35 Burst results for "Afro"

How Spanish Composers Influrnced Latin America

Classics for Kids

02:03 min | 1 d ago

How Spanish Composers Influrnced Latin America

"After christopher columbus made his first trip across the atlantic ocean spain and other european countries began to colonize the americas. Spanish music had a big influence on latin american music. And so did the music of the enslaved people who were brought over from africa one of the first places columbus landed in fourteen. Ninety two was cuba. Nineteenth century violinist. Jose white lafitte had a spanish father and an afro-cuban mother whites composition that they yaqoob ana the beautiful. Cuban uses dance rhythms from haiti and the dominican republic on the island of hispaniola twentieth century. Cuban composer and missile. The owner was a pianist. That's lik wound up performing his most famous piece. My leg ania which is a spanish dance. Kunas family was full of musicians including his great nephew. Leo brouwer leo. Brouwer was guitarist until he hurt his right hand even after he had to stop playing. He kept on composing in fourteen. Ninety three columbus landed on the island. We call puerto rico spanish for rich port. The taino people who originally lived there called it. Land of the great lords in their language voted ken. Which is the title of this piece by. Puerto rican composer. Roberto ever

Jose White Lafitte Yaqoob Ana Christopher Columbus Atlantic Ocean Americas Kunas Columbus Spain Leo Brouwer Hispaniola Cuba Dominican Republic Africa Haiti Brouwer Puerto Rico KEN Puerto Rican Roberto
How Are the Latinx Community Represented on TV

Latino USA

02:00 min | Last month

How Are the Latinx Community Represented on TV

"Latino and latina representation in film and television is an age old conversation topic and despite some recent milestones. The numbers are still pretty disappointing. According to a recent study by the la times latinos and latinas are underrepresented across all aspects of television and film productions despite making up nearly twenty percent of the us population that dino's and latina's constitute only six percent of main cast members less than nine percent of writers seven percent of directors and six percent of senior executives. The presence of african and indigenous latinos in the industry is even smaller but statistics can only tell us so much how latino individuals and communities are portrayed. Onscreen is another part of the conversation. That's why today we're taking you behind the scenes with two award winning latino creators were breaking stereotypes about how our communities are depicted on television. Stephen canals and linda evatt charges. My name is steven canals. I am co-creator executive producer writer and director of the f. Extra series pose. The category is hosed centers. The black and latin queer and trans individuals who are part of the new york city. Underground ballroom community as they are navigating the difficulties of the hiv as and crack epidemic of the eighties and early nineties. Stephen was born and raised in the bronx to an afro. Puerto rican mother and an african american dad. He made history when posed premiered in twenty eighteen featuring the largest cast of transgender actors in tv history

La Times Stephen Canals Linda Evatt Dino Steven Canals United States New York City Bronx Puerto Rican Stephen
What Separates Peru From the Rest of South America?

Travel with Rick Steves

02:17 min | 2 months ago

What Separates Peru From the Rest of South America?

"With rick steves with an insider look at how peru stands out from the rest of south america. It's where author and journalist. Marie arana grew up before her bicultural family moved to the us. She writes about her identity in her book. American teacup read. Thanks for joining us. Thank you so much. Rik good to be here. I'm just really excited for you to be my tour guide because is country. I know very little about before we get into this discussion about the people of peru. Just give us a quick one paragraph description of your homeland you know for a country that's the size of roughly the size of california not much bigger. It's an astonishing place because it has just every kind of land form you can imagine. Rick it has the coast it has the desert it has the jungle it has the mountain has the planes. It has all of that and if you fly over peru this is amazing to me you go from one land form to another land form just in the course of a few seconds. It's it's really astonishing place geographically when you compare peru to the other south american countries. How would the people of peru see themselves Compared to the countries that surround them. Well you know we are an andean nation and the andean nations are of course colombia and ecuador and bolivia these are the the spine of the andes of course runs through the whole continent. But we are. We call ourselves and ian people because we are a mix honesty so mix of indigenous and white and black in a very different proportion. Shall we say to. The people of venezuela which are are less india less indigenous more more black and the colombians as well which has a much larger population of blacks than we do improve we do have afro peruvian along the coast who have been there for hundreds and hundreds of years but we are distinguished. I think by our indian ness. And i think that you know the people of argentina. The people of that people are why they come. They come up to peru and they're they're struck by the truly indian culture that we have okay so when you say

Peru Marie Arana Rick Steves RIK South America Rick California Bolivia Ecuador Colombia United States IAN Venezuela India Argentina
The Year In Hip-Hop (So Far)

Rolling Stone Music Now

02:24 min | 3 months ago

The Year In Hip-Hop (So Far)

"You're going to talk about the year in hip hop so far. Were actually half way in to the year so we can look back. We already ran a list overall of the best albums of twenty twenty one so far but it seemed like a good time to look back just at rap stuff. Macher for you specifically. Maybe we should start with your two picks. Your personal picks for song of the summer sure. Yeah and interestingly enough. The songs that have really started to define my season is getting out a little bit more feeling a little bit safer to be out in the world those two songs. I'm hearing the most and hearing the most excitement. Abou- have actually been out since october their essence by whiz kid featuring thames who is A lot of folks newt know whiz kid as sort of afropop star from nigeria. Thames is the burgeoning star from nigeria. As well other song is quicksand by marais who is from north carolina stern driving around more hearing them on the radio and seeing debates on twitter about dj's not playing essence at parties as much as they should and both of them are really capturing sort of the levity that comeback for some people you know. Yeah i saw a dj saying that in three months people were going to be saying like can you please stop playing essence. Because he's playing it so much so it's definitely it's definitely out there. I mean what is it about those those two songs for your well with essence i think it s body right like it's laid back it has afro-caribbean feel to it feels very summary intil. Quicksand is a little bit more uptempo. It's fun but it has these guitars. That have the summary field and marais is like singing rapping in this really interesting cadence and has a really strong beautiful voice and it's just a really cool ballot of storytelling and whenever i'm at cookouts are at parties kickbacks like those are the songs i know want to hear

Macher Nigeria Abou Marais Thames North Carolina Twitter Caribbean
In The Heights and Colorism

In The Thick

02:17 min | 3 months ago

In The Heights and Colorism

"We're gonna talk about colors in latino and latina communities and yes. It's a conversation that was brought to the forefront last week after the release of the film in the heights. It's a movie. Adaptation of the broadway musical of the same name written by yada allegria hueys of politic prize winning playwright and the playwright enactor. Linneman will meet under so in the heights takes place well in washington heights were actually of course alexis joining us from it's predominantly dominican neighborhood. It's predominantly afro latino neighborhood but you know. I actually spent three years in washing deep from one thousand nine hundred eighty three to nineteen eighty six eighty seven. Those were interesting times most. Definitely i mean. I was on one seven one in fort washington and it was very dominican. Mind roommate was dominican but he was also. I was like i mean. Our parties were massive. Highway wait are parties were massive. Oh yeah i was hanging out with like letty. No phd's academics from columbia from city college and refugees and activists so people from inside by from nicaragua from cheer from tina from coup. All of these people were living in washington heights at the time. What i'm saying is that it's a community. What was incredibly vibrant and yes diverse in the sense that lengthy knows were staking their claim. They're predominantly dominicans better. They must felt safe living in that community. It was a latino community predominantly right right and we know even beyond washington heights. The afro latino population in this country is actually pretty significant. According to the pew research center in twenty sixteen when this came out approximately twenty five percent of all. Us latinos identifies afro latino afro-caribbean or of african descent with roots and latin america. So if you think about twenty five percent of sixty million people that's a pretty significant population and in another pew study from two thousand and nineteen five percent of all black. Americans identified as for latino which was a figure that doubled since two thousand

Yada Allegria Linneman Washington Heights Fort Washington Alexis Letty Nicaragua Tina Columbia Washington Pew Research Center Caribbean Latin America United States
"afro" Discussed on The Know Show

The Know Show

07:57 min | 3 months ago

"afro" Discussed on The Know Show

"In the from. Do care with which is below a the caribbean also. It's like kind off. Caribbean region but the molten start in the andean mountains. Any the chronicler the start the goal was identified and they cannot say found because doug owed was already being exploited treated by great civilisations indigenously. They say shows were vital. Air when they colonize arrived but when the colonize arrived date practically destroyed society. I cannot say that they disappear because many of them does runaway to an hide and she to even still today we can find in which are the descendants on the people who exploited entries gold and coal to also the golden because it was all related with religious ed usage and issues. Stop there so you can ask another so. This is a very interesting point because of connects to one of the research papers that you did on Following the lives of four women who had come from africa and Come to come to be forced to it in in the gold mines so took us a little bit about the journey of these women and and and so what what. What did you experience when you in the study. Different questions you can start you. Give us a bit of a background about about the women and their story okay. So the women surprised me a lot. Since the beginning of the research was the fact that four gold mines you know some very strong and harsh work the amount of women trophy kid of african. We mean the traffic who was the same as me. And then when you start digging in. Did you identified that. The women were to do exactly the same work as men so imagining so so and also because our bodies are lake air theme that the man's body they used them to enter into the caves and look for the gold and also excavated also deaths horrible and many of them arrived in fact to ask a being a children's so imagine being dusty sending the yield. The air from i m doing the. Es started to dig of course in africa communication. There's the work specialty of phobic green. Which is the one of the most recent but also many off of the he historians from west africa sign now the fact that the people were captured in specially children in first period often slave trade. So this is probably were captured. Make an all the weapons or the whippings. And they were captured brought to bend. And in any any day a piece of lemans derek wall sway used reproduced this labor. So that was the biggest thing justice that the a couldn't have meet Many of the kids just taking away from them and just after giving the music and they race to us on as many of them did not even have any kind of relationship with their children so they were also massively rate and their reproductive off-day the of the slavery and that is why they reacted. Of course the that's not alive since any anyone wants to leave and there received were so strong so strong so strong along the period that you cannot save that they they call me sation. Procyclical was a success. Eat has so many flaws it has so many lacks it. Ease it has. Many breach do reached that what we're leaving. Today's columbia all that polity call and and sociology commies is related to those industries in the past dozen. Incredible so you say they start this resistance. How this resistant. Stop in what wait this. Is this this historic start. Every that i study because there were so many resistance as i can say that in columbia that monroe communities were more than one hundred by dating century. So it's huge. So i'm going to talk you talk to your end. Most that i that history of groping has studied are the resistances indicate the hand problems which was set probings. Whose company told wes diana port but the regards also to the south. I decided to do to study. Another a rest- resistance into lines which started in particularly in antioch carolina's which started in fifteen ninety seven. The african population started to be introducing fifteen. Eighteen say so you see the same africans that arrived trombone reward. Do who let that be can take antique revolt. A general revolt which has not been studied onto now onto this research by the part of history owner iffy and these shows also the lack of interest to the large off. These people people that easy. Still leaving in some human competitions eanet yogyakarta hannah they had wandering so so it's it's a same region and in fact of force to gold was driving a a all around the undo care of katrina hanging out to reach the caribbean and central spain. So that the fact that there's no any with search that surprised me a lot of time than dedicated to that big revolt of fifteen ninety seven. How does it start running away runaway massively of the documents that almost one thousand people it which in the period imagine they was just a like a phone our little foundation of the spaniards in place and then to have one thousand people running away and development maroon community. I'm very strong american community and the latest finding that i have also developed eat Developing as a result of my post doctoral degree is the fact that they had better strategies for the mind for the gold mining. An need to it's because they came from sierra leone where mean many occasions they were also a the activities related we take golding they go in that period is your audio and the issue was that there is they've holders. They rely copley in.

africa west africa Eighteen today Today columbia central spain more than one hundred katrina sierra leone one thousand people one caribbean diana port Caribbean region africans african hannah doug owed first period
"afro" Discussed on The Know Show

