16 Episode results for "African American School"

Episode 205: Black Teachers Wanted

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

20:42 min | 6 months ago

Episode 205: Black Teachers Wanted

"In America is becoming more and more diverse every year and that means our schools are also also seeing increasing numbers of students of color but the trend isn't necessarily reflected in teachers across the country. Black students and other students of color rarely see the teachers who look like them and that can have serious consequences for their education and their future for the beginning of black history month. We wanted to play you. An episode from our archives that goes into the history of black teachers in America why gaps and representation among teachers persist to this day and what we can do to address this issue. Hi I'm Lizzie. Does he get era and misses the scholars strategy networks. No jargon each week we discussed an American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon and and in this episode I spoke to Dr Michelle Foster. She's a professor. And the Henri Hauser Endowed Chair in urban partnerships at the University of Louisville and a former teacher in the Boston public school system. Here's our conversation Dr Foster thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for asking asking me. So you've conducted a lot of research on teaching but before that you were in the classroom yourself. Where did you start teaching? Well I started teaching in and the Boston public schools before desegregation which was in one thousand nine hundred ninety four and so the first year. I was a system wide substitute teacher which meant I taught in almost all of the schools. That would be in Boston. That would have you. That would have me and sometimes the schools that where I could manage. oftentimes the principal would come at recess. And if I was still there he said can you come. I'm back tomorrow because as you know. Substitutes often have difficulty with some classrooms and urban schools and then the second year I was a teacher at the William Monroe Charter school which was one of the first magnet schools in Boston. And can you tell US quickly. What a what is a magnet school? A magnet schools were schools that usually had themes And they were designed to help ease desegregation to have programs that might be a program in music. What theater with the idea that you would attract voluntarily Ellen Terry Lee attract white students to attend thereby making it easier to desegregate and Boston had magnet schools before actually the court order in nineteen seventy four? Lots of Cities Louisville has a magnet program. So I had a three four five combination at the charter school. which is we're not too far from where I lived? And then the next year I had a job. As a fifth grade teacher at the champlain. School which was in Dorchester. And tell me more about those experiences. What was that like working in the Boston? Public school system during that time. Well that was a time. When Boston didn't necessarily hire hire black or African American teachers black teachers tended to be segregated in predominantly African American or black schools? Boston would often have overcrowded. African American school bus them passed a under cry and under crowded white school to another overcrowded. Black school the charter school was of a magnet school. So it was is racially mixed but the champlain. School was probably predominantly baby. Ninety nine percent African American there was a school across way which was the John Marshall School and the schools were segregate they were in a cluster of schools. But the John Marshall's which was across Washington street at the time was predominantly white and my school was predominantly African American. We it was like today day. We have very few supplies not many many books. Hence Loretta Premium No Playground equipment was a place. Where if you want to be a successful teacher you had to be creative? And it's one of the places I learned. I think to be a good teacher. you know. If you don't have textbooks textbooks are good but you can do a lots of things if you don't have them so one of the things I used to do is take the textbook and cut up the story the reading story and put on cards and hand them out to the kids and then I read the first paragraph and I say who is that the next one and that solve off two problems one. If you've ever taught you realize kids don't follow along so they never really know what page you're on that solve. That problem and I realized later on that I was teaching sequencing using because in order to know what comes next. You have to listen so it is possible with not a lot of equipment or supplies to be creative in your teaching but but of course you have to WanNa be wanna be creative and I had not been prepared as a teacher you know. I didn't study teaching so I was left to my own devices. But what I thought would make sense for kids and part of my principal was to have them excited. I felt like if you came to school every day. It was like Christmas. was you'd WanNa come so of course. I was probably not your typical teacher and and I think that my kids probably made too much noise. The principal would always be knocking on my door as they were noisy. Because in those days I suppose even today silence and comportment comportment looking like your on task. Whatever that means? You'll you'll pay attention is kind of rules the day. But I wasn't that kind of a teacher. I would run and have racist with the kids. I would play kickball where I would throw the ball. And then the kids would have to give a multiplication table and they'd have to answer it and then kick so I tried to combine the physical Cole with intellectual. I had all kinds of little tricks that I did. I suppose even as a college teacher later on I have some of those. And how did those early experiences in the classroom GonNa Affect your later research. The research questions you wanted to explore. I don't think I thought too much about that. Initially it wasn't until I laid Iran. Iran started my academic and my first job was at University of Pennsylvania. And I would ask you to summer school courses and I decided to teach teachers perspectives on teaching. You know I just. I just thought it was a two week course. I went decide. I would use autobiographies or biographies of teachers on their own practice. And when I looked into the literature I found very few Accounts of black teachers about their own practice and so. I thought this is unusual because I knew enough to know that for most of history black students have been taught by black teachers right. I knew that so I was shot that there were no. They were not more accounts of their practice. Because I found a few and it on the basis of that. I decided that I would do a study that looked at life histories of black African American teachers. And that's how I got into that area I was led into it just circumstantially. It was not something I had planned to look at. And so tell us about what you found then. Well one of the things I was interested in was what were the experiences of black teachers and I was particularly looking at teachers who were who started. Arctic teaching before desegregation I knew the desegregation was a pivotal moment in the education of African American students. I didn't know what I find and so the earliest teacher who was the oldest oldest was born in one thousand nine five. She taught in polly's island South Carolina. And then I found teachers to a process I called community nomination which was to ask S. communities I made up that term made it up to nominate teachers who they thought were particularly successful and so I went around the country Texas I went to Missouri. Glory and these teachers and then for many many years I wrote academic articles about them. You know just what the teachers had to say was kind of used in the service service of making better big points in a lot of points and then at some point someone. The new press actually asked me if I would write a book and I wrote a book called Black Teachers on teaching and that was like I was ninety. Seven with a twenty interviews are actually you know not condemn not cut up their whole interviews and many of these teachers would teach who started in in segregated schools in Texas and then made the transition to working in the newly integrated desegregated schools in the south. So that's story that I I was pleased because later on many young African American teachers who came of age nineties and two thousands read that book and many of them have commented that the situation that I just got different than what they are today. So you have worked as a teacher both before and after desegregation you have studied sort of that transition and what. It's looked like for other teachers across the country. Let's talk about the situation right now. Do you know enough about the typical sort of American teacher. Fair to say what that person kind of looks like on average today. You know we do know that there are more male teachers at high school than Elementary School. Most of the teachers at elementary the are women and as it turns out. They are white women from suburban and rural communities who teach the population of teach of African American teachers. It has not changed that much over time. In fact I was at a conference not too long ago and although the numbers are increasing in other words number of people afterward teachers will be coming candidates and going into teaching positions. They have the highest attrition rate. They ended up leaving in greater numbers numbers than other teachers. And I think there are some reasons for that. Of course you know one of the reasons is that they often get assigned to the most difficult teaching conditions. I mean let's the honest people want African American teachers because I think that they will be good for African American children. And there's no doubt that that's probably the case but you know if they end up in a school whether or no supplies wear. There are a lot of difficulties and they're not going to likely to stay especially if they don't have support to make it so although we know that the number of African American churches increasing we also know that the number of relieving actually not even lasting three years is also increasing. So it's been a zero sum game. The numbers have not increased appreciably that much because of that and then let's talk about the benefits to students. What are the good things that having a teacher who may be looks like you and your community can afford to students? Well for a long time. People had this idea that was just the role model argument. The reason that African American children in a benefit of having african-american role model then in two thousand three. I think it was a man. Whose name is Thomas? D actually wrote a wrote an article. What he had done he looked at some old studies? Are these that had randomly assigned students and teachers which is very rare in education research. Because you can't resign randomly assigned teachers and students but there was one study and he realized it one of the things he found. Is that where you had a teacher match. When you had a black students who had black teachers have teachers? They actually improved in their standardized test scores scores and of course he had a hard time publishing it. Partly because you know sometimes things that can be positive and also have negative kickback. People thought what would happen if if if we could say that matching teacher and student on race was a good thing. I mean you could use that negatively as well so he was the first person to write that article and then recently there have been more articles that have come out that have shown that African American students who have African American teachers are more likely to graduate graduate. They're less likely to be suspended or punished. punitively they're more likely to be assigned to gifted and talented less likely to go to special the lead and a host of other things all positive things so now recently quantitative people the people that do statistical research have been substantiating insulating. The those of us who don't do statistical research by finding that there were real positive effects of of black students having black teachers. And what do we know about the the positive benefits of having black teachers for non black students. Absolutely people ask me all the time they say. Well what black students need Black Teachers San Dan White students need black teachers. I mean I've been teaching both at elementary school. I didn't take that many white students there but I taught community college in Boston Roxbury Community Committee College. I taught at Umass Boston teach. I've taught at many universities across the country and for many of the students the first time they see me is the first time they've ever met a black person as a teacher. Think about it and so of course. They need black teachers because they need to see African Americans who are intellectuals who actually might be evaluating waiting them you know. Sometimes when I evaluate like shocked that that I would be in that position and of course if you're going to have a society in which people are going to understand that there's with no one group that has always gonNA be in charge. I think that's an ineffective always troubles me when I read the finding that you'll more likely to have a supervisor. Who's African American in the military than anyplace else in America? That's troubling to me. Let's talk about how we got here. Why are black teachers so underrepresented in schools? Well it's interesting. I think people in the United States have short memories. I don't think we we're kind of a historical in many cases and so we often don't know what happened. Twenty years ago let alone fifty years ago and what most people don't realize there's no black teachers though black teachers well what most people don't realize is that Brown versus the board when it was decided in nineteen fifty four between one thousand nine hundred fifty four and nineteen eighteen. Seventy that about thirty five thousand. African American Teachers Lost Their Jobs Brown v Board of Education. What was that case? Okay Brown verse. Brown's the board is the desegregation case. which was the combination of several cases consolidate it and went? Before the Supreme Court and that case decided that segregated separate was not equal it basically at first affected the south because it was the schools that were segregated by law or what they say genre and in the north they were segregated in a different way in Boston they were not segregated by law but defacto in fact it had to do with the residential patterns and we have people lived as those those that was the big case that started desegregation. And so you know they when you desegregated. You didn't need as many teachers and many many many teachers black teachers lost their jobs. What usually happens is they would close the black school most of the high schools? The black school close. Sometimes they stayed open and the black students went over to the white schools and when they went to the white schools some of the teachers from the black schools went with him. One of the teachers I interviewed in the book said that one day the Super Nicole Brennan said. Oh you gotta be so lucky because because you and your sister your cousin GonNa keep you jobs and everybody else was fired. They were the two teachers that went to the ways that was not that uncommon as so she said the first year they didn't teach. CNN cousin sat in a room and they just knitted because the people in Lyndale didn't want black teachers teaching white kids so that was the beginning of the decline of the black teaching force. And let's be honest if you're African American family and you see a lot of teachers of losing their jobs jobs you're not going to enter the workforce right. Oh no no no so that was happening today. People don't know that they just know. There are fewer black teachers. But they don't know the historic realities about. Why if you're black teachers? They just don't know that because as I said people don't know anything past twenty years ago right they certainly don't know what happened in nine hundred fifty four. and Are we doing anything then and to address this disparity today. Are we doing anything. In terms of those teacher. Trainings in terms of workforce development and recruiting. I don't think we're doing enough. We do a lot of lip service. We talk a lot about outlets. Have more black teachers right. We should have more black teachers. And I think that's a wonderful idea but one of the things that's happened in the meantime we've now now. We have a population of mostly young a young white suburban and rural women so we've kind of adapted our strategies for helping these teachers become more sensitive to the needs of African American students less prejudiced prejudiced about you know who these kids are so the curriculum has kind of you know switched to accommodate these young women. And there's very little focus on what you might do differently if you wanted to attract African Americans and say Latino teachers to the forest because they may not need the same as these other teachers and often there's been a lot of reports reports of these young black teachers go in who feel marginalized alienated because the curriculum being delivered is just not working. It's just not working for them so that's not been as accessible and there's a lot of you know I'm in the university and so you know in in every field. There's a lot more talk than there is. Walk a lot more lip service to things than actually doing doing what you need to make the change now. Some places have been very successful. They've they've I had a friend who had a program which partnered with community colleges where the young on black students would be and had a wonderful program of developing Devon the community college and then have a seamless transfer to the university. But you really have to make it a point to recruit the teachers if you want to you you know you just open the doors and say come in. That doesn't mean they're going to come so I don't think enough is being done. I think we have to do more and so if we did make. Some of those is improvements then to the teacher training and education side. And we did widen that pipeline. So we were getting a more diverse workforce and we were supporting more black candidates to become actual public school teachers features. Then what do you think the policy. We would need to have in place to support them. Once they were actually teaching in the schools would be. What are the things that the students here? They've done a study of students at Louisville who were students of color and the red program and one of the things they've said is they would like to be placed with more cooperating teachers who are African American in their teacher placement. That's a perfect perfect example. Most of them are playing. They find who the teachers who will be the place and they're not paired with a African American teacher when the student teachers. So that's one thing. It would be the ideal replacing groups of students together. They wouldn't be the one black teacher in the school which is a horrible situation to be in right. They would have mentors who are like them they could certainly have groups. I mean one of the things you see happening. Now is a lot of kind of online support groups. That Young African American teachers are involved in as support groups to talk talk to each other so I think those are the some of these. I think we certainly wouldn't place them in the most demanding schools to start off right the most difficult and then often assume they because they are African American will handle the discipline problems. I happen to survive in the buzzing public schools because I could handle the discipline problems when the principal came to see me at recess is still here you know part of what he was commenting on his. I didn't have kids acting out in my classroom for the most part so but you know all teachers. Young teachers are not equipped equipped to deal with that. So if you're the disciplinarian and lots of young black teachers say that they expected to be the disciplinary next to handle all the African American boys who are misbehaving living or and if you put them in that situation you know. They're not going to want to stay. Because that's what they went in there for so there's a lot of things that we can do. Both in and teacher. Preparation as teachers are beginning their careers as well as Once they get into the schools but you know the dilemma of finding more African American teachers persists. Can you think of some positive trends that you've seen lately that you wanted to highlight well. I mean the positive trend is more African. American teachers are going into the profession and sometimes it happens and we in strange ways for example. Many of the African American and Latino teachers were coming to the freshmen are coming through alternative certification routes and tell us what alternative certification is just to be clear Emma. Okay so alternative certification could be like a teacher residency program. They haven't been Boston. They have been New York's so you have a bachelors degree already in something and then you become like a teacher of record you get a job and it's almost an internship you have a mentor. Mentor you work in a class if you take classes at night and so it's almost like it would be a normal school. Normal schools were schools. That were two years after high school. which prepared most of the teachers up through the sixties sixties so? You're actually like an intern residence program. You'll getting support. You're getting feedback. You have someone watching you. So that's kind of like an apprenticeship right. You're an apprentice is teacher. Yes that's absolutely they actually as it turns out are producing. Most of the teachers of color are coming alternatives alternatives. So you know but if you're against against that as I tell other people you know the programs you have to have to do a better job recruiting. I mean there's so much there too I think travels farther than even just the teaching profession in that I think is as useful when we think about policies to increase. You know workforce diversity and allied of sectors whether they're public or private so Dr Foster. Thank you so much for this conversation. Thank thank you and thanks for listening for more Michelle fasters work. Check out our show notes at scholars dot org slash no jargon and tune in next week for a new episode on the experience of black students at predominantly white colleges and universities. No jargon is the podcast for the scholars strategy network a nationwide organization connecting journalists policymakers and civic leaders with America's top researchers to improve policy and strengthen in democracy the producer of our show is dominant Dharma and our sound engineer is jam. If you like the show subscribe rate us on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your shows you can give us feedback on twitter at no jargon podcast or at our email address no jargon at scholars dot board.

Boston Black school America principal African American school Elementary School Dr Michelle Foster Boston public school US Louisville William Monroe Charter school champlain Ellen Terry Lee University of Louisville John Marshall School Brown Henri Hauser Endowed Chair professor
387. Hello, My Name Is Marijuana Pepsi!

