35 Burst results for "African Americans"

Pope Francis elevates 13 new cardinals

KNX Programming

00:28 sec | 22 hrs ago

Pope Francis elevates 13 new cardinals

"Mass at the Vatican this Sunday. CBS is to be in a castle Franco from Rome, Pope Francis let a special Mass with the newly named cardinals, including the first African American Wilton Gregory, Archbishop of Washington, D. C, but two of the 13 cardinals did not make it to the Vatican due to the pandemic. The Cardinals were elevated during a ceremony yesterday. Nine of the 13 will help choose the next pope. This is

Castle Franco Pope Francis Vatican Wilton Gregory Cardinals CBS Rome Washington
Pope elevates 13 new cardinals then puts them in their place

Ric Edelman

00:24 sec | 23 hrs ago

Pope elevates 13 new cardinals then puts them in their place

"Pope Francis raised 13 new cardinals to the highest rank Saturday afternoon, including the archbishop of Washington, DC Wilton Gregory, who's now the first African American cardinal. Socially distant ceremony took place inside a nearly empty ST Peter's Basilica to celebrate the latest class of cardinals. The pope immediately warning the new cardinals not to use their titles for corrupt and

Pope Francis Wilton Gregory St Peter's Basilica DC Washington Cardinals Pope
Washington DC Bishop Wilton Gregory formally becomes a Cardinal

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 1 d ago

Washington DC Bishop Wilton Gregory formally becomes a Cardinal

"Catholics in the Washington area now can call their archbishop. Ah, Cardinal. I don't own the mine. Nope. It hit nobody selection opinion she picks up that is the sound of Pope Francis says he places the red hat of the cardinal on the head of the archbishop of Washington, DC Wilton Gregory Gregory is one of 13 to receive the title of Cardinal and is the first African American to do so. The ceremony known as a consistent Torey is usually a celebratory affair with parties and full masses. But during the pandemic, the ceremony was scaled down to the Cardinals even stayed home. Gregory will now be a member of the College of Cardinals and would be called to elect a new pope if needed.

Pope Francis Wilton Gregory Gregory Washington Torey Cardinals Gregory College Of Cardinals
Wilton Gregory becomes first Black American cardinal

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 1 d ago

Wilton Gregory becomes first Black American cardinal

"Gregory. Pope Francis has officially made the archbishop of Washington, D. C. A cardinal, we create and solemnly proclaim cardinals of Holy Roman Church Thies brethren of ours. Archbishop Wilton Gregory is the first African American to receive the red hat of a cardinal. The ceremony of elevating clergy to the role of Cardinal is usually a large affair with parties in large masses. But this year it was scaled down due to the pandemic. In fact, two of the 13 cardinal designates didn't even make the trip. The Vatican Archbishop Wilton Gregory, will now join the College of Cardinals, which if tests would

Pope Francis Holy Roman Church Thies Archbishop Wilton Gregory Gregory Washington Wilton Gregory Vatican College Of Cardinals
Pope Francis pays visit to predecessor with elevated cardinals

Purity Products

00:18 sec | 1 d ago

Pope Francis pays visit to predecessor with elevated cardinals

"Raise 30 New cardinals to the highest rank in the Catholic hierarchy today, a group that included Cardinal Wilton Gregory when they approach a massless pope to receive their red hats. But Cardinal Gregory, the first African American cardinal kept his on two new cardinals could not attend due to coded 19 travel restrictions.

Catholic Hierarchy Today Cardinal Wilton Gregory Cardinal Gregory
Former Atlanta archbishop becomes first Black American cardinal

Atlanta Living

00:23 sec | 1 d ago

Former Atlanta archbishop becomes first Black American cardinal

"First first today today from from Rome Rome and and involves involves a a former former Atlanta Atlanta archbishop. archbishop. He's He's now now Cardinal Cardinal Wilton Wilton Gregory, Gregory, as as declared declared by by Pope Pope Francis Francis Set Set us us Sir Sir a a ceremony ceremony today today in in Rome Rome and and also also the first African American cardinal in church history. Geordie chippies Pope Gregory served as Atlanta's archbishop for 14 years until moving on to head DC's archdiocese again. Now a cardinal Continuing

Rome Cardinal Cardinal Wilton Wilto Atlanta Pope Pope Francis Francis Sir Sir Gregory Geordie Pope Gregory DC
This Washington DC archbishop has become the first African American cardinal in Catholic history

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 1 d ago

This Washington DC archbishop has become the first African American cardinal in Catholic history

"Day for Washington Archbishop Wilton Gregory, now a cardinal ceremony at the Vatican officially made him the first black American Cardinal. 13 men here will be made cardinals. We see her here. Cardinal elect Wilton Gregory, Archbishop of Washington, D C. Pope Francis has named three American cardinals before this. Gregory is the fourth overall as you heard there, the pontiff elevating 13 clerics to the College of Cardinals, the elite group of churchman whose primary task is to elect a new pope. Vatican says to new cardinals couldn't make it to Rome for the ceremony because of covert 19 and travel concerns.

Archbishop Wilton Gregory Wilton Gregory D C. Pope Francis American Cardinals Washington Vatican Cardinals College Of Cardinals Gregory Rome
Ashby Street Theatre, Atlanta Eagle on Georgia Trust’s ‘Places in Peril’ list

Morning Talk with Martha Zoller

00:45 sec | 2 d ago

Ashby Street Theatre, Atlanta Eagle on Georgia Trust’s ‘Places in Peril’ list

"List of historic sites in Georgia that are in danger of disappearing, We get that story from GN ends Rob Stadler. Each year, the the Georgia Georgia Trust Trust for for Historic Historic Preservation Preservation names names 10 10 structures structures that that could could soon soon see see the the wrecking wrecking ball ball if if there there aren't aren't efforts efforts to to save save them. them. This This year's year's list list includes includes the the Ashby Street Theater, one of Atlanta's first movie houses serving the black community. It's something now and in bad need of her. Pair. Another is the Blackshear City Jail in southeast Georgia. It has a tower for gallows that was never used. Among other landmarks are the gotta. African American Civic District near Dalton and downtown Tombs, Burrow and Wilkinson County. Check Check out out the the entire entire list list at at Georgia Georgia trust trust dot dot org's org's Because Because of of the the pandemic. pandemic. There There

Rob Stadler Georgia Trust Trust Georgia Ashby Street Theater Blackshear City Jail African American Civic Distric Atlanta Wilkinson County Dalton Burrow
Philadelphia's Black-led charter schools band together for 'Black Schools Matter' campaign

KYW 24 Hour News

01:10 min | 4 d ago

Philadelphia's Black-led charter schools band together for 'Black Schools Matter' campaign

"Charter schools in Philadelphia, part of the campaign to raise awareness about inequities in charter oversight. S. K Y W Community affairs reporter Cherry, Greg explains. A recent study shows bias maybe baked into the system. Is he not Dr Naomi Johnson Booker is founder of the Global Leadership Academy Charter School. She's also one of the leaders of the African American Charter School Coalition. It launched the Black Schools matter campaign this week to raise awareness about the charter school system of Philadelphia and the disproportion. Impact on black lead charter schools, which provide culturally competent education many times to low income student populations and face Amiriyah the barriers when it comes to our school's oversight, extension and renewal, opportunities and many times When schools have spoken up, there has been retaliation. Recent study, published by the University of Arkansas reported that stringent charter regulations have negatively impacted the creation of black and Hispanic lead charters who may lack access to capital. The coalition is demanding recognition that black lead charter schools are needed in Philadelphia. They want a non by a system of oversight, more transparency and access to funding. Cherry Greg

S. K Y Dr Naomi Johnson Booker Global Leadership Academy Char African American Charter Schoo Philadelphia Cherry Greg University Of Arkansas Cherry Greg
Beyoncé leads the Grammys with 9 nominations

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 5 d ago

Beyoncé leads the Grammys with 9 nominations

"The Grammys are woke at least when it comes to this year's nominations in a year which calls for social justice were heard around the globe it only makes sense that the artist responsible for one of the biggest songs linked to the moment is the top Grammy nominee beyond say leads all with nine for the nine oh four black parade which is up for song and record of the year it is also nominated for best R&B song and performance the song was released on June thirteenth that's the holiday marking the last in slate African Americans learned they were free the unsafe picked up three other non for a guest appearance on making the stallions number one hit savage winners will be announced January thirty first I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Grammys Grammy Oscar Wells Gabriel
Grammys announce 1st batch of nominees for 2021 show

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 5 d ago

Grammys announce 1st batch of nominees for 2021 show

"The Grammy nominations are out the Burmese all woke at least when it comes to this year's nominations Beyonce is the top nominee with nine her not to come on the strength of her anthem about black pride the song black parade picking up nominations for song and record of the year that song was released on June thirteenth that's the holiday that marks on the last and slate African Americans when they were free Beyonce is now the second most nominated act in the history of the Grammys with seventy nine she trails only Quincy Jones and her husband Jay Z. who has eighty winners will be announced January thirty first I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Beyonce Grammy Song Jay Z. Grammys Quincy Jones Oscar Wells Gabriel
NYC's first African-American mayor, David Dinkins, has died