The Know Show

08:46 min | 3 months ago

"afro" Discussed on The Know Show

"You're like you said is is not grateful for for this. African influence in well saying effect is very earning my life because of the capital. Bogota all them hat of and the nanny handle sold. The personal were to aid in domestic services are all afro descendants. Any in the purely which. I was a child that we aegis and a the woman who who helped racing me who wasn't indigenous woman from his. How they're part of the country was off from the older woman you know and i had a very straight in powerful relationship with here and seeing the has developed. I was seen as cool of all white people. I was like all the term question. You're gonna come from very Coming say questioning family which is all the time trying to understand our realities solo. Season was a key to. I start to a. I learned to ask questions and to develop my mind. So i can say that from the beginning of my life i had these. And when they enter to apology as As some be day deeds in the national home university a i you started to be searching on after the symptoms because it will also dancing a lot in the university and all the music for and also mutations that are now report times were like drumming in some places Adversity or whatever our as to scene which is one of the best tim. Uc shots on singers from the air. From the caribbean and day. She a reconized. Our three like a tripod important steelers that had our music which is the african dane dejan end also day the arabic it means he county music coming from the middle east to because eh that's much more important that than the h- european music because we have all the migration strong migration off from the middle east during the period of eugene and that is different from the other countries because saying russell there were lots of europeans but they Sue to teyat saccone nuts to important they send people from syria and from not from germany as ending rescue so that makes that fusion of music careening worth of columbia. So as you see all my my research. Career is related to music. I see i can tell on an continuously to be part in your life is fascinating that you say. The there's like a tripartite foundation to music being indigenous in arabic. I didn't realize arabic was such a big influence in in columbia. Surprised if accent yourself is from is from. The lebanese migrants has also is also turkish migrants. Syria migrants Sank to you. Many are means from the period of the armenian genocide and does saw well. i think that's from ethnicities that are almost each of your oral. Lisa silencing correct periods boeing announced remember adult so gypsies ducey's were also very important because they didn't know where to send the sees so they looked for some races we should not out so a rather unto reporting sense of cutting lots of on it copy tower so they chose columbia and arrival poem at yes. It's very important also in the in the cooking you know. We have a lot tough cooking especially the caribbean because of course they arrived to the caribbean and many of the people from the middle east stating caribbean especially in the cut. The hannah byron keys is fascinating a had no idea by some really interesting stuff so you from from relatively young age you develop this sense of awareness of of the injustices of the past and how they've sort of been swept under the rug in society. So how did you sort of shape your your academic studies when you go into phd. What what did you start off with for a look. Meatless can be the master should because the message was really important from a for me when they king to to further their knowledge of african history due to the fact of although drumming today the lamentable than you seek amy in columbia in the caribbean and the pacific alad stay versity so i applied to mexico to. They equate hear me. He could worry the masters she because it was trying to maintain myself in the south a or in the southern realities because supports makes increase is his but it was very interesting idea that domestic shipping african studies anti i deep in. I was able to deep in the evening in there. He started are also on services I realized how they can which period state came. That was you in the from. The sixteen barrier lead was one of the colonies in which they africans arrived. I because of the contractors off a gold in uganda and encounters of silver either to cost to arrived to. They need to stop the he now or in panama and then go then low to the pacific islands of a of the st region. A dead also that particularity off this late trading a to columbia staff. He stopped at very early so basically by the end of the well. The beginning of the eighteenth century is just talked so while in brazil wasn't you'll meet the nineteenth century that and to our also africa which kind of was stoked in columbia. Who are right. Might do day half those expressions on not others and i continued in deadline. I i talked for lots of years. Also a i talked to a started to be very interested in reality sending the development of roseanne proposals on the academic arena for the african history. And that is why. I i worked to save for the To develop they teaching off the law of two thousand and three and then later two thousand eight that compelled all universities in school to teach african history as one of their tripods of course of residence. -ociety i worked a lot tylar coal so for a in my community almost a working inc renamed didactic materials. Were to eat lung. Desensitization you russell. And that's why. I went there to do my phd. Which was then an advancement off my master sheep in which i decided to study specifically specifically the region off the goldmines. Why the gold line's because it was the first lays to In which the africans were were sent Especially.

uganda brazil panama columbia two thousand Syria germany syria nineteenth century Bogota hannah byron lebanese africa ociety pacific islands mexico eighteenth century afro today first lays
"afro" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 5 months ago

"afro" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That is Omar Sosa, the Afro Cuban pianist based these days in Barcelona from his new album, although it was recorded over 10 years ago called East African Journey, and the East African Country that you heard represented in this track is Ethiopia. Sileshi Dem assay. Who's a pretty well known player of the cross are the traditional five string Ethiopian liar. He also sang Omar Sosa playing piano leading a small ensemble. The song is called Susaeta. Prior to that, a song from an album called Comorian. We are an Island but we are not alone a record by two musicians from the Camaras islands in the Indian Ocean. Mahdi and Sue be billed and play these double sided box guitars very similar to some of the sisters of Madagascar. The song we heard was called My Friends went abroad and were swallowed by the waves. Immigration from the camaras, especially by raft is common and often has tragic endings. And that song written in memory of some of Mahdi's own friends who died in the Indian Ocean. At the beginning of the set. We heard the South African group called Africa Mama's. Their new record is called Ilunga and This is a group of single mothers from the town of Durban in South Africa, the city of Durban. And we heard a song called Lone EPA. New releases. All that's what we're doing on tonight's edition of new Sounds as we do towards the end of each month, Another new release from the month of April comes from enough, Kanawa. Although they're based in Brooklyn, they play their own innovative take on Kanawa music from Morocco. The cannolis are the traditional musical healers and Kind of trance. Leaders of Moroccan music and from their new album, called Leela will hear a track called El Gaba..

Mahdi Omar Sosa Brooklyn Barcelona Sue Morocco Durban El Gaba Comorian Ilunga Madagascar Afro Cuban five string April Indian Ocean two musicians Africa Mama's Ethiopian over 10 years ago South Africa
A Rising Tide of Violence Against Environmental Activists

Short Wave

01:52 min | 5 months ago

A Rising Tide of Violence Against Environmental Activists

"Want to start today's episode with a speech from francia marquez. An afro colombian environmental activists indian in two thousand eighteen. She won the goldman environmental prize for central and south america and that's the biggest prize out there for grassroots environmental activists. Yeah it's sometimes called the green nobel's sucralose audio's don't they move quilon talking about her community in columbia letaba francia pauses to collect. This is a place where illegal gold mining was booming. A few years ago where miners were coming in and polluting local water sources with harmful chemicals and in response fronts organized eighty women to march in protest bogota the capital a journey of three hundred fifty miles. I mean that's a three hundred fifty miles. That's far that can help us. But through theon delo rio's francios as someone who has tirelessly fought illegal mining on her industrial land. But at great personal cost she says we are taught to love and value our land and to fight for charter. Podcasting includes poignant. Andrea's going mr appropriate even if it means putting our own lives at risk. That's the sentence i wanna pay attention to. Because the lives of environmental and land activists are increasingly at risk. An international ngo global witness has documented a rise in the murder and disappearance of environmental and land activists. In recent years they documented two hundred twelve murders in two thousand nineteen and one third of those murders. Were in colombia. Where fancy lives

Francia Marquez Letaba Francia Theon Delo Rio Goldman South America Bogota Columbia Andrea Colombia
Exploring Gender With Dr. Gee

Therapy for Black Girls

02:00 min | 5 months ago

Exploring Gender With Dr. Gee

"Thank you so much for joining us today. Dr g and q. It's a pleasure to be in conversation with you. yes it is. I'm so glad that you were able to squeeze into your schedule. And i would love for you to start bunches telling us a little bit about yourself as well as your practice. And what brought you into the field of psychology. Sure allegra-d delight to warm first generation afro-caribbean gender queer being and i am a writer. I'm a psychologist public speaker of british chaplain. I always tell people if it's something to do with women as if it's about liberation than that's what i center and that's what i do so. My clinical practice focuses much on the liberation of by poc and lgbtq mines and so that will look like somatic work. Existential work afro-centric work when i do a lot of trauma or work and they've been doing backer last over fifteen years at this point. We just stopped counting after ten. Yeah so a lot of people who find their way to me seem to be change. Makers activists men people who really appreciate the process of growth and transformation in their own lives but intergenerational. You know i'm always so inspired by how people in psychology how to just make their own spaces in like figure out how to use what we've been taught but then transform it you know we're communities that are not typically what we're trained on so i would love to hear like how you've been able to kind of do continuing education or other work that has allowed you to like expand your practice in this way. I feel like a was really blessed for the school. That i went to i went to the chicago school professional psychology and chicago and they were so community based and so from there. Learn to just go to the community to learn about whomever and what what wasn't covered in school.

Dr G British Chaplain Caribbean Chicago School Professional Ps Chicago
William Grant Still: The Afro-American Symphony

Classics for Kids

02:13 min | 6 months ago

William Grant Still: The Afro-American Symphony

"Today we're going to play musical hide and seek with the symphony number one. The afro american symphony by william grant still for his first symphony still wanted to compose music. That reflected the america. He knew one of stills earliest jobs was with. wc handy's famous blues band so he wanted to put the sound of the balloons into his symphony. You may have heard people say that they feel blue. When they're sad. Musical blues are about feeling sad and also have to do with blue notes in music. The word blue means changing certain pitches in a scale which changes the mood of the piece. William grant stills afro. American symphony is based on the blues e little melody. You just heard here. It is again. This time played by a clarinet when the composer takes a bit of melody and builds a larger piece around it. The bid of melody is called a theme in the afro american symphony. The theme sounds different sometimes. Very different in each of the four movements or sections of the symphony now for the hide and seek. You know that when you're playing that game sometimes people are easy to find. And sometimes they're hard to find the same thing with teams in the second movement of the symphony. The theme is easy to find. I the oboe plays it then. More instruments get into the act. But the oboe has the last word

William Grant Jobs America
Morgan Freeman quote

Bald and Blonde

01:53 min | 6 months ago

Morgan Freeman quote

"And now i'd like to give you another great example how to not take things personally because it has to do with our own stuff in quotes i call it also our sore points what you refer to as triggers the trigger is something that's coming from the outside world and what does it trigger. It triggers an old wound. That's never really healed. Yes and morgan. Freeman great actor. And of course i feel fond of him because he was one of the main actors in the movie driving miss daisy and of course. I'm kind of fun of him. He was interviewed by journalists from austria regarding discrimination and disadvantage of afro americans here in the united states and the abstract that i'm referring to end the book is solely meant to be viewed. Psychologically regarding hurts and the sore points. So i'm going to read it as i voted my book. She the journalist. What happens when i say you are black. He morgan freeman nothing. She why not he. What happens if i call you. Austrian stupid cow. She nothing he why not she. I don't feel it does address to me. He see me neither she. Is that the trick to not take. It personally addressed he. Yes you call me black then you had the problem and not me because you are using the wrong word by me not feeling it address towards me. I am leaving you alone with your problem. Now that's powerful us wise men. He

Change Self Sabotage Manifestation Transformation Mental Health Personal Development Mindset Freeman United States Austria Austrian Three Afro Americans One Of The Main Actors New Zealand Morgan Morgan Freeman
Faketinas