Freakonomics

42:15 min | 1 year ago

387. Hello, My Name Is Marijuana Pepsi!

"Freakonomics radio is sponsored by amazon. Launchpad amazon launchpad connects you with products to elevate your every day and it's the best place to find exciting new products. Get the most out of what's left of the summer shop unique outdoor games interactive pet toys and the newest innovations in speakers e bikes and more like a golf game. You can set setup anywhere a smart toy for your free companion or an e bike that makes riding a breeze. They've got you covered. All of life's upgrades so you can experience. It's more this summer visit. Amazon launchpad today at amazon dot com slash shop launch pad freakonomics radio is sponsored by capella university. Are you considering a doctorate to help lead at the top of your field and contribute to your profession. In more meaningful ways capella university can help with flexible online degree programs and scholarship opportunities for select programs capella can help support your goals from beginning to end eligible new students enrolling in select doctoral programs may qualify five for five thousand or ten thousand dollars scholarship in addition to scholarships capella has a team of financial aid counselors enrollment counselors and career counselors to help make your goal a reality learn more at capella dot e._d._u. Slash freakonomics. That's c. A. p. l. a. dot com slash freak onuma comics. You never know what's going to inspire an interesting piece of academic research imagine for instance since the you are a third grade teacher at the very beginning of a new school year. There was a teacher sitting at the table in front of me. My test scores going to the <music>. S-h-i-t i'm sick of this s-h-i-t this was in atlanta correct at came to a new school and they had just passed out the class list and on my list i have i my s- name of the student and then we have the gender and we were to use the class list to make the name tags. That's when she heard the other teacher chur worrying about her test scores and she was angry. Every year i get these bad a students and my test scores are going to be in the toilet and she ran over to the principal and they had it up and i am seeing there this new teacher the school looking at the front and back of my paper because clearly i missing some sheets of paper clearly. She's received something with more information than i a half. I'm like okay wait. What am i missing. What is the what was she. Her test scores test scores course. They're like look at the names. Look the what kind of names did these kids have. A march of mea julia linnea could be the quam acqu john they had distinctively african american names which apparently led the angry teacher who white to surmise that they would be poor students students and they'd make her look bad and that is the catalyst started. This research project that research project would eventually turn into a p._h._d. Dissertation asian it's title black names in white classrooms teacher behaviors students perceptions and the author of this dissertation -ation dr marijuana pepsi van dyke. If anyone could understand the friction created by teachers expectations over students name it might be a black woman who grew up with that name marijuana pepsi last week on freakonomics radio we ask how much does a name really matter so. The ultimate question we wanted to answer is does your name matter for the economic life that you end up leading. It's steve levitt. My freakonomics friend and co author are people who are saddled with distinctively black names facing a burden when they enter the labour market levitt long with the economist roland fryer analyze large rich set of data it encompassed the birth certificate of every person person born in the state of california between nineteen sixty and the year two thousand and included the name of the baby the first and last name of the mother along with a lot of other information of that give you a hint at some of the economic circumstances. The researchers can then track these babies grew up and see whether their first name affected acted their economic outcomes and we were able to see something quite remarkable. Which is that the name that you were given at birth seemed not to matter matter at all true economic five soul another conclusions and i also in agreement with their conclusions just based on my own research search however i can see where someone might question that that's the thing with research rarely interested in the end result. The study shows this but we miss everything in between which is why i'm like the qualitative in addition to the quantity of because quantitative gives us those numbers of the qualitative tells that story today on radio the story of marijuana wanna pepsi van dyke in what she's learned about the power of a name. I'm looking at what's wrong with you. Why are you messing with me <music> and from stitcher and productions this is freakonomics radio the podcast that explores the hidden side of everything your host stephen duffner <music> a couple of months ago marijuana pepsi van dyke received her doctorate in higher education leadership from cardinal stritch university in milwaukee wisconsin. This generated quite a bit of media attention marijuana pepsi. Van dyke has become dr marijuana into her p._h._d. From cardinal stritch you narrow on a pepsi van dyke. Yes that's a real name. Well i have been in the news quite a while. From the time i graduated from high school and the world has kind of fought me through in high school graduation my masters and now you know you can't get a p._h._d. Following up on the other stories and so there we are she got her ph. H the at age forty six it took about eight years total starts and stops in job changes and so life yeah they what was her graduation day like it was surreal. I was just blessed to be there. I was very humbled. I you know i felt like i felt like jumping for joy. I remember driving down the highway grabbing the steering wheel screaming out loud a few times cardinal stritch graduates are given the option to reserve classrooms where a large number of guests can watch the commencement broadcast but she kept her party fairly small all right my husband and my son is here my sister my mother and a few nieces and nephews and a a couple of cousins at didn't want the public to come. Why was that i'm an introvert. I'm late back. I nervous at times and so what i wanted to just make sure that i did what i needed to do. For the day and at the same time i wanna make sure that i'm not minimizing the experiences of the students who participated in my study and this is a serious research study despite some of the jokes and means that come up about a doctor pepsi choose born born in chicago in nineteen seventy-two. My mom has always been an entrepreneur. She has always made clothes on clothing shops gardening means. She's been featured in the few newspaper articles for her gardening skills. My father was a university bus driver so he drove the bus for the campuses in chicago. Was it your mom who named you or your dad or combination. I believe that was my mother. My father's a jehovah's witness and he says that it was all her and i tend to believe phil okay. So why did you choose the name. She shared with me that she believes that my name would take me around the world and that was always the answer. I got when i asked her pay. She wasn't wrong. No she was not wrong. Tom marijuana pepsi was the middle of three sisters. Others were named kimberly and robyn and i asked her so why couldn't can robin gaurav world you know what was it that when you look down at me the first time and you help me that made you go up. This is the one marijuana autopsy and so of course they are no answers to that and she'll go to her grave without answering it further than she already has. I don't even ask you or i mean. Did you at some point. Ask your mother. Were you smoking marijuana. Were you drinking a lot of pepsi. Did you ever ask her that. No i have not ever asked my mom that ed. I'll just say i know my mom all of my life and some questions i ask her at all and leave it there meaning. You're sure she did or she. She didn't smoke for a meeting that i know my mom. I know her personality and she is a lover of life and ed. I just believe nothing's off the table. What about you and marijuana and or pepsi or you're an avid or even occasional partake of either no no i have never drained and i never smoked. I've never smoked cigarettes and never taken a toll at literally done on nothing when she was very young. Marijuana pepsi lived with her dad in chicago. I attended almost was predominantly african american school. Everyone knew my name teaches. Call me by my name no issues. I did not understand that my name was unusual until i entered into the fourth grade here in beloit wisconsin beloit wisconsin is overwhelmingly white and it was it's very clear that marijuana pepsi was not usual it was not quite accepted and it opened the doors for a lot of teasing and bullying and issues and not just from the students themselves. I didn't have teachers who believe me but i guess the name. It was just so interesting. They just couldn't help themselves with the questions and the opinions and the statements and dragging me to different classrooms to introduce me to other the people to show who this little girl was who had this name. I didn't see that as they were trying to bully me or put. Put me down. Some of the questions were difficult however because they questioned my family the type of family that i had and what type of mother would name my child is some of teachers started calling her. Mary and i don't think they did it from a place of again being hurtful towards towards me. I think they were trying to help me. They saw the way that i was getting on with the students and the things they were doing and they wanted to make my life a little easier and that worked right until i placed in the school spelling bee and they wrote mary jackson on my certificate and i went home and my mother saw in hit the roof and came back to the school and everybody out and do not ever call her mary. Her name is marijuana. Do not ever write her name. You differently and she told me you had better never answer to anything other than marijuana. I'm going to get you and from that day on. I was a lot more scared of her than i was them when she was younger back in chicago. School had been a joy for marijuana. I was a very smart student and learn to read very early. I was picked to do everything i had great relationships with the teachers and the students lance overnight here. I am at a school here and not only are the teachers looking at me funny. The students are looking at me crazy. There's air surrounding me on the playground asking me questions. Why are your pants. I you know michael jackson and high waters and everything under the sun. I felt like i didn't belong there. I did want to be there because clearly they did want me there. Something must be wrong with me. I you know i never said on an interview or never even shared ever but sitting here. I remember thinking about committing suicide. I was nine and i remember that like yesterday and i was just hoping that everything would just go away and then i sat there said the rightful you do that there. We're going to talk about the more she says. Now there are a lot of reasons. She was having such a hard time. Environmental factors family issues the relationship between the students at school relationship with teachers. It was very difficult to wonder what was going to happen the next day and it was just it was a lot i won't go into too much detail. You know the last thing i want to do is make it sound bite. I didn't have people who loved me and didn't take care of me. I did but sometimes times. That's just not enough in his own home environment firemen. Let's just a little bit different between my. I have a very close knit family very loving family. I've got my my mom and we've you been raised in with our grandmothers on tees and so there's different types of things happen in families and so you have that going on and i go for a few more years i leave home when i'm fifteen and before i left home i was a failing student had all fs maybe de jim and i have never ever given any thought to what my life was going to be like. After after anything i was literally living day today and i happen to be walking down the street to the store with my cousin mikhail cooks and she was four years younger than me and she was bragging about how she was going to be the first person in our family to go to college and i remember stopping in my tracks because i said so. What is she saying about me. The next day i wanted to the counselor's office in high school and i ended up going into a credit recovery program and from then on i believe may have gotten over three point paint and then from there another three point something the higher i ended up <hes> getting the most improved student award at graduation i that was awarded an academic scholarship and i let go to university of wisconsin whitewater in retrospect the treatment you got over your name was is that do you think kind of just the straw that broke the camel's back that led you to becoming a straight f student is a smart kid or do you think that the the treatment you've got over. Your name was a big contributing factor to that. That was one of the straws that broke the camel's back again is that sense of belonging and in my case lack thereof were you angry at your mom either for giving you the name that cause trouble or for insisting that you continue continue using the name even when other people were you know offering you a sort of easy way out by calling you mary. I've ever been angry about my name. I have never felt that. There was anything wrong with my name again. I didn't even know that someone even believe that until i moved here. I'm looking at them. Mike what's wrong with you. Why are you messing with me. All i wanted to do was read. My books fly under the radar. Go to school and go home. I don't mean to put emotions into your mind but it's hard for me to imagine you wouldn't be resentful at your mom for insisting that you use the name that was causing you grief though i wasn't resentful love it again. It's it's like they name steven. If somewhat you steve and your mom says no. I want you to be stephen. That's your name. My resentful of the people bringing me the grief about it because again. That's my name when i ask you what your name is. You tell me it's over. Why do i have to go through through the fifth degree coming up after the break how marijuana pepsi turned lemons into lemonade in the form of a doctoral dissertation mm-hmm and someone's going to say oh she had a distinctly by name but look she successful p- but in the short term of her navigating her educational institutions to get their look at what she had to go through. That's coming up right. After this freakonomics radio uh-huh is sponsored by capital one with the capital one saver card you can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment that means four percent on checking out that new french restaurant restaurant and four percent on bowling with your friends. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores and one percent all other purchases now when you go out how you cash in capital one. What's in your wallet terms. Apply freakonomics radio is sponsored by ziprecruiter. There's one place you can go. We're hiring is simple fast and smart ziprecruiter with their powerful matching technology ziprecruiter scans thousands of resumes to find people with the right experience and invite them to apply for your job. Ziprecruiter is so effective that four out of five employers who post on ziprecruiter get quality candidate through the site within the first day and and right now freakonomics radio listeners can try ziprecruiter for free at this exclusive web address zip recruiter dot com slash freak. That's ziprecruiter ziprecruiter dot com slash f. r. e. aka ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire <music> marijuana pepsi vandyke turn things around in high school and went on to college. Her first major was business and is wants to do. That's always what i wanted to do but she also loved education and she wound up becoming schoolteacher even so she kept her hand in business that is correct so i owned and operated a small company and did real estate investing and i've actually been in real estate as long as i teaching now real estate for sale signs often include the name of the broker. I'm curious if you included your name and how that worked out so they steal it you know i have all costs from sellers dollars. Hey marijuana's someone stopped snatched aside. They're driving off down the street. I've tried to get the license plate. They took the magnets off my car. So many times it is just ridiculous so marijuana pepsi van dyke it clearly thought longer and harder than most people about the effects it's a first name but even this did not prepare her for what happened at her new school in atlanta and her fellow teachers angry response to seeing the class list my test scores point two s. I'm sick of this s-h-i-t grabs horse and like marijuana look look at the names this kind of response she would come to learn was not so uncommon among teachers to me. It's jarring to think that this kind of response would be prominent. Among educators haters because i guess we like to think that if there's a class of people in the world who you know don't prejudge and who believe in potential henschel it would be educators. I'm curious whether this response affected your view of the field that you chose them it definitely it did not because it made me think i did want to be an educator. It just reminded me that teachers. We're not on a pedestal so we are human. We have the same preconceived judgements when we see something we deem unusual. We sometimes have the same thoughts what i was shocked and disheartened to see is that when we have those thoughts it seems that we stuck with it those instead of saying okay. I'm thinking this let me just see. I don't know this person. Let me just go off from there and that is the part that sticks with me. The research steve levitt did on black names. Remember found that those names didn't seem to influence long term economic outcomes outcomes as indicated by things like neighborhood characteristics or healthcare status or years of education but what that research didn't explore was the the day-to-day reality of living with a distinctively black name. It was a big quantitative study. The research van dyke began to work on as graduate student was a much smaller phenomenal logical study phenomena logical study meaning that i'm looking at the students lived experiences their views us and told with their voice. The whole point of such a study is to zoom in on each individual data point with extensive group or one on one interviews. Van dyke was looking to speak with college students about their experiences in college but also in highschool and even earlier so she held an open call at her alma mater the university of wisconsin whitewater and chose ten students who fit her study criteria. My criteria was they had to be of course black. They had to be deemed to be academically successful as defined as they met all the criteria for graduation from high school acceptance into college and they must be good academic standing. They must have had name related experiences <music> throughout their academic history and must be willing to talk about and they believe that they have a distinctive black name when i see those criteria period i'm going to assume and maybe i'm wrong so tell me that. Most of those experiences were negative not positive am i wrong. There were positive experiences insists that i did highlight in dissertation in general many of them were negative however i did not enter into the research study expecting that as a researcher pitcher. You have to be very impartial. You have to make sure that your own personal feelings and i especially had to be careful careful of that. The last thing i ever want to do is <hes> be told that because my name this marijuana that i had a bias and so i was just very careful to stay away from that i wanted to learn from the students experience and not put my own experiences on them. Students in van dyke study were named mikhail m. y. K. a. e. l. can shrill kate e. n. mm-hmm t. r. e. l. to leah t a l i y h stephen s. t. capital visa and victor old in t- apostrophe e. r. a. d. a. y. A. h. D.'s david e. y. O. u. You in thi. E apostrophe should lease s. h. A. l. van dyke was hoping to answer a few fundamental questions. Google david or e w s h i k now the one what are they educational experiences of students with distinctly black names aims basically what are they going through on a day-to-day basis and number two what are the impacts of navigating educational environments as a student with a distinctive name so you've gone through this what happens to you and then lastly what recommendations do they have distinctly names for educators and for other students who have to go through life with that same name so what did you learn so when we look at research question number one the education experiences says of the students the major one was disrespect disrespect <unk> behavioral expectations low academic expectations and and stereotypes these disrespect was in two distinct ways disrespect shown towards the students with their names but secondly towards students personally as individuals they questioned what type of percents student was what type type of life they would have. They questioned what type of parent would name the child this. They took it a step further. They chose completely different names for students. Even without the students consent or your family's consent. Can you give a for instance sure can trunk sounds easy to me. It sounds simple but he talked about teachers always having the roughest time saying his name and they would always ask him. Can we call you kid head and he had a cold that i just loved. You can say trepidation but you can't control. Can you talk also about the low expectations and again. I wanna be clear. The criteria for the students in your study were that they were academically successful correct correct and that was purposeful sometimes when we are doing research on minority students there is this historical tendency to just look at all these mitigating factors of why oh it's because of their own contest at and i wanted to make sure that no one could come back and say well the reason it was this this is because the student was just not academically successful and so when you're looking at the low expectations the students felt like they you were expected to be disruptive or to have a discipline issues vandyke then dug into how these experiences affected the students academic academic experience. It put a strain on the student teacher. Relationship students have self perception issues if the student teacher relationship is strong strong that student can overcome can learn and can't succeed when that strain is put in from the very first time the students automatically clam up and they talked about how they can't give themselves and then the teacher sees that and then they think the student is low academically and treats a such and this suspicious cycle with the teacher bob understanding what's happening. They're attributing to to this and the student just pulling back back there so efficacy is ruined and that's where the self perception comes in in many cases at altered their future career choices several of these students they were going to be science majors and other stem majors and they changed and they want to work with students and not be the and lab. They wanted to be teachers because they felt that they could help other students who are going through this to love their names and not have to put up up with this one person. They said they wanted to do race. Related studies because of his experiences with this you could imagine at the effects van dyke is describing are not unique to students with distinctively black names. You could imagine students who belong to other minority groups being made to feel less capable than they are and this jibes with other research that seeks to explain the relatively low rate of female stem suits in van bake study. She did find that some students it had positive school experiences because of their names the teacher using their name as a conversation starter for instance to talk about cultural backgrounds but she says this rarely happened with teachers. When we talk about the positive experiences those came from tom african american and minority teachers faculty so here's a question that when you have a distinctively african-american name or any other name that's distinctive. It's obviously something that someone else can latch onto and maybe it's even a little bit of a diversion version from a more core issue of racism or prejudice or whatnot since you're studied didn't include african american kids who don't have distinctively african american names. How can you tell that in the case of the kids. You studied that it was their names that were the cause of this treatment as opposed opposed to simply being black. That was one of the research questions. How do you know that this happened because of your name and that's that's where the stories came in the conversations that started the issues within those classrooms were because of their name. When a participant participant talked about having to call their parents it was because of the name so not only did the instructor refused fused to call the student by the name they also told the student. You're not going to be here that long. It doesn't matter just sit down and the student talked about being so frustrated because while her parents were staying in there to talk with the teacher and the principal the assistant principal gave student a pass asked to go back to class and spoke the name wrong and the students say you spoke my name wrong and the assistant principal said it doesn't matter just go back to class at eh participant she hands it does matter that's the whole reason we're here because of the name i guess just continuing to play ah devil's advocate like it could be that those teachers and administrators would have exhibited racist behavior toward a black kid without the distinctive name. It's just there wouldn't be such over evidence of it right that is true and that's not a part of this study. The names are and so when the student comes in for that first time and they talked about what happened when they introduce themselves to the teacher and when the conversation was did anyone else cables questions. The answer was no. Did you have others students in your in class. Yes so your findings were really dramatic and interesting. I'm curious how they squared with your expectations dictation coming in. I heard that a lot of them did experience what i experience which was surprising to me because these students were so much younger than i was currently at. I thought that with the change over the years types of names now and all of the professional development around implicit <unk> is and race and equity and diversity that things would be so much better for these students but it's it's not okay so let's talk about now the here's what we can do about it in the paper you talk about recommendations from the students for other students and faculty faculty it so on well some of the recommendations that the students came up with basically to be culturally competent to to be respectful to understand that just because a student has a name that a an educator may not be familiar with the does not mean that there's something wrong with that student or with the appearance it was acceptance acceptance of the students acceptance of their backgrounds when and everything boils down ask the student how to save their names the talked a lot about the teacher eagles how teachers were corrected how the cops an attitude shoot about being told how to say the name so when you talk about implications for leadership again it goes back to educators being self itself reflecting looking at their own personal biases that they have think about when you hear a name or you see something about a student you don't know them but i think about what it triggers in you and ask yourself why it's triggering that and win it does trigger you remind yourself okay. I don't know this person i don't y. This is being triggered. However i'm going to make sure that i get to know them the way that they are. Let's say i hear you talking metal. This and i run a big firm or a government institution but same the president united states and i say you know even though you're talking about quote just the names of one subset of people. I believe there's probably a lot to be learned hear about how we all have different biopsies and that we often don't even see these biases. Do you have any advice more generally for people based on your research. It's the same advice you cannot judge someone by their name by their race. It is individual study show that when people are actually asked about their tendencies whether racist war the war just about other groups that they firmly believe that they are being fair and impartial they have to bring that to the forefront and have those conversations the stations and pathetic trade and make people aware that it happens so fryer levitt do make the argument that distinctively african american names did not affect long-term economic outcomes so i am really curious to know whether you think a distinctively african american name oregon distinctive name in some other category perhaps is ultimately <hes> a penalty eighty for lifelong economic and perhaps other outcomes when you're looking at the students that were in my study. Let's take to for example. She is a biology major. She has to myers spanish modernist theology minor. When she graduates she is going to go on and perhaps could impeach biology while she just want to be deemed successful and someone's going to say oh she had a distinctly by name but look she successful successful but in the short term of her navigating her educational institutions to get their look at what she had to go through and many of the choices and changes that she has made and many of experiences that she's had they were impactful impactful on her so you're seeing this success may come despite the distinctive name and the penalties of it yes and not even despite sometimes times in a small part because of you know that most people will go well. You know there's no way that marijuana pepsi headed long-term impact because because of her name look at she's dr van dyke now but my goodness i share it with you that i thought of killing myself at eighty nine and there was much i didn't share. How would you think your life would be different now. Had your name been just mary. I would have stayed in business. I've always been very murrial business-minded. I've always had students interests at heart. So at some point i still would've been in some sort of an educator even if i just went into schools and did some work as a business leader but i think that's where i would have changed because it did alter. I van dyke has been working most recently at beloit college in wisconsin. She's been director of their student. Excellence lund's and leadership program which supports low income first generation college students the big reason she went into education she says and stuck with it is because she he wanted to change how students who look like her or anyone else or no one else how those students will be received by the rest of the world yeah and i've said many times. I cannot wait to become a teacher because this is ridiculous. We have got to give students at least one teacher where they can come in and be themselves and they can come in and have a conversation she remembers there's one particular incident with a student back when she was teaching elementary school and i had conference with his mom and she cried throughout the whole conference and i could not understand it and i am giving her tissue after tissue and i finally say why are you crying. He's doing rate. That's just he has never had a good conference. Teachers have been kicking him out of school since he was in pre k. I came in here expecting expecting to hear everything. I've always heard and the student was on honor roll. He was doing a fabulous job <music> coming up next time on freakonomics radio if you were a judge on shark tank what would you make of this pitch inch. I'd like to open a new grocery store. <hes> we're not gonna have any branded items. It's all going to be private label. We're going to have a no television advertising eighteen and no social media whatsoever no facebook no twitter. We're never going to have anything on sale. We're not going to accept coupons. Would you invest in my company. And what if i told you that this grocery store not only already exists but that it's crushing the competition they not only at the top of the industry but they're at the top by a wide. I wide margin a look at the economics behind one of the most unconventional and beloved companies in america. It's next time freakonomics radio. Freakonomics radio is produced by stitcher and w productions. This episode was produced by daphne chen and harry huggins. Our staff also includes alison craig low greg rippin. I've been zach lipinski matt hickey and karen wallis or theme songs mr fourteen by the hitchhiker's all the music was composed by louis garra. You can subscribe to freakonomics that makes radio on any podcast app including spotify or the apple or google podcast apps. If you want to get the entire freakonomics radio archive that is available exclusively on on the stitcher app or at freakonomics dot com where you can also find transcripts show notes and sign up for our newsletter. If you want our entire archive without ads along with bonus episodes go to stitcher premium dot com slash free own antics. We also publish every week on medium short text version of our new episode goto comedian dot com slash radio we can also be found on twitter and facebook and lincoln or the email at radio at freakonomics dot com freakonomics radio also plays on many n._p._r. Stations so please check your local station for details. Thank you for listening stitcher. I'm krista minder and i'm delighted to greenberg the factors. We all space conundrums. I never really had to make friends and so now as an adult i find that hard or ourselves in the middle of predicaments bow would like it to be made unhappy by my facebook feed and it can be hard to feel all alone in our self doubts feeling like i'm not good enough. It's it's just it's demoralizing and and it's been holding me back all this messaging that's like getting into my head and i didn't even realize how much it was affecting the wayne which i thought after living by more than fifty self-help books for our other podcasts by the book we have definitely learned a thing or two and now we're ready to put our self help knowledge into practice to give our guests a little self love coaching. It's like a reality makeover. Show for your heart. We hope you'll join us for our first season of we love you and so can you we love you and so can you is out now. Listen stitcher apple podcasts or wherever you get your favorite shows.