Steve Scott

01:09 min | 6 d ago

NYC's first African-American mayor, David Dinkins, has died

"New York City's only black Mayor, David Dinkins, has died. WCBS reporter Mac Rosenberg joins us live from City Hall. Michael David Dinkins like to refer to New York City is a gorgeous mosaic. The city's 106th and first African American mayor held a few titles before being elected in 1989. He was first Manhattan borough president, State assemblyman and city clerk before he upset three term incumbent Democrat Ed Koch in the primary and then narrowly defeated Rudy Giuliani in the general election, who would beat Dinkins four years later. Think it took over a city that was in trouble economically, and also saw racial tensions come to a head during his administration with the Crown Heights riots for which the state ultimately said Jenkins did not act quick enough. He later admitted regret for that. Former governor David Paterson said that Jenkins tried very hard to be the mayor of all the people. Civil rights activist Al Sharpton says that Dinkins made American politics more inclusive and progressive. Dinkins wife, Joyce died in October and the former mayor died last night at the age of

Wcbs Mac Rosenberg Michael David Dinkins New York City David Dinkins Dinkins Ed Koch City Hall Rudy Giuliani Jenkins David Paterson Al Sharpton Joyce
David Dinkins, NYC's first Black mayor, has died at 93

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 6 d ago

David Dinkins, NYC's first Black mayor, has died at 93

"David Norman Dinkins began his life in Trenton, New Jersey, but New York was his heart and soul. His family moved to Harlem during the Depression. And it was there that he made his mark in government in politics, rising to become the first African American mayor in New York City in 1989. He called the city of gorgeous mosaic initiating programs with lasting impact. He launched the highly regarded Safe Streets Safe Cities program, the beginning of a reduction in crime that continues to this day. But there were polarizing events, the racially charged Crown heights riots and a boycott of a Korean deli in Brooklyn. Mayor De Blasio has always been proud to say that he met his wife, sure Lane when they both worked in the Dinkins administration. Renamed the city's magnificent municipal building in his

David Norman Dinkins Trenton Harlem New Jersey Depression Korean Deli New York New York City Mayor De Blasio Gorgeous Brooklyn Dinkins Administration Lane
Joe Biden cabinet picks include historic firsts

AP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 6 d ago

Joe Biden cabinet picks include historic firsts

"If Joe Biden's nominees are confirmed the nation would have for the first time. A woman Treasury secretary, former Fed chair Janet Yellen, is expected to be his pick. The first female director of national intelligence would be Averil Haines of former deputy director of the CIA and an African American woman, Linda Thomas Greenfield would be U N Ambassador Now here's another first for Homeland Security secretary. Cuban American lawyer Alejandro My or Kiss, the first immigrant who would be into Charge of the department. My orchestra served under President Obama as the director of citizenship and immigration Services. Insiders say Biden is fulfilling his campaign pledge to have government leadership reflect the diversity of

Janet Yellen National Intelligence Averil Haines Linda Thomas Greenfield Joe Biden Treasury FED CIA Homeland Security Alejandro Barack Obama Biden
In a first for San Francisco, police officer who shot Keita O’Neil charged in killing

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:34 sec | 6 d ago

In a first for San Francisco, police officer who shot Keita O’Neil charged in killing

"Chase A Boudin claims former officer Chris Temecula. Fatally shot robbery suspect Kato O'Neill after he ran away from police who've been chasing the stolen vehicle he was driving in through the Bay view. He says O'Neal was unarmed, and that Sammy Jo was the only officer around seem to discharge his weapon. The D. A. Says O'Neal was African American. The shooting inflamed the Bayview community. This historic decision sends a message that I hope will be loud and clear to San Francisco's African American community and all residents of San Francisco.

Chris Temecula Boudin Sammy Jo Kato Neill Chase O'neal Neal San Francisco
Smithsonian museums, National Zoo to close temporarily again amid rising COVID-19 cases

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | Last week

Smithsonian museums, National Zoo to close temporarily again amid rising COVID-19 cases

"Zoo and seven Smithsonian museums in our region will close to the public on Monday. They include the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the National Portrait Gallery and the National Air and Space Museum's Udvar Haci Center. The Smithsonian's Alise, Fisher says. We don't have a re opening day at this point. That that really gives us the flexibility to continue to watch the data monitor the situation very closely because things continue to change so rapidly. Also closing the National Gallery of Art starting Saturday that will affect both the West Building and the sculpture garden. No reopening date has been announced. They're either Michelle Bash w T o P News

National Museum Of African Ame Smithsonian Udvar Haci Center Alise National Portrait Gallery National Air And Space Museum Fisher West Building National Gallery Of Art Michelle Bash
Sydney Barber Becomes 1st Black Female Brigade Commander At Naval Academy

All Things Considered

07:51 min | Last week

Sydney Barber Becomes 1st Black Female Brigade Commander At Naval Academy

"Two news. Now of an important first in Annapolis, Sydney Barber will be the first African American woman to serve as brigade commander at the U. S Naval Academy. It is the top post for midshipman. She starts next semester. Sydney Barber Welcome and Congratulations. Thank you so much. Appreciate this opportunity is so great to be here. Yeah, We're very happy that you're with us. Tell me what does it brigade Commander do what's the job description? So I guess And if you were to look at it in a civilian sense, the brigade commander is what someone would describe is a student body president. So I am the sole representative of all 4400 midshipmen to the common on into the superintendent. So I'm the link between the Midshipmen body and our senior officer ship. So you told me. What kind of what A brigade commander does. What do you Sydney barber want to do like, How are you gonna make this special and make it yours? I feel like I have the heart to do it. My purpose in my objective is to build a team. People who appreciate each other appreciate every single thing that every person has and brings to the table who are really embracing our are blended organization and want to pursue a purpose, no matter what that looks like but are driven towards a shared short shared in common. Goal. So that's what I want to instill in my staff. That's what I want. And still in the brigade is a hole. I guess. First of all, if this whole military thing doesn't work out, please come work with me. I loved Tonto. That would be amazing if we could use you it at NPR. As I noted, you will be the first black woman in this role. And now the first woman to lead the brigade that came back in 1991. So not that long ago, um and back just then, in the early nineties, women were prohibited from flying warplanes couldn't serve on war ships at sea. In the Navy and the Marine Corps have changed so much Is there something what's left that the guys could do that you are prohibited from doing 00? My goodness. There probably are things out there that some limitations that still exist. There definitely are, but I am not worried about it. I'm not worried about all the any restrictions because I feel like we can keep. We can keep Breaking glass ceilings. This is just one of many something that I've heard recently and that I've really likes And I've said this a lot is that with every every step that I take, I mean, I leave the ladder down for the next person. Um and I've talked Tomo Miss Galina. She's been someone that's been a mentor to me the past week that all of this is kind of unfolded in the announcement. Has come about and I've gotten the chance to talk to people like her. Miss Jane is fine. She's the one who was the first woman back in. Yes, Yes, Mister Kalina? Yes, So she's been She's been reaching out to me Miss Janie Minds who the first African American female graduate of the Naval Academy. She's also been I've been speaking to her in depth. I got off the phone with Simone ask you who was the first African American first captain at West Point? Actually, 30 minutes ago, I was on the phone with Dr Rubin. Brigadier E S O. I just had a so money mentor who's also a brigade, commander of Black Brigade commander in the passing so many people who who have inspired me. Um, your story letters done to you. It sounds like right. And so when I think about this experience, I feel like it's special because it's not just about me. It's important that this story circulates for the purpose of The next generation all over the world. Who could look at this experience on Gluck at at this story is something that motivates them and inspires them Tonto amount of whatever goal that they have in their life. When did you know you wanted to join the Navy? Oh, I never wanted to join the Navy girl. So no, my so my dad. He was a graduate from the Naval Academy class of 91. He played basketball here. Andre something that they say is once you're in Academy grad or once a midshipman, always in mid shipment, and he lived by that everything everywhere. Any time was all about navy. This, namely that I was tired of it. By the time I was looking at colleges, I was trying to get away from that time. I wanted to write my own path. I'm looking at a lot of different schools. But what I really foster's in my heart is eyes just a drive for for wanting to pursue. Ah, Career of service. No matter what I did, I wanted to give back to the world. The reason we're doing this interview, the reason this is national news is that you are breaking a big old barrier there in Annapolis. I wonder how how big a deal is it on campus to your classmates care or you Sydney Barber, one of them and you know, like, Do you think about breaking the barriers as you walk around every day? Oh, I I try to keep a level head. I try to stay as grounded as possible. I try to keep a low profile, my friends, my teammates, especially on the track team with me. They kind of laughed because they know who I am. They know that I'm the last one to want my picture taken. Um, I usually I never post any stories on social media because I just don't usually like to Document everything that's going on in my life and just the shift of the past week they laugh because my face is everywhere. My picture is everywhere, People I also I don't usually like to To talk in front of a lot of people are talk about myself, but my mentors have actually helped me with that, and it's great to be humble, and that's something that I tried to be as best as possible. But at the same time, they're like Yeah, you need to be. You need to be confident you don't own this moment own the fact that you are the brigade commander. It took me forever to just say that to say those words because I don't. I don't like to fly. I don't. I don't want everyone to anyone to think that I'm any higher than them. So I'm going to try toe talk to the person that's taking out my trash or sweeping the floor outside my room and make them feel special. But the same time I need also step out of that. Like I need to own this moment to lead the brigade with confidence and with boldness. I do look forward to the day when we're not celebrating these firsts when when we're done because it is just not news that a woman that a black woman could do anything that her male classmates or white classmates could do. Um But it is also kind of. Ah, it's great, and it's a big deal, and I'm sitting here thinking If your grandmother so great grandmothers could see you. They must be so proud. Yeah. Yes, I think about something that I shared and in a founder's Day video about how I think about I'm so humbled by the fact that I get to walk here and be at the Naval Academy and be someone's wildest dream. And when I think about that, in my contents of my own history, my own family, my own ancestry, I think about My great grandparents were sharecroppers on a plantation in Mississippi. My grandmother now lives in Chicago. She was born on that plantation. Um They would never even pictured. This moment. This America looks nothing like the America that they experience and they died before they saw anything different, So I'm I always take that. Take that to heart. And I think about it pretty much daily as I go about my day here at the academy. Well, well, Those are words to live by own the moment. Congratulations again that Zbynek real pleasure and an honor to speak