Locatora Radio

05:02 min | 7 months ago

Faketinas

"Get started with. I think this person or this story broke during the summer. it's kinda hard to tell now with the pandemic. what time is like but one other prominent ones that i remember seeing that wino- was flooding. Our timeline was the story of jessica. Craig aka or formerly known as jess la. Barletta cringe already awesome early known formerly known best. I'm about that. Let's get started. Let's talk about her. Yes so this woman has allegedly and apparently apparently been taking on different like black and afro sport identities throughout her life. She's an a professor or was a professor and academic where george washington university and university teaching. You know black studies are afrikaner studies and publishing books but at some point she were shifting from being in a north african to being african american and then being afro latin next sand after boaty gua was i think the final landing place for her her official forum her final warm so jessica. Krog just aka justifiable maleta hers combination of black fishing and being a fake tina at the same time and She got called out basically rightfully so rightfully so by a group of professors who are after latina's who had issues with her they were witness to or on the receiving end of like aggression from her and like prejudice and bad behavior while she was masquerading as after let nine different contexts. Apparently being super like belligerent towards black women in my on cool and really I think overcompensating and so trying to be an ex sorted extreme caricature of like this south bronx like her. Allegedly her mother was like a drug addicts prostitutes like this narrative that should created about herself so black women in the academy you know began talking about these different experiences and came forward and said This is not right. Yeah she was definitely performing like whoa kness being extreme radical like it was very performative. She was a published academic author and she also received a ton of accolades rice. She received she was a finalist. For the twenty twenty frederick douglass prize book prize presented by yale's gilder lehrman center the study of slavery resistance and abolition. She also was nominated or a finalist for the twenty thousand nine. Harriet tubman book prize and just received a ton of accolades has really been propelled or was propelled forward and questionably hired because of not solely for her identity. But because of the work she was doing and also the way. She positioned herself as offer latino or body gua and it's very cringe to think about all of the opportunities she stole from actual author. Latinas boras caribbean women. That are doing if not the same work or better work you know. And so it's that was probably one of the first ones that we saw. And then i think it kind of just opened up the floodgates for a lot of others than i don't know about you ma. But in my chicano studies department at uc santa barbara. There were a couple of fake denies that i will not name. They were not. They weren't anyone that i took like. I didn't take any classes with them but they were around. People talked about them. People knew like this person is very white claims this this cheek. Ghana mohican identity. You know is wide. Skin blue is performing she gun. You know some kind of ghana identity wearing that. I had because with the free that carlo ecstatic the whole thing right and it's like you like i they weren't. They were my peers. I was a student right. But i have friends that were graduate students. And they would tell me about these. Things happen. And in their cohort or in their in their seminars. And so you know. I think if if you've been in academia right. I haven't been to grad school. But i was an undergrad but i've i've definitely seen the fake tina's around so they definitely exists and i think this one opened the floodgates for a ton of

Craig Aka Jess La Boaty Gua Krog Jessica Barletta Yale's Gilder Lehrman Center George Washington University South Bronx Tina Latinas Boras Frederick Douglass Harriet Tubman Ghana Caribbean Santa Barbara Carlo Academia
Malcolm X's Family Push to Uncover the "Truth" behind His Death

Democracy Now! Audio

06:37 min | 7 months ago

Malcolm X's Family Push to Uncover the "Truth" behind His Death

"The. Fbi and new york. Police departments are facing new calls to finally open their records related to the assassination of malcolm x. Shocked at fifty six years ago at the audubon ballroom and harlem february twenty first nineteen sixty five. This comes after the release of a deathbed confession of a former undercover new york police officer who admitted to being part of a broad new york police and fbi conspiracy targeting malcolm in the confession the former officer. Raymond would who died last year admitted he entrapped to members of malcolm security team and another crime. A plot to blow up the statue of liberty just days before the assassination. On saturday ray woods cousin. Reggie would read the letter at a news conference at the shabazz center in harlem assignment to draw the two men into a felonious federal crime so that they could be arrested by the fbi and kept away from managing malcolm. X's audubon ballroom door security on february twenty first nineteen sixty five in his letter. Raymond would also revealed. He was inside the audubon ballroom. At the time of malcolm's assassination at least one other undercover new york police officer. Gene roberts was also inside after infiltrating the security team of the organization of afro american unity. The group malcolm founded after leaving the nation of islam. Both officers would and roberts were part of the bureau of special services and investigations or bossie. A secret of political intelligence unit of the nypd nicknamed the red squat welcomes assassination. Police arrested three members of the nation of islam. His murder but questions about the guilt of the men have lingered for decades in his letter. Raymond would openly says one of the men. Thomas johnson was innocent and was arrested to quote. Protect my cover and the secrets of the fbi and the nypd unquote ray woods letter. Echoes claims and recent books by manning marable and less pain that some of malcolm's actual assassins were never charged in a moment. We'll be joined by raymond. Woods cousin reggie would released his deathbed confession. But i i want to turn to the words of malcolm x. Himself speaking after his home in queens was firebomb just a week before his assassination february fourteenth. Nine thousand nine hundred sixty five by house was bombed. It was bound by the muslim movement. On the orders of aligned to mohammed. Now they hit come around so they had planned to do it from the front. End the back so that i couldn't get out. They had they. They covered the complete the door then they had come to the back but instead of getting directly in back of the house in this way they stood at a forty five degree angle and talk with the windows so it it glance and onto the ground and the fire hit the window woke up my second oldest baby and then the fire burn on the outside of the house but it had had that one going through that window it would have fallen on a six year old girl a four year old girl and a two year old girl. And i'm gonna tell you if it had done it. Taken my wrangling going to anybody insight. I would not wait. Goes in the senate because this the police know the criminal operation of the black muslim movement because they have thoroughly infiltrated because they have thoroughly infiltrated it. Those are the words of malcolm x. Right before his assassination right after his home was firebombed in february of nineteen sixty five just days later he was shot seconds after he took the stage at the ballroom. We're joined now by reggie. Would the cousin of raymond would author of the new book. The ray which story confessions of a black nypd cop in the assassination of malcolm x. Still with us. Civil rights attorney. Ben crump who attended that news conference with Reggie wooden at the audubon ballroom now. The shabazz center where malcolm x was assassinated fifty six years ago. Reggie thank you so much for joining us. Use read parts of the letter this weekend. Talk about your cousin. Ray would and what you understand happened the conspiracy. He alleges that he was a part of by the fbi. And the new york police department to assassinate malcolm x. Morning thank you for having me ray was was a complicated man I think be based on his past experiences he he lived with a lot of fear and caution on a daily basis which instilled in me over the past ten years but are ray was a person that lived as a lived. He lived as a as a very quiet and reserved person because of what he experienced he witnessed some horrible things firsthand and also realized that he was a part of it after the fact and so therefore ray was told by his handlers. That not to repeat anything that he had seen or heard or he would Join malcolm therefore for forty six years. Ray separated himself from the family and In fear that he will put us in danger out rey lived alone many years and he Finally in his final years when he realized that he was his cancer was a reoccurring. He wanted to reconnect with family. Because he didn't want to die alone. So i volunteered to move them to florida so that my wife and i take care of them and get them back and forth cancer treatments things of that nature and therefore he trusted me enough to reveal this information and asked me not to say anything until he passed away but at the same time knox allow them to take it to his grave.

Malcolm Ray Woods FBI Audubon Ballroom Raymond New York New York Police Department Shabazz Center Gene Roberts Organization Of Afro American Bureau Of Special Services And Bossie Malcolm X Manning Marable Woods Cousin Reggie Reggie Thomas Johnson Harlem
An Expert's Guide To Curly Hair

You Beauty

04:33 min | 7 months ago

An Expert's Guide To Curly Hair

"Welcome to. I'm sharon hunt and this week's look dropped by. Guest is the incredible ruby aka the guru of curly and afro hair. Ruby is originally from zimbabwe but nowadays. She calls australia home. The originally self-taught stylist fell into hairdressing by accident. After witnessing friends and families struggle to find someone that understood this strands so she wound up doing it herself in her lounge room eventually she took up an apprenticeship began stalling out of multiple salons before finally opening up her own place. Rooming co in two thousand four room. Be thanks for dropping by. Thanks so much for having me sharing now. When i was a kid i distinctly remember being told if you ate all your crusts. Yo hey would go curly and i really badly wanted. Kelly has a you better believe i was gobbling down the crofton. I of course realize it was an old wives tale. That parents just tell you to eight year food. But i have to say. It's not the only myth that i've come across when it comes to curly hair. So why do you think there are. So many misconceptions about kohl's. I think something is misunderstood. There's a desire to want to make it a lot more palatable to each individual like answer for that very reason people come up with their own anecdotes around what this complex appendage actually is so people come up with so many things now yes i mean you told your cross for me. It was like eat your vegetables. And your hair is going to be straighter. You know what i mean like. Oh my gosh eating those so yeah. I think it's just because people really want to understand something that is complex and so yet this is where a lot of myths have come along and i hear them all the time. I've got lots of them to ask you about. Oh let's go. I guess to start with with. Kelly has to understand that. There's not just one type of co run us through just as an overview the different types of kohl's because you can tell by looking at someone calls not the same to the next. So why should you treat them the same one colleague on one hundred percent. So there's three curl types wavy curly in africa's how we sort of break down but then when you're looking at the typing system you've got type two which is wavy and that's lusa curls and there's three subcategories of that you've got to a to b to c and two c would be the tightest within that range and then you've got type three which is curly and within that again. Abc and c. And seeping tighter and then same thing for africa harrah's well after or coyly hair. Because i guess everyone who has coyly hair has an effort background. He is another curly myth. I've come across curly hair. Shampoos a marketing hype and normal shampoos worked. Fine let's start right there fact or fiction fact. They all marketing hive. Well okay no no no let me put it this way curly hair. People shouldn't shampoo their hair. That's a myth. Okay great stafa. Let's start there because that's actually. What's more commonly said trump who your hair. I've heard condition as well really. Yeah stop it. Maybe straight hair. How should you be carrying the curly hair. When it comes to washing its really simple. One of the things that i say to my clients often is you have to get rid of straight hair tendencies right. And how do you do that. It's just simplifying it. And which is part of what we do. We try and simplify everything for our clients. Because if you don't do that it's as though you're eating soup of the fork and that's gonna be very frustrating. And so how do you shampoo we take people through this whole process and it's like pretty much. Get the right shampoo first of all what you need to have the right product. Because not all sham periods would then be the same. Most shampoos actually stripped your hair. Which is why in some way. Yes don't shampoo your hair. I get with people. Come with that myth because it doesn't leave your hair as hydrated but then when you've got shampoo that is specifically designed for curly hair. It's supposed to cleanse but also hydrate to leave your hair feeling very moisturised. Soft supple and clean as well without streaky. Feel that you get when you get a deep cleansing shampoo

Sharon Hunt Kohl Kelly Zimbabwe Ruby Africa Australia Harrah ABC
Why Tech Companies Are Limiting Police Use of Facial Recognition

