my rage. This is where my rage comes out. It makes no sense at all that there is nothing for this guy here. The only thing named for him is genuine. The only thing named for him in washington. Dc is the sole crooner genuine. Whose real name is elgin. Baylor lumpkin ways and bless. I did not know that. Are you serious. Genuine us is from yes. He's a dc native and But other than that like this no park. There's no basketball court. there's no nothing. Seattle has a tournament in his name. Seattle has a basketball court in his name in los angeles has a statue. Washington has nothing. There's a marvin gaye park right. Next to kelly miller kelly miller playground is where elgin and well played and where where the legend was born. And there's there's a marvin gaye park and marvin gaye surely deserves something incredible. His albums are unbelievable but he also had to go to la to get this claim. He went to cardozo here but then he left and never came back. What's what's the excuse for elgin. I mean he made the rest of the world. A notice washington dc. But something has to be done. I mean it just has to be rectified. In is stories. Amazing it is dave mckenna wrote about elgin baylor for defector and washington paper and gallons will put.

kelly miller dave mckenna Sam lacey los angeles afro-american america Baylor afro american one hundred years old elgin America washington post ninety marvin elgin baylor marvin gaye gaye park Washington la many
Morgan Freeman quote

Bald and Blonde

01:53 min | 6 months ago

Morgan Freeman quote

"And now i'd like to give you another great example how to not take things personally because it has to do with our own stuff in quotes i call it also our sore points what you refer to as triggers the trigger is something that's coming from the outside world and what does it trigger. It triggers an old wound. That's never really healed. Yes and morgan. Freeman great actor. And of course i feel fond of him because he was one of the main actors in the movie driving miss daisy and of course. I'm kind of fun of him. He was interviewed by journalists from austria regarding discrimination and disadvantage of afro americans here in the united states and the abstract that i'm referring to end the book is solely meant to be viewed. Psychologically regarding hurts and the sore points. So i'm going to read it as i voted my book. She the journalist. What happens when i say you are black. He morgan freeman nothing. She why not he. What happens if i call you. Austrian stupid cow. She nothing he why not she. I don't feel it does address to me. He see me neither she. Is that the trick to not take. It personally addressed he. Yes you call me black then you had the problem and not me because you are using the wrong word by me not feeling it address towards me. I am leaving you alone with your problem. Now that's powerful us wise men. He

Change Self Sabotage Manifestation Transformation Mental Health Personal Development Mindset Freeman United States Austria Austrian Three Afro Americans One Of The Main Actors New Zealand Morgan Morgan Freeman
Faketinas

Locatora Radio

05:02 min | 7 months ago

Faketinas

"Get started with. I think this person or this story broke during the summer. it's kinda hard to tell now with the pandemic. what time is like but one other prominent ones that i remember seeing that wino- was flooding. Our timeline was the story of jessica. Craig aka or formerly known as jess la. Barletta cringe already awesome early known formerly known best. I'm about that. Let's get started. Let's talk about her. Yes so this woman has allegedly and apparently apparently been taking on different like black and afro sport identities throughout her life. She's an a professor or was a professor and academic where george washington university and university teaching. You know black studies are afrikaner studies and publishing books but at some point she were shifting from being in a north african to being african american and then being afro latin next sand after boaty gua was i think the final landing place for her her official forum her final warm so jessica. Krog just aka justifiable maleta hers combination of black fishing and being a fake tina at the same time and She got called out basically rightfully so rightfully so by a group of professors who are after latina's who had issues with her they were witness to or on the receiving end of like aggression from her and like prejudice and bad behavior while she was masquerading as after let nine different contexts. Apparently being super like belligerent towards black women in my on cool and really I think overcompensating and so trying to be an ex sorted extreme caricature of like this south bronx like her. Allegedly her mother was like a drug addicts prostitutes like this narrative that should created about herself so black women in the academy you know began talking about these different experiences and came forward and said This is not right. Yeah she was definitely performing like whoa kness being extreme radical like it was very performative. She was a published academic author and she also received a ton of accolades rice. She received she was a finalist. For the twenty twenty frederick douglass prize book prize presented by yale's gilder lehrman center the study of slavery resistance and abolition. She also was nominated or a finalist for the twenty thousand nine. Harriet tubman book prize and just received a ton of accolades has really been propelled or was propelled forward and questionably hired because of not solely for her identity. But because of the work she was doing and also the way. She positioned herself as offer latino or body gua and it's very cringe to think about all of the opportunities she stole from actual author. Latinas boras caribbean women. That are doing if not the same work or better work you know. And so it's that was probably one of the first ones that we saw. And then i think it kind of just opened up the floodgates for a lot of others than i don't know about you ma. But in my chicano studies department at uc santa barbara. There were a couple of fake denies that i will not name. They were not. They weren't anyone that i took like. I didn't take any classes with them but they were around. People talked about them. People knew like this person is very white claims this this cheek. Ghana mohican identity. You know is wide. Skin blue is performing she gun. You know some kind of ghana identity wearing that. I had because with the free that carlo ecstatic the whole thing right and it's like you like i they weren't. They were my peers. I was a student right. But i have friends that were graduate students. And they would tell me about these. Things happen. And in their cohort or in their in their seminars. And so you know. I think if if you've been in academia right. I haven't been to grad school. But i was an undergrad but i've i've definitely seen the fake tina's around so they definitely exists and i think this one opened the floodgates for a ton of

Craig Aka Jess La Boaty Gua Krog Jessica Barletta Yale's Gilder Lehrman Center George Washington University South Bronx Tina Latinas Boras Frederick Douglass Harriet Tubman Ghana Caribbean Santa Barbara Carlo Academia
Malcolm X's Family Push to Uncover the "Truth" behind His Death

Democracy Now! Audio

06:37 min | 7 months ago

Malcolm X's Family Push to Uncover the "Truth" behind His Death

"The. Fbi and new york. Police departments are facing new calls to finally open their records related to the assassination of malcolm x. Shocked at fifty six years ago at the audubon ballroom and harlem february twenty first nineteen sixty five. This comes after the release of a deathbed confession of a former undercover new york police officer who admitted to being part of a broad new york police and fbi conspiracy targeting malcolm in the confession the former officer. Raymond would who died last year admitted he entrapped to members of malcolm security team and another crime. A plot to blow up the statue of liberty just days before the assassination. On saturday ray woods cousin. Reggie would read the letter at a news conference at the shabazz center in harlem assignment to draw the two men into a felonious federal crime so that they could be arrested by the fbi and kept away from managing malcolm. X's audubon ballroom door security on february twenty first nineteen sixty five in his letter. Raymond would also revealed. He was inside the audubon ballroom. At the time of malcolm's assassination at least one other undercover new york police officer. Gene roberts was also inside after infiltrating the security team of the organization of afro american unity. The group malcolm founded after leaving the nation of islam. Both officers would and roberts were part of the bureau of special services and investigations or bossie. A secret of political intelligence unit of the nypd nicknamed the red squat welcomes assassination. Police arrested three members of the nation of islam. His murder but questions about the guilt of the men have lingered for decades in his letter. Raymond would openly says one of the men. Thomas johnson was innocent and was arrested to quote. Protect my cover and the secrets of the fbi and the nypd unquote ray woods letter. Echoes claims and recent books by manning marable and less pain that some of malcolm's actual assassins were never charged in a moment. We'll be joined by raymond. Woods cousin reggie would released his deathbed confession. But i i want to turn to the words of malcolm x. Himself speaking after his home in queens was firebomb just a week before his assassination february fourteenth. Nine thousand nine hundred sixty five by house was bombed. It was bound by the muslim movement. On the orders of aligned to mohammed. Now they hit come around so they had planned to do it from the front. End the back so that i couldn't get out. They had they. They covered the complete the door then they had come to the back but instead of getting directly in back of the house in this way they stood at a forty five degree angle and talk with the windows so it it glance and onto the ground and the fire hit the window woke up my second oldest baby and then the fire burn on the outside of the house but it had had that one going through that window it would have fallen on a six year old girl a four year old girl and a two year old girl. And i'm gonna tell you if it had done it. Taken my wrangling going to anybody insight. I would not wait. Goes in the senate because this the police know the criminal operation of the black muslim movement because they have thoroughly infiltrated because they have thoroughly infiltrated it. Those are the words of malcolm x. Right before his assassination right after his home was firebombed in february of nineteen sixty five just days later he was shot seconds after he took the stage at the ballroom. We're joined now by reggie. Would the cousin of raymond would author of the new book. The ray which story confessions of a black nypd cop in the assassination of malcolm x. Still with us. Civil rights attorney. Ben crump who attended that news conference with Reggie wooden at the audubon ballroom now. The shabazz center where malcolm x was assassinated fifty six years ago. Reggie thank you so much for joining us. Use read parts of the letter this weekend. Talk about your cousin. Ray would and what you understand happened the conspiracy. He alleges that he was a part of by the fbi. And the new york police department to assassinate malcolm x. Morning thank you for having me ray was was a complicated man I think be based on his past experiences he he lived with a lot of fear and caution on a daily basis which instilled in me over the past ten years but are ray was a person that lived as a lived. He lived as a as a very quiet and reserved person because of what he experienced he witnessed some horrible things firsthand and also realized that he was a part of it after the fact and so therefore ray was told by his handlers. That not to repeat anything that he had seen or heard or he would Join malcolm therefore for forty six years. Ray separated himself from the family and In fear that he will put us in danger out rey lived alone many years and he Finally in his final years when he realized that he was his cancer was a reoccurring. He wanted to reconnect with family. Because he didn't want to die alone. So i volunteered to move them to florida so that my wife and i take care of them and get them back and forth cancer treatments things of that nature and therefore he trusted me enough to reveal this information and asked me not to say anything until he passed away but at the same time knox allow them to take it to his grave.