Sydney Barber U. S Naval Academy Tomo Miss Galina Annapolis Navy Miss Janie Minds Dr Rubin Brigadier E S O. Miss Jane Kalina NPR Marine Corps Naval Academy Gluck West Point Tonto Simone
John Gorman Discusses the Use of Opportunity Zones to Address Social Determinants

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

06:36 min | Last month

John Gorman Discusses the Use of Opportunity Zones to Address Social Determinants

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host. David. Intra Cosso. During this podcast saw discussed efforts to address social determinants of health with John Gorman chairman of the nightingale partners and founder and former Executive Chairman of Gorman Health Group. John Welcome to the program. Thanks David. Great to be here. especially with another native DC guy here most welcome John's by is, of course, posted on the podcast website. Briefly on background, the ongoing covid nineteen pandemic has exposed. The country's failed to adequately address the social determinants of health. Generally defining health access and quality education, economic circumstances, food security, social conditions, and environmental factors. It is estimated that where people live work and socialize determines as much as sixty percent of their health status. Whereas formal medical care accounts for just ten percent. For example concerning. Circumstances forty years of wage stagnation among lower income earners has left forty five percent of working age Americans. With either no health care insurance for insurance without a pocket expenses so high. They avoid sinking care went for example, they developed covid nineteen related symptoms. Healthcare policy makers have slowly begun to take an interest in addressing sto ages as a way to improve health delivery by increasing increasing appropriate utilization and reducing costs. For example, Medicare, advantage plans which enroll more than one third of all Medicare beneficiaries have recently been given regulatory authority to offer Ma benificiary supplemental benefits beyond medical care such as mail deliveries, home modifications, and Personal Care Services. With beginning, discuss, addressing, social determine, specifically use of what are termed opportunities zones. Again. John Gorman. So Jon with that as background. Louis. Begin by asking if you could provide a brief overview of nightingale. Sure David Nangle partners is one of these weird opportunities zone funds that came out of trump's big tax giveaway bill It was actually Cory Booker's program that was designed to encourage investment in real estate and disadvantaged communities and I was sitting on my ass retired last spring and got a notification that the irs had just completely revamped the rags to allow opportunities own capital to be used not just for real estate investment. But also for leases one portly for working capital or for meeting the business requirements of a new company inside one of the nine thousand roughly nine thousand opportunities zones around the country and those opportunities owns David are all. Severely, economically disadvantaged and more importantly medically underserved, and because the irs allowed now opportunities own capital to be used for working capital for meeting business requirements. That's what opened the door to allow us to use opportunities on Capitol to make large scale investments in social determinants of health intervention. So nightingale partners with insurers with health systems with large medical groups to finance design launch, and where necessary execute on our goals to improve. The quality of care for vulnerable populations. In this country, a lot of people like to say and I love it that we packed a Republican billionaire tax shelter in order to improve care for black drought people on that gets me up every morning. Sir Thank you. So this as you noted, this was a provision in the December seventeen tax bill. Specifically page one, hundred, and thirty. This was picked up this previous legislation as you noted, that as you mentioned senator from New Jersey Cory Booker but also the South Carolina African American Republican, the only one Tim Scott. So this is picked up in the tax bill previous legislation and you mentioned the nine thousand. So these are census tracts that meet this low income community criteria wrote and then explain to me. Governors than have to select a discrete number. That could benefit from this. Tax Advantage program is that correct doubts correct and there was a little bit of mischief but some of the governors in the designation of some of those areas and there's been, you know some gamesmanship with this story like you know Chris Christie, the former governor of New Jersey is. Used an opportunity zone fund open up frigging LAUNDROMAT. In Asbury, Park with Bruce, springsteen cats not the kind of stuff that we do. I'm not surprised to hear that I guess the former governor is a is obsessed with. Mr Asbury Park and again just so on. Understand better more clearly, this is the tax advantage here is that by investing the capital gains on your investment, you can avoid paying the. Twenty three percent the capital gains tax and that basically. Sure go ahead, go ahead. Well, basically, the way it works is that if you invest money or capital gains in and opportunities zone and you leave it in for at least ten years, not only is the initial investment completely tax free but then all of the proceeds that you make on that investment are completely tax free. So high net worth individuals. And family offices large corporations the generate large amounts of capital gains love this program, and indeed it opened up about six point two trillion dollars in available capital based on the amount of capital gains that we generate in our economy. So of that amount, David Roughly a hundred billion dollars has been invested thus far into opportunities zones off. The roughly eight months programs operate.

John Gorman Nightingale Partners Gorman Health Group David David Nangle Cory Booker Medicare John IRS Sir Thank JON Louis Tim Scott Asbury, Park New Jersey Mr Asbury Park
"african americans" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

03:56 min | 4 months ago

"african americans" Discussed on Science Talk

"Big Hole. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> You <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Basically <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> right under our feet <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> somewhere <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> he's writer. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Free <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Snake citing <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> they collect a range of <Speech_Female> data, including <Speech_Female> GPS coordinates <Speech_Female> temperature <Speech_Female> and humidity. <Speech_Female> They're putting <Speech_Female> all those data together <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to try to understand <Speech_Female> why copperheads <Speech_Female> are only found <Speech_Female> in certain places <Speech_Female> within the reserve. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Jilin is especially <Speech_Female> interested <Speech_Female> in understanding where <Speech_Female> copperheads over <Speech_Female> winter. <Speech_Female> Last year he tracked <Speech_Female> a small number <Speech_Female> of individuals <Speech_Female> and found something surprising. <Speech_Female> These <Speech_Female> snakes spent the winter <Speech_Female> in rock piles <Speech_Female> underneath <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> major roads <Speech_Male> think about human <Speech_Male> influence manipulating <Speech_Male> the environment. <Speech_Male> What has that done? <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> why did <Speech_Male> at least to <Speech_Male> the snakes elect to <Speech_Male> hibernate in that particular <Speech_Male> area <Speech_Male> <hes> is that different <Speech_Male> than the natural <Speech_Male> areas that are there <Speech_Male> so people <Speech_Male> always the habitat <Speech_Male> fragmentation <Speech_Male> is of course bad, <Speech_Male> but there could be some <Speech_Male> other unintended <Speech_Male> consequences <Speech_Male> that may be beneficial, <Speech_Male> and <SpeakerChange> may not <Speech_Female> be an official <Speech_Female> as humans <Speech_Female> have moved out of <Speech_Female> the cities and built <Speech_Female> homes where forests <Speech_Female> once stood snake <Speech_Female> populations <Speech_Female> around Saint Louis <Speech_Female> have seized <Speech_Female> into smaller <Speech_Female> and smaller slices <Speech_Female> of Habitat. Many little <Speech_Female> habitat patches <Speech_Female> like powder valley <Speech_Female> are now bordered <Speech_Female> by major roads <Speech_Female> Bob <Speech_Female> Alright Ridge spent <Speech_Female> his career studying <Speech_Female> snakes in <Speech_Female> the Saint Louis area <Speech_Female> the retired. <Speech_Female> Saint. Louis University <Speech_Female> biology professor, <Speech_Female> says these <Speech_Female> small isolated <Speech_Female> populations <Speech_Female> are at a higher <Speech_Male> risk of <SpeakerChange> disappearing. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> Population is <Speech_Telephony_Male> large enough. You <Speech_Telephony_Male> can lose a fair <Speech_Telephony_Male> number of them <Speech_Telephony_Male> and the ones that survive <Speech_Telephony_Male> can spray <Speech_Telephony_Male> back out <Speech_Telephony_Male> was once isolated. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <SpeakerChange> That's <Speech_Telephony_Female> it roads, <Speech_Female> strip malls, <Speech_Female> and other artificial <Speech_Female> barriers <Speech_Female> can keep snakes from <Speech_Female> migrating to find <Speech_Female> maids, he says, <Speech_Female> and that's a <Speech_Female> problem because it <Speech_Female> reduces gene flow <Speech_Female> and <SpeakerChange> can lead to <Speech_Male> inbreeding <Speech_Telephony_Male> during the breeding season, <Speech_Telephony_Male> males will travel <Silence> long distances. <Speech_Telephony_Male> So <Speech_Telephony_Male> if you prevent that, <Speech_Telephony_Male> then all of a sudden, <Speech_Telephony_Male> this whole <Speech_Telephony_Male> population <Speech_Telephony_Male> in just <Speech_Telephony_Male> exchanging genes <Speech_Telephony_Female> between <SpeakerChange> one <Speech_Telephony_Female> another, that's <Speech_Female> a bad thing, says Aldridge <Speech_Female> because harmful <Speech_Female> mutations can <Speech_Female> build up in the population <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> make it more likely <Speech_Female> that it goes extinct <Speech_Female> right <Speech_Female> now. It's hard to know <Speech_Female> if these copperhead <Speech_Female> populations are <Speech_Female> at risk of disappearing <Speech_Female> for one <Speech_Female> thing, we still don't <Speech_Female> know how many there are, <Speech_Female> or how far <Speech_Female> they travel. <Speech_Female> Benjelloun is <Speech_Female> working on it, <Speech_Female> but it's been slow <Speech_Female> going <Speech_Female> last year. One of <Speech_Female> the pregnant females <Speech_Female> he was tracking drowned <Speech_Female> in a flash flood, <Speech_Female> and it was a big <Speech_Male> blow <SpeakerChange> to the study <Speech_Male> was challenging. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Finding the best <Speech_Male> way to try <Speech_Male> to answer questions <Speech_Male> and it's difficult to <Speech_Male> do the field. There's <Speech_Male> a reason that lab <Speech_Male> studies are amazing <Speech_Male> because you could control <Speech_Male> all the environments. <Speech_Male> Your <Speech_Male> snake won't get washed <Speech_Male> away in a flash flood. <Speech_Male> Your snake <Speech_Male> won't get run over. <Speech_Male> Hopefully will develop <Speech_Male> disease, <Speech_Male> but then of <Speech_Male> course if you're in <Speech_Male> the lab, <SpeakerChange> you're <Speech_Female> not in a natural setting <Speech_Female> for now. <Speech_Female> He says he's keeping. <Speech_Female> His fingers crossed. <Speech_Female> That nothing happens <Speech_Female> to the copperheads. <Speech_Female> He's been tracking <Speech_Female> maybe <Speech_Female> in five or ten <Speech_Female> years he'll <Speech_Female> have a better understanding <Speech_Female> of this mysterious <Speech_Female> species, <Speech_Female> and how the snakes <Speech_Female> are doing <Speech_Female> in their human dominated <Speech_Female> environment <Speech_Female> for scientific <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> American Science <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Talk I'm Shay <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Afars on. <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Let's it <Speech_Male> for this episode. Get Your <Speech_Male> Science News at our <Speech_Male> web site. WWW <Speech_Music_Male> DOT scientific <Speech_Male> American dot com. <Speech_Male> All <Speech_Male> of our corona virus <Speech_Male> coverage is <Speech_Male> out from behind <Speech_Male> the pay wall, available <Speech_Male> free <Speech_Male> and follow <Speech_Male> us on twitter <Speech_Male> where you'll get a tweet.