Short Wave

09:33 min | 7 months ago

Why Tech Companies Are Limiting Police Use of Facial Recognition

"All right emily kwong so. We're talking about this announcement from a string of tech companies that they are going gonna put limits on their facial recognition technology especially when it comes to law enforcement amazon microsoft and ibm yes on june eighth. Ibm said it would discontinue general purpose facial recognition or analysis software altogether. Get out of the business completely and it made an impression after. Ibm's big letter. Amazon announced a one year moratorium on sales of they're very popular software recognition spelled with a k. To law enforcement to give congress time to implement appropriate rules so a one year ban. Yes microsoft took it a step further saying it wouldn't sell products to law enforcement at all until a federal law is in place. Here's microsoft president. Brad smith speaking to the washington post we need to use this moment to pursue a strong national law to govern facial recognition that is grounded in the protection of human rights and for matali in conde who has been pushing for regulation changes in tech for years. This was a big deal when these words were coming out of silicon valley. She felt all of the feelings. My initial was thank god. Thank god i was. I was happy. I was pleased. I was optimistic. I was short of breath. I was exhausted. Tally is the ceo of ai. For the people a fellow at both harvard and stanford universities for her. These announcements shifted the conversation. But that's about it. So i'm pleased. It's got us incredibly far but we're by no means the woods not out of the woods because for all of the advancement and facial recognition systems. Still get it wrong. They'll incorrectly match folks what's called a false positive or fail to associate the same person to two different images of false negative. Yeah and what's vaccine. Is these errors are happening. More often. when the machines are analyzing dark-skinned faces and that can disproportionally affect already marginalized communities prone to unconscious bias at the hands of law enforcement leading to false accusations arrests and much worse so until there's action on this metallic said words just aren't enough gotcha. So let's unpack this a little bit. Let's talk about how biased gets into facial recognition systems in the first place. I'd love that okay. So it starts right with how the systems learn to do their jobs. A process known as machine learning so to make facial recognition systems engineers feed algorithms large amounts of what's called training data in this case. That would be pictures of human faces. Yes the way machines learn is that they repeat task again and again and again and again and again developing a statistical model for what a face is supposed to look like so if you wanted to teach the algorithm to recognize a man you'd put in like millions of pictures of men you got it. The machine will then measure the distance between the eyes on each picture the circumference of the nose for example the ear to measurement and over time the machine starts to be able to predict whether the next image it seeing is quote a man which sounds okay right here comes the but but the machine is only a smart as its training data so remember joy ghulam weenie who i mentioned at the top of the episode. Yeah the the mit yes. So she and her colleague timid gabe developed a way to skin color in these training sets and the two they looked at were overwhelmingly composed of lighter skinned subjects. Seventy nine percent for ibi dash a and eighty six percent. For etienne's these are two common data sets that were largely as joy. Put it pale and male. So basically the training data used to create these algorithms is not diverse. And that's how that bias gets in The diversity of human beings is not always being represented in these training sets and so faces outside the systems norm. sometimes don't get recognized. Here's matala explaining what the research meant to her. That goes back to this other issue of not just hiring but a bigger issue of those no one in the team to say that you haven't put all the faces you haven't put all the digital images of all human beings could look like in the way that they sharpen society in order to recognize these faces. And it's so. After realizing how unbalanced these training sets were joy intimidate decided to create their own with equality in race and gender to get a general idea of how facial ai systems performed with a more diverse population so basically they fed it more diverse pictures to to look at. Yeah it was kind of interesting. They used images from the top ten national parliaments in the world with women in power specific yes specifically picking african and european nations and they tested this new data against three different commercially available systems for classifying gender one made by ibm the second microsoft and the third by face plus plus an running these tests joint him knit found clear discrepancies gender and racial lines with darker skinned faces getting mis classified the most. Here's mut-ali again. So one of the things that joy blue armies amazing work looks. That is the coloration between short hair and gender so many many many black women with afros where mislabeled as men mis gendered because the system had trained itself to recognize short hair as a male trait and this research project mattie produced a massive ripple effect further studies legislation in december the national institute of standards and technology or nist published a big paper of its own testing one hundred eighty nine facial recognition algorithms from around the world and they found biases to looking at one global data set some algorithms in their study produced one hundred times more false positives with african and asian faces compared to eastern european ones and when tested using another data set of mug shots from the us. The highest false positives were found among american indians with higher rates in african american and asian populations again depending on the algorithm. Wow yeah that is not what you want from your data. And i'm guessing white. Men benefited from the highest accuracy rates. Yes they did now. The knicks study did conclude that the most accurate algorithms demonstrated far less demographic bias but for multi. This evidence of bias raises a bigger question about the ethics of relying on. Ai systems to classify and police at all the problem with ai. Systems machine learning is that they're really really really good at standard routine tasks and the issue with humans is that we are not standard. We're not routine. Were actually massively messy right. We're not the same but when a police officer searches face in the system. They're not making arrests based on just spat match alone are they. Oh absolutely not. Yeah it's a tool for identifying potential suspects but if you think about how there's already implicit bias in policing critics. A facial recognition are basically saying. It doesn't make sense to embrace technologies riddled with bias to right if all this research has shown. These tools are capable of misidentifying black people. We cannot use biometric tools that discriminate against a group of people who are ready discriminated against within the criminal justice system but policing most specifically mattie. When i first spoke to mut-ali in march she was open to moratoriums on facial. Recognition like amazon is doing buying time for these systems to improve regulations to be put in place but the protests have her views. Because why why am i being moderate with completely reimagined how we interact with technology so now she wants to see facial recognition banned from law enforcement use which some cities in the us have done. Moutallos has tried to push for legislation to outlaw discrimination in technology before but it seems like now people are paying attention and have a language for talking about structural racism that they just didn't have before whether why america listened to me or not. I was gonna continue with this work. I believe that technology should be an empowering force for all people and that's my work but now having old and new ala not just allies but co-conspirators bright. I'm so happy. Because i didn't think would happen in my lifetime and it's an it's

IBM Microsoft Emily Kwong Matali Amazon Ghulam Weenie Brad Smith Matala The Washington Post Stanford National Institute Of Standard Harvard Etienne Congress Gabe Mattie ALI Knicks
20 Years Later: How Dale Earnhardt's Death Changed NASCAR Forever

ESPN Daily

04:15 min | 8 months ago

20 Years Later: How Dale Earnhardt's Death Changed NASCAR Forever

"Ryan mcgee. Espn daily's chief. Paint trading correspondent. Thank you for joining me man. That's me man when i started. Espn a really really long. Time ago and i had this accent there were like. Hey you know about nascar right. I go yes you do. More than just know about nascar ryan you have now reported and narrated a new film for east sixty and it's called intimidator the lasting legacy of dale earnhardt. And i wanna talk to you about it today because it's a lot. It's about a lot more than how transcendent dale was on the track. It focuses on how he radically changed. Nascar's culture when it comes to safety but before we get into that. I do want you to just kinda sketch out for us. Who dale was for the uninitiated here and what made him such a towering figure in the nascar universe well and it's interesting because he's been gone twenty years i mean nascar's more than seven hundred races without del earnhardt and so for those of us of a certain age the idea of having to explain him and and why he's such a big deal seems insane but we saw what the last dance. The last dance ron's and half of twitter was like well. He was good. But you know this jordan character. Yeah we should know about it and we were so offended but bless their hearts. They didn't see him play. And so in this case you know. You have an entire generation twenty years exactly of sports fans who didn't see our heart race but it wasn't just about seventy six wins seven championships and also was just about the presence in the room. Always say with dell earnhardt if there was a thousand of us in a ballroom and we're all looking at a stage and he were to come in the back door when none of us were looking. We'd all instinctively. Just turn around because the air in the room changed. There was just a presence in a way that it carried himself and conducted his business and the intimidator thing that was legit. Every time i will. I know him. And every time i was in a room with him there was a little part of me. That was just trying not to say something stupid or pass out so on the back of the baseball card ryan so to speak. What are the accomplishments. That people should know about what dale did. Well the seventy six winds are really big deal but the seven championships and seventy plus year. The stockcar racing only three people one seven championships the checkered flag bands around their heat waves to them. That checkered card. His greatest success was on the super speedways. the taliban soup speedway and daytona he one thirty four racists and though tone national speedway thirty four nella one of those was the daytona five hundred and that was part of the appeal for him was even though he was this one tough customer and the man in black timid and all those things it took you twenty tries to finally win the daytona five hundred lawson in heartbreaking fashion multiple times twenty years frustration. Taylor that program names on the can't take it off. I guess i love it. He just he was in every man but he also of superman and that was always the appeal and outside of that ballroom. Full of the sports powerbrokers ryan. What was his status. Like regionally among the nascar faithful. How would you begin to describe what he meant to those people. What i hated it. Because when he came along in the late nineteen seventies. and you know it wasn't disrespect. But he didn't back down from. Richard petty from kailua from bobby allison from david pearson from any pissed them off the couldn't stand him and he would recommend a short track race. In martinsville and afro richer. Penn is electric. Listen kid you can't do it like this. And he just kept doing his way.

Nascar Ryan Mcgee Nascar Ryan Dale Espn Del Earnhardt Dale Earnhardt RON Jordan Dell Twitter Ryan Baseball Daytona Taliban Lawson Taylor Bobby Allison Richard Petty David Pearson
When Defending The Land Puts Your Own Life At Risk

Short Wave

03:30 min | 8 months ago

When Defending The Land Puts Your Own Life At Risk

"So emily why did you want to focus this story on. Columbia am the philippines. So remember that report i mentioned earlier. Yeah the one from global witness yes. So they're an ngo tracking threats against grassroots environmental actus subsistence farmers opposing mining tribal leaders condemning logging. Journalists lawyers organizers the un calls these folks environmental defenders and most of the murders that global witness documented took place in just two countries columbia and the philippines and in columbia indigenous communities are especially targeted. including the. Why you me known. His and nicole's piece this is on halacha or ortiz. A member of the y. You in northern colombia. In luck waheeda heater. We spoke over a secure video chat. She told me we raise our voice in defence of the territory and that the land is so much more than territories little walmart. It's wolman cup or mother. Earth where the why you pass on their culture to the next generation on halacha remembers being a little girl. When mining operations appeared dedicating the only stream the community had turning it into a better london. They have lan local on her community. Not only lost a source of water but a community meeting place where women would gather and do laundry and talk. Gauloise will come through and she became an activist because she doesn't want other communities to go through what she did. Okay so tell me a little bit about the activists work that unhealthy code does in columbia. So she is the secretary general of where side they mujeres y you mounting protests against mega mining projects in la guajira particularly. This project called l. said horn and what else to hone. That is the largest coal mine in latin america and it's right in her backyard. This is illegal operation owned by multinationals digging up coal that's exported to other countries but the practice of open pit mining. Mattie has proven really disruptive to the people who live there and harmful for the environment right. I know open pit. Mining can mess up local water resources absolutely and can create pollution that is physically harmful to communities that live nearby el cerro hone overall is really polarizing. Its construction has provided jobs and wealth to some in colombia for decades but it's also displaced indigenous and afro colombian communities forcing them from their lands without real resettlement consequently they are exposed to violence largely at the hands of paramilitary groups and criminal organizations groups that harass and target defenders like on helicopter who out against human rights abuses and environmental issues like those caused by the mine and this is on top of the violence. Colombians have already faced right. I mean. I know that colombia's kind of coming out of decades of conflict a conflict. Some say is an over because of armed groups still active in the region. And how does the government there respond to these attacks. Yeah that's a good question. I mean they often dismiss them as localized crimes and perpetrators are

Columbia Philippines Colombia La Guajira Emily Ortiz UN Nicole Walmart El Cerro Mattie Latin America London
North Carolina cities OK ban on hairstyle discrimination

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:22 sec | 8 months ago

North Carolina cities OK ban on hairstyle discrimination

"Too city councils in north carolina have you passed ordinances. Protecting against discrimination for wearing hairstyles. It's braids dreadlocks. Or afros the durham city council and the greens were a city council. Both voted yesterday ban. Employers from discriminating based on hairstyles. the ordinance is also protect residents from discrimination based on gender identity sexuality and military

Durham City Council North Carolina
North Carolina cities OK ban on hairstyle discrimination

Michael Berry

00:23 sec | 8 months ago

North Carolina cities OK ban on hairstyle discrimination

"Councils in North Carolina have unanimously passed ordinances protecting against discrimination for wearing hair styles such as braids, dreadlocks or Afros. The Durham City Council and the Greens were a City council Both voted yesterday to ban employers from discriminating based on hairstyles. The ordinances also protect residents from discrimination based on gender, identity, sexuality and military status.