Malcolm Ray Woods FBI Audubon Ballroom Raymond New York New York Police Department Shabazz Center Gene Roberts Organization Of Afro American Bureau Of Special Services And Bossie Malcolm X Manning Marable Woods Cousin Reggie Reggie Thomas Johnson Harlem
An Expert's Guide To Curly Hair

You Beauty

04:33 min | 7 months ago

An Expert's Guide To Curly Hair

"Welcome to. I'm sharon hunt and this week's look dropped by. Guest is the incredible ruby aka the guru of curly and afro hair. Ruby is originally from zimbabwe but nowadays. She calls australia home. The originally self-taught stylist fell into hairdressing by accident. After witnessing friends and families struggle to find someone that understood this strands so she wound up doing it herself in her lounge room eventually she took up an apprenticeship began stalling out of multiple salons before finally opening up her own place. Rooming co in two thousand four room. Be thanks for dropping by. Thanks so much for having me sharing now. When i was a kid i distinctly remember being told if you ate all your crusts. Yo hey would go curly and i really badly wanted. Kelly has a you better believe i was gobbling down the crofton. I of course realize it was an old wives tale. That parents just tell you to eight year food. But i have to say. It's not the only myth that i've come across when it comes to curly hair. So why do you think there are. So many misconceptions about kohl's. I think something is misunderstood. There's a desire to want to make it a lot more palatable to each individual like answer for that very reason people come up with their own anecdotes around what this complex appendage actually is so people come up with so many things now yes i mean you told your cross for me. It was like eat your vegetables. And your hair is going to be straighter. You know what i mean like. Oh my gosh eating those so yeah. I think it's just because people really want to understand something that is complex and so yet this is where a lot of myths have come along and i hear them all the time. I've got lots of them to ask you about. Oh let's go. I guess to start with with. Kelly has to understand that. There's not just one type of co run us through just as an overview the different types of kohl's because you can tell by looking at someone calls not the same to the next. So why should you treat them the same one colleague on one hundred percent. So there's three curl types wavy curly in africa's how we sort of break down but then when you're looking at the typing system you've got type two which is wavy and that's lusa curls and there's three subcategories of that you've got to a to b to c and two c would be the tightest within that range and then you've got type three which is curly and within that again. Abc and c. And seeping tighter and then same thing for africa harrah's well after or coyly hair. Because i guess everyone who has coyly hair has an effort background. He is another curly myth. I've come across curly hair. Shampoos a marketing hype and normal shampoos worked. Fine let's start right there fact or fiction fact. They all marketing hive. Well okay no no no let me put it this way curly hair. People shouldn't shampoo their hair. That's a myth. Okay great stafa. Let's start there because that's actually. What's more commonly said trump who your hair. I've heard condition as well really. Yeah stop it. Maybe straight hair. How should you be carrying the curly hair. When it comes to washing its really simple. One of the things that i say to my clients often is you have to get rid of straight hair tendencies right. And how do you do that. It's just simplifying it. And which is part of what we do. We try and simplify everything for our clients. Because if you don't do that it's as though you're eating soup of the fork and that's gonna be very frustrating. And so how do you shampoo we take people through this whole process and it's like pretty much. Get the right shampoo first of all what you need to have the right product. Because not all sham periods would then be the same. Most shampoos actually stripped your hair. Which is why in some way. Yes don't shampoo your hair. I get with people. Come with that myth because it doesn't leave your hair as hydrated but then when you've got shampoo that is specifically designed for curly hair. It's supposed to cleanse but also hydrate to leave your hair feeling very moisturised. Soft supple and clean as well without streaky. Feel that you get when you get a deep cleansing shampoo

Sharon Hunt Kohl Kelly Zimbabwe Ruby Africa Australia Harrah ABC
Why Tech Companies Are Limiting Police Use of Facial Recognition

Short Wave

09:33 min | 7 months ago

Why Tech Companies Are Limiting Police Use of Facial Recognition

"All right emily kwong so. We're talking about this announcement from a string of tech companies that they are going gonna put limits on their facial recognition technology especially when it comes to law enforcement amazon microsoft and ibm yes on june eighth. Ibm said it would discontinue general purpose facial recognition or analysis software altogether. Get out of the business completely and it made an impression after. Ibm's big letter. Amazon announced a one year moratorium on sales of they're very popular software recognition spelled with a k. To law enforcement to give congress time to implement appropriate rules so a one year ban. Yes microsoft took it a step further saying it wouldn't sell products to law enforcement at all until a federal law is in place. Here's microsoft president. Brad smith speaking to the washington post we need to use this moment to pursue a strong national law to govern facial recognition that is grounded in the protection of human rights and for matali in conde who has been pushing for regulation changes in tech for years. This was a big deal when these words were coming out of silicon valley. She felt all of the feelings. My initial was thank god. Thank god i was. I was happy. I was pleased. I was optimistic. I was short of breath. I was exhausted. Tally is the ceo of ai. For the people a fellow at both harvard and stanford universities for her. These announcements shifted the conversation. But that's about it. So i'm pleased. It's got us incredibly far but we're by no means the woods not out of the woods because for all of the advancement and facial recognition systems. Still get it wrong. They'll incorrectly match folks what's called a false positive or fail to associate the same person to two different images of false negative. Yeah and what's vaccine. Is these errors are happening. More often. when the machines are analyzing dark-skinned faces and that can disproportionally affect already marginalized communities prone to unconscious bias at the hands of law enforcement leading to false accusations arrests and much worse so until there's action on this metallic said words just aren't enough gotcha. So let's unpack this a little bit. Let's talk about how biased gets into facial recognition systems in the first place. I'd love that okay. So it starts right with how the systems learn to do their jobs. A process known as machine learning so to make facial recognition systems engineers feed algorithms large amounts of what's called training data in this case. That would be pictures of human faces. Yes the way machines learn is that they repeat task again and again and again and again and again developing a statistical model for what a face is supposed to look like so if you wanted to teach the algorithm to recognize a man you'd put in like millions of pictures of men you got it. The machine will then measure the distance between the eyes on each picture the circumference of the nose for example the ear to measurement and over time the machine starts to be able to predict whether the next image it seeing is quote a man which sounds okay right here comes the but but the machine is only a smart as its training data so remember joy ghulam weenie who i mentioned at the top of the episode. Yeah the the mit yes. So she and her colleague timid gabe developed a way to skin color in these training sets and the two they looked at were overwhelmingly composed of lighter skinned subjects. Seventy nine percent for ibi dash a and eighty six percent. For etienne's these are two common data sets that were largely as joy. Put it pale and male. So basically the training data used to create these algorithms is not diverse. And that's how that bias gets in The diversity of human beings is not always being represented in these training sets and so faces outside the systems norm. sometimes don't get recognized. Here's matala explaining what the research meant to her. That goes back to this other issue of not just hiring but a bigger issue of those no one in the team to say that you haven't put all the faces you haven't put all the digital images of all human beings could look like in the way that they sharpen society in order to recognize these faces. And it's so. After realizing how unbalanced these training sets were joy intimidate decided to create their own with equality in race and gender to get a general idea of how facial ai systems performed with a more diverse population so basically they fed it more diverse pictures to to look at. Yeah it was kind of interesting. They used images from the top ten national parliaments in the world with women in power specific yes specifically picking african and european nations and they tested this new data against three different commercially available systems for classifying gender one made by ibm the second microsoft and the third by face plus plus an running these tests joint him knit found clear discrepancies gender and racial lines with darker skinned faces getting mis classified the most. Here's mut-ali again. So one of the things that joy blue armies amazing work looks. That is the coloration between short hair and gender so many many many black women with afros where mislabeled as men mis gendered because the system had trained itself to recognize short hair as a male trait and this research project mattie produced a massive ripple effect further studies legislation in december the national institute of standards and technology or nist published a big paper of its own testing one hundred eighty nine facial recognition algorithms from around the world and they found biases to looking at one global data set some algorithms in their study produced one hundred times more false positives with african and asian faces compared to eastern european ones and when tested using another data set of mug shots from the us. The highest false positives were found among american indians with higher rates in african american and asian populations again depending on the algorithm. Wow yeah that is not what you want from your data. And i'm guessing white. Men benefited from the highest accuracy rates. Yes they did now. The knicks study did conclude that the most accurate algorithms demonstrated far less demographic bias but for multi. This evidence of bias raises a bigger question about the ethics of relying on. Ai systems to classify and police at all the problem with ai. Systems machine learning is that they're really really really good at standard routine tasks and the issue with humans is that we are not standard. We're not routine. Were actually massively messy right. We're not the same but when a police officer searches face in the system. They're not making arrests based on just spat match alone are they. Oh absolutely not. Yeah it's a tool for identifying potential suspects but if you think about how there's already implicit bias in policing critics. A facial recognition are basically saying. It doesn't make sense to embrace technologies riddled with bias to right if all this research has shown. These tools are capable of misidentifying black people. We cannot use biometric tools that discriminate against a group of people who are ready discriminated against within the criminal justice system but policing most specifically mattie. When i first spoke to mut-ali in march she was open to moratoriums on facial. Recognition like amazon is doing buying time for these systems to improve regulations to be put in place but the protests have her views. Because why why am i being moderate with completely reimagined how we interact with technology so now she wants to see facial recognition banned from law enforcement use which some cities in the us have done. Moutallos has tried to push for legislation to outlaw discrimination in technology before but it seems like now people are paying attention and have a language for talking about structural racism that they just didn't have before whether why america listened to me or not. I was gonna continue with this work. I believe that technology should be an empowering force for all people and that's my work but now having old and new ala not just allies but co-conspirators bright. I'm so happy. Because i didn't think would happen in my lifetime and it's an it's