"african americans" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

03:10 min | 4 months ago

"african americans" Discussed on Science Talk

"The CO founder and president of Neon Company. Finally more than three thousand snake species slither across the planet. Many are hard to find in the wild, which makes them difficult to study. The copperhead is an example. It's well camouflaged body blends in with leaves and branches on the forest floor. Even veterans snake trackers have a hard time spotting a copperhead in the forest, but a group of scientists in Missouri's cheating a little with technology reporters Shayla. Farzin has the story as he gets ready to perform surgery Chris Hanley listens closely to his patients heartbeat. Giving stuff. Fluids. The,.

Farzin Chris Hanley Neon Company CO founder Shayla president Missouri
"african americans" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

05:47 min | 4 months ago

"african americans" Discussed on Science Talk

"But CRA ovonic relishes a challenge I remember thinking. If everybody expects you to fail, you can always exceed expectations and chronic did just that designing corrective lenses that focus the electron beam like a spotlight scans back and forth across the sample in a scanning transmission electron microscope. For this pioneering work chronic shared the Calveley prize in Nanno, science with the team of Harold Rose, Maximilian Haider and Newt Orbin, who independently developed characters to boost the resolving power of the conventional transmission electron microscope, in which a broad stationary beam illuminates the entire sample at once. Both characters produced the first crystal clear images of individual atoms that clarity opens up new fields of investigation and to see how scientific American custom media in partnership with the prize chatted with chronic about designing tiny computers, seeing into cells without destroying them and getting a handle on hydrogen, the smallest and one of the most abundant elements and a potential source of clean energy, the resolution of any microscope is limited by the wavelength of its illumination source, optical microscopes which use visible light to examine samples can distinguish items a few hundred nanometers in size, so bacteria or visible, whereas most viruses are not. Electron microscopes invented in the nineteen thirties can reveal objects that are much smaller because the wavelength of the electron is very very much shelter theory, these scopes should be able to resolve objects that are a hundred times smaller than an atom, but in practice they rarely get close. Because electrons are harder to focus than light, you cannot make glass lenses electrons because electrons will go through the ghosts. They will get Scotland they wrote come out to change the trajectory of electrons, so they all arrive at the same point. Point the lenses you use actually magnetic fields. You make a big call spool of wire, and you send current through it and tracing magnetic field, and the magnetic field focuses the electrons, but electrons that pass through different locations in this field are deflected at different angles, producing aberrations that distort and blurred the resulting images, the characters designed by Vanek and the team from Germany..

CRA Maximilian Haider Vanek Harold Rose Nanno Newt Orbin Germany Scotland
"african americans" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

03:20 min | 4 months ago

"african americans" Discussed on Science Talk

"But no less fascinating creatures, including docile but fierce, looking Black Scorpion and this guy that came over. He was just all your. What is that? You know Blah Blah. Blah Blah, and he was terrified like. And then he wouldn't. Even whatever I said well, you got a cell phone camera on it. As you want me to hold you like you don't have to hold the Scorpion, but you can stand next to the case whatever so he was like. Hold it, so we talked them through it. And he held it and gave him some facts, or whatever took his picture, and he was over the moon, he came back like fifteen twenty minutes later with like seventeen, seventeen of his friends from across the street from the projects, and they're like. Oh, you're. And we let him. Hold the Scorpion. Tell them about it. You know. And he remembered what we told him. He was a natural born educator from the way that he just picked that up and so again I. Think we have it in us. It's just a matter of the exposure river keeper. Fred Tottenham is found that the key is not lecturing or proselytizing, but meeting people where they are finding common bonds, and taking the time to learn and understand their stories about nature, their connections rather than imposing yours on them right, you have to be open to the possibility that if you make this as exciting as a science lecture. You'RE GONNA. Lose a lot of folks who don't. Come from that place. They're coming to it from the sense of a heartfelt. My daddy used to teach me to fish in this river or you know I. experienced my first You know whatever on this river I had sex for the first time on the banks of the river. Negative people have said stuff like that to be. People have all kinds of crazy connections. These rivers and you have to be open to let them experience them. If you're gonNA, proscribe those connections, you're gonNA, lose people because they don't fed. Once people care once they feel included. They'll begin to find the niches within the environmental community that speak to them then whether ecology climate, science, urban planning, or just learning to enjoy and appreciate the natural world, the greater community that embraces environmental awareness, appreciation and understanding will grow and thrive. As a river keeper with five heart surgeons in a row. My challenge is to make sure that this work doesn't disappear. If I retire fall over, get sick and the way you do that. Is You build a movement that's embedded within the community. It'll never die. You can't stamp it up for scientific American. I'm Bob her sean. In the past week, the president announced a plan that would according to an NPR report by Jeff. Brady reduce the types and numbers of projects that will be subject to review under the fifty year old. National Environmental Policy, act or Niba. That NPR story includes comments from NBA Chino a senior attorney at the natural resources defense. Council that touch on the very concerns just noted by Maisy. Hughes and Mustafa Santiago Ali. Chino explained that the Nipah Law was designed to give a voice to communities along hurt by pollution from highways, pipelines and chemical plants that are disproportionately located in their neighborhoods, but she know also said quote. Nipah gives poor and communities of color essay in the projects that will define their communities for decades to come rather than listen. The trump administration's plan aims to silence, such voices and quote. On despite his plan, I suspect he's going to hear those voices on November third now.

Fred Tottenham Chino NPR Hughes Nipah Law Mustafa Santiago Ali National Environmental Policy Brady Niba Bob NBA president Jeff senior attorney
"african americans" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

05:28 min | 4 months ago

"african americans" Discussed on Science Talk

"Like after we heard the speakers, everyone was like so engaged in how they're talking about climate change. As soon as we left the festival, everyone was like okay. We're going to go back to our everyday lives, and like no one really understood that like every actions ads, the crisis over and over again unless you actively change your lifestyle and advocate for system change, nothing is going to happen so I discontinue books and being seven years old I couldn't. I couldn't do much, but I just. Want documentaries and discontinued educate myself, and when I was like gotten sixth and seventh grade I was like I'm done just reading books. I got to tell people about. This is insane that no one's taking real action to stop the climate crisis foster started a climate change. Related instagram page increased his social network footprint, and eventually launched the climate reporter and Inter. National Online publication with Youth Reporters in eight countries in ninth grade, he launched a virtual reality company called Tau VR featuring simulations designed to promote empathy and social justice, and about two years ago, he got an email for Greta Thornburgh, not long before she began her climate strikes and. And I'm GONNA start climate, striking and I'm in Sweden. What there I also want young people in the US start striking with me, and if you can join in so I. It was like the White House will be perfect place and I started way. I, climate, striking right in front of the White House protesting in his blue think, globally bike locally, t foster gained national attention even more so when Jane Fonda, asked if she could join him, but foster says the climate strikes and marches weren't meant to be the news..