Durham City Council North Carolina City Council
Boston's Black Nativity Celebrates 50 Years

Radio Boston

01:53 min | 10 months ago

Boston's Black Nativity Celebrates 50 Years

"Black nativity is celebrating fifty years in boston. This weekend written by langston hughes. It's a gospel song. Play that re imagines the story of the nativity by placing it in an early twentieth century. Black neighborhood so he's talking about the in like the hotel and the he has characters who talking behind the back of the management about how cruel they were to turn away a woman who was about to have her child. The boston show is the longest running production of black nativity. In the united states and edmund buried gaither says this year they were planning a season long celebration gaithersburg involved in every productions since one thousand nine hundred seventy and is now in charge is the director of the national center for afro american artists. We would be getting and congratulating each other. It's the context of the virus. Most of that has just disappeared and we have had to think about how to reinvent ourselves. Based on what's possible gaither says the celebration will instead be a virtual gala saturday night celebrating joy love and hope it will pay tribute to the productions legacy and chart the next fifty years we have over a long history faced a lot of difficulties and we are still here so we are our president evidence of survival so let us draw on the strength that has seen as through previous stresses to give us the hope in courage to get through this one and let black nativity be part of what sustains.

Black Nativity Boston Langston Hughes Gaither National Center For Afro Ameri Gaithersburg Edmund United States
"afro" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"afro" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"We can just find a studio that has basic or black background and change the color with the gels. That is nice I looked. Very crushing it I love it. So on top of all that everything that's going on, you also have a book a book coming out. Don't tell me about the book. How did that come about? Were you writing it because butts are hard? Our babies. it's really like we are so excited it's been two years in the making. So I think it was around the end of two, thousand, seventeen, early two, thousand, eighteen of our Afro Art series went viral. So we started a series callback art series and it was really just a celebration of Akra here to celebrate the showcase, the beauty and versatility of April here and. We did we were traveling like we do. Now we were travelling to different locations each location we would do a different theme concept and really at the time we were just doing it because we before then we had done a lot. Of environmental shoots and so we wanted to do more in studio. So we did that and a blogger had asked us if they could. Share, our series, and so we thought sure let him show this series and the series by all. Of. All of these outlets started sharing it. A CNN BBC news came from London. To come feature US and. took off. It was crazy. and. So then after that, we'd actually I received a call from someone from Saint Martin's press and we talked to her and she was just like look I don't have kids but my future kids, my nieces and nephews, they need this book in their hands. And so she said, let's talk and the rest was history and so we actually. We've been. Shoot we should we shot Ford for about a year a little less than a year and we traveled to. Kenya Ghana South Africa several. States in the US London. And then we also included some of our previous work. So we have just worked from really all over all over the world and it's Not only showcasing just the you know black beauty black culture. Through kids, but it's also highlighting the kids story. So it's a coffee table book, but it also has. Essays, which with you know each child so we have. A nine year old neuroscience expert here in Atlanta. We have a girl who was eight year old DJ in Ghana. It's just a broad spectrum of kids and so many different things that they're doing. So I'm so excited for everyone to be able to see this book and see. Everything come together and see all the all the cool things that these kids are doing. Yeah Yeah. It's really good for I'm excited for everyone to not only the book but also like I said, just see sheriff the the kids stories, I think some of them really need to be told. Me To begin a bigger platform. So I'm excited about that congratulations and best of luck with that I'm Gonna I'm GonNa put you on the hot seat when that book comes out you guys as part of your press tour for the book to come back on the show to talk about..

US London Ghana Akra CNN Saint Martin Atlanta Kenya BBC Ford Africa
"afro" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

09:08 min | 1 year ago

"afro" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Looking like right in the world has gone on in life. It's really nervous and. My goodness after we had here make up, we had the clothing, the dress and everything. It was a whole different girl, right? Then when The confidence. It's awesome. I love it. Great and then you win the pictures come back and look fantastic and then. Around, and then those people come in there. Yeah. It's sort of snowballs right there. How the marketing. Or more doing we've been doing a lot of clients have been now I kind of the main thing that clients are wanting is are the big wall art pieces for their home and. They've been doing these. Kind of started because some of the clients were just sitting these videos to us. So we started sharing our stories but now they're doing like these reveals right and so. The parents will surprise the kids with the photo at them opened up, video it and oh my goodness it's just so so cool to see these kids. That way for the first time I said I'm going to actually just started compiling video someone to get them up on our website eventually, but it is so cool to see. Like the. Of Marketing is. That they buy. They. Buy. Experience. So like. The scenes of on both house. On. Our side it's Because I'm like I'm always like you know we don't have kids but I was like if I did I, want this experience for my child. I always tell my parents. I'm like, I'm always jealous to see these edge with their. Hours where nothing like this, right we had JC Penney's and sears. Still Yeah. It's really it's really a fun experience for for both appearance and the kids honestly. Yeah that's cool. You guys. We want to send my daughter out there. Seven. Yup. I'm coming in Atlanta Atlanta is on my list soon as the world opens up I'LL BE IN ATLANTA. Thing is we've been getting a lot of this year we've been blessed, but we've been slammed in the past few months because a lot of people are not able to do the traditional birthday parties now, and so they're actually gifting the photo sessions for the birthday. Instead of birthday so I would say about seventy percent of the kids that we have coming in. Now it's birthday surprise for them. Because guaranteed gifting the photo shoot and then they'll get you know a piece of Walmart afterwards and you know like I was like that's something that will last. Them will well past a birthday party. For sure I area it's an, it's an archive at this. Point in their lives, right? He's. A time machine. What does it look like from a from a the day in the life business standpoint so you? They call you up okay and you set it up for. Three PM on Thursday show up, do the shoots yes. What happens after that you? Digitally or that happen. The proofs. Online gallery or do they come back? We actually. So I was talking about it the other day and I said, we do our crews online and I know a lot of photographers you know are into the in person sales and they want to do that. I tell people we don't imprison. And it's actually for reason. I. I when I told you that we wanted to build our business, the way that we wanted. It is definitely true. I wanted it to be around our schedule and our lifestyle and how we wanted and I felt like you know. I'm willing to make certain sacrifices so that we can have the time that we need right and so now we don't do in-person sales. We do a lot of. The reveals that stuff kind of sells itself. And we're really kinda shooting for that one mark piece of art and so. That really helps us so that we're not having to kind of come back and do another session. I know that we could definitely probably make time more were new imprisoned sales, but for us that the time that we have is more important. In. So we're able to we kinda calculate what we need based off of the the actual package price and then. The that they're going to purchase afterwards and you're happy with that. So. So that. Work at but I just feel like you know for us. It's important that since we're also since we're a couple like there's no off. Switch. We you. We are business, and so if we're not happy and regular everyday life. or in. In work life than we're not going to be happy home life as well. So we have to kind of pick and choose the things that we want in our business, and so that's one that that you know we chose not to but. But in terms process for the kids coming in, they come in and it's kind of a full service thing. They, we have their coding ready We do all the styling we have here makeup team and they get them ready with your makeup and so it's really a full service kind of it's a play date for the kids. And I like it. That way we. Tried a few different ways away I started out and we I would try to where we would kind of slip the clothing and have appearance by but it was still just didn't turn out quite the way we wanted it. and. So now it's so much easier. The parents are happy because they all the only thing you have to do is show up. And so it just makes it so much better for everyone. So cool. Yeah. We added to the package and you know they add wardrobe rental or whatever, and they just show up so. Do. They get to keep the wardrobe after that no, it's a rental. So yeah. Okay. So. Cool. So they book it everything is handled from the time they get in there. What are the parents doing or the parents off to the side while? They're here with their cameras. BECAUSE THEY WANNA get every part of. New Yeah I know a lot of photographers. But I will tell you the parents. Are there even more excited than the kids because you know they just one they know the experience that you know. Just having the kids be able to see themselves in how it's going to look at and so the parents are usually more more excited than they are just as excited as kids so. You're taking behind the scenes, photos and things like that because. They're excited and they helped spread the word as well. So they're usually posting on their social media and you know we're getting two or three more injuries because of that. So. I don't mind at all. That's fantastic. Yeah. You know what I'm also curious about is it really quickly wanted to touch on gear like what whether you guys? What are you shooting with? How are you lighting it the ever sent light or do you guys like the night before sit down and kind of skits? Ice Give. That detail but. Yeah No, we actually are testing out. The new five for from cannon right now and. Yes. So so yeah, I'd say. Mostly, they were not like really equipment heavy. Yeah we're. Honest before this we were we were still using mark three so. We have been pretty late on equipment. We go to the twenty, four, seventy, and eighty, five and then. We. The Game Changer for us in terms of lighting has been our photo muddy. Tim Plus because we're able to. We traveled a lot. So usually on a regular year. We would every month we're going to a different location at different city, and so kids are booking. Our parents are booking us in different cities, vindication and so. To. We have to travel. We basically travel with all of. Not only are letting. But a like a suitcase full of accessories. Case full of holding. and so we're taking everything along with us, and so the beaten have been just a game changer for us in terms of being able to travel with our lady equipment in a backpack and. Just able to to quickly. You know change those in out. Our style, we use a lot of color GEL and so we're able to. Use The jails in the background so that you know when we're traveling..

ATLANTA Walmart JC Penney Tim Plus cannon sears Atlanta
"afro" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"afro" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Really Been Fun I. Think Right now we're in a I feel like in her career had a really really good space because now were able to I. Think you know people know our work enough in our in our clients trust US enough to where they kind of leave us to come up with the theme and the concept and they're just like we love whatever you do. Come up with something great and so it's awesome to be able to you know have that creative freedom and to be able to kind of create our own world in our own realities of with these characters and kits working with. So it's very. Yes about let's talk about Metro here. By the way I. Was Very. Very nice and natural. Most of. These tells up so So, tell me about that I. mean we know as as black people we know there's been sort of ongoing tug of war between the actual here and leave and it is mine because I bought it. You know. So. How we got into yeah, I can talk to so. Obviously. There's been this kind of transition. To natural hair for a lot of men over time. So our transition I think in two, thousand, seven, two, thousand, seven. So I. Just kind of people that don't understand the. But we? When I was, you know I think around six years old that's when my mom relaxed my hair to make straight. So you know when I was growing up, it was understood that you would get your here relax to make it straighter so that you know number one, it was for them it was easier to maintain and then to. You know. Acceptable. That's what many of us grew up with. We grew up. Relaxing are here and you know have birds in our scalp and. And everything? Trying to get. Over Jerry Curl Becker. So I. Never even knew what my natural hair looked like growing up. Great. Until I was an adult You know working everything else that already graduated college that I decided to. Transition into natural here and the funny thing is reg was the one that actually encouraged me to do so. So. He really liked the natural and I was honestly scared because I didn't know what my my natural here within a look like but we Kind of went through it together and transitioned into natural hair, and so you know it's been a journey for a lot of women over the past few years So in two, thousand, three, two, thousand, thirteen, we decided that's when we started to get more heavily into the The Children's industry in we decided that we are style wasn't really to. Just take a kid out in the field and let them run around. and. So we got into the kids fashion industry and we got there. We know this a few things number one it was a very diverse at the time. A number two, a lot of the kids that would have like natural afro here. Their parents would come in for head shots and they would have their straighten because they thought that's what they needed to do their kid into the industry. And so we're like, wow, that's really sad like when you think about it from early on, you're basically teaching your child that you know they're here is not good enough or their looks are not good enough which leads to they're not gonNA. Yeah. So he decided to just to our do a couple of personal projects. We this is actually our first ever out to New York. New. York shows time square and we had these three little girls like five and six years old with natural hair. These big dresses out in the middle of Times Square and we're trying to do a shoe. Factory. was. On. Yeah. I didn't think that went through. One or two people in times? Square. But we capture the pictures came back and we were still fairly new to social media and posted photos on instagram and before you know what people started sharing it, it's like, wow, you know that never happened before. So a lot of natural hair bloggers and Started, sharing it and so we were like, wow, maybe we should do a few more of these and. We did a couple more. We went out to Austin Dinner Roller Skate girl shoot, and that was history our a I think we went from about two thousand dollars to about twenty thousand in about a month. In this gate grows shoot and that was a personal project that we did. So I told you all the time. Do Personal Work that you love so that you can figure out how to find your own voice in and you know figure out your own style. I, think that every time we kinda change directions in our business, it comes from. US experimenting with Personal Work and then our clients. And then they say, Oh, can you do something like that for me? Right and so that's really what happened with our business. We started doing personal shoots us, and then people would pick up on it and see it and say, Hey, how can I get photos like my child? That's really how into the natural hair. And his timely right? Because he said great right now that it's that movement. Will Not withstanding all the other you know. Going on in the country the natural hair thing has been happening for a while. Keeping up and I don't know you guys tell me it seems like the the. Unnatural hair. Or. The, augmentation. Kind of on the down swing. Cool and acceptable anymore you guys seeing. And I see it as a really. We're it's definitely a good time right now. I, don't see it as a trend up for say you know what I mean I feel like it's something that people are you know it's a change as a transition right people. Stand it before or. Now, we understand the benefits we understand the risk of actually using relaxers and. Everything else and so people are starting to transition a bit more. But yeah, it is definitely now. People are start are definitely more. More aware of it, and also I think now's the time we're. Just people in general are trying to instill. Competence in their kids and trying to instill that early on and for them to be self aware and for them to love their culture and their here. Skin. Tone. So. It's you know what we do. It's Kinda encompassing all of that and it allows them to come in and you know the parents when they come in they're like, oh my gosh. So glad you guys are able to. For them to be able to see themselves now looking like kings and Queens. They, they love all of that. A lot of times we noticed that. The kids start inspired their parents and then the parents go. and. So we see that as well. But yeah, just to see their the confidence change from when they first come in to the time after they get their just explain. Experience Day. We had all this her mob surprise there for her thirteenth birthday and at first she was like She was surprised but she also.