IBM Microsoft Emily Kwong Matali Amazon Ghulam Weenie Brad Smith Matala The Washington Post Stanford National Institute Of Standard Harvard Etienne Congress Gabe Mattie ALI Knicks
20 Years Later: How Dale Earnhardt's Death Changed NASCAR Forever

ESPN Daily

04:15 min | 7 months ago

20 Years Later: How Dale Earnhardt's Death Changed NASCAR Forever

"Ryan mcgee. Espn daily's chief. Paint trading correspondent. Thank you for joining me man. That's me man when i started. Espn a really really long. Time ago and i had this accent there were like. Hey you know about nascar right. I go yes you do. More than just know about nascar ryan you have now reported and narrated a new film for east sixty and it's called intimidator the lasting legacy of dale earnhardt. And i wanna talk to you about it today because it's a lot. It's about a lot more than how transcendent dale was on the track. It focuses on how he radically changed. Nascar's culture when it comes to safety but before we get into that. I do want you to just kinda sketch out for us. Who dale was for the uninitiated here and what made him such a towering figure in the nascar universe well and it's interesting because he's been gone twenty years i mean nascar's more than seven hundred races without del earnhardt and so for those of us of a certain age the idea of having to explain him and and why he's such a big deal seems insane but we saw what the last dance. The last dance ron's and half of twitter was like well. He was good. But you know this jordan character. Yeah we should know about it and we were so offended but bless their hearts. They didn't see him play. And so in this case you know. You have an entire generation twenty years exactly of sports fans who didn't see our heart race but it wasn't just about seventy six wins seven championships and also was just about the presence in the room. Always say with dell earnhardt if there was a thousand of us in a ballroom and we're all looking at a stage and he were to come in the back door when none of us were looking. We'd all instinctively. Just turn around because the air in the room changed. There was just a presence in a way that it carried himself and conducted his business and the intimidator thing that was legit. Every time i will. I know him. And every time i was in a room with him there was a little part of me. That was just trying not to say something stupid or pass out so on the back of the baseball card ryan so to speak. What are the accomplishments. That people should know about what dale did. Well the seventy six winds are really big deal but the seven championships and seventy plus year. The stockcar racing only three people one seven championships the checkered flag bands around their heat waves to them. That checkered card. His greatest success was on the super speedways. the taliban soup speedway and daytona he one thirty four racists and though tone national speedway thirty four nella one of those was the daytona five hundred and that was part of the appeal for him was even though he was this one tough customer and the man in black timid and all those things it took you twenty tries to finally win the daytona five hundred lawson in heartbreaking fashion multiple times twenty years frustration. Taylor that program names on the can't take it off. I guess i love it. He just he was in every man but he also of superman and that was always the appeal and outside of that ballroom. Full of the sports powerbrokers ryan. What was his status. Like regionally among the nascar faithful. How would you begin to describe what he meant to those people. What i hated it. Because when he came along in the late nineteen seventies. and you know it wasn't disrespect. But he didn't back down from. Richard petty from kailua from bobby allison from david pearson from any pissed them off the couldn't stand him and he would recommend a short track race. In martinsville and afro richer. Penn is electric. Listen kid you can't do it like this. And he just kept doing his way.

Nascar Ryan Mcgee Nascar Ryan Dale Espn Del Earnhardt Dale Earnhardt RON Jordan Dell Twitter Ryan Baseball Daytona Taliban Lawson Taylor Bobby Allison Richard Petty David Pearson
When Defending The Land Puts Your Own Life At Risk

Short Wave

03:30 min | 8 months ago

When Defending The Land Puts Your Own Life At Risk

"So emily why did you want to focus this story on. Columbia am the philippines. So remember that report i mentioned earlier. Yeah the one from global witness yes. So they're an ngo tracking threats against grassroots environmental actus subsistence farmers opposing mining tribal leaders condemning logging. Journalists lawyers organizers the un calls these folks environmental defenders and most of the murders that global witness documented took place in just two countries columbia and the philippines and in columbia indigenous communities are especially targeted. including the. Why you me known. His and nicole's piece this is on halacha or ortiz. A member of the y. You in northern colombia. In luck waheeda heater. We spoke over a secure video chat. She told me we raise our voice in defence of the territory and that the land is so much more than territories little walmart. It's wolman cup or mother. Earth where the why you pass on their culture to the next generation on halacha remembers being a little girl. When mining operations appeared dedicating the only stream the community had turning it into a better london. They have lan local on her community. Not only lost a source of water but a community meeting place where women would gather and do laundry and talk. Gauloise will come through and she became an activist because she doesn't want other communities to go through what she did. Okay so tell me a little bit about the activists work that unhealthy code does in columbia. So she is the secretary general of where side they mujeres y you mounting protests against mega mining projects in la guajira particularly. This project called l. said horn and what else to hone. That is the largest coal mine in latin america and it's right in her backyard. This is illegal operation owned by multinationals digging up coal that's exported to other countries but the practice of open pit mining. Mattie has proven really disruptive to the people who live there and harmful for the environment right. I know open pit. Mining can mess up local water resources absolutely and can create pollution that is physically harmful to communities that live nearby el cerro hone overall is really polarizing. Its construction has provided jobs and wealth to some in colombia for decades but it's also displaced indigenous and afro colombian communities forcing them from their lands without real resettlement consequently they are exposed to violence largely at the hands of paramilitary groups and criminal organizations groups that harass and target defenders like on helicopter who out against human rights abuses and environmental issues like those caused by the mine and this is on top of the violence. Colombians have already faced right. I mean. I know that colombia's kind of coming out of decades of conflict a conflict. Some say is an over because of armed groups still active in the region. And how does the government there respond to these attacks. Yeah that's a good question. I mean they often dismiss them as localized crimes and perpetrators are

Columbia Philippines Colombia La Guajira Emily Ortiz UN Nicole Walmart El Cerro Mattie Latin America London
"afro american" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:45 min | 8 months ago