Greta Thornburgh White House Jane Fonda foster US Tau VR Sweden reporter National Online
"african americans" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

05:19 min | 4 months ago

"african americans" Discussed on Science Talk

"Swami this conversation with myself began sixteen years ago started production, river, keeper, and the Guy delivered packages to the office. It might have been ups or something like. Like that, so what in the world you guys do? I told him you know. We protect a river, and we sue polluters, and we run advocacy movements. And he said wow thought about that I could see the wheels turning in his head. He was a person of color, and he said I didn't think that black people could do this successfully wore. The white communities would accept doing this. So I realized that there was perspective out there a set of expectations about what any of us are likely to be able to do, and that we had to challenge those expectations all of us as the only African American river keeper in the US Tuchman acts as a bridge between a white, dominated conservation, establishment and communities of color alongside the river. He protects you find challenges being a person of color in working in this field. Sure I feel challenges and their intricate ones because I don't want to. To be identified as the river keeper for the Black Folks. That's kind of futile right I. I feel like I'm representing a movement that wants to protect a watershed that requires as much participation across many boundaries and I do find time to the messing us in black and brown communities necessarily needs to be different, because the problems are different, because the perspective is different, environmental consultant to Chemo Price adds that perspective may be at odds with the perspectives of mainstream environmental groups had to talk to people who. Bring bring trees to neighborhoods. It hadn't even considered the history of African. Americans in trees. People may not be jumping up and down. Going here on trees, you know older people, maybe like you know what reasonable represent safety for me who knows, but it's just being open and honest about an invalidating the fact that not everybody is a tree hugger in it's okay, and while many people consider untrammelled park lands peaceful escapes from the stresses of the city. People of color may view them differently. There's a lot of people that you know of justifiably are afraid of certain parks because that's where people go maybe to. To Do to dump bodies where people go to do things that they don't want other people to see them doing, and she says that people may simply feel unwelcome especially in federal parks. This like that room in your house that has the plastic on the couch gymnastics to.

Black Folks African American river Tuchman Swami gymnastics Chemo Price US consultant
"african americans" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

04:16 min | 4 months ago

"african americans" Discussed on Science Talk

"Road wanting. This is so exciting. Fred Tuchman is the river keeper for the Pawtuxet River in Maryland and a winner of the Audubon. Naturalist Society Twenty Twenty Environmental Champions Award River keepers are part of the national nonprofit group dedicated to protecting waterways. Swami this conversation with myself began sixteen years ago started production, river, keeper, and the Guy delivered packages to the office. It might have been ups or something like. Like that, so what in the world you guys do? I told him you know. We protect a river, and we sue polluters, and we run advocacy movements. And he said wow thought about that I could see the wheels turning in his head. He was a person of color, and he said I didn't think that black people could do this successfully wore. The white communities would accept doing this. So I realized that there was perspective out there a set of expectations about what any of us are likely to be able to do, and that we had to challenge those expectations all of us as the only African American river keeper in the US Tuchman acts as a bridge between a white, dominated conservation, establishment and communities of color alongside the river. He protects you find challenges being a person of color in working in this field. Sure I feel challenges and their intricate ones because I don't want to. To be identified as the river keeper for the Black Folks. That's kind of futile right I. I feel like I'm representing a movement that wants to protect a watershed that requires as much participation across many boundaries and I do find time to the messing us in black and brown communities necessarily needs to be different, because the problems are different, because the perspective is different, environmental consultant to Chemo Price adds that perspective may be at odds with the perspectives of mainstream environmental groups had to talk to people who. Bring bring trees to neighborhoods. It hadn't even considered the history of African. Americans in trees. People may not be jumping up and down. Going here on trees, you know older people, maybe like you know what reasonable represent safety for me who knows, but it's just being open and honest about an invalidating the fact that not everybody is a tree hugger in it's okay, and while many people consider untrammelled park lands peaceful escapes from the stresses of the city. People of color may view them differently. There's a lot of people that you know of justifiably are afraid of certain parks because that's where people go maybe to. To Do to dump bodies where people go to do things that they don't want other people to see them doing, and she says that people may simply feel unwelcome especially in federal parks. This like that room in your house that has the plastic on the couch gymnastics to go into, but looks really nice, but you can't go use it so sometimes I think people perceive that is just any unaccessible space to them that distance people may feel regarding these spaces comes partly from their not having been included in the process of creating them, maisy us is a landscape architect and arborist and says that city. City planners pay much more attention to the needs and desires of upscale neighborhoods than those of low income communities. I've gone to so many different community admitting and can tell you from firsthand experience. How much more deference communities that are rich white? Get in the in the planning process how they get to Co. create their communities as part of that because they have power that they can leverage in that process. She's found that many people don't fully understand the process one in which city planners create land, use maps and decide the fate of each community everywhere there is. There are people who decide what type. Type of land use goes where rate so if you have like a power plant in your neighborhood, somebody decided that your neighborhood is a good location for that power plant. If you have other types of pollutants in your neighborhood, a lot of times it has to do with industrial land uses or commercial land uses those are decisions that an urban planner would make, and so if you noticed stat, communities of color tend to have these adjacent cities with pollution. That's because somebody approved that land use, but people don't know that land use maps drive like these kinds of decisions and a lot of times people. Are not part of the process when they're creating the land use maps in a lot of times, people are part of the process. Get Nord in the process of creating this,

Black Folks African American river Tuchman Swami gymnastics Chemo Price US consultant
"african americans" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

04:16 min | 4 months ago

"african americans" Discussed on Science Talk

"Road wanting. This is so exciting. Fred Tuchman is the river keeper for the Pawtuxet River in Maryland and a winner of the Audubon. Naturalist Society Twenty Twenty Environmental Champions Award River keepers are part of the national nonprofit group dedicated to protecting waterways. Swami this conversation with myself began sixteen years ago started production, river, keeper, and the Guy delivered packages to the office. It might have been ups or something like. Like that, so what in the world you guys do? I told him you know. We protect a river, and we sue polluters, and we run advocacy movements. And he said wow thought about that I could see the wheels turning in his head. He was a person of color, and he said I didn't think that black people could do this successfully wore. The white communities would accept doing this. So I realized that there was perspective out there a set of expectations about what any of us are likely to be able to do, and that we had to challenge those expectations all of us as the only African American river keeper in the US Tuchman acts as a bridge between a white, dominated conservation, establishment and communities of color alongside the river. He protects you find challenges being a person of color in working in this field. Sure I feel challenges and their intricate ones because I don't want to. To be identified as the river keeper for the Black Folks. That's kind of futile right I. I feel like I'm representing a movement that wants to protect a watershed that requires as much participation across many boundaries and I do find time to the messing us in black and brown communities necessarily needs to be different, because the problems are different, because the perspective is different, environmental consultant to Chemo Price adds that perspective may be at odds with the perspectives of mainstream environmental groups had to talk to people who. Bring bring trees to neighborhoods. It hadn't even considered the history of African. Americans in trees. People may not be jumping up and down. Going here on trees, you know older people, maybe like you know what reasonable represent safety for me who knows, but it's just being open and honest about an invalidating the fact that not everybody is a tree hugger in it's okay, and while many people consider untrammelled park lands peaceful escapes from the stresses of the city. People of color may view them differently. There's a lot of people that you know of justifiably are afraid of certain parks because that's where people go maybe to. To Do to dump bodies where people go to do things that they don't want other people to see them doing, and she says that people may simply feel unwelcome especially in federal parks. This like that room in your house that has the plastic on the couch gymnastics to go into, but looks really nice, but you can't go use it so sometimes I think people perceive that is just any unaccessible space to them that distance people may feel regarding these spaces comes partly from their not having been included in the process of creating them, maisy us is a landscape architect and arborist and says that city. City planners pay much more attention to the needs and desires of upscale neighborhoods than those of low income communities. I've gone to so many different community admitting and can tell you from firsthand experience. How much more deference communities that are rich white? Get in the in the planning process how they get to Co. create their communities as part of that because they have power that they can leverage in that process. She's found that many people don't fully understand the process one in which city planners create land, use maps and decide the fate of each community everywhere there is. There are people who decide what type. Type of land use goes where rate so if you have like a power plant in your neighborhood, somebody decided that your neighborhood is a good location for that power plant. If you have other types of pollutants in your neighborhood, a lot of times it has to do with industrial land uses or commercial land uses those are decisions that an urban planner would make, and so if you noticed stat, communities of color tend to have these adjacent cities with pollution. That's because somebody approved that land use, but people don't know that land use maps drive like these kinds of decisions and a lot of times people. Are not part of the process when they're creating the land use maps in a lot of times, people are part of the process. Get Nord in the process of creating this,

Black Folks African American river Tuchman Swami gymnastics Chemo Price US consultant
"african americans" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