US Times Square Jerry Curl Becker Queens New York York Austin The Children
"afro" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"afro" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"S that's. GonNa find out what foods you like before you can find out what? That offense as you're looking at your work, you know just sort of zeroing in on the work itself. It's very vibrant, very colorful, very like. Feel. Good. How did you? How did you guys is that? I. Mean that's one hundred percent intentional. Lien on that side. So I see loves colors. Her thing. And then also, I was GONNA say. I feel like we try to incorporate. African also just black culture in general and always say that I feel like Black Culture is very vibrant at in your face. It's not. You know you think about here style as you think about clothing. I really try to pick up on that L. and showcasing. It's a little bit extra. But not in a bad way, right like I like. We try to play up and I think so many times we are told that you know it's too much or too much. and. So I think with our photography we really just have it in your face to where you are forced to take a look at it and look at it for what it is. So yeah, I don't mind. The little bit of extra. Vibrancy and are working. Love the. Extras. Ride a little. Our looking at. I think it was a fashion blog. I saw something in it said. It was like it was a few years ago and that was like there's a new trend and it's called. Maximum. maximalism or something like that right now it's like, oh, my gosh. It's never it's never enough like. People. Ask them are accessories like we layer on. Ten. Accessories. Hurts decree teasers. This is xtra is. Listen, you might have given. It's all yours trademark. Thank. Cool I. Love that. You know it's interesting because photographers not all photographers. It's the the since abilities and creative. You know nissen photographer spans the spectrum obviously but the photographer I. Am I think the photographers that I gravitate towards the ones that create a world the way that they want to see it I I if I put on glasses VR. Increases Saturation and the clarity. Spy. Read. We're concentrated so whatever we put on the world. which you guys see. People see and honestly I think there's fun and being able to create your own world at your own characters and you know that's where the fun is. Fun To recreate some things in you know other things but I love being put our own spin on. Even if we are recreating something that's existing, I love being able to take it and put our own spin on it to see you know what would it look like we did before we've done. Our take on steam pump characters right and so we're like, okay. What would Steve Look like if it was in our styles so We have a big Afro and you know. Raisin. So it's really fun just putting our own spin on it. Yeah. That is so cool. I mean you look at companies like marvel right. Very eight your own cinematic universe than than till stories within that universe. As photographer create your own universe. Talk..

marvel Steve
"afro" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"afro" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Hey folks in this interview, I'm speaking with Carin in riches from creative soul. Welcome back to another episode of this week. I am your host Frederik van Johnson today. Got To. Atlanta based photographers on show from creative soul current regius. We're GONNA be talking about. Photography business. We're GONNA be talking about natural hair and just as amazing body of work that these guys have built up and you know what it took to get there the marketing side of it all of that stuff. Welcome guys, how're you doing? Thank you for having us. Thank you for. Until you before we started the interview I was I was stalking you and getting nervous on your website. Talking to these people, I. Get that's, US we're actually. Time Sir. Not at all, he's fant at work is the work is beautiful. Awesome. You guys are firing lenders. We're GONNA talk about a book that you guys have coming. Alcohol. Glory. Book that in the end. Just origin story of creative soul and how you guys built this brand, which is it seems to be on fire as sure. So we are again car in and this is reg we are husband and wife team. We've been doing this for Gosh about eleven years. Now we started in two thousand nine out of my mom's garage. So we were honestly, we were always capturing photos of. Our family and each other. We actually were long distance for about a year and a half of our relationship started, and so you're always taking pictures of each other. And eventually, we've moved here to Georgia. We decided that I go to school for photography. So he went to school from photography and I learned along with him and so I told him like you're not leaving me. So actually I learned. On, you in school so. That's where we started our business and. We started out, we were doing a little bit of everything. and. We were kind of tell people in the beginning we were kind of finding our way and we were taking on really whatever people pay as..

Frederik van Johnson Carin stalking Atlanta Georgia
"afro" Discussed on Zafrika Radio

Zafrika Radio

31:14 min | 1 year ago

"afro" Discussed on Zafrika Radio

"You. Same. Boy, of. Mobile. Are Not necessarily. A commodity news. My Messing. Right. S Good if received. mcclay. took. Resolve issues. Wayne Williams. Diane. The. Lou. Lou. Do not. Lawyer Commodities. Is. ME. Though city. Jeff. Let me put his. Son. Seek with their. The Golden. Radio. The Bill. Suddenly. Think. Point. You. Do. Prison. Only. On the. Film. June. Patch. Song. Water. beat. Back. Burner. ME Mama. One But Africa's findings. On, South Africa. WHOA. Dj Fresh. took. Off. Africa radio, the sound, the ages. Bill money. It. was. Tidy Up on eighty. Be. I ended up without. Of. What is In. The Eye. took. ME. In You but. Newport. On. The. Ninety. Talk. Only. Type. And Jay Fresh French. Old. Woo. Um. Yup. took. ME. We are. The ages suffering. Radio. took. Thanks. Eighteen. Think. Go. took..

"afro" Discussed on Zafrika Radio

Zafrika Radio

29:04 min | 1 year ago

"afro" Discussed on Zafrika Radio

"Among. South Africa. Radio. Off. Dj Fresh Freddie. Go Hop on. The corner. Signed up. All the state that we can. Baby. Banal. Maybe. Goal. depends. Nuts. Wanted to watch google. Being. Watch. Maybe Up. Things and. Nothing has. To be something needs to be. At. that. Moment. Want To. Music complimented. South. Africa Free Cup radio. Head. Was, my daughter when Donald Trump. German. got. down. because. got. Off? Ah. Ah. Pickup. Donald. Economic. It got missed. mean. South Africa. Do. Awesome. Dollar. Two. Look. Doc. Pratt. Afro Hits The oldies. Goldies South Africa radio the sound of the ages. Donald. Dj Fresh Brady. I. Serve regardless radioed the sound. Of The ages. Lean. See. Film. Mussa. Senior. People. Don. When Goes. Food. Sound. Dj Fresh Fred. Vote. Out. Jason. A. taught. US. We are the sound of the. Selfridge, Brady Oh. Dante. Goddamn. League going. On and. The. On. On. Funds. Pre. War. Only. Non? Dong. Back. On and A. Fund. A. Food. Young. Meat. Nine. Know..

"afro" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"afro" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

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I <Speech_Male> was right and I <Speech_Male> was <Speech_Male> right <Speech_Male> and I was wrong. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> that also means <Speech_Male> that Dana <Speech_Male> P was also <Speech_Male> right and wrong. <Speech_Male> Charlotte was right <Speech_Male> and wrong. <Speech_Male> Andy Newton was <Speech_Male> right and wrong. <Speech_Male> And Jared was right <Speech_Male> and wrong. <Speech_Music_Male> Yes <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Oh yeah. Then <Speech_Male> that also means Brock <Speech_Male> Brock P. <Speech_Male> was <Speech_Male> right and wrong <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> Raphael <SpeakerChange> is right <Speech_Male> or wrong. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Wrap that I was <Speech_Music_Male> going to be <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Josh. <Speech_Male> Nevermind <Speech_Male> RAFF. Isn't there. <Speech_Male> Sorry <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Josh next <Speech_Male> week fence next. <Speech_Male> You'RE <Speech_Male> GONNA get <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> gas <Speech_Male> producer <Speech_Male> got forrest. Gump <Speech_Male> yeah we need a win. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Drying <Speech_Male> more so shut. <Speech_Male> It should <Speech_Male> be shown to Dana. Charlotte <Speech_Male> Andy and jared <Speech_Male> my <Speech_Male> in enemy. <Speech_Male> Ben Is it <Speech_Male> we did <Speech_Male> it. I feel complete. <Speech_Male> Collected all the headband. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm still <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> plaguing. Oh <Speech_Music_Male> well <Speech_Male> anyway. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you everybody <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> listening <Speech_Male> to us. Let <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> us know what you thought <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of Afro. Samurai <Speech_Male> if <Speech_Male> you have seen it <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Let us know who you thought <Speech_Music_Male> the GRANDPA's please <Speech_Male> reach out to <Speech_Male> any of our Social <Speech_Male> Media. You can message <Speech_Male> us <SpeakerChange> all <Speech_Male> that good stuff. <Speech_Female> Leave us some reviews <Speech_Female> around <Speech_Female> the apple. Podcasts <Speech_Male> are basically <Speech_Male> anywhere <Speech_Male> listen. Fuzzy feels <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> facebook. <SpeakerChange> Even facebook <Speech_Male> has a review thing. <Speech_Female> Make <Speech_Male> US forget about revenge <Speech_Male> for like a second. <Speech_Male> Now <SpeakerChange> come to our <Speech_Male> show. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> I live <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> show like we said <Speech_Music_Male> it will be in Santa Monica <Speech_Music_Male> at Apogee. <Speech_Male> Studio <SpeakerChange> very very <Speech_Male> excited. Remember <Speech_Male> remember <Speech_Music_Male> no the seventh of <Speech_Music_Male> March <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> seventh after <Speech_Music_Male> you <Speech_Music_Female> <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> history <Speech_Male> for us yes <Speech_Music_Male> check out our website <Speech_Music_Male> dot TV <Speech_Music_Male> has all the information <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> there <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> But yeah that's it. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> There isn't any more <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> love you. <SpeakerChange> You know the drill <Speech_Music_Male> as always <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> talk <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Indian broadcast.