"afro american" Discussed on WTOP

"And shot at them. The two victims were taken to the hospital and are expected to survive. No arrests have been made. Two people are dead after two separate shootings in Prince George's County. Last night, The first happened it around 8 50 on shady Side Avenue near Lacey Avenue in Suitland, leaving a man dead. Prince George's County Police say the man died after taking himself to the hospital to be treated for a gunshot wound. Second shooting left a woman dead and happened at around 11 30 on Hamilton Street near Edmonston Road in east Riverdale. Police say they found the wounded woman in a parking lot and took her to a hospital where she later died. No arrests have been made in either case. For the next month. Anyone driving into D? C on South Capitol Street, we'll see a new billboard honoring George Floyd. The Billboard shows a giant oil painting of George Floyd, lying under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer. Karen bash be with the George Floyd Justice Billboard Committee tells our news partners at NBC for why they chose to put the billboard up. I think art is crucial in civil rights movements in the sixties if it wasn't for photographs of Off the lynch ins or photographs of police, dogs and the water hoses. I think people wouldn't have embraced the civil rights movement on Dad. Empathy for what Black people have been going through down South. Next to the oil painting on the billboard is a quote from Martin Luther King Jr Reading Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere for 23, a w T o P This week, President Biden sign a raft of executive orders, including a four aimed at increasing racial equity in the nation more now from CBS News correspondent Who spoke to Howard University professor about whether that will mean much in the long run. One directs the Department of Housing and Urban Development to start rooting out racism and housing. Another orders federal agencies to regularly engage with tribal governments and strengthen ties with American Indian and Alaskan native tribes. Greg Carr, chair of the department of Afro American Studies at Howard University, says Maybe this means repairing a stain on the nation. America's original sin is set the colonialists. Car thinks orders ending the Department of Justice is use of private prisons and taking steps to stop violence toward Asian Americans of Pacific Islanders are important coming from the leader of the country. But will they change anything? Not overnight? Perhaps not even more than a little bit, but he says they do. Send a message. Allison Keyes, CBS News Coming up in money. Well, tourists save DCs hotels this year. I'm Jeff label for 24. 77 cars, kids, Okay, ask our kids running 77 guns, Kids. Take your car today..

County Police George Floyd Prince George Justice Billboard Committee Pacific Islanders Department of Housing and Urba Howard University Riverdale Department of Justice Suitland CBS Allison Keyes Martin Luther King CBS News DCs Afro American Studies NBC Minneapolis
North Carolina cities OK ban on hairstyle discrimination

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:22 sec | 8 months ago

North Carolina cities OK ban on hairstyle discrimination

"Too city councils in north carolina have you passed ordinances. Protecting against discrimination for wearing hairstyles. It's braids dreadlocks. Or afros the durham city council and the greens were a city council. Both voted yesterday ban. Employers from discriminating based on hairstyles. the ordinance is also protect residents from discrimination based on gender identity sexuality and military

Durham City Council North Carolina
North Carolina cities OK ban on hairstyle discrimination

Michael Berry

00:23 sec | 8 months ago

North Carolina cities OK ban on hairstyle discrimination

"Councils in North Carolina have unanimously passed ordinances protecting against discrimination for wearing hair styles such as braids, dreadlocks or Afros. The Durham City Council and the Greens were a City council Both voted yesterday to ban employers from discriminating based on hairstyles. The ordinances also protect residents from discrimination based on gender, identity, sexuality and military status.

Durham City Council North Carolina City Council
"afro american" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:03 min | 9 months ago

"afro american" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Were so again the more upset sometimes about how was going at other games. And they were the game plan but Yeah surprise me. But it's now i guess Fantasy football is the big thing and Which also surprises me. I i saw a pure. I love the sport and love the gadget. Play the game and It's a pretty serious business and we only have about forty seconds left so quickly when you think back on your life your career particular sports career in the studio doing a color analyst and also playing the game any one moment. Stick out to you. Why did this happen just recently. What much during my career but The smithsonian museum and this massoni. It's a two has a the afro american museum of natural history and culture. And you have. An earth crosses playing there for the the first african american sportscaster full-time with the network and to me. That's a major major thing. Because fired encouraged a lot of people who probably never thought about entering the business to do that but Now the key thing. Though i think in terms of my career interest around the four people on the saint pete. Four people on the seven brent. Tell us know the greek. And and and jack whitaker. We became one yet people. Sometimes we'll be studios a family maybe disarmament as functional family was so well but still a fan who were closed and that closes the something that i think. can never compare anything i've ever had except The asa experiences a a player on the field. I wanna thank your again urged. People check it out bearing the cross. Take care my friend. And let's talk again. Hi ryan thanks. A i take care okay. Cross with nine years in the nfl and then of course was cbs. We continue on sports. Byline have you written a book..

smithsonian museum afro american museum of natura jack whitaker football asa ryan nfl cbs
"afro american" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:28 min | 9 months ago

"afro american" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"I don't think he really had a great understanding of television but he did have lots of contacts and in lots of ways of looking at teams and games and and he did that thing but i it all worked our personalities were such that as individuals stand apart but when we came together all four of us that work there Greek had issues with Both britain phillips. But they're you know those were resolved as well. How did the nfl feel about somebody giving odds at that particular time on professional football because the league had always been sensitive to the gambling aspect. Run i almost said that. And i didn't really bothered me because a with the first time you're on the air together. Jimmy wanted me to tell them what i thought about. Some games and Some players and i told him it's the greek. We could talk about anything. You want except footba. I'll never talk to you about it at that time. The league was firm about that right. What did you have any kind of a connection with anybody with gambling ties. But here's the guy who was a gambler. And so i always felt the need to draw from them and we got along right but we'd never talk about football. You went to a south a few times. We know each other pretty well. But i never ever talked to about about football and People's elvis commissioner at the time and he took a very firm stand on on Gambling and betting in the sport and frankly all prize that We're able to have a jimmy on the air because of the league at such a strong policy about the not being engagement. Betting and gambling remember Far horning right to spend it taras to carris. Yeah because taking bets. But i remember in the locker rooms. They had these little cards. That i guess is makers making or something but Would have those things that then make bets. Remember standing in the huddle a few times and guys look at the scoreboard. We were playing early game Or late game. You could see the plan coursework so then getting more upset sometimes about how was going and other games and they were the game plan but Yeah it surprised me. But it's now i guess Fantasy football's a big thing and Which also surprises me. I saw a purist. I love the sport and love the gadget. play the game and It's a pretty serious business. We only have about forty seconds left so quickly when you think back on your life your career particular. Sports career in the studio doing play Color analyst and also playing the game any one moment. Stick out to you. Why tell you this happened just recently. What does the much during my career but dismissal nghien Museum and this persona you test the afro american museum of natural history and culture and you earth crosses playing there for the the first bathroom. american sportscaster fulltime with the network. And to me that's a major major thing because fired encourage a lot of people who probably never thought about entering the business to do that but The key thing. Though i think in terms of my career so ron but the four people on the three p. Four people on the set with brent till us. You know the greek and and and the jack whitaker We became one. yes people. Sometimes we focused studios a family maybe dishonest dysfunctional family whatsoever. But still a family..

football carris phillips nfl britain Jimmy jimmy nghien Museum afro american museum of natura jack whitaker ron
Boston's Black Nativity Celebrates 50 Years

Radio Boston

01:53 min | 10 months ago

Boston's Black Nativity Celebrates 50 Years

"Black nativity is celebrating fifty years in boston. This weekend written by langston hughes. It's a gospel song. Play that re imagines the story of the nativity by placing it in an early twentieth century. Black neighborhood so he's talking about the in like the hotel and the he has characters who talking behind the back of the management about how cruel they were to turn away a woman who was about to have her child. The boston show is the longest running production of black nativity. In the united states and edmund buried gaither says this year they were planning a season long celebration gaithersburg involved in every productions since one thousand nine hundred seventy and is now in charge is the director of the national center for afro american artists. We would be getting and congratulating each other. It's the context of the virus. Most of that has just disappeared and we have had to think about how to reinvent ourselves. Based on what's possible gaither says the celebration will instead be a virtual gala saturday night celebrating joy love and hope it will pay tribute to the productions legacy and chart the next fifty years we have over a long history faced a lot of difficulties and we are still here so we are our president evidence of survival so let us draw on the strength that has seen as through previous stresses to give us the hope in courage to get through this one and let black nativity be part of what sustains.