WSJ Your Money Briefing

02:13 min | 5 months ago

"african americans" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

"Ways to make their <Speech_Male> workplaces more equitable <Speech_Male> new <Speech_Male> research from Boston <Speech_Male> University shows <Speech_Male> that African American <Speech_Male> and female <Speech_Male> job seekers get <Speech_Male> a big bump in pay <Speech_Male> when employers can't <Speech_Male> ask for their salary <Speech_Male> history, <Speech_Male> a reporter <Speech_Male> Omeday is with <Speech_Male> us to explain <Speech_Male> so America <Speech_Male> is the banning of asking <Speech_Male> salary history <Speech_Male> questions of job <Speech_Male> applicants <SpeakerChange> a national <Speech_Male> law, so <Speech_Female> it is not a national <Speech_Female> law, <Speech_Female> but several <Speech_Female> states <Speech_Female> and local jurisdictions <Speech_Female> have passed <Speech_Female> some sort of salary <Speech_Female> history. History Ban. <Speech_Female> The exact <Speech_Female> nature of the band <Speech_Female> will vary depending <Speech_Female> on the <Speech_Female> location, <Speech_Female> but Massachusetts, <Speech_Female> in two thousand, sixteen <Speech_Female> became the first <Speech_Female> state to pass <Speech_Female> such a ban, and <Speech_Female> since then we've seen <Speech_Female> several other <SpeakerChange> states and <Speech_Female> local jurisdictions <Speech_Male> follow suit <Speech_Male> wanted states do <Speech_Female> that I <Speech_Female> it takes away <Speech_Female> the bargaining power <Speech_Female> from <Speech_Female> the employer <Speech_Female> and Kinda <Speech_Female> puts power back <Speech_Female> in the hands of an applicant <Speech_Female> right, because <Speech_Female> if the employer <Speech_Female> knows how much you've <Speech_Female> made, they <Speech_Female> can use that to <Speech_Female> sort of determine <Speech_Female> what to offer <Speech_Female> you. Would they <Speech_Female> give you? You a job <Speech_Female> offer, and so it <Speech_Female> kind of puts bargaining <Speech_Female> power in the hands <Speech_Female> of the employer. <Speech_Female> The other thing <Speech_Female> that economists <Speech_Female> I spoke to said <Speech_Female> is that if <Speech_Female> you are part of a group <Speech_Female> that has faced <Speech_Female> historical <Speech_Female> discrimination <Speech_Female> in the labor market, <Speech_Female> and because of <Speech_Female> that, you've been paid <Speech_Female> less than perhaps <Speech_Female> your your peers are comparable <Speech_Female> workers. An <Speech_Female> employer can use <Speech_Female> your wage history <Speech_Female> to kind of perpetuate <Speech_Female> those inequalities, <Speech_Female> so it's <Speech_Female> a way of making sure <Speech_Female> that the <Speech_Female> playing field is level <Speech_Female> as people <Speech_Female> are in <Speech_Female> negotiations <Speech_Male> for how. How much <SpeakerChange> they should be <Speech_Male> paid now. <Speech_Male> How of the research indicate <Speech_Male> African Americans <Speech_Male> and women have benefited <Speech_Male> from not being <Speech_Male> asked about <SpeakerChange> salary <Speech_Female> history when <Speech_Female> salary history <Speech_Female> bins go into <Speech_Female> effect, <Speech_Female> it has <Speech_Female> a considerable benefit <Speech_Female> for <Speech_Female> African Americans <Speech_Female> and women who <Speech_Female> are changing jobs, <Speech_Female> so the <Speech_Female> study basically found <Speech_Female> that African <Speech_Female> Americans who <Speech_Female> were covered <Speech_Female> by a salary history <Speech_Female> band when they were changing <Speech_Female> jobs, they <Speech_Female> saw an increase in <Speech_Female> pay that was thirteen <Speech_Female> percent higher <Speech_Female> than comparable <Speech_Female> workers who are not <Speech_Female> covered <Speech_Female> by salary history. <Speech_Female> Ban and <Speech_Female> women also saw. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Greater increase <Speech_Female> in pay than <Speech_Female> women who were not <Speech_Male> covered by a salary <Speech_Male> history man. <Speech_Male> What does the study data <Speech_Male> tell us <SpeakerChange> about wage <Speech_Female> gaps?

"african americans" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

04:56 min | 6 months ago

"african americans" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Groups of people who are often neglected. I believe it. This is gonNA sound like a really awful. All question you ever watch the TV show new Amsterdam. I just started watching. You know because I used to watch. This is us, but now it comes on the same time as black ish in makes a mix this which we're like both shows and stuff like that, so but the moment that black ish goes off. I always turn to Amsterdam. Because I remember I was looking for something because it's not ready to go to bed, I want something to watch TV or whatever and turn on a new Amsterdam in. They were working with These African Americans in the Barbara shop now it's. Getting that and is so funny, because I can't think of I got a Frat Bro. Memory kept off aside, but he's a matter of fact. He's from Oakland but he lives in Los Angeles and his. Event is called trapped medicine, and eventually they go to different barbershops around south, central Los Angeles and I think either. They get free haircuts and promote. Cardiovascular disease and awareness in her take care of herself. Menam can't think of his name bread. His organizations called trap medicine. He went to Morehouse. University, So, that's going to bother me. By I I. Encourage you guys to deafened. Look at the medicine because ever listened to this and. Is because he's doing some positive things. Djamil Lacy Djamil Lacey. Lacey yeah, told him out. The reason I brought that up was because. The white doctor was sitting in the black barbershops, wanting to promote cardiovascular health like blood pressure testing all that stuff, and he wasn't part of their community, so they were ignoring him, and so he gets the bright idea to teach. The Barber's how to do the testing now they're not medically trained. And of course, the board of the hospital has a tizzy fit, and I guess somebody goes, and and they see the barber is doing you know the test? I think they might have been do. Blood sugar testing to I watched Kinda late at night, and I watched for entertainment, and then just kind of it's brain doesn't doesn't i. don't need the details to remain. Should I just remember cover time I talk to you? I think about that episode. How you know he was trying the white director of medicine doctor was trying to help communities. Help themselves there's. An I think I think that's important it is. There's so much until Barbara Shop. It is a member because content about last time. We were hosting amateurs of called the power three in one of the places that really help promote was the barbershop and things from people. See that you're from a community and they blew what you're doing stuff like I. can only go to Barbara. Starr slower than other things to do, but those bombers are cutting hair all day in they kind of promote and they talked. talked to different groups of people about what you're doing components of it because you gave them the blueprint what to do, that's like additional promotion, and it was like a badge of honor, because my yards from the suburbs of Indianapolis in give him a haircut in West Chicago when I was taking classes when Dr Program and they thought so highly. Let me hang the poster. To light with all the other things that they promoted community like like like you know a badge of honor, and it's just one of from. We'll see because. When people see what you do, system to slow unique has aware northwestern. Psychology, switcher? And what happens like you could be in the most obscure area. And we'll say on team. Uncle, my Granddad, my grandma, my whomever. They have some Alzheimer's. They had a stroke they how all this stuff in? We didn't know what to do, but when we see you, let us pass you. Pester you with these questions because you're resource that we don't normally have, and that's why like that's so committed to like this whole idea of community, neuro, psychology and cognitive agent health disparity because I believe that this utility and I think like we're just at the tip of the. And so much more to do with it. I agree. Well? That's a wrap for this week. If you enjoyed this episode, you know the routine ratings reviews. Share this episode with friends family strangers. Follow me on social media, so you get to see all the other fun things that are going on in my caregiving life, and as always over in your ears again next Tuesday..

Amsterdam Djamil Lacy Djamil Lacey Barber Barbara Shop Menam Los Angeles Alzheimer Barbara Oakland Morehouse director Indianapolis Chicago Starr Dr Program
"african americans" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

02:05 min | 6 months ago

"african americans" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Ends up happening in the middle of the field, it's like okay. Go to big name versity, you prominent professor. Cool, but then sometimes struggled work on people that you never encountered before. So say how can we get people from these communities, people of Color. You know say species in African Americans because I am African Americans, but for the Latino brothers sisters, the same being say okay. We recruit these people they go by him to places that most people can reach in getting people off doing different things, and that's why. I'm so excited with what Dr Goldberg is doing. North Carolina Antique with the coach Program so yeah, so this theme in Nutshell, but yeah. I'm. In a definitely has some plans are really really really WanNa to pursue and just really think I can make it happen i. Make it happen. I can really like implement change on to see so I'm super excited about. Six months, and then you can start teaching the world. Right a hostal. Will I I kinda started changing the spark plugs right now, so I just had to keep I. Just have to keep pushing just kind of keep going, and that's why I'm so appreciative. That Jim Vitamin podcast because in a way kind of gives me a bigger platform. What a bike can do it like? Maybe somebody else will here you know this is a good idea to and continue to implement these activities. I agree and like I said earlier with the. California doing the programs within the local county health health departments. I can see how that's really crucial and I just. I really think that this is gonNA. Come down to like a community level just because Alzheimer's is so different in each person that you can't just have a blanket solution or blanket services in like okay well. You've been diagnosed so here. You're going to go, do A. B. and C.. A. Doesn't necessarily fit everybody, which is the biggest challenge with this deceit with.

professor North Carolina Antique Alzheimer Dr Goldberg Jim Vitamin California A. B.
"african americans" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

01:41 min | 6 months ago

"african americans" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Am driving out of the parking lot, so it was really you know changing things up is really it's hard for me, but it was a really good thing to do, and I'm like okay well. If we ever start getting any rain like we had hundred and fifty percent last year so far this year we've had zero. Like hit or miss, I, guess I might do that class more. Often I might get my own gloves that we don't half borrowings from the gym, but it's just it's I find also being out in the sunshine helps me a lot. And when I take my mom out, I find in. Most people would not see this herbert she has just. It's like a little bit brighter. Light is on for a little while when we're outside in the nature in the fresh air, although we've been having some crappy air-quality lately because a fire. The Sunshine it's just the nature is so restorative. So I try to mix up my workouts between indoor and outdoor. Hopefully, we don't have one hundred fifty percent of our rain so that I don't feel like. Laying on the floor, crying in the winter. I definitely understand. I'll be nice Mike's. Yeah well once it was like. We had drought. We one hundred percent than we seventy-five than we had one hundred fifty. I wish Mother Nature would just be like. Here's The rain you need and our. Pleasant yeah, and then where I live, we don't get snow, but we're not that far away about two hours away from the snow for WanNa go the snow. That's what that's. What people like they're like. I actually had this woman asked me what was so great about California and I was like you did not just ask me that, and that's what I told her. I'm like from.