marijuana pepsi dr van dyke steve levitt chicago wisconsin van dyke atlanta stephen duffner amazon principal capella university Google Ziprecruiter cardinal stritch julia linnea c. A. p. l. h. A. l. van dyke african american school
Why This Startup Company Chose To Stay, Grow, And Hire In Detroit

Daily Detroit

14:14 min | 1 year ago

Why This Startup Company Chose To Stay, Grow, And Hire In Detroit

"I believe from my experience. There's really no better place to start a business. I think there's a culture here. There's a community. There's people that wind you to succeed and prior to being in Detroit. This time I've lived in Phoenix, I lived in Chicago have lived in New York, and I, I believe that unique Detroit as unique culture. That's that's really special. And there's really no better place to be an entrepreneur. That's Andrew Landau. His Detroit-based startup jewelled was acquired by banking giant Capital, One last week. Jewel had raised about a half million dollars in funding and the purchase price was undisclosed. But they're going to stay grow and hire in Detroit. So what does it take to make a start up work here and why Detroit that's the focus of our conversation today? We'll also get into some stories you need to know around town. I'm Jerry stays and welcome to episode. Two Ninety-three of your daily Detroit recorded on Tuesday, June twenty fifth twenty nineteen but I thanks to my left. Milo is a marketing agency that produces amazing experiences fraud, Ince's Milo partners with their clients to drive business with strategic insights, and create innovative content. Do cool stuff with them at Milo dot agency, and we thank them for their support. Joining me in studio, Andrew Landau. He is a really interesting guy because he is leader of well, this time, anyway, of a startup that recently got acquired by Capital, One named us jewel or dual basically. Right. And as I understand it, it was a it is a luxury rebate company. So what exactly is the top line news on that? Sure. I, I think you so much for having us here, really, really appreciate it about two weeks ago jewel got acquired by Capital One. And we're really excited to jewel is a Detroit based luxury ecommerce company and the opportunity to partner with Capital, One was amazing. And then our part of the broader organization, so what I really want to get you on this conversation. Is that this isn't your first? Rodeo, you know, you've done things you had multiple projects in the past. I remember specifically chalk fly because I used to work somewhere that bought from chocolate because Chuck fly sold Green Paper clips, and that was the differentiator for them. And so I remember that. So kind of you have an experience with the Detroit startup community that I think it'd be really valuable for our listeners around kind of your journey and some of the things that you've learned along the way. So I guess first off, you know this is a your first company being your first company in Detroit. So why are you doing this in Detroit or why have you been doing this in Detroit? Great, great question. So I think there's a couple of things. First of all, my family was born and raised in Detroit. And this is where I went to school. This is where I grew up. And I believe from my experience. There's really no better place to start a business. I think there's a culture here. There's a community. There's people that winds is succeed and prior to being in Detroit. This time I've lived in Phoenix. I lived in Chicago, I've lived in New York, and I, I believe that unique, Detroit as unique culture that's that's really special, and there's really no better place to be an entrepreneur. So how did you come up with the idea of your most recent project? For these these luxury rebates. So the, the, the quick sort of overview of, of the mechanics of jewel is users come to our site, where partnered with over four hundred luxury retailers if a consumer buys through jewel via one of these retailers, they get cash back in. So these retailers are going after aspirational consumers in, in really, we think a jewel just because you spend a lot of money doesn't mean you don't wanna good deal in so jewel allows people to get access to these consumers or jewel outta these brands get asses consumers, but in a brand safe environment in. So I think there's a couple trends that are happening in the, the digital ecommerce space one, obviously, people are looking to buy more and more products online in than to obviously luxury is an opportunity that's relatively under penetrated the other verticals in Zo with jewel, it allows these brands to get these aspirational consumers in also gives these, these consumers the opportunity to shop in these cover these luxury brands, so. I know that doing a little bit of research you raised a small amount of angel funding with this. But how did you know that you kind of even before then you had some traction with this thing? How, how did you know that you had you were kind of in the right lane? I think with the startup, you never know. But I think what we've done hopefully. Well as one we have a really great group of passionate individuals into every day, we set individual goals and along with that we have not only daily goals, but weekly goals in monthly goals in so we knew there was an opportunity in this space, and I think by working hard by working smarter by really bringing a great group of people together, we've been able to focus every day and trying to grow business in, we've been lucky for this stage of business that's under two years old, to have this opportunity to be part of Capital One. What about being in Detroit helped accelerate your business? So I'm I'm obviously biased because I love Detroit. But I think there's a few things. So I know I alluded to before I think there is a fantastic. Talent pool here that not only wants to, like be part of, you know, entrepreneurial endeavors, but also wants to be part of the greater community. And so that to me has brought people that are interesting and dynamic in diverse in that passionate that people may have outside of their professionalize. I think they also bring into their into their business lies in. So if you can create a community of great people that are passionate in positive, I really believe anything can happen in that is something that you may not have in other cities. Was that? I see that a lot. You know, the kinds of businesses that are truly like dig in and start here. There are people who really give really care about whatever it, not only just the city but also what they're doing. I think passion in general is a theme that I, I see across the board with the successful successful businesses here. So what are some of the key things if there was a, a few different key things that folks should know about when they're, they're getting going, and maybe they're, maybe they're looking at? I don't know if you're familiar at all with the concept of, like Seth Godin and the dip right? You come up to it, and you're like, oh, I don't know if I can get through this. This is really hard how for you. What are some of the jobs you have to get kind of past that dip? So I think there's a few things that we've tried to utilize a jewel. So, so one is really being goal oriented. So, you know, not everything that you do not every action has to be perfect. But you need to be going forward. You need to be making moves you needed to go, where you need to know where you wanna go. And so, I think if you work every day towards a common goal you really can. Get anything done in. And I think the other thing one of the lessons that I've learned, you know, being an entrepreneurial space now for a while is at the end of the day, it's all about the people if you get great people to work with you. If you can expect, you know, inspire culture of action and creating something bigger than yourself, then you can do whatever you want. And I think in Detroit along with other cities, you know, great people have the opportunity to do many things in so you need to create an environment. A culture where the best of the best choose to spend time and I think if you can do that, you know, sky's the limit on what you can accomplish. And then I think another one I wanted to kind of go down a little bit. I have heard from people folks that sometimes funding can be a little bit more challenging here as opposed to other areas, because we're not in the valley, right? What were some of the things for angel funding for things along the line, just general things that you've learned that helped you go along the way? I think there's a couple of things. So funding is challenging, but what I've seen over the last five or six years, specifically in Detroit, that, if you have a good business, if you have -tunities, the money will be there, I think, being in Detroit has a competitive advantages in the fact that a lot of the larger VC's aren't based in Michigan. I don't think is an excuse for not having an opportunity to raise money. I think for us, it's saying, okay, we're going after a large market. We have a unique value proposition. We want to create something really special in something large. And I think if you have those traits in, you have growth, the capital is there. I mean some of these things are kind of universal rights scale large, you know, basically the size of the opportunity for, for angels venture capitalist. Right. Exactly. You know there are plenty of different sources of capital in. So it's not always going to venture capital groups or angel investors. You can have other friends and family. There's banks a lot of ways for capital. And I think it's really important when you're starting. Growing a business to understand your capital needs then to book for those appropriately. It's not about getting in the newspaper. It's not about raising millions of dollars. It's about needing the capital that you need to build a successful business in if you have that then you'll be all right. So what's kind of next? You know, so this acquisition happened what you guys staying in Detroit is, is what's the what's the story there? Yeah. So one of the important things for us was continuing to build and grow this business in Detroit. So there's six fulltime people right now jewel, we are certainly going to grow significantly over the coming years, in terms of adding headcount jewel gonna be based in Detroit will, obviously have a lot more resources to marketing and other pieces of the business. I think we're just a chapter one. I'm personally really excited to just continue sort of being part of the broader entrepreneurial community and you know who, who knows her. We'll go as great end, if people wanna know more, you know, participate, what's going on. Are you are you guys going to be looking to hire soon or what's the story with that used to we're actively hiring for mull? Multiple positions. Whether you're an engineering marketing account management, etc. Myhill is Andrew at used jewel dot com. Again, it's Andrew at U. S. E. J E, W E, L dot com in, you also can go to our website, which is usual dot com to find out more. So here's what else you should know today around metro-detroit, the board of the Grosse Pointe, public schools, serving a number of east side suburbs near the Detroit border has voted to close to elementary schools. The ax is hitting Trombley elementary in Grosse, Pointe park and Poupard in Harper. Woods, the closures have been controversial as the district isn't drawing as many kids. So their schools Grosse Pointe is somewhat unique in that it does not participate in Michigan school of choice program, so you have to live within the district in order to go to their schools. Also changing demographics in the community have drawn charges by some that the closures are racially motivated, who part after all has a majority African American school population this matters as Grosse Pointe has a tattered history when it comes to race relations for many years. There were explicit restrictions on Jews Catholics immigrants African Americans and other minorities from buying homes. The district is one of the highest performing academically in the state and in one of the. Highest income communities, but still faces multimillion dollar reductions in revenue because of how schools are funded in Michigan with money tied to the number of students grade levels. There are also changing with elementary schools now serving kindergarten through fourth grade, and middle schools fifth through eighth grade. High schools, will remain the same. This site of the Hazel park, racetrack is going to get a new lease on life German battery maker, Acas dole is planning a forty million dollar manufacturing plant there. According to the Michigan economic Development Corporation, they awarded a two point four million dollar grant saying the project would create two hundred twenty four jobs, Acasuso boasts the largest battery system, plant for commercial vehicles in Europe, metro-detroit with selected oversight in Georgia that was no timeline for the project shared but Agassi is hiring. We'll have linked to that in the show notes. Now, some food and drinking news permit and licensing issues have closed to fund spots one temporarily and one might be permanent. I cold truth in eastern market, according to an Instagram post the soft serve place that also carries vegan options will be closed until June second over a licensing issue with the city of Detroit. And Secondly, the villages beer, garden may be done. It's in a neat spot on Van Dyke near Jefferson on the border of Indian village in west village and Bursa Louis, I've had some pretty good times there over the last three years, and even before that when is ran by another group as the tash MU beer garden, the beer, garden has been operated as a partnership, including the nonprofit villages, CDC and their operator brute, Detroit, but in part, due to an audit from the Michigan liquor control commission, the results of which apparently have not been shared with the operators by the state. The decision was made to pull the plug on the event this year while the linked to the social media post in the show notes third and finally a deter. Dive bar might make a return the Stonehouse bar on Roulston street near state fair and Woodward has a giant sign that says they'll reopened in the fall of this year. It had been closed over liquor license issues in the past. It's old tripod website. Yes. Tripod says that the building it is in is a house from the eighteen sixties and the basement was a hang out of the infamous purple gang that website time machine complete with animated Homer beer gifts is at the Stonehouse bar dot tripod dot com. And I it's amazing it still exists people. I really suggest you check it out for good old yield website time loop. And when I know more about this possible reopening. I'll be sure to tell you more. All right. We're done for today. Here's a couple of ways you can help which Detroit's conversation forward. He sure to tell a friend, about the daily Detroit podcast. Let's climb up those apple podcast charts and that happens through more people subscribing. So let's make that happen. And if you really love what we're doing. You can join us as a member, atrium dot com slash daily Detroit. That helps keep everything field around here so until tomorrow for spin, Randy Cheyenne, and the team, I'm jareth stays take care of each other. We'll see you around Detroit. You're listening to the podcast, Detroit network. Visit WWW dot podcast, Detroit dot com. For more information.

Detroit Capital One Andrew Landau Jewel Detroit network Phoenix Chicago Milo dot agency New York Michigan Jerry Seth Godin Milo Grosse Pointe Chuck Zo partner fraud Instagram
Race runs through it