Black Nativity Boston Langston Hughes Gaither National Center For Afro Ameri Gaithersburg Edmund United States
"afro american" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"afro american" Discussed on Throughline

"Capital One NA member FDIC. On. facebook. There are these three brothers who love guns said guns are over-regulated. Say the NRA is too quick to compromise and they're gaining more followers every day they're very in your face offensive and by God I, love him for it. Listen now to the no compromise podcast from NPR. Part one confronting the LAI. I started reading Baldwin seriously in Graduate School. I fell in love with the sound of his voice the power of his ten. His courage the way he queered politics. How he inhabited his own. misfit. NECE. The way in which he balanced his rage and love. This is Eddie glad on the chair of the Department of Afro American Studies at Princeton. The author of Begin, again James, Baldwin's America, and it's urgent lessons for our own in two thousand eighteen. Any was starting to write that book about Baldwin, but he was struggling. So he went to Heidelberg Germany on a fellowship to try and figure it out. I've been thinking I was gonNA write his intellectual biography of Baldwin. And I was having trouble The archives weren't aren't yielding what I hope they would yield I'm in Heidelberg. I experienced this horrible scene. He just arrived at the train station when he saw something disturbingly familiar. Here's how he describes it in his book. As we entered the station I heard screaming. People in front of stood still and stared at some kind of commotion. followed. There is four policemen were piled on a black man. When officer had his knee in the man's back? Twisted his arms. His pants were halfway down his legs. Bare was exposed. The police pressed his head down into the concrete as if they were trying to leave the imprint of a leash bear. With each attempt to cuffing the man, let out a blood curdling scream. All eyes were on him as the crowd stood by and watched intently. Like spectators at a soccer game without any real attachment to the teens plane. I watched them as they watched the police and the black men. Their faces revealed nothing. It were inscrutable at least to me. I had not been in Heidelberg for two hours and police had a black bands face press down on the concrete with Nina's back. Intensity of that scene snap things into focus for. He wasn't going to write an intellectual history of James Baldwin as he had originally planned he was going to try and write with. Bald. To, try to put him in a deeper more philosophical context and understand what is work offers us. In, our world. He. Went back to his room and the words just started pouring out. and. To do it, he had to call back to when he started reading James Baldwin more than thirty years earlier. And I knew that when I started reading them in graduate school that he was going to happen me deal with my own TRAUMAS, my own wound spy on pains and I didn't have a philosophical language for that. Then he would in effect open me up. And that I would have to deal with the fact. Disturbing fact in some ways that I am in remain vulnerable little boy. But in order for me to say anything substantive about the.

James Baldwin Heidelberg FDIC facebook Graduate School NRA Heidelberg Germany NPR LAI soccer Department of Afro American St officer Eddie TRAUMAS America Princeton Nina
"afro american" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"afro american" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"And we are the morning drive with Casey and Ellie this is an Adam Housley who's a a fox news reporter is saying that the latest document dump coming out of a the I. Richard Grinnell and these transcripts has to do with the unmasking and surveillance and FISA documents and Housley saying old brother he tweeted this out just moments ago massive massive surveillance that's what is being found massive the way was sent to me so again the FBI and the Obama regime responding probably all just about everybody yeah one of the dental just tweeted out Biden has just lied about the set up of general Flynn by Chloe's FBI quote I know nothing about these moves to investigate Michael Flynn pressed about the January five meeting in the oval office of Russia where he was but he was he dodged why won't Biden and Obama actually address this one of the high tech well we know what they're actually going to go that far you're hiding their complicity they twenty six coming up next contact tracing and wanted that could be a bad thing we'll explain lenders in Pasadena hello Linda good morning when you make a comment on without licenses proportionate manner corner cases with Afro Americans and Latinos I am I'm amazed you know they dump it on the American flag it is surprising to me that the leaders of those particular needs or areas aren't you know incentivizing hello related action plans for job opportunities in trying to enhance that and the reason that that is more comorbidity with that particular section admit this is necessary so I I do think you know instead of making a statement for act and how we can improve the quality of life for those people on our own site so that's my comment yeah you're you're right about the quality of life starts with one's own health and taking care and ownership of one's soul from these comorbidities in fact I recently saw a study over in Europe I think was in Italy yeah can all have to find it for you but every single death almost almost almost a hundred percent but but like ninety nine percent of the deaths had some kind of co morbidity underlying medical condition heart disease lung disease diabetes obesity which is a serious health problem if people simply walk around and other healthy one day the next day they have issues with the these are comorbidities and that's really what is is impacting people greatly in this this country by the way fleet Carroll County good news there only one will flow doesn't three days in pleasant view nursing home is no longer an active outbreak sorry for so that is good news for Carroll County there and today at one o'clock there's going to be a hearing online on Senate committees are planning a nine hour online hearing on the unemployment issues that we're having here in the state of Maryland first time the General Assembly will hold a virtual hearing that includes live online testimony from members of the public in court as Senate finance committee chairman senator Doral Delores Kelley although it is clear the problems with the system have not been solved as the administration claim last week so if you're still having problems with the unemployment system there's going to be an online hearing today at one okay if if I might because we come up with comorbidities the biggest comorbidity that there is is obesity that if it calls for nineteen in China they their students all over the world our data from three hundred eighty three patients showed being obese is associated with a hundred and forty two percent higher risk of developing severe pneumonia associated with a wheel handlers four thousand patients in New York severe obesity a major risk for hospitalization in Seattle a city of critically ill patients similar findings all over the world that's the Biggie now the question is is this cultural if it is that displays a lot of what's going on when you say people in urban areas who are obese more that'll be sports never mention people urban areas black Hispanics they're getting more is that population more obese than the rest of the population well there's also a I would think a of a rather than a base problem within the white population as well sure seen it repeatedly in Appalachia and other uses in the south when you do a lot of the southern states they leave the most of these indices innovation so it is a I think it's a it's an epidemic in America today and that is unfortunate because we need to take better care of ourselves coming up next what could be so wrong with the house bill six six six six that calls for contact tracing yeah it's a thirty five for news headlines possibly go wrong well something at the devil's number yeah I want to do.