Josh Dana Andy Newton Charlotte Jared facebook Brock P. Tom US Santa Monica producer Afro apple
"afro" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

07:40 min | 1 year ago

"afro" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"Number was so much buildup really deep discussion back. And you're like I'm GonNa hit it and then you just watched it for the Grabotski respect you so much for that. Chicken nuggets growing. I understand CAITLYN. Let's say this vengeance BS. I'm kidding wow no the revenge. The revenge thing was really difficult for me to get over there. Were just so many chances for really bothered by by things that like you have the opportunity to grow or change or adapt or like there are so many ways that could have maneuvered around it and it was just that mowed down like we can't change. We can adapt. We have to go this way. This is your other your eyes when you're like four right okay but like you but the the the sword master was kind of egging him on like. He waited until after this massive bloodbath to be like. Hey you're probably experiencing some pretty severe. Ptsd DO YOU WANNA kill me for revenge or do you WanNa like peacefully. Deal with this. He's like would I got. I got from that moment. Is that that masters. He got stabbed a thousand times. That is going to die anyway. So he's like May as well. You can't get the headband. Without really killing him. So He's like maize. We'll give it to him. Pass it off and like Australian handed. Also that was one of the things that was never warriors deaths in. But he's GonNa Die Anyway. That was the final lesson the master had to give him was after. You see your friends die. You see all the bloodshed that this headband has caused. Do you still. Do you still want this. And this is like the solidification I choose to go down this route and I I guess is one of those earlier like this is a personal baggage thing of just like there were so many other ways and I get that. It doesn't for the story and that's what this story is so that's fine. It was just a personal like there. There were so many points where you didn't have to go the revenge route but you did well especially later on. There was some points with Gino and stuff like that. But then you like will then the thousands of people who died for nothing is that is? I know it's personal baggage because this is a story about revenge was also like his character. Yeah he's always say none of the characters in here are typically anyone you want to be and this is again. I say this is the tragedy of Afro Samurai and like this is like the sad. And that's the sad thing about the show is more like like these are people who are kind of victim to circumstance and the way the world works and everyone has to choose the the way that they're gonna live even if it's not the best way going about it like I don't WanNa be for San Right by a fucking dope his character in the show But like yeah. It's it's a sad like he chose vengeance. He could have been like. Yeah my dad died and I just chose to live happy life right like when you're exposed at such a young age like that becomes you even at a young age. His Dad's head was stolen from him right. And so it's like it's hard. It's hard to me to think like you had other options but also those options were taken away from you right and maybe he would not have if like the head had been not stolen from him like he wasn't wearing the headband. He would just had the headband. On the DAD's head and so to me. It's yeah it's I get it what you're what you're talking about. Words like there are so many options of redemption for the characters but then a lot of them. Yeah they don't see past it in like a lot of people do become people based around trauma and that's that's a telltale and I think because this is the same problem I had with Sad right I just it. That's why I say it's baggage like I know that I just have with this specific type story. It's it really bothers me. I think you're just really jealous that you haven't finished your revenge arc. I mean enough bloodshed kidding. You can see I can see like too bad because you have a second one like if they had if this was a longer series like if there was to be a silver lining to them putting more episodes I think it would be like then maybe exploring the topic of it more right. It might be like. Is this really what you want? And kinda like coming in from different different facets but again. That's the story to told here. So that's why it's like. It's it's not next time. I said that's why I said No. I just said watch the movie because I would say this like my question is. Let's say he does find a choice? I'm going to go for peace than what happens to the show right and again already said. Yeah I get it this. This story Personal Josh. Your second call potentially be my second quotas. Ironman decide to go for peace. He's still going to build new. So may okay qualm that the ladies just felt so useless in this they were just like it was very James Bond useless hot women everywhere like the there were what three women in this aside from the grandma who gave limited so there was like a little girl she which later turned to his. Like Fuck Buddy. So Jesus well what? That's what it was John. Maybe they loved each other. Maybe they did but she was like. Oh you're dick gave me salvation so destroy the chip like that's what it felt like her character. I can't wait to him. I'll give you that. Yeah yeah that's precisely how that went down James Bondy. It's Super James. Bondy every it's a it's a very cliche. I know and it it goes way too. Yeah but that was like a hangout for me of like. Couldn't there be one cool chick who just as bad as own like I don't care if she even died Afro like can she just be cool and legit watch. Naya's snaky just Niki Thirteen. It was thirteen years ago. Almost fifteen and I give it that credibility but at the same time that was. That's still a hang up for me to watch how much how much media has changed so much. See I would say this much media change. But they're still hasn't been a lot of like male African or black lead anime stuff including to give it a little bit of grace because like their first black James Bond for anime where like how many white ones that are you know and again I get it but it's still it's still a qualm dot com. Okay that's all for me. I think the only qualm and this is a gift from doing a little. Reach around the back of the you know. In what is it? It would be just like I think I could use a little bit more interaction of of Afro between other characters. Yeah that's it really. It's like because I get him and I get an engine engine. Buy One get him with more people but the movie fixed that so. I'm cool with that. There's so that's me I've seen the movie cool so the movie so now go on to the final segment. Which is our reacting rate on your you. I know I already said it. Okay I give it a four point. Seven Nice for.

James Bond James Bondy San Right Afro Samurai Grabotski Gino John Naya Niki Thirteen
"afro" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

09:39 min | 1 year ago

"afro" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"Going to ask a lot of plots. Actually maybe all the hero plots and so like him. It's more like it's more just like I'm like I have what I'm GonNa do. But like even then like I've he he sees like how much of the destruction and Rath that he's brought upon the world is he better than justice at all. I really appreciated that that the way they like from a plot standpoint. I really appreciate it that that was how he got the sort of like balance of of ideals versus like some sidekick character that is just that yeah but then that would also mean that like That Afro is also just like the serious version of himself. I like it made him a much more fleshed out and three dimensional character while also satisfying like what the plot needed as well also kind of provides payment to write One of my favorite Parson. It's more of like an aspect of the show is really the pretty much everything you hear from The sound effects. I was like wow it. They weren't cheesy punches. They weren't cheesy like sword. Hits or swipes like they sounded like realistic very The voice acting and it was. I thought amazing but also the music that I mean. It's just the whole sounds. Hang the whole soundscape of the entire. Show the sound Experience I was like. Wow this is just a. I really dug it like everything. I really could not stop thinking about the sound effects because I really appreciate it so much of not being cheesy but I mean in the art to. It's just like this is probably one of the most gorgeous looking animated things that I've ever seen. Yeah I I so I mean this coming from like someone who watches like you know a good handful of anime fucking love the opening opening opening sequences of an anime really kind of Tell you how this enemy is going to go. And sometimes they give you like a little red herrings here and there but like this one was just like very like it felt very boondock seed fell very like but also like very much of its own style like had a little bit of that blaxploitation feel a little bit the James Bond feel like the capturing now where it's like. Okay this is going to be like a really one of those cool characters. I'M GONNA fall in like there's there's that level of like this character does cool things but then there's going to be that deeper layer with within this character that he's not only tortured but like he you know he comes from a different background than other heroes that. I've watched a great blend of cultures to be honest. It's really really good. Blend makes me think of a mix between like outlaw. Darned beserk legacy that let me see that those notes real quick director. I think for sure he was the one that he was like. He really wanted to make something very cinematic. And so when he He created the pilot like he just made that out there and then the interests of a lot of people because they were like holy crap and then a lot of networks wanted to jump on his project but he wanted to make sure that it maintained like it's style no matter what because that's typically like the sad tale Taylor what happens to a lot of shows. Yeah is that like they have a great pile. Awesome hey is great list marketed. Like make it like. Let's have some toys and stuff like that because in Japan toys paramount. Yeah right I I do like that. It's I mean. Yeah it's so it's five episodes and then a movie like the movie Kinda serves as a sex. Yeah okay so I'm not going to talk specifically about it but it's like I like of course I would love more of this but it's kind of perfect the way that it is because it ended. Yeah that's like that's the thing where it's like. It's like a different story. Now I have more revenge. Everyone home listening as well as the people here at the table. And in the inter-web if you watch the movie to me I think it's a perfect like okay. Cool so what happens. After but also like here's the other side of the argument that there's more to this world and and his world in if forces the I guess the audience as well as the creators to challenge Afro even more because they pull in some personal strings in their language colonel. It's really really good. Like I really like the film and I think to me. That's a perfect ending but again this is the movie episode but like the fact that this is a one season one and done it remains a classic for like all time. And so like it's I wouldn't want any more coming from new nice. Thank you for this. Yeah among our too which is cool and mistaken in thinking that like there's another effort Samarai live action coming out. Mma possibly ain't look netflix spewed. Doing all I know. That's why I'm like. Maybe I'm being firm this point. I'm not sure but I wouldn't hate it There is I mean. There is the video game and the game does kind of like possibly expand a little bit of like the nature of the world like is Ninja Ninja actually a physical manifestation or is it just a psychological one. All of the movie does a really good job of kind of like reiterating that too with one lines which really laid a lot but anyways knows for there's any other favorite parts. I don't mean the whole thing I don't know why but like the screaming bloody face before he gets. This is tied to the lemonade thing. But I don't know why but I was like that's great well kind of a strange individual man. Violence I liked about this too was the actually the amount of blood and Gore and the a lot and to me. It's not for kids like I and I've been very particular very critical of like when other people use Gore and things like that. I think I find it very hokey. And even though it's meant to be like I think it kind of fits in with this one here. It's like a showing. How like how gruesome and terrifying and terrible it is hyperbolic on spin. It didn't feel like it was doing like it was doing the like cut a thing and then shit but it wasn't. I don't know how to describe this. Other as much of a fountain as like comically it has been and other animate it was like. That's like a fountain of blood. That would not actually happened. But you did the right. Harkin hearkens back to like a Samurai said in which is based off. Seven Samurai which is a cure course. And there's a lot of that stuff in Japanese like live action films where it's like. There's a lot of those like one move fights and also some guys just like put on the fountain and like to me like that's become such a staple of it but then I've seen different Americanized version of those things that I'm like. I just don't like it. I really just abhorred. Because I don't think like they're capturing words really come from if anything they're altering it for their own vision which hey that's up to artists and director But to me like this felt so right because like I don't WanNA fucking San Rafter. This terrible well like the thing. I appreciate about this. Is that it kind of kept the art of it up and didn't sacrifice that part of it to show you know. Show the Gore. Whatever like and my friends at final fight at the end where he's just a slice slice into like a billion pieces is it gives you a wide shot of saying like and it's like a silhouette of what happens disintegrate swirl around your like that conveyed everything. I needed now. Yeah Yeah Holy Shit. And it's free well grit and they did a good job with communicating the world. And that way too like they weren't being so straightforward they were giving you kind of like a silhouette of the world speed. Know what happened? You know what happened? You know where they are not that of win Renault shoving in your face it. I mean it's the year twenty four thousand. The first episode gives you everything you really need to know. It's like Halo there. Sam that his blood. There's this guy named Afro and offer cell phones the cell phone and he didn't have the phone charm has the background for this. Like I I can only I know how big impactful it was around like my social circles when I was watching I can only imagine how big it was to the like arcade crowd in Japan. Oh yeah that was like I can only imagine how huge it was in like people the fact that people still talk about it nowadays and like no. It's a recognizable character. I think is really awesome. I will also say another show like a neon genesis where I'm looking behind me because I'm watching at work. Like graphic sex second time going through on my word best served a great purpose the refreshing. You can't fast forward through that. What if you missed something important like no? I saw my second time through. I was like I was at work and I was like. Let's get through. Let's get through tapping already come in nothing to see here folks. Nothing to see I did yes. Oh I in a sense I did. Actually I really did enjoy that first moment in the bar. Where there's there's all these headbands and Blah Blah killed here and then he comes into the bar and I was like okay. Yeah character the characters. Yeah it was just really quick like precisely one of my favorite parts. Is the character design. Yeah so I mean all of these characters are so like just cool. They all stand out. Yeah so we'll do one favorite Ninja and then second your favorite your second favorite it could be Afro and then secondary was India. That's fine yeah I.