Today, Explained

18:29 min | 1 year ago

Race runs through it

"All right. So we're all in agreement that the Lieutenant governor should be encouraged to step down Virginia had a bit of year last week. One more quick thing before we get outta here. As you all know earlier this week our governor admitted to wearing black face and college is part of a costume. It suffered embarrassments than later. The attorney general also admitted to wearing black face college as part of a costume after embarrassments. It's extremely embarrassing to the state became the laughing stock of the country, and as chair of the ethics committee. I have to ask has any body else. Glad face in college got its own SNL sketch. But what if the cost you wanna contests? The contents black face, but Christie Coleman says this isn't just a Virginia thing, this is a national problem menstrual C and all of that. It was something that the entire country participated in and we see the really the birth of popular black face as an entertainment form actually getting it started in New York City. She spoke to me from the American civil war museum in Richmond Virginia which she runs for Virginians. It is more painful perhaps simply because it is something that has come to the fore. When Virginia has worked been working so hard to be a tad more progressive in, oh, this is a state that has a very mixed economy. It has urban centers that are extraordinarily diverse. And so this slide backward from a figure or figures that people have presumed were. Part of that March forward is the jarring part. For the uninitiated from what exactly is Virginia moving forward. Virginia is preparing to commemorate three key events that happened in sixteen nineteen. The first of those being the first Representative government. The second of those being the arrival of women and the third, of course is the arrival of Africans in sixteen nineteen. They are brought here against their will. And they are sold to be put to work in the colony by the seventeen hundreds of course, slavery is very much entrenched in Virginia even into the eve of the American revolution Virginia at that point is forty percent people have African descent so the whole questions will idea that almoner created equal endowed by their creator all of that is born in Virginia and yet born in a place where even the man who writes those words isn't enslave her. But there are also been people who have resisted it from the beginning. And that's part of the story that often gets missed. We get into the eighteen hundreds it takes two votes for Virginia to determine whether or not it's actually going to succeed when they do. See the decision is made to move the confederate government to Virginia because she has this legacy of independence revolution. But it is also the second largest intrastate slave trading. Port in Richmond to the point where today about forty percent of African Americans. Could in fact, Trason ancestor that was sold from Virginia to points further south. So this is our this is our history our legacy what did things like for black Virginians during the civil rights era. They are doing the same thing that black people are doing throughout the south. They are boycotting. They are asserting their rights to vote the differences. You're not seeing the same level of violence that you saw in the deep south of Mississippi and Alabama and Georgia that well. Instead, you saw things that were tad more insidious rather than allowing for for example, the schools to be desegregated, we'll just shut down the schools, and then they'll transfer the money into private Christian schools. And that's what happens a lot of private schools that get started in the state are actually started as a form of massive resistance by whites who don't want to integrate their school. So that's part of Virginia's history elementary affective schools, which white colored children make and Pell job in to all seen any funds from the brighter while up, right? The transition. Gan in the seventies. With governor hope I love affair with Richmond public schools began when I was a twelve year old Niger had Linwood. Holton was elected governor of Virginia in nineteen seventy Hyun rules, who's young white daughter and into public schools. My dad my sister off to the high school with the local national international press in tow following their every steps. Meanwhile, my mother took my brother Woody and me to MOS b middle school most middle school now Martin Luther King middle school, formerly all African American school. And I think it showed a certain grace and dignity that he was trying to pull out a Jinyan because Virginia's do pride themselves on that. Even in the midst of ugliness. There is a certain dignity that people share. And I think he was trying to call upon the sense of dignity and decency, and it wasn't always easy. But that one action I think. Really helped turn the tide. And then you move into Virginia lex, the first black governor former Lieutenant governor Douglas wilder took the oath of office in Richmond today and became the first black ever elected governor in the United States, and he was voted into office. Obviously by a lot of white people in Virginia. Right. That's correct today in Richmond, the capital of the old confederacy the grandson of slave it. What's never been done before? Lawrence Douglas wilder this well through solemness way, our support the constitution of the United States that I was the constitution of the United States and the constitution of the Commonwealth agenda. And so my point is Virginia's history in the state house's history is full of these moments of moving more progressively forward to full inclusion, but then these sort of snapback moments. Which I guess brings us back to today. It brings us back to black face the use of black face is cultural violence. It was designed that way from the beginning as an entertainment. So, of course, people's reaction to it was visceral. What is the thing that people who who see black face at sea a controversy like this and go like I mean, I want to be Serena Williams for Halloween. Why is that offensive? What do they not get that people's culture is an accustom in that more often than not these depictions are meant to mock, that's what they don't get. And they don't want to. I should be able to do what I want is. Also, what you hear whether they're wearing black face or whether they're donning a so called native American headdress and putting themselves and any number of these costumes were person throws on some Brera with a funky mustache with a poncho. It's all offensive black face. Just happens to be have had been around the longest and the most pervasive, and that's different right? From like a a ten year old kid who wants to be Black Panther for Halloween. Very different because that that child that wants to be Black Panther for Halloween. I pray to God. His parents are not pudding shoe polish on his face to do it. He doesn't need to do that most people acknowledge if you put on the suit, we know who the heck you're supposed to be. You know? I mean, it's kind of ridiculous, right? It's completely different thing. I saw a picture of a young, man. A boy probably was no more than ten years old giving a black history report and he dressed up like, Malcolm X. Did he Brown skin? Absolutely not he put on a pair of glasses. He put on a suit any put on a bow tie. Bring this back to governor Northam who may have worn KKK whites and definitely blackened his face in the eighties. He's also the guy who ran on getting rid of all the confederate monuments in Virginia. And that's the duality of Virginia. Right. That's the duality. Prognosis is a new podcast comes from the people at Bloomberg. And it looks into the leading edge of medical advances and ask the question who gets or should get access to them you meet the people at the front lines of medical change. There's this crusader in psychedelic drug research. Who's roaming the sands of burning man looking for venture funding. He sounds like a character. There's an entrepreneur who's genetically engineering frogs in his garage with up to get another frogs, and there's an online community of diabetics who've had together in artificial pancreas. I wanna see that thing prognosis is a podcast about the leading edge medicine, and the people who are bouncing on trying not to fall off and die. The first season of prognosis is available right now. What you used to listen to podcasts, apple podcast, Stitcher. Google find it there. Prog no says. These monuments during Jim crow era when people were essentially receiving their freedom. And also there several rights these monuments put up as reminders that you might be free. But we're still in charge SEM trying to defend their state their country. We didn't go baffled with the north. They come down here trying to to invade it us. It's an utter disrespect. I actually took my first trip down monument avenue might I complete trips all the monuments two days ago, I deliberately avoid monument avenue for that reason in my own personal protests. The young people today. You can't please. I don't know. I guess it just grew up different from what I did. I was in the military stationed in Italy, you go there and tear the call him down because many people were murdered there. I mean, it's it's history. I don't look at it as a monument, celebrating slavery. Moore's just a monument to history. Let's respect what they contributed and have continued to contribute before. And after the war and audit them in. We're not raise this friend. With a lot of the blacks had come out here with us. We tried on the soldiers that fault for the state of Daniel. We have so many large tall historic pieces of African American history that do not get preserved and literally get bulldozed over. And so it just puts a punctuation Mark on what's important to Richmond. Take them down. Take them. Christie Coleman you live in Richmond Virginia home to monuments avenue where any day of the week who can go visit Robert Lee and stonewall Jackson and Jefferson Davis. We got Lee highway right across the river from the district here in northern Virginia. When did these confederate monuments and tribute start to get controversial? We'll see that's the thing. A lot of people don't realize that even at the time that these monuments are going up there are people who are protesting them for various reasons. So the idea that this was sort of a unified front among all white people number one or that all Virginians and the other is patently wrong and false. It's just at the powers that be at the time made those decisions, and because they knew they were potentially threat because there were people at least here in Virginia that they were potentially at threat when they even went up they try to legislate protection. They do legislate protection of these things. What do you see when you look at a confederate Mon on Richmond Virginia? Well, I think for me, it's a lot different. You know, I understand the placement I understand history, and I understand their meaning even though I acknowledged former propaganda that was placed on the landscape as well. And I also understand why people do have this reaction to it. And whether those reactions of like paint them, they're disgusting. And I don't want them there as well. As people who look at them and have some form of veneration because generation Li they have been taught that that's what they should monuments and statuary, and all of this kind of thing they reflect the communities that put them up. He talk about this duality Virginia. How much does taking down confederate statues? Help a race that duality or help undo that duality taking down the statue is not going to raise the duality. The history is still going to be there that doesn't go away because the statue goes away. You know, that's probably one of the most beautiful things. I hear is that when you take down a stature you're racing history. Now, you're not history history. Still going to be there. But would it address the history of violence and suppression? No, it doesn't for some people. What it could mean is that the removal of them is an acknowledgement of the pain that they have caused it is an acknowledgement that they are not benign. And then there are other people who say you really want to deal with structural racism. I could care less about whether that statue. On the ground. What I care about is. Why do we still have redlining? Why do we have one of the most aggressive or had one of the most aggressive eviction programs in the country that in vertically affect poor people and people of color be really wanna make amends for this stuff. Let's go after the structural problems and the structural things that were put in place, not a statue. And you've got a governor who at least talks about doing both taking down the monuments during his campaign mentioned and and working really hard towards racial equality. He's been talking about since his black-faced past walked out of the closet. Do you think he's a loss caused now? Or can he salvage some legitimacy in the eyes of Virginians who who really want to move forward? I don't know. I would imagine that he is doing a lot of soul searching. And I think he's trying to figure out a path forward. And there are people who said if governor north them in his run-up to election had said, you know, there's some things about me, and my past that I have learned about because of my interactions with all of these people, I is a physician and understanding the challenges of families, or if you know, and then you know, if he had gone into this and said, I even grappling with race when I was a student. I did this the idea that if he had come clean about that Virginians particular genes of color would have been that's the first honest thing politician said in a long time, you figure what a work absolutely would've worked really absolutely would've. Really? Absolutely. How would that our apple because here's here's the thing is an acknowledgement that I did this in my past. And I've learned I've grown versus our ideas that I still embrace. That's the difference and people are willing to accept that that there is. Oth in. There is change. Christie. Coleman is the chief executive officer of the American civil war museum in Richmond Virginia. I'm Sean Rama's firm. This is today explained. Irene Noguchi is our executive producer of Piero's the engineer Richie McCarthy. Edits Noam hasn't felt in Luke Vander blue produce Sione, petro says the intern and Isabel is our essential oil diffuser. Thanks, mom special. Thanks today to Peter Solomon and Roberto Roldan for their help in Richmond and regular thanks to the mysterious brake master cylinder for all the music. Today explained is produced in association with Stitcher and part of the vox media podcast network.

Virginia Richmond Richmond Virginia Christie Coleman apple Richmond Virginia New York City SNL governor Northam Lieutenant governor Douglas wi attorney Lawrence Douglas wilder Serena Williams United States vox media Google
Race: Can We See It In Our DNA?

Science Vs

35:06 min | 1 year ago

Race: Can We See It In Our DNA?

"Hi, I'm Wendy Zuckerman. You're listening to science versus from Gimblett. To stop this episode. Why going back to the year two thousand? It's a warm June morning in Washington DC, and we're in the White House's East Room where a press conference is set up. There's an expectation in the air. Everyone stands and in walks President Bill Clinton. Clinton walks up to the Partium and faces a room full of photographers reporters and scientists behind him on a TV screen is some scienc- that very cheesy imagery, a double helix, and the words decoding the book of life. Good morning. We are here. To celebrate. The completion of the first survey of the entire human genome Clinton is announcing that the human genome project had hit its watershed moment and mapped out the human genome for the first time reveal nearly all three billion letters of our miraculous synthetic code and on that stage. One idea that was front and center was about race race had always been this concept that carried a ton of white socially. But did it have any scientific meaning will now this project had mapped the DNA of five people who had ancestry from across the globe, including Asia, Europe and Africa. So what did they find? Well that day in two thousand it was announced that on a genetic level. These people would basically no different ugly. One of the great truths to emerge from this triumphant expedition inside the human genome is that in genetic terms. All human beings, regardless of race or more than ninety nine point nine percent. The same one of the lead scientists on the project took the stage and drove this message home, the concept of race has no genetic or scientific basis. There's no way to tell one ethnishity from one another. So these guys might have thought they were closing the door on the idea that race was biological. But actually this announcement left the rice door ajar because ninety nine point nine percent the same that means zero point one percent different. So in the twenty years since this announcement, what has science found out about that tiny bit of difference between the soul does race live there. Because that's what some people starting to say. If you're looking at someone from China, you're looking at a man from Kenya. Yeah. There's something different about them. So your instinctive understanding is correct race is real these are biological fats. They're not sociological construct. And this idea that new science shows the races, a real it's taking hold in dot corners of the internet where white supremacists using it to make even bigger claims. The genetics proves the white people of the smarter superior rice. Okay. So what's happening here for centuries race has been a political and social idea, but where does science fit into this today? We're to answer the following questions. One. We'd new science can we see race in genetics and two if he can what those differences main like could one race be smarter than another. When it comes to race. There are lots of opinions, but then Dez science. Yet. This is actually an area science has missed up for a long time. We'll tell you about that too. Science says race is coming up just after the break. Episode of science Festus is brought to you by dropbox dropbox is more than cloud storage. It's an entire collaboration platform. Why teens can ship projects coordinator, sinement and communicate Finlay discovered? What dropbox can do for your team at dropbox dot com slash flow. That's dropbox dot com slash flood. Welcome back today. We're talking about race. And we're asking scientifically does it exist. And by that we mean that when you look at how DNA can you see consistent differences that separate people who are black or white or Asian or what have you, but understanding the science behind race is super complicated and messy poly because it has this dodgy scientific history. To tell us about it. We got professor Dorothy Roberts from the university of Pennsylvania into our office and put a microphone in front of a I have a giant puffy thing in front of my mouth fuzzy it's furry it's furry and pretty quickly. We got into the history of race and science thirty told us that really began in the seventeenth and eighteenth century in Europe. It was the age of enlightenment. Science in Europe was having a heyday and scientists were racing to understand the world around them. These typologies were classifying all of nature, they were classifying plants and animals and rocks. You know, other aspects of the natural world, and they included human beings. Colonialism was in full swing Europeans with sailing to Africa, the Americas and Asia and seeing all these people who looked really different to themselves, and so they started to categorize them too. And this was a particular pastime of this highly respected botanist, cold Khaldun, Nias kirwin may Swedish typology just had a very prominent enterprise of classification. Call slaughtered people into several categories, including European African Asian and native American. Oh, yeah. And he had some wild cod categories to like there was this one called you win lupine ass- or get this. Wolf boys for children raised by wolves really widdly that one didn't catch on. But what did catch on with some of the descriptions that he and other scientists gave? Of each race always giving Europeans the best adjectives. He's Dorothy white people are characterized as beautiful, and they're also characterized as the most rational and black people are described as prone to violence to laziness to illness to mental disorders, call also described Asians as severe and haughty while native Americans were reddish and obstinate. All through the seventeen and eighteen hundreds scientists ran with these ideas, claiming that you could see real differences in the bodies and brains of the rices and very quickly a clear scientific hierarchy was formed with white people at the top and everyone else underneath them. And all of the scientists thought they were being objective. But we can now see in hindsight that they were being woefully subjective. That's even too mild a term they were being racist. And part of the reason these ideas was so powerful was because they were very useful for justifying slavery as well as colonization more. Generally after all if science says that Africans or native Americans are less group of people, then it's okay to take them land. And enslave them it made the. Domination of white people over other people seem as if it was just following what nature had planned. These definitions of the races hung around in the scientific world for a really long time. While some scholars did question them. These ideas were a big part of the jenex movement. And it