Casey Ellie Adam Housley reporter
"afro american" Discussed on Chewing the Fat

Chewing the Fat

14:55 min | 1 year ago

"afro american" Discussed on Chewing the Fat

"Network welcome to chewing the fat. The Yale sustainable food programs podcasts. Books at people making change in the complex world of Food and agriculture. I'm your host. Burnley this February. We've partnered with the Afro American Cultural Center at Yale. Bird special chewing the fat event series entitled Cooking Across the Black Gaspara in addition to black history month. The Collaboration Commemorates this year's fiftieth anniversary for both the Afro American Cultural Center and Yale's Department of African American Studies Building upon the conversations with past chewing the fat guests like Michael Twit. He and Leeann Headman. The series celebrates the food traditions and innovations of Afro and black identifying people's in hosting Naish Errington Villas Bryant Terry this series create space for four chefs to share their stories of food and identity heritage and resilience dealing injustice cooking across. The Black Gaspara begins when Naish Errington chef and founder of La Restaurants Leona native. Nitrous hadn't incredible culinary career training and Michelin Star Kitchens. Two TV appearances most recently competing at the acclaimed international chef championship Bogor. We speak to her more. Afro Korean roots and our heritage has inspired her to create such original and artistic. Here's an Asia chatting with podcast manager museum. So you have this rich cultural heritage and you grew up in southern California. So can you tell us a little bit about how that has shaped your upbringing and your relationship to food yes definitely my culture and heritage and growing up in Los Angeles. I really feel like it was destined in certain written in the stars for me to be a chef. I come from a multicultural sort of array of background black Korean Cherokee Indian Japanese and Caucasian as well and then growing up in Los Angeles really gave me this amazing terroir to draw inspiration from which has naturally really played into my food today and articulating my heritage. Replace both of the restaurants that I've had have been kind of rooted in celebrating multicultural. Facets but I come from a French fine dining background and I kind of use and draw techniques from that and draw from different heritage and make this amazing entity that comes from my soul. It almost seems as if there's a synergistic effect from all of the different influences absolutely and that's comes from both tangible and intangible entities you know it comes from lineage and heritage it comes from my grandmother I say from a love standpoint. You know that was something that I felt through my grandmother's cooking. I think that food is a very special thing. And it's a transfer of energy from family aspect from being a steward of the land from farmer growing an amazing product from an artisan being so passionate about their craft and making a goat cheese or rancher that raise this amazing calf or milk or you know the entire sort of smaller footprints that make up the end result adds up to the bigger equation you know and then from the chef standpoint. I'm able to take that sort of like behind the scenes part of it and then bring that to life by applying you know my inspiration from around the world and inspiring my team to also love what they do and bring that to the guest you know there was someone sitting in enjoying one of my dishes. And she looked like a little despondent. And I said are you enjoying the dish and she said I've transcended to heaven? She's like this. Is I feel you through this plate and it like literally made my eyes well up because it's just like that's such that's the goal to just not to create just to create you know for me it's to create to feel you know and to bring life speaking a chef and being in the service industry. It's a lot about coming from a place of being humble and a place of nurture you know. So that's probably the long winded. Answer your question but you know. Yeah I think it's It's really the beauty is in the intangible as well as the actual tangible entity of the food that comes from the creative process. I really like what you said. Transfer of energy. So when you're looking at home your family members I think that's a very intimate process. It's a great way to bond with your family members and it seems like a part of that extends into your behind the scenes work at a restaurant so I guess. Can you compare what it's like to cook at home today? Versus cooking in a restaurant say yes so like for me at home is cooking with my immediate community. I have a small garden and the people that are in my building. We all sort of chip in and take care of this garden that feeds us. You know so. That's sort of the immediate transfer of energy. We're all watering tending. And then it nurtures our bodies sort of like a step larger from that. I have you know farmer sort of community that I go to the farmer's market and you know there's artisans the ranchers farmers that are there like this plot of land. I'm excited about this amazing potato. You should try this out you know. And that's for me that transfer of energy through seeing that brought to life you know and then like a restaurant professional cooking standpoint. There's a lot more facets to it you know you really have to sort of gather up this unison in the goal you know because it's not just cheer when I'm at home and cooking for just my immediate friends and family. It's easy because a lot less can like go wrong so to speak. But when you have dollars in play and you have a huge team to manage and operate. It's important for everyone to have the same common goal to rally around. It's a different. It's just a different approach. That makes sense. Yeah so it seems like you go to a farmer's markets a lot so there's an importance of using locally sourced ingredients but you also have this really interesting global experience where you traveled to different parts of the world and integrate these global flavors. So is there a balance that you strike between local ingredients and a global palette? Yes and it's so funny when you when so like Global Pallet. I love that it could be. It could be a an ingredient and it could also be a technique right so like for example a from a local sustainable farm sort of Lens. I can take anything like squash right. That's in season and then a technique from picking duck like I did. I did this dinner based off of a whole pig. Cooking and And I cooked it in many different like sort of levels and platforms of technique in style. So I Cook Dinner Caccia. So and then Tried it out and then poured the hot fat over it. Which made it like a crackling. You know so. It's like using that and then like different flavor components Really kind of gather up this entire experience that make it special. You know where you can. It might be a global technique or global flavour or spice. But you can use a local ingredients a vegetable or animal protein and sort of melt the two. That's really cool. I've heard you use the term palate development. So is that a process that begins in your childhood and your upbringing. And I imagine that it's still evolving. So can you tell us a little bit about how your policy development process has been like? Yes I you know. It's definitely one of my favorite subjects I think palate development really is an art form in itself and ultimately it comes from the journey. And what you want to feel right bike when I approach a dish. I always draw like I call it. My like Matrix Excel. Draw Big Cross and then I'll list adjectives like what's my intention. Essentially is a stitch masculine. Feminine is it bold soft to elegant right so I'm already starting to conjure these ideas about the articulation of product before it's enjoyed on the palate right because it's about tapping into the census. So when I was young I ate a lot of different not different from an American palate standpoint. You know it wasn't like chicken fingers or like things like that you know it was octopus. It was go to it was. Kimchi was both It was like all these delicious amazing flavors in eating with chopsticks and understanding from a very young age which left in a huge impact on me to understand a culture through food. It's all about the arts. You know music as well but to understand culture through food for me. That was my experience at a very young age. So that's why I kind of say like it was written in the stars for me to be a chef because I understood palate development at a very young age and it's as simple as my grandmother cooking for me and it's also funny stories. I learned that from a very young age through eating this starburst and it's funny because I remember like your parents take you to like a corner store and you get like a treat or something but I remember is that I'd left. One of the starbursts in the back. Seat of my parents car like like fell seed or something and I remember we were driving somewhere and I found it this banana flavored and it was summer but I remember I ate it and it was soft and it was a completely different experience for me as a kid I was like. Oh my God. This is amazing and so I felt like just something simple like that you know understanding palate is like how the food is registered the brain from just your tongue you know your little pellet so. I think that over time you start to understand how these foods make you feel are they Brian. They salt forward to sort of hug your soul. They brought the you know all these things that register as food data it's really through experiencing different flavors from different cuisines and delving into that creative process. That's really cool. That cooking is a sort of art form. So there's a lot of experimentation sensation going on you can learn about a culture through food. There's different sounds different colors. Can you tell us more about how this is an artistic creative process absolutely? Yes so for me growing up. I've always been in the arts whether that was painting or sculpting. Those are sort of different mediums of art which tend to be self expression right. It's making the intangible that lives in your soul and through your life experience tangible whether that's through painting what have you and an artist right when people think of an artist. Someone who like. Hold the paintbrush to a canvas. They're diving into the same creative process as a chef. In my opinion for me my palate my palate of of articulation is temperature its texture to Roma it sound. My canvas might be the dining room. How does my guest feel when they walk through is it vibrant and boisterous you know tons of energy or is it a subdued and classy or like white tablecloth elegant fine dining and all of those articulations of the dining experience makes one feel before they even delve into the food so in the artist? Brain of chef. It's really looking what you want that guest experience and how you want them to feel when they leave so I guess moving on to some of your concrete experiences part of your learning process and becoming a chef so you went to culinary school and you trained with renowned chefs at Michelin Award winning restaurants so I imagine those are really rewarding interesting experiences. So can you tell us about? What was your growth like in that time period of your life. I love this question. It's IT'S A. It's an interesting time. You know one day. I'll write a memoir about it because I think it's a really special experience. I have to say you know being in those kitchens are very challenging and I have to say if I did not sort of curate. My tool belt of life prior to stepping into those kitchens. They would have eaten alive like they have so many by that. I mean playing a lot of team sports understanding that. You're only as strong as your Weakest Link. Studying martial arts. You know almost being like a Jedi in the kitchen and having self discipline and work ethic no from my parents making me wake up in the morning and go rake the leaves or you know and do stuff take out the trash just have life skills as a young adult really helped me to have staying power within myself and in the kitchen and just this upward mobility to nasty did have upward mobility within my career and to want to be the best you know have the sharpest knife in the kitchen and not have an ego really and just to sort of you know understand how. I play on this team so in saying that you know. It's it's definitely challenging..

Black Gaspara Los Angeles Afro American Cultural Center Naish Errington Villas Bryant Afro American Cultural Center Bogor Burnley Leeann Headman Michelin Star Kitchens Naish Errington California Yale Nitrous La Restaurants Leona Asia founder Michael Twit Global Pallet Department of African American
"afro american" Discussed on School Colors