Gore Japan director Rath Mma netflix India James Bond Taylor Harkin San Rafter Sam
"afro" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

10:34 min | 1 year ago

"afro" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"Certain percentage. So it's it's it's doing so people like us. Oh okay so you could say. It's critically acclaimed and fan beloved. Yes so people kind of like it Yeah it's interesting Has Anyone watched the pilot? The pilot is three minutes long. And that's Samuel Jackson into like wanting to be part of it. Oh Yeah And the cool thing is like. It's a really good like an anime opening. That would be like all the characters all the villains story a quick fight between all of them and you can see your some like pop music some eighties nineties. Japanese pop rapper or pop rockers. Yeah interesting We but So Yeah Now. We'll move onto The meat and potatoes and show our favorite parts favorite characters and then our qualms and reading. Yeah so he wants to go first. Go ahead Jesus that second and a half to Lake Internet fucked me is that a mother fucking RPG. Come on peachtree that made money back so much in a backpack. Don't mess with him. It was just oh my God so get it made me. What does he do with that? He sliced ham gangster Dan Yeah that scene like that was my very first thing. That just made me laugh out loud. I was like this is amazing. You like Ninja Ninja. I am one might say I like engineering in Holly My my favorite has to be just his fight against himself. The Robo against Israel self like it was just really in the rain and the rain like reborn same skills and him having to like remember that yes to like fight from within and not be predictable like that was cool and then it's the it's the death strike. Yeah it's just like legends and all that is exactly what happened. Yeah but then like incoming back Like and looking like he did and of course you know you gotta looking like he did. It's it's it's like it's like your usual face to fight. Where like he has new moves? Yeah Yeah and it was really funny. Laser arms retractable arms. I liked. I don't know why I was so fond of the lemonade. Spill of things. Where it's like everyone's like this is so disgusting he it's like his favorite thing ever. I don't know why just really enjoyed that aspect of it eliminate helps Continue the story of him being the Guy Gene and all that stuff. Yeah for everyone at home. That doesn't know what guiding is. It's like they're just an outsider and You know that's a very powerful or in there. Yeah that's a very big powerful Film move especially to elaborate on being other so like liking something that other people don't also like how his life is you know just limited but also Lived by different rules Yeah so I have three very specific thing I won my first one is the first fight where the guy shoots and he cuts it in half and it every Scotto shots into like six or seven other people My second favorite part is brother three peacefully offering tea because he doesn't want to fight. Yeah he just wants to listen to music and be chill and my last is the fight with the Gino. The entire thing from start to finish. Oh yeah never. I think that that was the Especially the last couple of times round but this last time really being critical of it for this episode I I was so emotionally invested in that. You're you don't one hundred. I at least one hundred percent know who to root for and I really. I think that was a. I really enjoy that kind of conflict in storytelling. It's impressive to me So that that whole fight I was. I was on the edge of my seat. Even though it spans two episodes. Yeah that I mean. That's one thing Kind of going back to me wanting to talk about the revenge part of it like normally I would have a problem but it just I feel like it was such good fuel for the rest of the characters to play off of that like okay. Like the show's very self aware that that is an extreme form. That's right it doesn't make and so it was really fascinating to watch like how that affected. Well Yeah I WANNA talk with. One of my favorite aspects is at like Afros able to find a new family and like even then like his mission to find the number two. Headband has never left his mind so like even though he he can find friends he can live life. You can make love to women. He can have fun eating food. And whatever the hell it is but no matter what the end of the day the missions always the mission and he has a. He has a laser focus. He's not trying to use that against people like the thing that Saturday other people have told him to try to walk away from that path. But it's just like the way that he lives doesn't again. It doesn't abide by those rules. Like Gino's biggest sick tragedy is the fact he's like. Hey like don't go after the master because like he has a number two but like you shouldn't go for revenge anymore but that's been my whole mission in life like live then why he was saying like my true father was like. Oh Damn and that's the sad thing where it's like. Lowe's who wear the headband. No like the you know you either kill or be killed and like it's the life they accept and like even then like I forget her name but like the the woman was passed from the very first episode knows the suits like of course. You're a Great Samurai nowadays because you've lived and then like you find out like how much part of his past she was and like how like even then she knew she was. She was a casualty of the fact. That like when push comes to shove he'll have to break ties in this continuous mission. And that's like the sad thing where it's like if no one really went against what he wanted like they would all technically be safe. They have all been fine but then everyone wanted to have him against him in fine. Yeah I mean like if brother three like yeah that's It's interesting thing that like that them wanting to put what they wanted for him into their lives caused them to have their own revenge towards him. Like because you acted out against me because I was act against you now have to kill you and it's like well just fucking leave him alone letters. Yeah it's like the guys now held on revenge on. Yeah and so it's interesting. I really liked that because to me. That's just kind of how delicate like people's livelihoods are and lend people's like mission life because everyone is trying to tell someone how to possibly live their life. Better do something by that. But it's kind of like at the end of the day you have to kind of live by the beat of your drum. Yeah Yeah So I if there's a significant moment that I really really liked To several but it's actually right after Corey's first part with the scattering of the bullet. And it's the guys like what he pretty much fucking says. Who gives you the rides? The whole dark. Tell me all my man and he says like it's nothing personal it's revenge and I really liked that. Well it's like I mean. Revenge is one hundred personal. But it's like you getting in my way has now made it like I have to kill you. It's yeah I he didn't want to and like that's one thing I really liked that. The movie actually does They talk about that later. Would like there. Is someone complete bystanders? Like look I'm not trying to nobody by if you get in my way down. Yeah I'm like you know I I really respect. That's go ahead and sorry I I really respect those kind of things and I I try to think. That's typically how I live my life. It's like no no me. Nobody hard but like if you start getting in the way of what I want then. You now arming me harm. It's the reason I like the brother three moment so much like even though he was a part of this thing that was trying to stop him the moment he says okay. I'm out Afros like all right. Cool you off now. Yeah like that's IT'S A. It's a really beautiful moment to show that he's not just in the revenge. Isn't anyone else except the one guy? Another favorite thing that I liked was Be Usage of Ninja. And I really liked that. You know there's two voices of Afro Jinja represents the part that like the audience. It's supposed to understand. I like what Afro Sam is not and so yeah because I I was literally my next thing I was going to say I love that. Yes you can also see at the Yin and Yang the black and white hair but yeah engine engines like that other side that it's not that he can't be the foil he's the he's the kind of silly one but he's also the doubt like in the moments that he's taking on something where he's like. No you can't buy them and he's he's talking about this other side of the personality which is which is shows that he's a he's like a balanced person like he's not just like consumed by his conviction has to but at the end of the day missions the mission but he doesn't have that like he is still he's still human. Yeah I mean like like an engineer like a man while we get some sweet ass like those are like the real mechanisms are working in. His mind is like he may want. We have relaxed. Hey man you looking funky and like it's all that shit like everyone works but Afro understands. I like the mission paramount so I have to subdue these fans and it's like the physical rip a manifestation of anxiety. I mean that's that's an interesting way too. Like I like the that. The show takes time to do that. And you know like with the with Samurai Jack. It's a little different. Where like he's very nice and calm peaceful but then there's moments of pure rage and violence. Will you never get a lot of that side? You get a lot of contrast within the episode. We don't get them at the same time and so like we see Afro fighting you see like Ninja Ninja like panicking and stuff like that. So it's like those things like oh like this isn't a rubber human being like and that's one of the actually really love about Africa as he gets injured a lot and even though he can take up you know getting blasted the mound like he's still bleeding like oh that hurt for sure. Yeah but like he laser focus. Yeah he's like I have to have to win. Yes sometimes he loses his will to win. And so that's one thing I love to or it's like he's not like a typical shown in hero. He's like I'm GonNa untouchable win because the earth is GonNa die is like no. I'm.

Dan Yeah Samuel Jackson Afro Jinja Afro Afro Sam Afros Lake Internet Gino Africa Lowe Corey engineer Yang
"afro" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"afro" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"Now I'm going to watch that nerd on. What is everybody? Welcome back to nerd on the PODCAST. You didn't need but you deserve and we're all levels of NERD are welcome today. It's nothing personal. It's just revenge. We celebrate and discuss the two thousand seven hit anime series. Afro Samurai. Can YOU DIG? It I can. I can dig it. It's just revenge. We're doing it. We're doing it live at the moment of recording of recordings and Corey joining us over the interweb. It's space magic or Japanese magic. Yeah like you're in my head issues the rest of the host. I am Tom Ali. Caitlyn and I M Josh and Cory's on the interwebs I already said that so I'm repeating myself and this episode is brought to you in part by the members of the nation that is powered by Patriot on as a member of the nomination. You do get fun. Perks like bonus episodes. That are not heard by anybody else early access to pretty much all that we do. Our videos are episodes are merch. It's fun stuff. And you get that discord that you get access to us and you get to talk to other fans. It's a good time. Discord that discord. No you can check out our patriot. Nerd DOT. Io backslash Patriae on and of course like we recently told everybody we recently partnered with apogee an odyssey of these companies are both leaders in the field of audio and these headphones are ridiculous. They sound amazing. They Light Chris cry. I Love Them. Also the people who work there super dope yes everybody at Apogee and Odisea has been incredible And do remember apogee the speaking of advocacy remember. We do have our very first live. Show coming up march seventh remember. Remember the seventh of March. Imber doesn't have really close doesn't have as good of ice show up. It's our our live show. It's GonNa be fun exciting. You've got to participate and local to only US IN LA. Check IT OUT AND RSVP. Please do NERD ON DOT. Io backslash alive a feel free to invite your friends your family your enemies you may not bring you know for Future Events Lousy Short or your spouse or the people that you care about and want to see a lot of time. I guess what we're trying to say is bring anybody bringing shout out. I wanted to shout out Tom for putting a positive spin on its local only to us in California and it says great. Always know we'll come to places close to you could also bring XS that you want to rekindle a relationship in cinemax of.

Apogee Tom Ali Cory Corey LA Imber Caitlyn Chris California Odisea M Josh
"afro" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"afro" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"She was black with an Afro yeah and she had to darken skin right not cultural appropriation okay right okay so you have that going on and then we also should remember and Donald Trump junior did not bring this part of the whole I wish she would have I but you know this has to be added to the conversation because we'll be Goldberg comes back at them and and and don't say that she was not in black is what are you talking about well she was in in Al Jolson black race but I do remember somebody doing Al Jolson lack phase in fact it was would be Goldberg's boyfriend at the time I believe they they referred to because I went back and look for some of the stories this is a big scandal at the time yeah and it was Ted Danson at a roast came out in black face needing watermelon eating watermelon while he was the lover of Whoopi Goldberg which is the pre that weird news stories refer to it at the time to the point where no this completely bombed right like this at all it was it was an ugly in the room yet everybody everybody was there was at the friar's club everybody who was anybody was there and the room got really really hostile yeah they've all sorts of shots of black celebrities in the audience looking horrified earning turning their chairs away from it yeah yeah that's right Montello Williams writes cheese have a good memory anyway she she said she said it took a whole this is what people were talking after the incident.

Ted Danson Whoopi Goldberg Montello Williams Donald Trump Al Jolson
"afro" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"afro" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"Find it in old drifters hits you can find it right now in the cardi b song that's happening right that that's based on that book olu i like it right which represents an afro cuban domination of the piano this afro cuban cowl reverse colonization of a european instrument right and this is significant this has significant today we are living in a freaking new york where a guy curses someone out for speaking spanish caught on video a lawyer cursing out people working in a restaurant for speaking spanish get out of my country's speak english that is the context that's the cultural context in which this as i say afro cuban reverse colonization of european melody and european instrumentation is unfolding and that is powerful and dukes telling me that she they were really trying to come up with a song that only she could sing it was sort of a career defy that you know would it sort of introduced sort of the world is like this is what communica mayo is and that this was when once they hit on the song it was clear to them that that could the song could be that a really amazing thing about her in about this record is that you go from a song that only she can sing a song like never be the same which is a song that anyone can sing it is a big power ballad and yet she does strange things to it i was saying i hear a little vanessa in there britney says that's not the kind of sort of alz stuff that she likes i still here have an essence in it i don't care you don't necessarily hear that in that song though right now no i mean other than the really kind of non melodic jimmy worlds maybe that but what's your never be the same.

new york britney communica mayo