wasn't really until the aftermath of the holocaust that the scientific establishment got together and said this idea of a biologically superior white rice, it's not science and then decades later, I'm we had the human genome project, which came along saying human beings, regardless of race are more than ninety nine point nine percent the same. So science had done a one eighty since Colonna said, it was now telling us that rice doesn't exist. But there will always these things that didn't seem to make sense to some because people can look around and see that we have different skin color different is shapes and different hair. And so. There's no point in denying is absolutely true. That human beings are diverse genetically. Yes, you can see that. You can see that, you know, walking down the street in any big city. And there's another problem too. When Bill Clinton told us, I did not have sexual relations. Oh, sorry wrong. Quite when Bill Clinton told us that the human genome project had showed us that we are ninety nine point nine percent the same. Well, what about that fits leftover? The problem, though, is that the point one percent is a lot of genetic variation. Yeah. This is a lot zero point one percent amounts to around tens of millions of possible changes in our DNA. It's enough to explain the differences in the way, we look because even small genetic changes can have a big effect. Think about pooches switch up a teeny portion of Dougie DNA and you'll five pound to our turns into a fifty pound Siberian, husky. So does the zero point one percent leave the race store? Aja scientifically. For this. We need to meet professor Joseph l graves junior. He's an evolutionary biologist at North Carolina. I n t state university. I was always attracted to these big questions. The reason I've Lucien hooked me is because it answers the big question. One of the big questions. He wanted to answer is can you say rice in the tiny differences in our DNA? Well, when you zoom in on that zero point one percent for the vast majority of that day, you can't see anything that looks like rice, but for a very small bit of it, it gets complicated. So to sort it out we first need a definition of biological rice. We figure out that full race to exist. Biologically, you would need to find that people with the same appearance like the same skin color will they should be genetically uniform group, so they should be really similar to each other, and they should be different from people with other skin colors. So that is when you just look at DNA white people should be more similar to other white people, and they should be clearly different to say Asian people. And if they obvious genetic differences, then they might map onto racial stereotypes influencing different abilities and behaviors like, maybe athleticism or intelligence. So is this what we say let's start with these question of whether people who broadly, look the same genetically similar to each other his one way scientists might try to work that out what they do is. As they take a certain number of individuals that are sampled from different portions of the spectrum of human beings, then scientists can put the DNA through an algorithm and plugging how many categories they want us to file into. So if I want to see five clusters, the outgrow them will give me five clusters one of the most influential studies that did this looked at around one thousand people, and he is what they found. Kinetic gropes didn't map neatly onto skin color and appearance. So for example, Europeans whitey's with clump together with people from the Middle East central and South Asia. There was a group for Africa. But they were in a completely different group from other people with doc skin like those from our Sheehan. Yeah. Joseph told us. He's seen other studies that show this kind of thing like in these islands waste of Indonesia the Solomon Islands. So if one for example, where to take people who live in the Solomon Islands, and you were looking. Their physical characteristics. You would find them. Indistinguishable from many sub Saharan Africans, but genetically Solomon islanders are actually more closely related to East Asians than they are to sub Saharan Africans. So that tells us that genetically speaking if you wanna put people into groups with their closest genetic relatives skin color is not a scientific way to do it. We also said that for the racist to exist biologically, you'd need each race to be pretty genetically uniform. But when you zoom in on that Africa cluster, you actually see crazy genetic diversity. In fact, Africa is a genetic hotspot, and that's because it's way human beings came from in the first place one of the things that has been consistently agreed upon. With regard to the history of our species is the origin of human beings in sub Saharan Africa. And that those populations have the greatest genetic diversity of all people on this planet. And when you understand why we have differences like skin color, this idea of grouping in this way and saying that all white so all black people of basically the same kind of people. It doesn't really make sense the humans evolved, DACA skin to protect us from Sunday message and light up some people got lighter skinned to get more vitamin day. So that tells us that skin color is just a simple adaptation to the environment not necessarily anything else. So if you're a sub Saharan African you have darker skin, if you are in the Middle East, and you're in the tropics, you have darker skin. If you're in in China and live in the tropics, you have darker skin one can clearly see that. Yeah. There are people who are like complected. And yes, sir. People were dark complected. But that's about as far as that consistent different goes through natural selection has worked its magic on us to make us look different. But what about traits that invisible? Because it feels like for rice to be biological. We would need to see stuff that's more than skin deep. We would need to see specific traits that we unique to one race. And not the other is that what we say. Well, Matz, start with a simple example, drinking milk. You might have seen white supremacists. On the internet getting all amped up about chugging milk to prove this. Superiority and now most alarming of all white supremacists. Are chugging milk because for white supremacists? Lactose is their only form of tolerance. But actually, lots of people from around the world can drink cow's milk. You can find lactose tolerance in northern Europe shore, but also in a stage and parts of the Middle East. And that's because cultures around the world have been domesticating castle. Full thousands of years. Long enough to have evolved to chug a cold one we have geographic variation? We have adaptation to local conditions. But we don't have really genetically distinct groups, and this is what you'd expect humans and newbies on this planet where a relatively young Spacey's than we just haven't had that much time to accumulate a ton of differences the way that other animals have we've also never been that separate from each other for thousands of years people were having sex with their neighbors. Well, setting off in canoes and having babies in far flung places, and that's what makes it impossible to define biological races within our species because there simply isn't enough genetic variation at these regional and continental levels that allow us to unambiguously defined groups that we say are different from each other. And so the way we throw around the word rice does it match. What geneticists see when they look into our DNA? No, that's not correct. So that's off the table. Evolution didn't read Collines his book and go pefect. I'll do that. Still though, if we evolved to drink milk quota have a different skin color could the environment have pushed some groups to evolve of a more complicated things like maybe intelligence after the break, we tackle one of the most controversial claims, and it's one that's been getting a lot of attention. It's that science actually shows that some groups a more intelligent than Avas. And that is coming out. This episode of science is brought to you by dropbox dropbox is more than a folder in the cloud. It's a place where teams can manage projects and access. The latest version of any file which is a feature my senior producer Kadian. I could've used years ago. Like, I worked on a daily radio shirt and the only way to share a scripts was in Email, and like trying to work on different revisions of a thing, which is like a lot of emails back and forth. You know what I mean? And like you'd always get confused about like version like someone would be unlike version one, and then they like, but I've already made version to latest latest latest version. Van know fun of final. But which final how many finals, but a three point one have you like don't get into the plights funnel. This is really it. Update a file on dropbox. It automatically updates for the rest of your team tooth. No more emailing and normal final final final. This is really if version eight up learn bowl at dropbox dot com slash flow. Dropbox keep teams flowing. This episode of science versus is brought to you by Lassen, atlassian makes collaboration software that helps teams open up. So they work better together. Normally these ads I would interview someone from atlassian. But this time atlassian prophet lodge interviewed me about how team works to get up. Specifically, how we pitch episodes for science Fasces example of a pitch that wasn't quite sold. Right. But ended up being a story one with emotional support animals that was something that had come up several times. And I just could not save little fluffy on the plane. I couldn't even imagine any science that would make me excited about that. But our producer Merrill pitched it, and she found some weed funny studies that then got it over the line that Merrill is comfortable enough to keep pitching it over and over even if you shoot away the cute fluffy dogs. Yeah, I'm glad that I didn't close the door. On it atlassian believes that when we create an environment where creative conflict can thrive we can tap into the genius of the entire team. Learn how your team can open up, atlassian dot com slash Arpan. Welcome back today were exploring the science of rice. And we're asking biologically does it exist. We've found out that genetics doesn't put people cleanly into boxes, but rather evolution gave us little pushes into slightly different directions. Giving some of us the ability to drink cows milk goal. Say have a different skin color. The fact that different groups of people have different genetic mutations. Thanks to ever Lucien is making some people wonder could evolution have played a role in bigger things with big consequences. Like, maybe our intelligence. Professor Joseph l graves junior has had stories as to why some people think this makes sense somehow their presence of winter makes you smarter than than living in the tropics. The idea is that people who lived in cold places like northern Europe had to work out how to survive in this hostile environment. So only the smart made it and over time they made smarter babies than people who lived where it was warm like sub Saharan Africa and Joseph is used to hearing stuff like this. He had it all through his career moving your loser's. Probably don't know is. I was actually the first African American to ever receive a PHD in my field. And I went through professors who, you know, sat in courses and did not think I should be there, and who published the work that attempted to prove that genetically that Africans were inferior to European. And those folks, of course, had a really hard time with me being in their classes and being so good at what I did. And while Joseph was battling prejudice throughout his Korea. People who study this kind of thing the way humans evolved, they haven't dug up anything that suggests this winter idea is true. In fact, we know that people in warm climates kept themselves quite be the coming up with amazing things like maths and agriculture. But this question of is one group more intelligent than Inaba. It's one that we felt we had to look further into because it's gotten a lot of attention recently from a number of high profile people and this saying science suggests that white people are smarter than black people. It's folks like Nobel prize winner, James Watson signs, Rydin nNcholas. Wade and putt Kosta Sam Harris. He hey is people don't wanna hear that until is a real thing. And then some people have more of it than others. And they certainly don't want to hear that average. I q differs across races and ethnic groups. Now for better or worse. These are all facts facts facts. Okay. So these people are saying this controversial thing, and they say that the proof that whites us Mata lies in IQ tests. Okay. These guys wanna play in the science sandbox. Let's see how they go. Science best is producer rose Remler, and I called up an I q expert. My name is yield averts the best. It's very close the vicar. Yup. Vicar. Yes, that's just at the Essen urine. Good subbed is E L ta is a professor of psychological methods at the university of Tilburg in the Netherlands. So we asked him straight off when you compare blacks and whites who does better on I q tests watch on our fridge perform better how how lodge is the difference. So in acute testing data beer to born at least ten acupoints between a African American somewhere in Americans while they will always be whites who get terrible. I keep school isn't black people who do really. Well, studies have found that on average African American school about ten points lower than European Americans. Yeah, it's a big gap. And it's important to know that psychologists do take I q tests seriously redo, no, I q scores predicts an awful lot of things. So we noted that you of your young age predicts. How will people do in school? How many years of education, they will eventually obtain IQ predicts also how well people do in different types of jobs, people tend to have the same. I q scores over the course of their life. Which is why scientists like yell to say that I tests really can tell us something worthwhile. Given that these tests on rubbish and European Americans tend to do better on them. What does that mean does that mean that why Americans are inherently smarter than black Americans? Now, you can't you can't say debts does distinction between the IQ scores and thing that we're trying to measure an EMMY intelligence, what Yeltsin means is that even though I q tests count tell us a lot about who's going to be successful. Then not necessarily measuring innate true intelligence. And that's because they could be things that affect some people skulls outside of this smarts. Some argue that these tests are biased that is that typically written by white people who might have unintentionally included questions that easier for white people to answer. And this is actually what Yeltsin researches. So we asked him if it's true if the tests a biased, we don't know some do show that are fair, but also handed some by sees and something we've found frustrating is that we've seen people online cherry picking. In the work of Yeltsin and Abbas pointing just to the findings that suggest these tests are fair and unbiased meaning to them whites truly us Mata. So I asked him about it some people use your work, and you'll research to say that whites have genes that make them smarter than blacks is that what you're work says. I'm not aware of any of my papers that actually shed that or shout that in the particular way did just show some people have their opinions made up, and then our very well quipped, even if they're smart to find the evidence that corroborates views and Yeltsin says, although we don't know about this bias question. They is something we do know when it comes to I q scores. And it's this the world around you has a huge influence on how well you'll do definitely showed that the environment by the very important role. Studies have found that things like getting less education living in a poor neighborhood and being exposed to set and chemicals like lead and mercury can drop your accu- school, and in the US on average, those things are more likely to affect you if you'll black than if you white has a great deal of differences between African Americans European Americans. It's not only schooling. It's. Also health. The nutrition children get as they grow up as important as so many different things that can help explain the differences. A lot of the studies that find an IQ gap between white and black Americans. They haven't controlled properly for this stuff. It's very hard to control institutional racism, which means we don't know why African Americans perform low on these tests, and when research is do consider some of these factors the IQ gap. It gets smaller. On top of this. No, one has found a so-called intelligence Jane that pops up more in white people than in black people. In fact, there's been some new studies coming out on intelligence, and so all we can really say is that there a maybe a thousand genes also and each seem to have a tiny effect on intelligence, and we don't know if those genes are different in different populations. So basically for those who are arguing that whites are the smarter ones. And that this is genetic. Yeltsin is like the science, isn't that a back you up. We hardly know what's going on doesn't make much sense to say this predetermined at birth. Given all that it seems the only way we'll really know if one group is smarter than about us to control everything in Herrin virement. In other words, for example, make sure that black people in this country, a traded as well and have the same of its Unity's as people who are white. So when it comes to signs vez race does it stack up. One. Can you say race in genetics? Now, not in the way, we think of as rice, you can't neatly divvy people up into defined races based on their genetics still though we can say genetic differences in people depending on where their ancestors lived to what those differences main often the genetic quirks, we see in populations popped up to help us survive in our environment. Mike places where the sun is strong or wake cow's milk is readily available as for stuff like intelligence. Well, we know that different groups of people on average do get different IQ scores. But there are just too many things that affect those scores to know what that means. So we don't have evidence that evolution pushed any group to be smarter than Inaba. The end of the day though, much of this stuff about how humans deed or didn't change thousands of years ago. It's practically impossible to know. And there are gaps in what genetics can tell us. So it feels like there is so many crevices that people can we lean to to say, well, this is the proof that races exist. I think the science tells us that it doesn't make sense to divide people by skin color. The me the one thing that Colonna is did get right about people, though, is that we really should be dividing up children into whether they were raised by wolves or not. So it's a shame that one didn't catch on. That signs vessels rice next week? We tackle the Tillery cliff. If you wait too long to try to have a baby you screwed. It's much buying eggs and putting in your fridge Reiter. You can't just leave them there. Forever. Hello. Hi. Whereas Rimma Herman of Fasces host of science versus how many citations in. This week's episode this week we have one hundred and twenty three hundred twenty three. Are you impressed? I am impressed. Although I saw them climbing throughout the week. So they are to get a prize. You get the prize of facts, guests and knowledge. Yes. Where can people go if they want the prize pack. The library. Of course. Well, if you wanna see our transcript of one hundred twenty three citations, you can go to science versus dot show and click on the episode or it's also linked in our show nuts wherever you're listening right now. Thanks. Thank you. This episode was produced by Roy's rim with help from me. Wendy's come in as well as Merrill Hawn. And Michelle dang, I'll senior producer is Caitlin story where edited by Blythe, Terrell fact, checking by Michelle Harris, Merrill, horn and Michelle dang mix and sound design by Peter Lennon music by Peter Lennon, among and Bobby Lord, recording assistance from Ulama and shiny ever. I'm a huge thanks to Stillman Brown Morgan jerkins Amadeus. Cedric shine a Joji and to all the scientists. We got in touch with for this episode, including professor Noah, Rosenberg, professor Rasmus. Nielsen professor Mark Shriver, Dr Garrett Helen thou- professor, Sara Tishkov, professor. Kenneth kid. Doctor Joan SCO Dr Dan Leviticus and others finally a huge ex- to Zuckerman family and Joseph Lavelle Wilson. I'm Wendy's looking back to you next time. I had a child with someone when I knew there were red flags, and I just ignored them after Zoe left. Her husband. She had to start over as a single mom and now she feels stuck. And so here I am. This is the situation. I put myself in from Gimblett media. This is motherhood sessions. I'm Dr Alexander Sachs. I'm a therapist and on this show sit down with women like Zoe and try to offer some help listen to motherhood sessions wherever you get your podcasts. Thanks to our sponsor dropbox dropbox simplifies team, what by helping people assigned tasks track projects and centralized communication around your team's content. Learn more at dropbox dot com slash flow. Thanks, joust, atlassian openness is important to Latvian. It's the reason they make software like JIRA, trello, and confluence to help teams share information and collaborate effectively. Learn how your team can open up at Lassen dot com slash open. That's AT L ISS. I A N dot com slash open.