School Colors

09:51 min | 2 years ago

"afro american" Discussed on School Colors

"Hi this is anthony pair the deputy director of the movies on as you've heard by now still colors is produced by Brooklyn deep which is BMC's citizen journalism arm real we put us by Gus together on shoestring the budget and there's so many more powerful and deeply impactful stories to be told in Central Brooklyn. If you WANNA see more in storytelling like this we need your help you can donate to Brooklyn deep as school colors podcasts dot com slash supporting the end of the strikes not exactly worked out in Ocean Hill Brownsville favor but math teacher Charlie Isaac says there was a short period about three weeks after the end of the third strike strike that was in some ways the apex of the experiment the clearest demonstration of what was possible with community control. There were a lot of assemblies cultural presentations presentations in many classrooms. The American flag was replaced with the Red Black and green black liberation flag the principle of two seventy one William Harris Harris had been suspended so assistant principal Alvin was in charge and one of the songs that was very popular at the time with the kids was own happy days. I think well happy days. When Jesus School Anyway does very popular in the time throughout the back newsy and along with the Negro National Anthem? We always played that every morning cluster cotton remembers this very well in the morning and we used to just have the pledge of allegiance. Nobody just the into it. I know what happened was they did the pledge of allegiance but then they did lift every voice and sing and you could hear the whole school thing and that I couldn't believe the transformation they stood up sang along. We all say we it sounded US song with the whole school every morning. I get goosebumps thinking about it. so this sort of infused the spirit of the strike period back into for this all that ended when the principal came back he had a more conventional approach to things things and the chaos came back to when striking teachers returned to Ocean Hill Brownsville their students were not too pleased. He's disabled the two seventy-one They'd start chanting whenever a teacher tried to speak making basic communication impossible teacher said the kids have been coached not to allow any education to take place kids like Mani Edwards didn't see it that way for us. We felt if you were with the F. T. that you weren't with us I would say a certain point. It did become come yeah. Let's say you were there. You were the enemy the return of these unwanted teachers and the constant presence of Police in union observers hallways classrooms was taking a toll no one I know exactly who was who in the school and result was just total chaos all the units he that was there before all the education it was going on everything just stopped teachers features started leaving for some it was just too much. You'll gravitate toward teaching because you love conflict and some just couldn't take it now. As teachers left they weren't being replaced by boy education so we were increasingly short-staffed as the rest of the school year war on and this is meanwhile kids are fighting their guerrilla war against the returning teachers and as the pressure increased the black teachers to seventy one split into factions so using the terms they may have used for each other. It was the revolutionary black militants versus conservative black bourgeoisie and everybody took sides many of the so called radicals were members of the Afro American Teachers Association and they rallied around social studies teacher less Campbell but Campbell wasn't doing himself or the movement any favors Chris in early nineteen sixty nine to events began to turn the tide of public opinion against community control and Ocean Brownsville and the first centered squarely on leslie is Lee Campbell near the end of January the New York Times got wind of a radio appearance that Campbell had main back in December gable guest more than once on a show on Wbai called hyung-chol. Tom's cabin hosted veggies lester but this time I showed him a poem by Theobroma hand that was a raw response of a fifteen year old you to what had happened emotional browns and he asked me to read this poem on the air. The title of the poem was to Albert Shanker Antisemitism. Here's how it started. Hey Jew boy with that Yang. Had You paleface jubilee. I wish you were dead. I could read the rest of it but I don't want to. I it's not fun for me to read and you know Campbell was dogged by this really for the rest of his life and I don't Wanna contribute to that and he always said that the poem is taken out of context and that's true about honestly. What did he think was going to happen? The poem seemed to confirm exactly what the union had been saying for months about Black Anti Semitism and not only that antisemitic beliefs were personally held by the leaders of Ocean Hill Brownsville by teachers like him but that they were being taught in the classroom. After the poem became public the mayor announced that he was opening an investigation investigation into Leslie Campbell and reporters who had previously been sympathetic to community control and painted Al Shanker is the bomb thrower started to change their tune. The next blow against Ocean Ocean Hill Brownsville in the press came from journalists Martin Mayor here he is on WNYC talking about his new book the Teacher's strike they had very serious troubles at junior high school to seventy they won and in general the quality of teaching that I saw I was not terribly pleased with two seventy one had been visited by countless reporters and academics but Martin Mayor it was the first out the gate with a book about it which was published in February nineteen sixty nine and it was loaded with inaccuracies and distortions and it's just terrible Charlie Isaacs the UFT saint copies of his book to every member of the state legislature. This was their story the story they wanted two people to believe and it just kept getting retold the U. OF T. sent copies of Martin mayors book to every member of the state legislature because it was the state legislature that was ultimately going to decide the fate of community control in fact the state legislature was set to take up a bill that might have expanded community control citywide creating governing boards like the one in Ocean Hill Brownsville all over the city. AL shanker lobbied hard to make sure that would never happen. I'm not opposed to community participation or even community control control. I am against what knows as was called total community control which means that we can do anything we want and people don't have any civil rights or human rights We don't have that in our country. A mayor air can't do anything he wants. A brother can't do any one-sided. What school district do I want? At the end of April Shankar got his way a decentralisation law with the U. OF T. Stamp of approval was passed and set to go into effect the year later this law made it almost certain that the ocean though Brownsville experimental district in its current form would be phased out between teachers fighting teachers leaving and students fighting teachers and this new State Law Morality to seventy was low. Eventually you know we just couldn't wait for the school year to end. This was the context for junior high school to seven. He wants Eighth Grade Graduation on June thirteenth nineteen sixty nine when Edwards was the Valedictorian. We started the story with the beginning of her speech. Our ancestors were brutally forced to an unknown land to be enslaved and looked down upon as animals by the white man now. Here's the end of it. We have a responsibility to our people. We are the might and the strength of our race we of young leads set the pace. We are the hopes the dreams the future that must be fulfilled. Black and Puerto Rican students must go on to high school and Finish go to college and finish and come back to our communities and finish the job that has been left unfinished for over over four hundred years be- black be beautiful be brilliant and be yourself. I ask Komo Neva how she felt reading this today. It feels very odd. I hear a lot of this being said again today. It's like certain things things were not resolved and all these years as I read it now seems a youthful naive optimistic and I thought that by now that work would be done on so to read it and see like Oh my gosh somebody fourteen could have written that today is kind of awesome banana greatly kind of mind boggling three days after graduation the Ocean Hill Brownsville governing board dismissed every single teacher affiliated with the Afro American Teachers Association including Campbell Alvin was demoted. He never return to two seventy one or two public education describe it without being vulgar I felt betrayed and point in time that all that we had put into supporting arousal at the time the board in all struggle where gone through and the progress we made those kids in that one year was extraordinary extraordinary and so I guess I just felt frustrated to the point.

Ocean Hill Brownsville Lee Campbell Afro American Teachers Associa Ocean Ocean Hill Brownsville Campbell Alvin Leslie Campbell AL shanker Brooklyn junior high school principal Mani Edwards Ocean Brownsville William Harris Harris US Negro National Anthem Charlie Isaac Brownsville anthony
"afro american" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"afro american" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"Starts with Christian ministers in the era rhino right after reconstruction or just having to ask the quite terrible question. What what a new abolition be now. I mean, the old abolition has come and gone, you can't just keep giving that abolitionist sermon or response to what was said, in an earlier time or now in the time of reconstruction has come and gone. And we're living into this era of American history in, which things were supposed to be so much better, having gone through the civil war, and then reconstruction. And all that. And yet things are actually worse. If you've got this mania of lynching, that is ratcheting up and all over the south reconstruction amendments are already being stolen away. So people in this situation of, what is the gilded age all this or social dislocation and traffic into the cities and economic modernisation and capitalism, going corporate, while all that's going on just this just terrible. And I think you know distinct situation especially in black churches of just are facing the terrible. Circumstances of what became the early eighteen eighties and then Anward where figures are having to just ask this awful question over. All right. What would a new abolition be in this context? How do we conceive construe preach the gospel, how do we organize? How do we make an impact on society with our face? That is the sort of orienting issue. I mean. There is something distinct about the social gospel, that can get ministers and trouble. And that is controversial within church that Jewish in so virtually everybody, I wrote about with one exception, the new abolition had some sort of a battle, but his own church, because arguing that the gospel has a mission to transform structures of society in the direction of social Justice. That's not only controversy on the churches. It's new churches haven't really said that, though when you're making that social gospel argument that indeed churches have a mission to transform social structures in the direction of something we're calling social Justice, that's language. It just didn't even exist before. But now it does exist. And it's gonna reversal within churches. So all these folks, six for Alexander Walter have a battle with their church, just to establish the validity of that very thing that the founders of the N AA, C P wanted to call it the new abolition movements, but they thought better about that. Title considering what impact that might have in southern chapters of the new organization? That's right, that they thought of himself, a bunch of white liberals and there on the board and most African Americans who are on the board. We're on the little more moderate on, you know, not the radical side and the boys is radical enough for that board. So just sort of dealing with the boys goping with them was enough for a number of folks there, which is why one of my favorite figures in this whole story, Reverend ransom, just doesn't get on the board. They've got enough trouble dealing with the boys and yet with all those qualifiers that I just threw out. They all thought of themselves as new abolitionists, there, Neil abolitionist, there, the next generation of the abolition movement. That is their self understanding, and they do believe. Yeah. That would be the best name for this organization that they're creating because that's exactly what they think it is. I mean, the afro American League came and went, and then the afro American Council. The next attempt to try to build an all black protests organization, and then Booker T takes that over and then the Niagara movement. So had three passes at a blacks only protest organization that deals with this. And finally, when that one is failing to the boys is willing if you have to just cut a deal, these white liberals and build something that is adequately funded and that will last and will make an impact, which is what they did. And so, you know, you have this binding together, these white liberals with folks into boys circle and beyond it, and they all thought of themselves is carrying forward to abolition struggle in the next generation in this new abolition context, but you can't call it that I mean, they do agree that recant, Paul, it the new abolition movement are we'll never get southern chapter. I mean that's just inherently threatening in the south that will just be condemned to be this northern organization. We do that. And the ends up adopt. Eating this actually fairly clunky name that they never really thought was going to be at forever more, they kept arguing about how should we rename this thing for years,.