WanNa herbert California Mike
"african americans" Discussed on The Trip

The Trip

06:35 min | 6 months ago

"african americans" Discussed on The Trip

"Own, right there you are. How you doing my med all right, this seems great. It seems like we're coming through. I'M GONNA I'M GONNA. Put on my speaker. My headphones looks like you've got it. Voice memos going. The writer and comedian Jennifer Neil used to have a deeply smart travel column for the route called blacks. With one very simple premise. Things are just too twisted for black Americans, so they might like. She had been feeling the urge to live in some other freer country. But where? What is it like being black in different parts of Asia or the Jennifer's column was way to find out. Now I recorded an episode with Jennifer in Berlin where she lives for a pre covert episode of this show and I hope we can play that one soon enough, but this week. She connected me with someone she had written about in her blacks column Reggie Robinson an African American native of Dallas, who is a middle school, history and English teacher and a longtime resident of Korea and now Taiwan. I had originally wanted to do an episode this week about Americans abroad generally, but that can wait. For now as the police are rioting through my city and through our nation. and has are miserable. President says all the quiet thirty parts of America's social and racial contract out loud. I'm glad to be able to spend the entirety of this episode with Reggie and with his unusual vantage point. From the other side of the world. This is Nathan Thornburgh and from Rosen Kingdoms. You're listening to the trip the world lockdown. I'm interested especially for this week. What it's like being an American watching all of this happened. You know and I thought I was just GonNa talk about like bad corona shit, but we're we're you know we're back again? Talking about an older virus anyways. So that's. So. Let's let's start with that so you. You came from Dallas Yeah. You went to the Far East Yeah. You went to East Asia. How did that come about? Well for whatever reason. I just knew that I didn't want to really work in corporate America and say, how can I see the world I was a poor college students I was like I. Want to see the world. How can I do it and luckily my English? Adviser. He was like Yo. You could just. Teach around the world and I was like that's not possible, and it was like I, did it in the seventies and house at this point, it was two thousand six and I was like. Wait what this has been going on. Assist the seventies and you. Know he told me. He was like yeah, just Google, and I googled it and I ended up coming to East Asia. It was out of at the time. It was out of China. Japan and Korea and Japan was just way too expensive. China was just not at the point where I wanted to visit to live there and career was somewhere in the middle I was like okay. I can I can do this and so I ended up going to Korea. And you spent quite a while there, then men I've been there for. I've been in Korea for at least twelve years that I. recently two years ago, I moved to Taiwan, but I was there for about twelve years. And what brought you over to Taiwan Republic of China. It was just time for a change There was some immigration stuff that was going on. It was time for a change. It's just like how can I? It was between Taiwan Vietnam and I was like I'm not again. It was like Vietnam sounds cool, but I'm not really sure was a place where I wanna live and luckily. Who lived at lived here? Who now live in Korea do you should go to Taiwan? It would be great. It's very chill relaxed. People were kind and I came here, and it was everything everyone had ever said about it and I was like. Wow, this is surprising. What is what's going on and there's a little island a? Yeah. I mean for all the time I've spent there. Maybe twenty four thirty six hours I got the same feeling, plus it's all just bathed in like one gigantic beautiful hot pot. And Love and good food. For sure for sure. So, but at that point when you were thinking about leaving Korea did it cross your mind to to repatriate to return to your your native land. At. The funny thing was when I came here for year. I went home to visit for. I've gone home. What twice now, so two thousand, nine, thousand, nine, hundred, and right before the covid virus late really hit off. which was like I think it was last home and right at the end of January beginning of February, but I thought like man I should really maybe I could come back home. It wasn't really like a real thought, but it was like it has enough things that I enjoy about life that I could get into, and I was like you know I, could I could really live in Dallas again and then everything happened knows yeah I'm cool. Stay. That thought was a butterfly. Way For your shoulder. No for sure, so tell me tell me about that feeling I mean. As an American, watching corona virus as an african-american watching. Racist Virus. What is it like being far away? And and how does it? How does it look to you over in Taiwan? Well for their entire, we'll start with the. I guess the Corona Virus First Covid nineteen. Living here, it's been. It's been kind of a really weird situation where I'm in a place, where as soon as I got back like they quarantined the entire country for about two or three weeks, and then there was this slight. They introduced everything very slowly it until we're at a point now to where we can kinda do some things, but they're still mass like the other day was reprimanded because my mask was over my nose, it was just right above my beer right above of my mouth, and the guy was like the workers was hey mask and I was like Oh. SORRY DUDE! I I'm not trying to do anything wrong. Sorry,.

Korea Taiwan Dallas Jennifer Neil East Asia Reggie Robinson America Taiwan Republic of China Taiwan Vietnam Asia China writer Nathan Thornburgh Google Vietnam President Japan Berlin
"african americans" Discussed on Black History in Two Minutes

Black History in Two Minutes

02:54 min | 6 months ago

"african americans" Discussed on Black History in Two Minutes

"Dry-cleaning gas masks and traffic signals are some of the many innovations that we owed to the ingenuity of early African American inventors. In eighteen twenty one. Thomas Jennings became the first African American to be granted a patent. Jennings been the process of dry scouring. A forerunner to dry cleaning, it is surprising that Jennings was able to patent his process of dry scouring, even though he was free, because there are still a great deal of resistance on part of lawyers to take African, Americans says clients and patent their ideas and inventions. Regardless of how the lawyers being a felt. Jennings had staked claim for blackened vendors. And once slavery was abolished. A steady flow of African Americans was able to patent their inventions. Among them was judy read? The first African woman to receive a pet. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty four read patented a machine for needing enrolling dough. Ms Reed signed the application with an X. Indicating that while she was a brilliant inventor. She had never been taught to read or write. Two of the most influential early black inventions came from the mind of one inventor. Garrett mortgage. Garrett, Morgan, invented breathing device, which is a equivalent to what we would call gasmask. There's a story that in nineteen sixteen, there was a natural gas explosion in the Midwest and Morgan was able to demonstrate that his gas mask actually save people's lives, and so his invention got a great deal of notoriety. Years later after witnessing the traffic, Accident Morgan devised another invention. This time to make driving safer. Morgan ended up patenting a new kind of traffic light that would allow people to have a little bit more time to stop, which was the forerunner to the yellow lights recognizing how hard it had been to get his gas mask except it around the country, he sold it to General Electric. He knew that because he was African American he did have the access to the kind of markets that would help those inventions sell. Later black innovators stood on the shoulders of Jennings read Morgan and other patent. Pioneers such as Jan Matt, Zellweger Creator of shoemaking machine and Sarah good inventor of a folding bed. Their inventions not only improve daily life. But they also established black people's role in fostering America's long tradition of trail, blazing.

Thomas Jennings Morgan Garrett Zellweger Creator Ms Reed Jan Matt judy Midwest America General Electric Sarah
"african americans" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