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The Future of Racism w/ Terry McAuliffe

FUTURE STATE

38:59 min | 1 year ago

The Future of Racism w/ Terry McAuliffe

"The future state podcast at the intersection of Technology National Security and politics. I'm your host take Clark the future of racism in America we talked today to the seventy second governor of the Commonwealth Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe A man who confronted racism in a formerly confederate state who turned his state from red to purple to blue who battled at Charlottesville the Klu Klux Klan and former Nazis Ed. We're GONNA talk to him about his new book beyond Charlottesville and before we do a word about the book it's coming out July thirtieth. It's one of the books we recommend for the seasons reading and Terry told us that that he's giving every penny from his proceeds to the people whose fathers mothers family were killed that day and Charlottesville heather higher and the two state police troopers who worked with Terry McAuliffe who died in the helicopter crash that is a great book beyond Charlottesville and it's about racism in America and a practical approach to dealing with racism in the age of Donald Trump also going to talk a little politics because as the former chairman of the Democratic Party in this nation and the former fundraiser for the Hillary Campaign Bill Clinton campaign. Nobody knows politics at a granular level like the former governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia and I suspect the future governor Terry McAuliffe Governor Terry McAuliffe welcome back to future state. You are a returning champion champion. You're in season one in your back for season two and you've got a great new book out <hes> about what happened in Charlottesville. I live not too far from Charlottesville. It's a beautiful town. It's a democratic town. In the Sea of Republican counties. It's a liberal town and yet Charlottesville somehow has become a name synonymous with racism and then you're you're great book beyond Charlottesville you walk us through the details of what happened happened on that terrible day and Charlottesville when racists from around the country came to the Commonwealth Virginia most of them are not from the Commonwealth and we saw the dark underbelly the hate <hes> we saw all those terrible screams and outrage and we lost three lives in the process when you think back on that day were you you were expecting trouble but where you expecting it to be that bad. We were expecting affecting trouble. I've known for several months. You know they had filed a petition with the city Charlottesville. I stood up my fusion center so I had State Police National Guard Law Enforcement F._B._i.. Homeland Security <hes> coordinating coordinating we'd embedded state police. We had a lot of undercover operation going. We were monitoring websites. I knew ahead of time they were told to come armed and they were told to come her people so we did the preparation cy sent a thousand thousand guard in about nine hundred police down so we were prepared but what I was not prepared for standing that day to see a thousand neo-nazis with swastikas white supremacists white nationals marching down the street screaming the most vile things I've ever heard against African Americans and members of the Jewish faith standing in front of the synagogue screaming. WE'RE GONNA burn you in. WE'RE GONNA burn that synagogue like we did. Gosh what's now. These are Americans for me. That was the hardest thing you know Richard. These were hoods in this country and they used to do it at night. How did we get to a place in this country where they feel? They can walk down from thirty. Five states walked down this beautiful city in spews such file things against fellow Americans now. I opened the book up with my conversation with President trump that day you called him. He called me and that's what a president does atomic crisis. He calls the governor. I explained to him what had happened what we've seen what we'd heard and expected him to do the right thing expected him to come out and condemn these folks who explained in detail tail who they were and what they were saying because Richard. Is You know working for many presidents. A president may have one may not have any opportunities and a very specific moment to show that they are the moral leader this was trump's time and I told the President Bill Clinton had Oklahoma City Bracken bomb had Charleston <hes> you had Bush had nine eleven. This was the moment for president trump. Those three events that you just mentioned were turning points in their presidency where they united the country brought everybody together. You weren't a Democrat or Republican that day in we needed to hear our president unify US against hatred in racism and when I hung up the phone I was sure he was going to do the right thing so so I said I'll wait for my press conference. You let you go first. Mr President press conference got delayed half hour hour two hours three something's going on and then when he finally came out that day he started out right and then veered so far off course and said they were good people on both sides Richard. There were not good people in the Neo Nazi movement. My father fought in World War Two as deadman exterminated six million members of the Jewish faith. They were not good people. The president of the United States failed that day failed the world wasn't just Virginia wasn't just America. The world was watching the same what is going on. This is not nineteen thirty three the looked like it but it looked like it did. Let's get back to trump but beyond his strangeness. What is it about young American men because that's what they were for the most part <hes> young American men and grow up in this country in presumably there grandfather's fought in world war against the Nazis what could possibly attract someone to say that their Nazi to to paint a swat sticker? It's anathema to most people. How did they get there? That's a great question and I talk all about this in the book. How did we get to a place in this country and I make the point that no one is born this way Richard no-one you gotta were it somewhere? You got to instill this hatred in. It and I talk in the book. How we gotta do better at home early? GotTa do better in school early but for a lot of these folks who came you know supposedly it was about the Robert e Lee statue most of these people had never heard of liberty they came dispute hatred and I don't blame president trump for specific acts but I do blame the President United States for creating environment that people think it is okay to come spew this hatred. Donald Trump is a racist to me that day he came out is a white nationalist neo-nazi loving racist he had an opportunity and it was his job is president is states to be the moral leader to say this will not as I did several hours later I call them out. I told him to go home to get the hell out of Virginia. Get the hell out of America. I said you think you're patriots. You're not you're a bunch of cowards so the word dog whistle is used a lot here <hes> and what people you mean meanwhile a dog whistle is a sort of wink wink nod nod <hes> where trump never actually says it's okay to be a Nazi but he sends this message. This dog whistle that the Nazis can hear the Crypto donuts as the one that'd be Nazis and well. We can't point to a sentence anywhere that trump's ever said I support the Nazis or I support racist causes. I support the Klu Klux Klan but he talks about it in a certain way he tweets from these bizarre <hes> people on twitter. He re tweets their stuff. <hes> people who are just beyond the French President United States should be a million miles away from them and he re tweets them he sends out this dog whistle that it's okay try and what happens is they come out from under the rugs. Come out of the woodwork and they're they're more of them than we wanted to believe and I talked about this in the book. We have David Duke another racist in the books and we did this for trump trump tolls. This was okay but I'll take it a little further than you say with dog whistles I think he is yelling it listen. He wants a white America the same things that we saw back in the nineteen thirties where he wanted Hitler wanted to create and all white race all Aryan race look what he's doing with the squad and these four members of Congress go you. You know what three of them were born here in America just like he was so he's even gone further than that and I'm baffled by. I've done politics a long time. He's got his base of forty percent. He can't get ahead and move forward with language like that. He's losing independent women so I don't understand the strategy. He's got the forty he's not growing but I've heard people say he thinks there are people who didn't vote last time who believe this stuff and that he's expanding. His base is getting out the vote. This is a get-out-the-vote campaign for the nut job right either ninety two million people who did not vote. There were three states. Is You know Michigan Wisconsin. In Pennsylvania. We lost by seventy seven thousand votes combined. I can promise you that the vast majority of the ninety two million were our supporters who just stayed home. Who Thought Hillary had won it or wasn't excited by the race the people whom Donald Trump with his rhetoric he got them mm out and you saw it in seventeen year after the election? The biggest pickup in one hundred forty years in Virginia are how Sedillo gets you saw last year in the congress. We netted seven governorships. We picked up. I think eight new State Chamber so my point what is it goes to our benefit but as I talk about in the book the One is horrible. Charlottesville was Richard. The one benefit was ripped off the scam and racism people in this country. Tell comfortable felt. Would we dealt with racism. We had elected Barack Obama after directed Brockman. There's nothing more to do and it's for some people it was like that expiated the sin <hes> slavery in racism. I say that I voted for Braga Obama. How could I possibly be a racist? How this possibly be a racist country? It elected Bronco and for a lot of people Richard and I talk about this in the book where this real hatred grew is when a black man got elected president United States that was a fuse for out of the people and then trump with his rhetoric created this combustible mix it really came out in Charlottesville yeah and he started <hes> with the birther movement he more than anyone else was responsible for the birther birther movement that kind of said between the lines this guy's from Africa <hes> and therefore how could he possibly be our Muslim from Africa Muslim from Africa so he's a terrorist. He shouldn't be our president. That's right. That's how Donald Trump became mathematical entity so its entire life story an in. I don't like it when people say <hes> or your father did this so therefore you do it but it's true in his case his father was going to K._K._k.. Rallies and and we know this because he got arrested at try <HES> and then his entire housing <hes> empire <hes> was segregated. Even though that was a against the law when the the attack occurred in central park he paid for out of his pocket a full page ad in the New York Times demanding that these four young men be executed and they didn't even commit the crime right. He's whipped up hatred all of his life. I've had people ask me. Do you think he's just whipping up hatred because that's what Putin wants and while it's tempting to think that he's actually whipped up hatred his entire life. Absolutely he's changed his country and you know better than anybody how the perception of America Erica around the world has changed dramatically and that's why encourage folks to read the book I mean it's fascinating <hes> the lead up to it. I talk about Friday night when they all came with their torches to the University of Virginia Yeah Cheeky Torches tiki torches chanting throwing the torches at people and then obviously what Hap- which by the way for people who don't know is what the Nazis did in Germany they would have torch parade. That's what they replicated and they said that and they had the swastikas and they were quoting their Nazi chance looked like Munich of nineteen thirty-three yeah and and the day of the event is you know I've finally called a state of emergency at about eleven twenty in the morning. It wasn't supposed to startle noon but I'd seen enough I sent in the National Guard I sent in the state. Police cleared the park in about eleven minutes so what about eleven forty five everybody had been dispersed felt good no damage new property damage they'd had skirmishes and fights but all in all pretty good day and then about an hour later a right-wing maniac by the name James Fields weaponized his car from Ohio from oil and drove down the middle of City Street and Charlottesville hurting in dozens of people and killed three two year old heather higher and that was not a good person on that side and then also tragic that day with an hour is a state police helicopter which is the one I flew on all the time trooper one with my pilot and another pad who'd been on my security detail so close to my family when down in a horrific crash that day those three died fighting against those people who were marching that day and you knew the to state troopers personally oh my goodness <hes> Jay was my pilot had flown me all throughout the Commonwealth in Burke you know as governor you get protection detailed twenty four seven burke was primarily working with my children and he was a member of our family and his family. I mean I was crushed that day. So you went to the families the new you can sold their families. Yeah I went home that night. I mean it'd been a rough day. I gave my my speech. Then I went home and went to the C.. J. cones family and Burke Bates his family and then went back again the next day visit the family again both of them with young children <hes> both with two children. I mean it is sad but for those people but for those people coming into our city Burke Jay and heather higher would be alive today so for me. It's personal and one thing you find in the book is heather hires mother Susan Bro Magnificent woman the courage of this woman. She's quoted loaded throughout the book and she wants Heather Hires Death to be a positive about getting changed in the country. I also have John Lewis Congressman. John Lewis writes the forward in my national hero national hero but you know on Monday. I'm sitting in back in the governor's office and I get a call. It was congressman Lewis and he said Governor I watched your speech Saturday night and it brought tears to my eyes and I thought to myself I said Congressman after all all you've been through the fight the struggle the beatings for you to call me and tell you that speech inspired you to tears really move me and you know so I went. We spent a lot of time in which you love about the book he does the forward forward and he and I talked a lot. Which is my final chapter? Where do we go from here? How do we bring America together but racism is prevalent in Southern States Juno Richard? I restored more felon writes in any governor in American history and the Republicans looking spot you they fudgy tooth and nail sued me twice sued me for contempt decor and in the end they they made you sign how many thousand <hes> individual one hundred six thousand I was honored to do it but remember nineteen to enrichment in Virginia in our capital in Richmond. It was been our constitution with a poll tax and literacy tests in the state Senator said that day I'm doing this to eliminate the durkee from being a political factor in Virginia well. I got to stand there one hundred in fourteen years later and write a horrible wrong of remnant of Jim Crawl so two hundred thousand American citizens who had paid their dues to society and serve their time. We're being kept from voting <hes> and new struggled struggle over the course of over here <hes> to get them. They're voting rights back. They got their voting rights back. Are they voting good question. I saw one analysis that <hes> about forty eight thousand had voted in this in the seventeen seventeen election. If that's true that is very significant of you met any of them meet him every day I mean I'm not overstating. There's not a day goes by I mean it. Brings Tears drives in fear listeners to understand in forty states Richard word. It's automatic right to states you vote while you're in prison Maine Vermont Fourteen states you vote the second you walk out of prison in the remaining states when you're done with Probation Parole match right put Virginia in the third category but in forty states it's this is not an issue so wasn't like I was making Virginia the first state I was taking a southern state with Jim Crow Laws and ending a horrible tragic racial law that was on our books and they sued me soon me for contempt to coordinate ultimately won but this is why people get in politics to lean in and do the right thing and this is the point I making the book. I'm so tired. Politicians who just talk they talk talk. Talk people want to see action and with me whether you agreed with me or you didn't Richard I always took I talk that I always took it wasn't a day at by what so you bump into someone who is now a voter because of what you did <hes> <hes> in letting them have their rights back <hes> their fundamental rights do they say well. Let me say first of all I mean I just got a lovely letter. I was able to get it right before when the book about a mother talking about her daughter who made a mistake young and life member. We were one of just two states at permanently. Permanently disenfranchised you from voting think of that <hes> and because of voting rights she feels like a full citizen of the Commonwealth. She's never been better but I'll tell you when I did the order and signed him. All one individual person faneuil Barnes was eight years old. He had not voted in sixty years. He'd never been allowed to vote. He was permanently disenfranchised so I went down to personally give him his rights back. He was sick that day and his daughter came to the ceremony she she took it home and she told me just how it for the first time he was gonNA vote in two thousand sixteen presidential election so right after the election I got a call from his daughter. I was so excited and she called and thanked me and I said well how was does it formed vote for the first time in his life. She said he died a week before the election. I was Chris Phone and she said Oh don't don't don't don't be upset. She said when I took home your certificate it was the first time he smiled in years and he died full citizen of the Commonwealth of Virginia. <hes> I mean I could tell you stories I mean there are so many individuals Richard who I ran into before I did the order grown men with children would go to voting booths on election day A. and try and get one of those. I voted stickers so they could put it on and go home to show their children. They voted because they were embarrassed that they couldn't vote right I mean why would we do this society. You paid your debt to society think of this. We want you back in society. I want you back paying taxes and watch apart. zillow watches successful goes back to that <hes> senators comment nineteen four you just mentioned is pure racism. Yeah we know taking down the statues <hes> of these traders. There's <hes> who rebelled against our country's seems to me an obvious thing to do changing the names of the highways around here. <hes> seems obvious thing to do but some people want reparations and I'm just not sure that that's necessarily necessarily the right approach. I think that's wrong answer and I've said this what I want to do. In what I did is governor is. How do we go forward? You can't go back but to me. Dealing with the issue of reparations is about today day investing in our schools listen. When I became governor I had problems in school district's in Petersburg and Norfolk and enrichment? I put a billion dollars in education largest investment our billion one billion largest in the history of the Komo up to redesign redesign all our schools. We have schools Richard where believe it or not when it rains water through the ceiling. I mean you have inferior schools in predominantly African American School district that is racism so for me. Hey what we ought to be doing the inequities in school the inequities in housing mandatory minimum sentencing. We got a we've. I'll tell you one story. I earned gentleman before I left office. He had done five robbery. She was a drug addict. Nobody was ever hurt. I think the total he stole in the five was five hundred thirty five dollars. Okay Lenny Singleton was his name. Nobody hurt Richard How along you think his sentence was for five robberies. no-one hurt in over five hundred dollars. Total stolen probably life to life sentences plus one hundred thirty years so incredible. I can't make the stuff up. It's just not right and I can go chapter and verse through all the People I pardon but my point is this is what we need to be doing and I think we can bring Americans together on this issue. So when you see institutional racism you think it's possible <hes> to get consensus in legislatures to dig it up and take it out only if you have leader standing up raising the issue talking about it doing as I did let it be in Criminal Justice Reform Ormeau pardons or my restoration rights are on my investment in schools you have to lead on this topic and I as I say it drives me crazy when I hear about a reconciliation commission what that means to me a bunch of white people sitting around Ronna room talking and making themselves feel good. I WANNA see action so racism is now injected into the twenty twenty campaign explicitly deliberately deliberately by the President Sir <hes> but it's also been injected within the Democratic <hes> primaries now you did one of the most courageous things I think of any <hes> buddy in the Democratic Party in this year. You didn't run for president. <hes> you've got to track record that overqualified you to run <hes> and especially when I see some of the people who are running <hes> why didn't you run and after the answer that I I want to talk about what you think about the the debate between Camel Harrison Joe Biden right listen you know better than anybody and I wanNA thank you because you helped me a lot of foreign policy advice in other things as you do to any candidate who asks you for it. I was prepared <hes> traveled the country had gone to twenty plus states last year campaign and thought we had a great record southern governor who want to became governor inherited huge deficit left the biggest surplus in the history of the state record record number of jobs record investment in education restored the felon rights re reform criminal justice biggest investment and infrastructure. I thought that was a message that would resonate around the country in most people felt that I could take on Donald trump up who could stand on that stage. I once wrestle an alligator ever fifteen thousand dollars eight foot L.. I could take on old donald trump but it's about being able to two things one about being able to win and I did. I always the thought that Joe Biden would not run. It always been my thought once he decided to run were in similar not space not the same space but similar space so that gave me pause and then we had a confluence wants events as you know we had some bad circumstances in Virginia and I had our senior Senator Senator Warner and our Steve All came to see me one weekend saying we're in trouble. We've got our house and Senate up for the first time in twenty-six years we we could win the TRIFECTA in Virginia and we need you to come home so I spent the weekend with Dorothy talking. Do I take this which Wa dying to do but it's very narrow path. Is You know in my message isn't isn't very pragmatic politician. I talk about things I can get done. Not what I hope for but things I know I can get done and or go home and help Virginia and you gotTa do in life where you're thinking can make the biggest impact I've gone back to Virginia. I've done fifty two events in the last six weeks campaigning for House and Senate and we're going to win the House and Senate and I'll take tremendous pride matt so I made that decision and I've been happy with the decision. We should tell our listeners. The Virginia has its election on odd years. Then nobody else has their election thing we need to we do chins every single year in Virginia right every single year. This year is the is the house aide set the statehouse in the states next year of course ars. We're going to have the congressional in our senator up and the president then we go right back and then we have this is just every single year we dealt with this and this is a very unique opportunity when I just quickly when I took over our state Richard don't mm forget where we were from the Republicans. I inherited a gigantic deficit. Two Point Four Billion Virginia was laughing stock. They had just past the Trans Vaginal Bill. If you remember which made us laughing stock Nash you know every Single Night Rachel Maddow when John Stewart we'd pass the trap laws to shut all of our twenty-five women's clinic town. We had the worst anti Rainbow Coalition language in the country to the point that our economy was anemic sequestration hurt us no business. This is WanNa come the Virginia because we were put a wall up. I ended all that I did one hundred twenty vetoes more than he governor in the history state open welcoming no matter whom you love the religion you pray to it didn't matter and guess what and the biggest surplus in the history of the state. Why do you think Amazon came to Virginia Google facebook Microsoft Open and welcoming so I thought that was a great message? That would have gone on but you know I'm still a young man who knows what could happen. I think I have some ideas about one way happened but you are one of the best political handicappers in the country <hes> especially when it comes to the Democratic Party and so to get back to racism <hes> we had the sort of strange moment between between Camel Harris and and Joe Biden on bussing in the nineteen seventies <hes>. What's your take on that? I was unhappy with the debates. I've been very public on this all important important issues but people didn't tune in that debate to hear what happened forty years ago on bussing I did not hear the words K. twelve mentioned I did not hear the word infrastructure mentioned I did not hear cybersecurity mention the biggest threat. into our country today you WanNa talk about fighting a World War we are in when it comes to cyber. I'd rather good book about that recently. The fifth domain great I'm reading it. Everybody should buy resilience beyond the offense not defense and then I didn't hear Workforce Training Workforce Development and to me. That's the biggest thing I led the nation I in the nation Workforce Performance Development Grant Training People for all the jobs that exists today and yet and listen. I understand what Comma Harris who's doing. They need a breakout moment. If you're in the move Oh tier and she knew her she had to go. I think the vice president opened himself up when he quoted Senator Excellent and when he's quoted Herman Talmadge I mean really I mean these were racists. James E solent said that blacks were inferior race now. I knew what the vice per who's trying to say even with these horrible creatures. You know I'm able to get things done but you just can't cite racists basis so we put himself there and she took advantage of the vice. President could have been much better prepared. You had to know that line of questioning me so she did what she needed to do. You need a breakout moment. The vice president didn't do what he needed to you. Do however you got another debate coming up short yep and we'll see where we go. He's he's still the front runner. I think what Joe Biden where he's getting. Most of the energy is that he looks like the one that can best beat trump into Democrats today. That's all matters. That's all the matters so I know you. You don't like to do this but breakout your crystal ball because you're good at this. Even though we don't like to do it <hes> How do we get from twenty five candidates stu one or two and who are they yes so let me tell you so we will the next tier debates in September my guesstimate. They'll probably be twelve will be gone. You have to have one hundred thirty thousand donors and two percent in these other or not and two percent so I you know listen anything can shave so by September. We get half the her away more than half him because it's not the your ideas Richard aren't any good anymore. It's you just plain out run out of money. They can't pay your staff and you can't you know fire plane and do what you need to do. So that's what will happen. Unfortunately you know you need money in these in for politics you do and that's a piece of strength. Trump is raising a boatload of money boatload so you gotTA money obviously to compete against him. You know I'm very confident sitting here today. We're going to beat trump <hes> I I have been as you say. I've been doing this longer than most people forty years I started with the Democratic Party back in Nineteen seventy-nine believe it or not not right out of college was Jimmy Carter's national finance director at the National Party. I've been doing this. I've had every job I've cheered the National Party of cheered inaugurals conventions. I I'm telling you people are energized. They're gonNA come out but I'm just saying in. This Democrats got to be very careful. They've got to start talking about issues that mattered to people at home. I did not like an immigration is very important topic and we need to make sure we're taking care of everybody but in that et debate we spent all this time talking about you know undocumented folks coming into our country. We're not gonNA charge them with a crime and then we immediately moved in. We're GONNA give them all. Healthcare people are sitting at home and saying Whoa wait a minute. How about me? What the heck are you going to do for me? I got a homeless problem with my city today. I mean that's I'm just telling you so. The message is wrong. You think horrible mess in every time we're talking immigration. We're playing on Donald Trump's turf and you're going give me a prediction no predictions because I I've been doing this long time. Anything can happen. We'll see what happens in in Iowa but could there be a surprise always could be surprise. The money is going to as I say knockout two thirds of these folks relatively quickly. I say relatively quickly. I mean you know the the next September and October debates obviously are going to really call the field and then money will take care of the rest of it and do you agree with people who say the Democrats crowds are paying too much attention to twitter and facebook <hes> and not all the party is on twitter and facebook a newer times that are great piece two months ago show with small percentage of the actually voters are we have got to this is my point. Listen and blame congress shame on them. They should have passed national immigration reform a long time ago. This is on Congress. They need to come together. They gotta quit making it a political critical football. We've gotTA give people a pathway to citizenship. We gotTA help these immigrants. Who've come to our country? We are mosaic tile fabric. That's what makes us great and get this issue off the agenda by national agenda by solving this isn't there's some things that take years to solve this takes a month. If we're serious you and I could get in a room with a group of people and we could get a law done as you know as could most members of Congress if they wanted to do it. These undocumented folks in this country. Give them a pathway. Make make it very definitive. Obviously secure the borders but you gotta remember people come to this country because they're facing death in gangs and four hundred years ago. This month was the first legislative chamber in America in Sixteen Nineteen Virginia. You know they came to James Van with Williamsburg and that was put in place to protect individual civil liberties and we just need to remember that but this rhetoric of what he does immigration we keep taking the bait on him and that's what he wants us to talk about healthcare the bread and butter issues. He doesn't want US talking about them because we are better and people trust us so let's get the Democrats over here. They're not talking about blowing prescription trump prices and all the things that people worry about at home with twenty four candidates or whatever it is can at the end of the day when when the process decides on one candidate whether that's ads in the primaries are at the convention. Can this party reunite I think so. I think this is unique town. I think the debates will be very important as we go forward. You know I love the debates as you know. When I was chairman of the Party I started? Are these debates the D._N._C. Debates is very important that we get everybody on stage and show the American public. I started them in two thousand drew a large audio night goodness yes which is great now and at this stage it's fine. They're all up there. You know everybody's speaking to different different areas which is great and I'm fine with it this year naturally as we get closer and closer you know we get to a smaller group and so forth but at this point I'm fine with more of the Mary. It really doesn't matter there. Somebody Marianne Williamson is talking to somebody. In John Delaney's Duncan there they all are talking to some whoever they are yeah but I do think trump gives us the greatest opportunity for us to come together and unify and you know I'm optimistic about twenty Kony twenty I really am I was optimistic about eighteen when I talked to you before I said we're GonNa win the House for him and I predicted the exact number of how seats we pick up six months ahead of time to do and I predicted the governor's listen. This is why I want you to your great at predicting this stuff. <hes> this is why I want you to give me. A prediction on the Democratic nominee is well. I can tell you this as a former chair of the National Party. I want everybody to be in the battle and I don't WanNA handicap because I want to give everybody a shot at that are gonNA make a prediction. I'm going to predict to the next next. Governor of Virginia is going to be and I think I'm looking at it so terry. Thanks for coming in again Richard. Thank you to future state great work you do thanks for the book. <hes> I urge people to read it because it was a moment in history that <hes> that need we need to understand because it tells us a lot about America where we've come from and where we have to go. Can I say one thing. It's also an audio all right well by the book listened to the Audio <hes> but <hes> <hes> Terry thanks for coming nights and we're going to get you back on your state for third and this I'm. I'm not GonNa let you out the studio till I get a prediction okay deal. I hope you enjoyed that conversation and if you did please go to wherever you get your podcasts and rate us so that others will get your recommendation and if you see a list of other season one and season two shows go to future state PODCAST DOT COM and also at that website you'll see what we are reading the books of Twenty nineteen of that we think you'll like many of which we're going to talk about on the podcast but they're more books there as well one book. You'll find their the I hope you'll read is the fifth domain by Rob Kentucky and meet. It's about cyber war and how to get from cyber war to cyber piece. It's written in well. I hope is clear. English has lots of real stories and real people as well as some recipes for getting to cyber babies. The fifth domain can be pre-ordered now traveler entrance for future state are made by Sire Travel C. I. R. E. Sire Travel Dot Com for your personal travel as well as your business travel. Don't think you can do it as well.