Alexander Walter afro American League afro American Council Reverend ransom Paul Booker T
"afro american" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"afro american" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"We're all said, I wish mayor Pugh former mayor Pugh the best speedy recovery, and hopefully, she will be able to get through the physical challenges and the emotional challenges in the the days ahead coming up next after the five thirty news will share with the interview with what she told the afro American newspaper, which I find very interesting. Yesterday as well. But it's you know, again, I don't know if the people say, it's sad. It's sad because they're concerned about the city, but once again, Frank it's the city voters the city voters continue to put the same kind of politician in office. And the names change the ideology does not this is one party rule. And when you have this kind of dominant one party, and this is why we see it time and time again, whether it's Catherine Pugh or whether it's Sheila Dixon to whether it's Stephanie Rawlings Blake at all. This is what happens when you elect the same kinds of individuals and ideology year in and year out, and if you really want change the city voters are going to have to take a deep long introspective look into what they want the city of Baltimore to be. Well, unfortunately, Baltimore City is pretty much the seat of poverty here in the state. And there are a lot of people in Baltimore City that are uneducated or under educated, and as the result of become ignorant of the of the background of a lot of individuals and don't go necessarily into their background to see who they are. Whether they're best suited for the city to lead the city, and it's unfortunate because education means a lot. When you're you're picking a a leader to to lead, whether it's city state or or country, and I think that that is one of the problems we they're just not enough people in Baltimore City who have done their homework who have educated themselves on on politics in Baltimore, the background of the individuals running it cetera. There are a lot of other problems too. But I think that is one of them. Surely, you look at it governor HOGAN reacting to the resignation of mayor, a former mayor Pugh saying, quote, it's the right decision as it was clear, the American no longer lead, effectively the federal and state investigations must and will continue to uncover it the facts HOGAN. So the city can now begin to move forward. But can it, you know, again with I I know hope springs. Attornal? I just think unfortunately, we're going to get more of the same. I don't mean that at of disrespected to Jack young, but you know, at the same time, this is what happens in a dominant one party rule jurisdictions. We've seen it in Vienna. We've seen in Cook County Chicago not that it is again, the Democrats are the only party to suffer. This kind of thing you can happen to Republicans on has happened to Republicans as well, you need these checks and balances you need people that are able to hold people's feet to the fire. Now, the interesting thing here is that we have a state investigation federal FBI IRS, Catherine Pugh as we've said all along may just be typically iceberg with his self-dealing stuff. That's been going on at the board, and perhaps go there, there might be much deeper corruption that gets a uncovered by the by the feds here. So we'll have to wait Nancy. Join us with your thoughts your reaction as well for ten WC VM six eighty would you like you've heard from mayor Pugh herself. Would did you think that you know, again that would have brought you some closure or did it really matter at all. And we'll tell you what she told the afro American newspaper about, you know, again, still at the very end in denial as to what happened to a former mayor Pugh five twenty nine.

Baltimore City Catherine Pugh mayor Pugh afro American newspaper Stephanie Rawlings Blake governor HOGAN Sheila Dixon Vienna Nancy Cook County Chicago Frank Jack young FBI IRS
"afro american" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"afro american" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Of things that have been built into the system, which I've taken away the discretion that good judges would use in order to agenda. The judge pardon me, my office judge had discretion all of those several judges do exercise his discretion to the benefit of Manafort. And he does not he's a judge that has historically been known to rule and a. Disparate manner when it comes to black versus white rich versus poor defendants. So it's not about just being nice. And and wanting to rule effectively we don't have enough blacks on the bench and the federal bench, particularly because they are appointed recommended by the president and confirmed by the Senate, we don't have any blacks in the Senate that are fighting to make sure that we can preserve and integrate the federal bench and many state levels. They use a marriage selection rather than election of judges has Robin Jackson continues to say, we don't even vote. Genucel phone. Remember push coalition. Let me say that we'll have enough blacks in the Senate who will fight this fight, right? Is Corre book of finding it. Finding in Scotland the house I despite the. But on the Senate side. Scott. Oh. Okay. Well, I'm saying even Senator Scott from South Carolina makes them so. Dan too close to a book. I haven't had triggers of getting yet called the burden Afro-American. The impact of flavor. The thirteenth amendment leaves us gap open, right? We'll be acceptable. In the prison opens the the the gateway for for prisons as a former labor. I was in Jerusalem in Montgomery last week. In eighteen seventy four was seventy two percent of Alabama state budget. Driven by leasing prisoners of the whole budget. Unbelievable. And you know, what there's twenty fourteen university of Michigan study on racial disparities in federal criminal sentences had found out that prosecutors were seventy five percent more likely to seek a charge. That included a mandatory minimum sentence for black suspects..

Senate Senator Scott Robin Jackson university of Michigan Manafort Corre president Scotland South Carolina Dan Alabama Jerusalem Montgomery seventy five percent seventy two percent
"afro american" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"afro american" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We wanted an afro American heart. And we wanted an art that would fight blackheart. Poems are. Unless they are teeth are trees are lemons piled on a step. This was a step further. A new address to America that f- American people would no longer be ten to the decisions and the predisposition of America white racists, America. Flesh and coursing blood music made that a metaphor that. No. We don't wanna have ten alley chord changes. We wanna plaque. When people like weren't it began to insist that they no longer needed those guidelines the question of a black aesthetic had to do with a revolutionary of steady all black people, speak this poem. Silently. Did you think that jazz was revolutionary? Yeah. Sure, it has Sheridan's. Jazz vocalist. Dee Dee Bridgewater because we were taking musical forms and setting them and changing them up, and we were just trying to create our own voices and not be defined by the powers that be. Monarchy. Speaking to step that was atonal for the regular ear. Baraka thank mislead about the importance of James Brown as well as cultural. Was real important. James brown. I'd say it was almost singularly the artists always talked about our blackness. They allow laughing. I'm I mean, he he. Was our. Unified us. Musically. Basically black show me your black..

James Brown Dee Dee Bridgewater America Sheridan Baraka
"afro american" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"afro american" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That we wanted an afro American heart. And we wanted an art that would fight blackheart. Poems are. Unless they are teeth are trees are lemons piled on a step. This was a step further. A new address to America that African American people would no longer be ten to the decisions and the predisposition of America white racists, America. Flesh and coursing music made that a metaphor that. No. We don't wanna have ten alley chord changes. We wanna plaque. Then people like weren't at began to insist that they no longer needed those little guidelines depression of a black aesthetic had to do with a revolutionary of steady all black people speak. This poem silently. Did you think that jazz was revolutionary? Yeah. Sure, it has Sheridan's. Jazz vocalist. Dee Dee Bridgewater because we were taking musical forms and setting them in changing them up, and we were just trying to create our own voices and not be defined by the powers that be. Monarchy speaking to stop that was a tunnel for the regular ear. Barack thank mislead. James Brown as well as Coltrane. Was real important. James brown. I'd say it was almost singularly the artist always talked about blackness. I mean, he he. This was our. Unified us musically. Black show.

Dee Dee Bridgewater America James Brown Barack Sheridan Coltrane
"afro american" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"afro american" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Bobby seal was born on October twenty second nineteen thirty six and Dallas, Texas, the oldest of three children his father carpenter struggled to make ends meet. And when Bobby was eight the family left taxes for California seeking a better life. The seals were just a few of the millions of African Americans who left the south as part of the great migration, they wound up in Oakland. Joining the growing black community there at eighteen seal dropped out of high school and enlisted in the air force. He lasted three years until he got kicked out for fighting a commanding officer seal was court martialled than dishonorably discharged. He was told. He had just five minutes to get off the base he replied, when are you going to do with the other formats and fifty nine seconds because it won't take me any time to get away from here. Seal return to Oakland where he worked in a sheet. Metal factory by day and finished his high school degree at night. Seal sought to continue as education at Oakland's Merritt college, a seemingly. Ordinary decision that would have a major impact on the civil rights movement in the early nineteen sixties at Merritt college seal stood out he was outspoken, political and anti-authority he immersed himself in black nationalist literature studying the teachings of Malcolm X and joined the afro American Association one day during a rally in west Oakland CO came across another young black man making a name for himself on campus. Speaking to riveted group of about two hundred fifty students about the Cuban missile crisis. His name was Huey p. Newton Newton was born in nineteen forty two the seventh son of Louisiana sharecropper, and Baptist preacher. He was named after Huey P long. The populace Louisiana governor assassinated nineteen thirty five the Newton's like the seals wound off in Oakland. As part of the great migration there Newton and Seale shared, a mutual respect and bonded over their commitment to radical black activism, they fought to get black studies. And other afro Centric courses at into the Merritt college curriculum and on October fifteenth nineteen sixty six they founded the Black Panther party for self defense. The previous year had been difficult for those in the civil rights struggle, Malcolm X had been assassinated on February twenty first nineteen sixty five shot twenty one times while addressing an audience in Manhattan the following month. Bloody Sunday occurred in Alabama hundreds of protesters marching from Selma to Montgomery were attacked at the Edmund Pettus bridge by state troopers who beat them with nightsticks and sprayed them with teargas though..

Bobby seal Oakland Newton Newton Merritt college Black Panther party Huey p Edmund Pettus bridge Malcolm X Louisiana Dallas California Texas carpenter afro American Association Alabama Selma Baptist