09:06 min | 1 year ago

"african americans" Discussed on Short Wave

"How long was Robert on the transplant? Waiting List before he got offered that like initial face. Oh very very quickly that offer came. I think about a month after after he got on the list which is pretty unheard of and then after that it was a very long wait for a second one in my understanding is that he turned down. The first face that he was offered heard was that said the way it works is they try to find a donor who is close in complexion match as possible. Just because it makes you know the surgery easier ear the cosmetic result is better and it also helps ease the recovery mentally. I think just because your identity changes as little as possible And this donor honor that they found was much much lighter in complexion than Robert They use a one eighteen scale to kind of talk about the the color of the donors that they're looking at Roberts about a fifteen or sixteen and this donor I think was a one No darker than a three and Robert just decided that that was not going to work for him and that he wasn't quite ready to take on a change that drastic. You know one thing that he said that I thought was kind of interesting. That he wasn't really didn't really feel like he was in a rush all he wanted was to be able to use his face To each normally closes mouth drink through a straw to kiss his daughter on the cheek so to him. You know it. It was not the kind of thing that he was thinking about all day every day it was sort of when we find the right one. It will happen but he was not impatient at all. So eventually Robert. Burt did get a face. Bat matched his complexion enough that he accepted it. Tell me a little bit about the actual surgery. So the surgery was insane it takes about sixteen hours including including all of the phases. It was led by an amazing surgeon at Brigham and women's Hospital. His name is Dr Bohdan. POMAHAC this was his ninth face transplant. Which is incredible to me He started out by flying to the site where the donor had died And he and his recovery team started by detaching his face in tissue shoe so that they could be reattached Roberts so they put it in this cooler and then they fly back to Boston. Where team is prepping Robert buyers starting to Detach some of his nerves and vessels So they start with the neck and make sure that all of that goes smoothly and then once there are signs that the transplant it will be successful than they remove his skin And start reattaching. All of the vessels and nerves with extremely painstaking work like tiny. Amy Tiny stitches that they have to do under a microscope. Wow that's a lot and like scientifically pretty cool. Oh it's amazing. So Robert was the first African American American to receive a full face transplant. Tell me a little bit about why. That's such a big deal you know. There's a long history of African Americans being mistreated by The US medical system going back to you know times of slavery when slaves were often recruited to be unwilling participants in medical experiments And something I really uncovered in my reporting and talking to people medical historians and people who study the space is that the legacy of mistreatment treatment through things like again experimentation on slaves and the Tuskegee experiment in which. US researchers denied black men with syphilis treatment for decades. And you know all of these horrible examples have really culminated in a feeling of mistrust in the medical system among black Americans. So they're much more hesitant president to do things like organ donation because they don't inherently trust that a doctor is going to do what they say they're going to do with the organ. The study that you were talking about is kind of infamous infamous Syphilis experiment their apologies and people came out and talked about how unethical it was and out never should have gone forward. In the way that it did headbutt men died and men pass onto their partners into their children. And it's it's very hard to make that go away. I don't think that you can you. Ram and that study lasted decades. It was a very long study. And it's it's frankly incredible to me that something like this was going on during Robert Chelsea lifetime. I'm GonNa play you take proper. He actually talked a little bit about that. There's very little donor ships. Our community carousing resulted the history particularly ending African American culture. The scripture schism is is very blue. It's not just skepticism. But we will history. This is not a law for Austin throughout confident System and that legacy has unfortunately followed the African American community for centuries in decades since then. Yeah I mean let's talk a little bit about that because I think in your piece. It said that only seventeen percent of black patients awaiting an organ transplant got one in Twenty fifteen compared with about thirty eighty percent of white patients right. So there's a definite disparity there correct so there's a few different factors that contribute to that one being that rates of disease or just much higher among black Americans and part of it which I found fascinating is that black Americans are far less likely to ask their family members and loved ones to donate for them so oh having a really visible example like Robert Chelsea could make an enormous impact on encouraging people to to register as organ donors to see it as a good thing and to sort of literally. See the face of what this can do work. Arkansas save equals is. I'm GONNA narrow transplant. Illuminate A- cursing of sickle cell disease and argued a chance to not only a lot of this glut out of the coot. Now we'll talk in humanity are I would not have heard this condo focuses Horton interest To this degree if I had gone through this experience so yes there is a great deal of responsibility. How shoulders are feeling well heart? Yeah that sounds like the Robert that I know yeah and I was. I liked it because I asked him about and he was was like well. Let me tell you some things. Let me sit down and let me tell you about organ donation you know what I mean. It was just like boom boom boom. These are the things you can do. This is why it's important and I thought that was pretty awesome. He is far from done now that the surgery is done. I think this is something. He's going to be working on for years in the future. Right so Let's talk about how Roberts doing now. You've checked in with him a little bit about his recovery. Yeah I mean from the very beginning. His doctors were blown away by how well he's doing. He had very very few complications locations after the surgery His face looked great right away. He was up and walking and talking days after the surgery needed. Very few painkillers His vision was a little off. He had some swelling around his eyes and some extra skin on his eyelids so he couldn't see all that clearly and people kept telling him how great his face as looked and he really couldn't see at that well and that was just really striking to me. That people are so impressed by the surgery but Robert's just China China Z.. Trying to recover you know since then he has just done amazingly well and you can even here in the tape that you've played for me. His voice is so much clearer than it was is when he was discharged his recovery has really been remarkable to watch with garbage. Grace of God. Maddie do this are are not had any pain. Wow you you you heard ago valley skin is not to talk to Lily's rally how. How would you like to gear with a little along? The lillies valley. I I like your attitude. That's this gummy okay. Ascension are optimistic causative thinking who has released the Dalai you got to get done in order to excursion excursion. So Robert Wood. You see more than anything. Your faith has has helped you through this experience. Grog Kerr's me. Who is a curfew? Genoa Woah. You're I was smiling. The whole time listening to that clip because he has said almost verbatim all of those things to me and it's it's been very very affirming. I think to see their response to the story. I've gotten numerous emails from readers. Who thanked Robert for sharing his a story and a few have even told me that they've decided to become organ donors since reading it which is just incredible and I think a real testament to the story that Robert is telling both Robert Chelsea Jamie disarm for talking with us today? Today's episode was produced by Brett Hansen and edited by Vietnam. I mattie suffiad yeah thanks. For listening to shortwave N._P._R...

Robert Robert Chelsea Roberts Brigham and women's Hospital Robert Wood US Robert Chelsea Jamie Genoa Woah Amy Tiny Dr Bohdan Burt president Boston Grog Kerr Bat Arkansas painkillers Ram
"african americans" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:45 min | 3 years ago

"african americans" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Houston, We have a podcast welcome to the official podcast of the NASA Johnson Space Center episode 32 African American History Month. I'm Gary Jordan. I'll be your co host today along with Kawhi Harris. The lead budget analyst for propulsion and power engineering division, and the chair of the African American employees Resource Group KYW thanks for coming on, Hey, Gary. Glad to be here. So we have these groups here at the center called employee resource groups, and KYW here is the chair of the African American employees Resource Group. So we teamed up to do a special episode for African American History Month where will be bringing in four guests that specialize in different areas across the center to do four unique segments. That's right. We're very proud of our employees Resource Group, and we have folks with the riot range of skills today. We have guest involved in life support systems and a flight controller, robotics, engineering, and human health and performance. Awesome. I'm excited that we can bring everyone together for this episode. So this is pretty cool because you'll see all in one episode how many. Things are going on at the same time, So with no further delay, Let's go light speed and jump right ahead to talk with our guests from across the Center for African American History Month. Enjoy. Declining vibe market County. Marc Chagall deserve we have on now. All right KYW Thanks for a helping me open up this episode. But uh, before we go to our first guest, kinda wanted to set some context about Yorke's these, these employee resource groups. So if you can kind of start off by talking about what is an employee Resource Group here at the Johnson Space Center and then about yours. The African American employees Resource Group said the mission of the a ERG is to serve gear. See as a catalyst to strengthen JSE recruitment on an retention engagement and development of African Americans at J. Thus contributing to the maximum inclusion, an innovation of the juicy workforce, and a Hanson success of the NASA mission. Envision. We do a lot of outreach events through to community. We feel it's important to have a focus on community. Let them know that there are people out here at AFC who looked like them who work here. How can give them hope that they can also work here. We also promotes Stam a lot. We bring in speakers And we focus a lateral, develop an armed. Louise, We have several training sessions throughout the year. We have speakers come in and is all about helping to make J C A and even better place to work Hossam are I want excited to kind of kick this off. So All right, Chi, who is going to be our first guest today. First, his anti a chambers She's to Thermopylae humidity control, subsystem manager of the EIA SIS and the life-support systems branch. She started here is a coop has worked on a lot of different projects in our time here. All right. Well producer, Alex, let's play the warm whole sound effect in get right into that. Talk. Okay, So so you start a your journey here as a cooperate I did. I started Basically, I got into So I went in the University of Texas at Austin Okocha were, I does pursued a degree and uh, in aerospace engineering and um, but prior to that, when I was in high school, I participated in the Texas aerospace scholars program. Um, I believe they've updated it, uh, since then the name of it as a and cost. Now it's a national community colleges that they bring they bring Community College students from all over the nation. I think now yet how That's awesome. Now they, um, I remember, uh, it was advertised in my high school. Um, hey, were analysis looking for high school students to come to a NASA and have mentor ness engineer mentors. And I was I hopt right on it. And uh, I went to NASA for about a week. I we had like a series of assignments up until that point. And uh, spent a week at NASA and I learned about the Co-op program, and Alan was like one of the primary hiring grounds first for students or for full-time employees. And I was sold. So when I uh, the ferry very, very first career fare at University of Texas, I was a freshman and the NASA booth was the booth that I went to first hand in my resume, end that following year, they were actually hiring sophomore level. Since uh, I interviewed in, uh, was offered a coop uh, at NASA cells really excited. Nod Aniko off is, uh, it's a rotational programme, right? So you go multiple times. Yeah,

NASA African American History Month employee Resource Group Resource Group NASA Johnson Space Center KYW University of Texas Gary Jordan Marc Chagall Houston engineering division Kawhi Harris Johnson Space Center analyst Nod Aniko official Yorke Stam
"african americans" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"african americans" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"Because of the amount of white whatever quote unquote white genetic stuff material right they have so rights because one thing that's completely implausible is that the genes for a skin pigmentation are linked to genes for for intelligent so we can rule that out just it's given that you have these differences from african americans that had that whose dissent is all over the place yeah looting european uh that is reason to us to believe that much of these much of the differences explained by social and environmental causes so even when you look at within africa right the amount of genetic diversity that is within africa is much greater than the amount of genetic diversity that is within europeans and so you really need a theory linking the particular genetic mechanisms of intelligence to the genetic mechanisms to give rise to race and um and it really there is no rule of nature that says that the observable physical differences in two people uh is tracking right a biological ancestry in in an important way so so too you know this is sort of a reduct your because this is a a like a i mean not a ridiculous is like a an extreme case illustrate the point but you can literally have item you know sorry twins that are born to the same mother one black and white like that that is possible it would be weird that those genes that cause one to be white and wanted to be black are exactly the ones that lead to intelligence like there's no plausible biological theory there's there's a.

african americans africa