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Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network: Freakonomics Radio (August 17, 2019)

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

43:18 min | 1 year ago

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network: Freakonomics Radio (August 17, 2019)

"Don't miss old navy saturday seal. It's a big one. All jeans are a huge fifty percent off. That's right all jeans plus. Get gravity's the family for just five bucks. Saturday only lee at old navy and old navy dot com validate seventeen genes excludes in store clearance select tease get to old navy right now. All jeans are on sale up to fifty percent off off from fifteen bucks for adults ten bucks for kids. Try on a pair in store and save even more with five bucks off your purchase of fifty dollars or more during old navy's great denham uh-huh triathlon hurry in now to find your perfect fit and save big with up to fifty percent off all jeans now at old navy valley twelve day twenty one excludes in store clearance is gift cards register lane items jewelry five dollar discount valid with jeans purchase. Freaking radio is sponsored by amazon launch. Pad amazon amazon launch pad connects you with products to elevate your every day and it's the best place to find exciting new products. Get the most out of what's left of the summer shop unique outdoor games interactive pet toys and the newest innovations in speakers e bikes and more like a golf game. You can set up anywhere a smart toy for your free companion or an e bike that makes riding a breeze. They've got you covered for all of life's upgrades. So you can experience more this summer. Visit amazon launchpad today <music> at amazon dot com slash shop launch pad. You never know what's going to inspire an interesting piece of academic research <music> imagine for instance that you are a third grade teacher at the very beginning of a new school year. There was a teacher sitting at table in front of me. My test scores going to be s-h-i-t i'm sick of this s-h-i-t this atlanta correct at came to a new school will and they had just passed out the classless and on my class list i have i am ice name of a student and then we have gender and we were to use the class list to make the name tags. That's when i heard the other teacher worrying about her test scores and she was angry every efi year i get these bad a students and my test scores are going to be in the toilet and she ran over to the principal and they had it up and and i am sitting there this new teacher at the school looking at the front and back of my paperwork because clearly missing some sheets of paper clearly we. She's received something with more information than i have. I'm like okay wait. What am i missing. What is the point where she tests fourth. I've had any test scores scores. They're like look at the names. What kind of names did these kids have. Shomar jamea jeliah yeah linnea kwon kwon they had distinctively african american names which apparently led the angry teacher who wait wait to surmise that they would be poor students and they'd make her look bad and that is the cadillac started this research project that research project it would eventually turn into a p._h._d. Dissertation it's title black names in wiped classrooms teacher behaviors and student perceptions and the author of this dissertation dr marijuana pepsi and if anyone could understand the friction created by teachers teacher's expectations over students name it might be a black woman who grew up with that name marijuana pepsi last week on freakonomics radio we asked how much does a name really matter so. The ultimate question we wanted to answer is does your name matter for for the economic life that you end up leading that steve levitt my freakonomics friend and co author are people who are quote saddled with distinctively black names facing burn when they enter the labour market levitt along with the economist roland fryer analyzed the large rich set of data it it encompassed the birth certificate of every person born in state of california between nineteen sixty and the two thousand and included the name name of the baby the first last name of the mother along with a lot of other information of that give you a hint at some of the economic circumstances the researchers could then track these babies as it grew up and see whether their first name affected their economic outcomes and we were able to see <hes> something quite remarkable which is that the name named you're given at birth seem not to matter at all true economic five so another conclusions and i also in agreement with just they start my own research however i can see where someone might question that that's the thing with research rarely interested interested in the end result. The study shows this but we miss everything in between which is why i like the quality have in addition to the quantity because a quantitative gives us those numbers of the qualitative tells that story today on freakonomics next radio the story of marijuana pepsi van dyke in what she's learned about the power of a name. I'm looking at what's wrong with you. And why are you messing with me it from stitcher and productions. This is freakonomics radio. The podcast acid explores the hidden side of everything. Here's your host stephen duffner. The couple months ago marijuana pepsi van dyke received her doctorate in higher education leadership from cardinal uh-huh stritch university in milwaukee wisconsin. This generated quite a bit of media attention marijuana pepsi. Van dyke has become dr marijuana into into her p._h._d. From cardinal stritch marijuana pepsi van dyke. That's a real well. I have been in the news quite a while from the time i graduated from high. I school and the world has kind of fought me through high school graduation my masters and now you know you can't get a p._h._d. Following up on the other stories and so the theory. I got her at age forty six. It took about eight years total some starts and stops in job changes and so life yeah. What was her graduation day like. It was surreal. I was just blessed to be there. I was very humbled old. I you know i felt like crying. I felt like jumping for joy. I remember driving down the highway grabbing the steering wheel l. and screaming out loud a few times cardinal stritch graduates are given the option to reserve classrooms where large number of guests can watch the commencement broadcast ask but she kept her party fairly small right my husband frederick van dyke. My son is <hes> my sister my mother and and <hes> a few nieces and nephews and a couple of cousins at didn't want the public to come. Why was that i'm an introvert. I'm late back i. I'm i'm nervous at times and so i wanted to just make sure that i did what i needed to do. For the day and at the same time i wanna make sure that i'm not minimizing the experiences variances of the students who participated in my study and this is a serious research study despite some of the jokes and means that come up about a doctrine marijuana. I wanna pepsi choose born in chicago in nineteen seventy two. My mom has always been entrepreneur. She has always made clothes unclogging shops gardening. She's been featured in a few newspaper articles for her gardening skills. My father was <unk> a university bus driver so he drove the bus for the campuses in chicago. Was it your mom who named you or your dad or combination asian. I believe that was my mother. My father is a jehovah's witness and he says that it was all her and i tend to believe him okay. So why did you choose the name name. She shared with me that she believes that my name would take me around the world and that was always the strikeout. When i asked sir hey she wasn't wrong. No she does not wrong. Marijuana pepsi was the middle of three sisters. The others were named kimberly really and robin and i asked her so why couldn't can go around the world you know what was it that when you look down at me the first time and you helped me that made did you go up. This is the marijuana pepsi ad so of course there are no answers to that and she'll go to her grave without without answering it further than she already has. I don't even ask you. I mean did you at some point. Ask your mother. Were you smoking a lot of marijuana. Were you drinking a lot of pepsi. Did you ever ask her. Uh no i have not ever asked my mom that at. I'll just say i know my mom all of my life and some questions i have to ask her at all and and leave it there meaning you're sure she did or she didn't smoke that i know my mom i know her personality and she is a lover of life and i just believe nothing's off the table. What about you and marijuana and or pepsi or you a an avid red door even occasional partake of either. You know i have never drank and i never smoked. I never smoked cigarettes. I've never for taking a toll and literally done nothing when she was very young. Marijuana pepsi lived with her dad in chicago cocco. I attended almost predominantly african american school war. Everyone knew my name to just call me by my name. No issues news. I did not understand that my name was unusual until i entered into the fourth grade here in beloit wisconsin beloit like much of wisconsin is overwhelmingly white and it was very clear that marijuana pepsi was not usual it was not quite accepted and it opened the doors for a lot of teasing and bullying and issues and not just from the students themselves. I didn't have teachers who bully bullied me but i guess the name was just so interesting. They just couldn't help themselves with the questions and the opinions and the statements and dragging taking me to different classrooms to introduce me to other people to show who this little girl was who had this name. I didn't see that as they were trying to you. Bully me or put me down. Some of the questions were difficult however because they questioned my family the type type of family that i had and what type of mother would name a child is some of her teachers started calling her. Mary and i don't think they did it from a place of again being hurtful towards me. I think they were trying to help me. They saw the weight that i was getting on with the students and the things thinks they were doing and they wanted to make life a little bit easier and that worked right until i placed in the school spelling bee and they wrote mary jackson on my certificate and i went home and my mother saw in hit the roof and came back to the school and i everybody else and do not ever call her mary. Her name is marijuana. Do not ever write her name differently and she told me you had eh never answer to anything else other than marijuana or i'm going to get you and from that day on you know i was a lot more scared of her than it was them when she was younger back in chicago to kogo school had been a joy for marijuana. I was very smart student and learn to read very early. I was picked to do everything gene. I had great relationships with teachers and the students overnight here. I am at school here and not only are the teachers looking at me funny. The students are looking at me crazy. They're surrounding me in the playground asking me questions. Why are your pants old high. You know michael jackson and high waters ears and everything under the sun. I felt like i didn't belong there. I did want to be there because clearly they did want me there. Something must be wrong with me. I you know i never said on an interview or i never even shared it ever but sitting here i remember thinking about committing suicide. I was nine and i remember that like yesterday and i was just hoping that everything would just go away and then i sat there and said the right do you do that. They're going to talk about you even more. She says now there were a lot of reasons she was having such a hard time. Environmental factors family issues the relationship between the students at school relationship relationship with teachers. It was very difficult to wonder what was going to happen the next day and it was just it was a lot i won't go into too much detail. The last thing i want to do is make it sound right. I didn't have people who loved me and who it didn't take care of me but sometimes that's just not enough in making my home environment. Let's just a little bit different between my. I have a very close knit family very loving family. I've got my my mom and we've we've been raised in with our grandmothers an aunties and so there's different types of things that happen in families and so you you have that going on and i go forward a few more years. I leave home when i'm fifteen and before i left home i was a failing student had all s maybe a d._a._m. And i had never ever given any thought to what my life was going to be like. After anything i was literally living day to day and i happened to be walking down the street to the store with my cousin appeal cooks and she was four years younger than me and she was bragging about how she was going to be the first person person in our family to go to college and i remember stopping in my tracks because i said so. What is she saying about me. I'm <music>. The next day i went into the counselors office at high school and i ended up going into a credit recovery program and from then on on i believe i may have gotten over three point and then from there another three point something the higher i ended up getting the most improve student award at a graduation and i was awarded an academic scholarship to go to university of wisconsin whitewater in retrospect the treatment you got over your name was that do you think kind of just the straw that broke the camel's back that led you to becoming a straight f student as a smart kid or do. I do think that the the treatment you got over. Your name was a big contributing factor to that. That was one of the straw that broke the camel's back again is that sense of belonging and in my case the lack thereof were you angry at your mom. Either forgiving you the name that caused the trouble order for insisting that you continue using the name even when other people were offering you a sort of easy way out by calling you mary. I've ever been angry about my name. I have never felt that. There was anything wrong with my name again. I didn't even know that someone even believe that until i moved here. I'm looking at them. Might what's wrong with you. Why are you messing with me. All i wanted to do was read. My books fly under the radar. You're going to school and go home. I don't mean to put emotions into your mind but it's hard for me to imagine you wouldn't be resentful at your mom for insisting thing that you use the name that was causing grief though i wasn't resentful love it again. It's it's like they named steven if somewhat steve and your mom says no i want you to be even that's your name. My resentful of the people bringing me the grief about it because again. That's my name when i ask you what your name is as you tell me it's over why i had to go through the fifth degree coming up after the break how marijuana pepsi turned lemons into lemonade donate in the form of a doctoral dissertation and someone's going to say oh she had a distinctly by name but look she successful but in the short term offer navigating her education institutions to get their look at what she had to go through. That's coming up right. After this freakonomics radio is sponsored by campaign monitor the radically easy solution to email marketing as the highest driver of customer retention and according to eighty percent of retail professionals email serves as digital marketings most successful channel and with campaign monitor. You can leverage email and use it as a tool to empower your brand and spread your message. Try it for free at campaign monitor dot com slash freak no credit card or email marketing experience required tired campaign monitor. Make your emails unforgettable. Freakonomics radio is sponsored by transfer wise. When you send money abroad with most providers they usually really don't give you the real exchange rate market up. If the rates pretend you must not send transfer wise always gives you the real rate when you send between seventy currencies fees you pay only a small upfront fee and more of your money gets to the other side transfer. Wise even has a multi-currency account that lets you hold over forty currencies convert them when you like test out for free at transfer wise dot com slash freakonomics or download the app today marijuana pepsi vandyke turn things around in highschool and went on to college. Her first major was business and a. and that's what i wanted to do. That's always what i wanted to do but she also loved education and she wound up becoming a schoolteacher even so she kept her hand in business that that is correct so i owned and operated a small row state company and did real estate investing and i've actually been in real estate as long as i've been teaching now real estate for sale signs often include the name of the broker. I'm curious if you include your name and how that worked out so they steal it you know i have phone calls from sellers. Hey marijuana someone stopped and snatch the side. They're driving down the street. I've tried to get the license plate. They took the magnets off my car. So many times is is just ridiculous own so marijuana pepsi vandyke clearly thought longer and harder than most those people about the effects of a first name but even this did not prepare for what happened at her new school in atlanta and her fellow teachers angry response the box to seeing the class list my test scores of one s t i'm sick of this s-h-i-t grabs that's worse there wanna look at the names this kind of response she would come to learn was not so uncommon among white teachers <music> to me. It's jarring to think that this kind of response would be prominent among educators because i guess we like to think that if there's a class people in the world who don't prejudge and and who believe in potential it would be educators and i'm curious whether this response affected your view of the field that you chose them. It definitely did not because it made me think. I did want to be an an educator. It just reminded me that teachers. We're not on a pedestal. We are human. We have the same preconceived judgements. We see something that we deem unusual. We sometimes have the assane thoughts what i was shocked and disheartened to see is that when we hapu spots it seem that stuck with those instead of saying okay. I'm thinking this let me just see. I don't know this person. Let me just go off from there and that is the part that sticks with me. The research steve levitt did on black names. Remember found that those names didn't seem to influence long long term economic outcomes as indicated by things like neighborhood characteristics or healthcare status or years of education but what that research didn't explore floor was the day to day reality of living with a distinctively black name. It was a big quantitative study. The research vandyke began to work on undergraduate student was much smaller phenomenal logical study a phenomenal logical study meaning that i'm looking at the students lived experiences says their views and told with their voice the whole point of such a study is to zoom in on each individual data point with extensive group or one one on one interviews van dyke was looking to speak with college students about their experiences in college but also in high school and even earlier so she held an open in call at her alma mater the university of wisconsin whitewater and chose ten students who fit her study criteria. My criteria was they had to be of course they had to be what i deem to be academically successful as defined as they have met all the criteria for graduation attrition from high school acceptance in college and they must be in good academic standing they must have had name related experiences throughout their academic history and must be willing to talk about it and they believe that they have a distinctly black name when i see see those criteria i i'm going to assume and maybe i'm wrong so tell me that. Most of those experiences were negative not positive and my wrong. There were positive experiences that i did highlight in the dissertation in general many of them were negative however i did not enter into the research study expecting that as a researcher. You have to be very impartial. You have to make sure that your own personal feelings and i especially sean had to be very careful of that. The last thing i ever want to do is be told that because my name is marijuana that had bias and so i was very careful to stay away from that i wanted to learn from the students experience and not put my own experiences on them. The students in van dyke study were named mikhail m. y. K. e. l. l. cantrell k. e. n. T. r. e. l. l. to leah t a l. I y a h stefan tae s. t. e. capital visa victor old n._t. Apostrophe e. r. a. d. a. y. A. h. d. as in david e. y. I t. e. Apostrophe should lease s. h. A. l. van dyke was hoping to answer a few fundamental questions david or eat w. s. h. I. k. eight number one or did they educational experiences of students. The distinctly black names basically what are they going through on a day-to-day basis and number two what are the impacts of navigating educational environments as a student with distinctly by name so you've gone through this what happens to you and lastly what recommendations do they have for suits with distinctly by names for educators and for other students who have to go through life with that same name so what did you learn so when we look at <hes> research question number one the the education experiences of the students the major one will disrespect disrespect <unk> behavior expectations low academic expectations nations and stereotypes these disrespect was in two distinct ways disrespect shown towards the students with with their names but secondly towards the students personally as individuals they questioned what type of person to student was what type of life they would have. They questioned what type of parent would name the child this. They took get a step further. They chose completely different names for the students. Even without the students consent <unk> families cassette. Can you give a for instance sure. <unk> sounds easy to me. It sounds simple but he talked about teachers always having a rough time saying his name and they would always ask him. Oh can we call you king and he had a colt that i just loved you can say trepidation but you can't say can shrill can you you talk also about the low expectations and again. I want to be clear. The criteria for the students in your study were that they were academically successful correct correct and that was purposeful sometimes when we are doing research on minority students there is this historical tendency agency to just look at all these mitigating factors of why because they're all encountered this dad and i wanted to make sure that no one could come back and say well the reason it was this is because the student was just not academic successful and so when you're looking at the low expectations the students silence felt like they were expected to be disruptive or to have i disciplined issues vandyck van dug into how these experiences affect affect the students academic experience. It put a strain on the student teacher. Relationship students has perception issues if the student the teacher relationship is strong that student can overcome can learn and can't succeed when that strain is put in from the very first time the students automatically clam up and they talked about how they can't give themselves and then the teacher sees that and they think the student is low academically early and treats them as such and this cycle with the teacher out understanding what's happening in their attributed to this and then the student just so you don't pulling back their efficacy is ruined and that's where the self perception comes in in many cases that altered their future career choices several several of these students they were going to be science majors and other stem majors and they changed and they wanted to work with students and not being a lab. They wanted to be teachers because they felt that they could help other students who are going through this to love their names and and not have to put up with this one person. They said they wanted to do race. Related studies because of his experiences with this. You could imagine that the effects van dyke is describing are not unique to students with distinctively black names. You could imagine students who belong to other minority groups is being made to feel less capable than they are and this jibes with other research that seeks to explain the relatively low rate of female stem students in van dyke study. She did find that some students it had positive school experiences because of their names teacher using their name as a conversation starter for instance instance to talk about cultural backgrounds but she says this rarely happened with white teachers when we talked about the positive experiences those dell's came from african american and minority teachers faculty so here's a question when you have a distinctively african american the name or any other name distinctive. It's obviously something that someone else can latch onto and maybe even a a little bit of a diversion from a more core issue of racism or prejudice or whatnot. Since you're studied didn't include african american kids don't have distinctively african american names. How can you tell that in the case of the kids you studied. That was their names that were the cause of of this treatment as opposed to simply being black. That was one of the research questions. How do you know that this happened because of your pain and that's where the stories came in the conversations that started the issues within those classrooms were because of their name when a participant talked about having to call in their parents it was because of the name so not only did the instructor you refuse to call the student by the name they also told the student off. You're not going to be here that long. It doesn't matter just sit down and the students talked about being so frustrated because her parents were staying in there to talk with the teacher and the principal the assistant principal people gave student a pass to go back to class and spoke the name wrong and the students say spoke by name wrong and the principal said it doesn't matter just go back to class and the participant she threw her hands up and said it does matter theft the whole reason we're here because of the name i guess just continuing to play devil's advocate lake it could be that those teachers and administrators would have exhibited racist behavior toward black kid without the distinctive name. It's just that there wouldn't be such over evidence of it right that is true and that's not a part of this this study the names are and so when the student comes in for that first time and they talked about what happened when they introduce themselves to the teacher and when the conversation was did anyone else get those questions. The answer was no. Did you have other students in your class. Yes so your findings were really dramatic and interesting. I'm curious how they squared with your expectations coming in. I heard that a lot of them did experience experience which was surprising to me because these students were so much much younger than i was currently at i thought that with the change over the years and the types of names now and all of the professional development elementary implicit bias and race and equity and diversity that things would be so much better for these students okay so let's talk about now the here's what we can do about it in the paper you talk about recommendations from the students for other students and faculty. It's so on some of the recommendations that the students came up with basically to be culturally competent competent to be respectful to understand that just because a student has a name that a an educator may not be familiar. Are you went to does that. Mean that there's something wrong with that student or <hes> with the appearance it was acceptance acceptance of the students acceptance of their background <music> when everything that's spoiled out ask the student how to save their names. They talked a lot about the teacher eagles. How when teachers were corrected how how the cops an attitude about being told how to say the name so when you talk about implications for leadership guinea eagles act to educators being self reflecting looking at their own personal biases that they have think about when you hear a name or you see something about a student you you don't know them but think about what triggers in you and ask yourself why it's triggering and when it does trigger you remind yourself okay. I don't the person. I don't know why this is being triggered. However i'm going to make sure that i get to know them the way that they are. Let's say i hear you talking about all this and i run a big firm or a government institution with same the president united states and i say you know even though you're talking about quote just the names of one subset of people. I believe there's probably probably a lot to be learned here about how we all have different bias. He's and that we often don't even see these biases. Do you have any advice more more generally for people based on your research. It's the same advice you cannot judge someone by their name by your race. It is individual studies show that when people are actually asked about their tendencies weather the racist or just about other groups that they firmly believe that they are being fair and impartial they have to bring that to the forefront ah have those conversations and petty trade and make people aware that it happens so fryer levitt. Do you make the argument that <hes> distinctively african american names did not affect long-term economic outcomes so i am really really curious to know whether you think a distinctively african american name oregon and distinctive name and some other category perhaps is ultimately <hes> <hes> a penalty for lifelong economic and perhaps other outcomes when you're looking at the students that that were in my study. Let's take too young yeah for example. She is a biology major. She has to minors a spanish minor and a psychology minor. When she graduates she is going to go on in perhaps biology while she is going to be deemed successful and someone's going to say oh she had a distinctly ed but look she successful but in the short term of her navigating her educational institutions to get their look at what she had to go offer and many of the choices and changes that she has made and many experience that she's had they were impactful on her using this success may come despite the distinctive name and the penalties of yes and not even and despite sometimes in a small part because of you know most people will go well. You know there's no way that marijuana pepsi headed long-term long term impact because of her name. She's dr van dyke now but my goodness. I share it with you that i thought killing myself at asian i and there was much i didn't hear how would you think your life would be different now. Had your name been just mary. I would have stayed aide in business. I've always been very entrepreneurial business minded. I've always had students interests at heart. So at some point i still would have been some sort of an educator even if i just went into schools and did some work as a business leader but i think that's fair i would change riches as well vandyke has been working most recently beloit college in wisconsin. She's been director of their student excellence and leadership program which supports low income first generation college students the big reason she went into education she says and stuck with it because she wanted to change how students who look like her war. Look like anyone else or no one else how those students will be received achieved by the rest of the world and i've said many times. I cannot wait to become a teacher because this is ridiculous. We have got got to give students at least one teacher where they can come in and feed themselves and have parents that can come in and have a conversation. She remembers one particular incident with a student back when she was teaching elementary school and i had conference with his mom and she she cried throughout the whole conference and i could not understand it and i am giving her tissue after tissue and i say well. Why are you crying when he's doing. That's just it. He has never had a good conference. These teachers have been kicking him out of school since he was in pre k. I came in here expecting to hear everything. I always heard and the student was auto role. He was doing a fabulous job <music> coming up next time on freakonomics radio if you were a judge on shark tank what would you make up this pitch. I'd like to open a new kind of grocery store. We're not gonna have any branded items. It's all going to be private label. We're going to have a no no television advertising and no social media whatsoever no facebook no twitter. We're never going to have anything on sale. We're not going to accept coupons. Would you invest the company and what if i told you that this grocery store not only already exists but that it's crushing the competition they not only at the top of the industry but they're at the top by a wide wide margin look at the economics behind one of the most unconventional and beloved companies in america. It's next time on freakonomics radio radio freakonomics radio produced by stitcher and governor productions. This episode was produced by daphne chen and harry huggins. Our staff also includes alison listen craig low greg rippin zach lipinski matt hickey and cornwallis our theme song mr fortune by the hitchhiker's. All the other music was composed by louis kara. You can subscribe to freakonomics radio on any podcast app including spotify or the apple or google podcast apps. If you wanna get the entire freakonomics radio archive that is available bill exclusively on the stitcher app or at freakonomics dot com where you can also find transcripts show notes and sign up for our newsletter. If you want our entire archive live without ads along with bonus episodes go to stitcher premium dot com slash freak. Oh we also publish every week on medium short text version of our our new episode goto medium dot com slash freakonomics radio we can also be found on twitter and facebook and lincoln or the email at radio at freakonomics dot com. The radio also plays on many n._p._r. Station so please check your local station for details. Thank you for listening <music> stitcher on crystal mines and i'm delighted to greenberg the factors actors. We all face conundrums. I never really had to make friends and so now as an adult i find that hard or hind ourselves in the middle of predicaments admits that would like to be made unhappy by my facebook feed and it can be hard to feel all alone in our self doubts feeling like i not good live enough. It's just it's demoralizing and it's been holding me back all this messaging. That's like getting into my head and i didn't even realize how much it was affecting affecting the way in which i thought after living by more than fifty self-help books for our other podcasts by the book we have definitely learned a thing or two and now we're ready to put our self help knowledge knowledge into practice to give our guests a little self love coaching. It's like a reality makeover. Show for your heart. We hope you'll join us for our first. Season of we love you and so can neil we love you and so can you is out now. 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Episode 2: Power to the People

School Colors

54:04 min | 11 months ago

Episode 2: Power to the People

"Our ancestors were brutally forced to an unknown land to be enslaved and looked down upon his animals by the White Man on June thirteenth nineteen sixty-nine. Monica Edwards got up to speak at her junior high school graduation. She was the Valedictorian and that was the first line of speech they were separated the from their tribes and unable to speak to their own people because the language bowing forced to speak the language of the oppressors they have since that time. I've been struggling from what was considered. The lowest of worldly creatures slaves in bondage to achieve a respected place in the world that voice. You're hearing right now. That's MONIFA fifty years later reading her own speech out loud for the very first time since that graduation day today. Black people are still technically McQueen bondage. The man has been limiting our education keeping us from getting jobs and keeping us in slums though are black men are the last to be hired in times of peace. They are the first to be hired to die in times of war remember. This was his junior high school graduation. She was fourteen eighteen years old. We must be aware and proud of our blackness. I feel that we must also get out of the hate. Whitey bag that so many of us developing awareness fall into a white person may be a great friend and valuable asset to your career later on but remember that even God. I helps those who try to help themselves. So how does an eighth grader come up with this. She went to two seventy one in the late. Nineteen sixties sooner highschool to seventy one was the center of a bold experiment and community control of schools in the central Brooklyn neighborhood of Ocean Hill Brownsville after decades neglect from the board of education creation black and Puerto Rican parents Ocean Ho Brownsville we're given power over their own public schools but as they tried to exercise power they collided head first with the teachers unions leading to the longest teachers strike in American history this school colors a podcast from Brooklyn deep about how race class and power shape American cities and schools no single event has done more to define the New York City school system in Ocean Hill Brownsville what started there's a local pilot project turned into one of the most divisive racial confrontations ever witnessed in New York City Ocean Hill Brownsville made the national news from once shattered shattered political coalitions and created new ones and fundamentally shaped the city. We live in today for better or worse but as the strike tore the city apart something important Horton was happening on the ground in Ocean Brownsville the union had shut down schools all over the city but the people of Ocean Hill Brownsville mobilized to keep their schools open and prove to the world the black people could run their own institutions successful in the process Ocean Hill Brownsville inspired her particular brand of defiant independent and intensely proud black activism that would define local life in central Brooklyn for generations for me as a community organizer it provided a vision of black self-determination inaction for students like Monica Edwards. They still say the education they got in ocean. Hill Brownsville was the best thing ever received but fifty years later exactly what happened and and why is far from settled depending on who you talk to you can hear dramatically different versions of the same events teachers. Were very dedicated trying very hard to do a good job. There was no teaching going on teaching just stopped. They didn't have any skin in the game. They never intended for this pilot program. Having a meeting we had like a regular election like a politician. Auditions has covered elections that is fraud in this a hope. Somebody has to say something to the children that we are not the enemy fire. These people care for so's teachers to go back there because otherwise the city will burn down. They will burn down. We are engaged in a fight for survival survival of the black race of of our rates of our people do know what survival means who you choose to believe is up to you but that choice is especially personal for us us. We both have family who were directly involved on opposite sides of distract. This is Mark Winston Griffin Max free. Welcome back to school colors. certainly changed a lot. That's I started walk. How justified is the word they use. This is my mother's first cousin J Eskin. He picked me up in Bedford stuyvesant where I live because I had asked him to drive me around the neighborhood where he was born. Just southeast of bed Stuy Brownsville to where we're going. I we're GONNA take a look at the junior junior high school to seventy one which was the scene of the the longest teacher strike of American history back in nineteen sixty seven sixty eight and Jay was right there on the picket lines as a union teacher in fact junior high school to seventy one was down the street from his grandmother's apartment. Jay's grandmother was my great grandmother her when she came to Brooklyn from Russia nineteen twenty-three Brownsville was a poor Jewish immigrant neighborhood. My great-grandfather literally sold junk from a pushcart in the streets but after World War Two the neighborhood started to change what I lined up the first grade school the first day of school. I was still new Caucasian child. My mother said this is ridiculous. We have to hold. She wasn't prejudice but she did want me to go to all African American school prejudiced or not Jay's family had the means to move to Queens so they did and they weren't the only ones one million white people left New York City in the fifties and sixties and they were replaced placed by an almost equal number of African American and Puerto Rican migrants who moved into many of the same neighborhoods the Jews and Irish Americans Italian Americans relieving so when Sophia Dasilva ripe in Brownsville in the early sixties the ethic boundaries were pretty clear okay so right there on her. C'mon Ralph all the way up to Hopkinson Avenue was black and then you cross Hopkinson. Also you WanNa Puerto Rican neighborhood you walk two more blocks and you weren't an Italian neighborhood and everybody kind of knew how to stay in their lane the wrong people bowl went in the wrong area. There was a fight that would break out you know sometimes it was really fine with guns and bats and feel him in Hatton as a young girl so when her family came to Brooklyn. It was a culture shock for me it really was I remember praying every night. God please let me go back to Manhattan because I moved to a black neighborhood and I was Puerto Rican. They would never let me forget that I it was every day. I go out to play and they call me Amita which I didn't understand especially because is I'm a dark skinned Puerto Rican and so I had to go through this thing of fighting almost every day to establish myself in Brooklyn despite the fighting a very close knit community everybody knew each other played together and they had a store on the corner called Jimmy's which were owned by some Italians and we all used to go there every day. Go Get hoagie sandwiches. They made the best sandwiches Father John Palace softspoken. White Catholic priest grew up in another part of Brooklyn and came to Brownsville Ville in nineteen sixty three what he found there was troubling gradually what was happening was lodged blackness. Panic families were moving in to these tenements that had sixteen twenty apartment and we are as one or two Jewish people would live in an apartment. There was now eight or ten people living in each apartment. Just like tenements were increasingly overcrowded so with the schools all the kids in Ocean Hill Brownsville at that point. We'll go in the school on a half day basis either win from eight to twelve or they went from twelve to four well what happened was they told us the kids would have to go on double shifts. Delors Torres was the mother of four boys and Brownsville. I had to go in in the morning and two going in the afternoon school. ooh overcrowded to an extreme whereas there wasn't much learning wasn't much education going on one way to relieve the overcrowding might have been a serious school integration plan there are plenty of open seats and majority white schools that even after a citywide school boycott in February nineteen sixty four that kept almost half a million students home from school in Support of immigration the board of Ed responded as they always had big promises and one off pilot programs and there was massive organized resistance from white parents the Movement for school integration was fracturing exhausted and increasingly appeared out of step about giving visibility to the one people in this country who have been locked out of everything in this country and who are the only people who can build a fourth to turn this now talk about that talk about that stokely Carmichael President of the student nonviolent Coordinating Committee in Stokely stokely view black people fighting for integration were playing themselves by reinforcing the idea that the only way for a black child to get a good education was to send them to a white school integration. It was just a cover for white. Supremacy Dolores stories wasn't gonNA wait for some pie in the sky citywide integration. Her kids were still in overcrowded schools that we're failing to teach them much of anything so she organized a group of parents from the neighborhood to appeal to the Central Board of Education for help and totally ignored auto tech to our local school board which they did when into the local school board that represented supposedly represents our district. We found not one person everything on that board listen I district. Most of the people on that board were white. We were district mostly Hispanic and black families. The one that did have children in public schools went to public schools in good neighborhoods. We were poor neighborhood so they went back to the Central Board of Education which sent them back to their local board and these people we felt did not represent us. They had no children and the school district. They weren't paying any attention to us because we would the ignorant people these were the educating table and we felt that they didn't care about on December nineteenth nineteen sixty six frustrated parents from across the city went to a meeting of the Board of Education at Third Brooklyn Headquarters. The meeting started to unravel when a black mother from Brownsville tried to speak her peace only to be ruled out of order because she had not submitted her name in advance. Parents were fed up the procedure. The board tried to continue the meeting with the audience drown them out chanting. Let her speak. We pay the taxes. Father John powis was there and suddenly the members of the the board of ED got up and walked off their platform and refused to hear anymore and people who were there selected nine representatives and I was one of them and we went up and took over the seat of the Board of Education and we were there for forty eight hours and people all during the day all during the night will coming down all the parts of the city and testify by about how bad the schools were able. They called this the people's board of Education after this bit of political theater parents all over the city started to demand people's boards in their own neighborhoods in other words community control and at the same time the pressure for community control of schools was coming up from the neighborhood the the idea of getting traction at the very top with Mayor John Lindsay Felony Argus. I summon you to enlist in the fight for a better New York. John Lindsay was a liberal Republican Wasp with an Ivy League education and deep ties to the business class fight to revive the downtrodden exploited for new and better employment. He was elected mayor by running a fresh-faced idealist. He talked like a man on a crusade to fight against wretched slums poisoned air stifling traffic congested subways for excellence and Quality and equality in our education plus in the wake of so-called race riots in Los Los Angeles Boston Newark Detroit and many many other American cities Lindsey also believed that giving poor communities like Ocean Brown more power over their local institutions would help to keep the apiece New York made it through the notorious long hot summer of nineteen sixty-seven without a major outbreak of violence with the mayor was rattled by going along with community control aw Lindsey could be seen as helping to head off a black revolution without having to demand anything from angry white parents so the mayor appointed a Task Force to study decentralisation the school system led by McGeorge Bundy president of the Ford Foundation and incidentally one of the architects of the Vietnam War and in May nineteen sixty seven under under pressure from the mayor and his task force two board of Ed created three demonstration district's one in East Harlem one on the Lower East side of Manhattan and one combining a handful of schools from two adjacent neighborhoods on the eastern end of Central Brooklyn Ocean Hill Brownsville. The plan for community control was get people people on the local school board that represented these kids and would represent us another words people that lived in the community had children in the community tours. Toro's as we would have an experimental district eight schools two junior high schools six elementary schools and first things first that experimental local school board had to be elected his father John powis the Ocean Hill Brownsville demonstration school district began with an election and a very representative election. We were speaking to people coming into the office. We won't allow speaking allow speaking in the streets. We have people campaigning for a regular election like a politician has Albert shanker president. The Teacher's Union saw it differently while there was no election. The election was so called election was conducted by having a members who wanted to be elected to the governing board knocking at the apartment so the people saying do you vote for me. What kind of elections that sign election. Yes it is that's literally how you do political organizing for an election or otherwise is Shankar. Depending on your point of view is either hero or the mustache twirling villain of this story. He was hostile to community control almost from the beginning but why it's hard not to hear in his voice. This embedded racism receives the community as some kind of Banana Republic that doesn't we know how to govern itself sure but it was more than that he saw community control as a direct threat to his union the United Federation of Teachers. They like to think of themselves selves as Blue Collar. They'd like to think of themselves as teamsters. This is Labor historian Steve Riot. We're tough-talking where militant. We're GONNA fight for our. We're GONNA get benefits. It's for our members higher salary. Better working conditions. We're going to control the workplace and that's what happens. Throughout the nineteen sixties as unions go you have. T- I was pretty young but in just a few years they have been very successful and all that success was at risk. If the board of Ed went through with its plan to split up the school system that would have meant a all conditions would have to be negotiated locally that was anathema to Shankar and the Union they strew held in want to have to add three or thirty any more contracts. They wanted one contract negotiate. That's the Labour leader tally. You'd sort of don't want to deal with the dispersion of authority you want as ask they say in other contexts one throat to choke fact. I had a meeting with the George Bond I asked him career that dividing the city up to sixty four districts and having parents picked boards principals and teachers that he's GonNa make Johnny Reid and he said well well no but they won't blame. You won't blame the mayor to your point mark about the embedded racism in the way. Shankar talked about Ocean Hill Brownsville. The irony is that Shankar saw himself itself as a champion of civil rights and he talked about civil rights all the time when he was attacking community control. I must say at the time that I didn't see it as part of the Civil Rights Tomato Civil Rights Movement for Integration and the Movement to eliminate segregation and the census represented kind of backward step representative step by people in the the community saying we've given up on it the gracious so we WanNa take all of us schools. That's pretty much it. My argument about Shankar is Shankar Lights. The civil rights move move when it was Martin Luther King in the march on Washington in nineteen sixty three. He had no connection to sympathy for ability to connect to the movement. When it became came more radical so from Malcolm Exxon he was an antagonised because he felt like those people were bomb throwers and they were undermining the very thing that he believe leave workers needed to do which was to form as he imagined a black wide alliances buddy wanted that done within the confines of the Democratic Party and he wanted that done within the conference of the traditional labor movement not it's more radical alternatives that were posed in the nineteen sixties so these are the battle lines on the one side. We've got poor. Parents of color and black power activists seemingly allied with the mayor in the Ford Foundation and the elites represent on the other. There's the teacher's Teacher's Union. Was it inevitable that they would come to blows. I don't know many teachers justice unhappy about overcrowded classrooms. The parents were but from the Union's point of view the first shot across the bow was this governing board election in Ocean Hill Brownsville in the summer of nineteen sixty-seven or what kind of elections that sign election Shankar believed the election was was held during the summer deliberately so as to exclude teachers who were on vacation but what were they supposed to do wait a whole year. There was too much at stake woven. My family moved here from Birmingham. In nineteen sixty-five they came from totally segregated schools. Jody wore all black. The teachers more relaxed. The principals were all black. The chairman of the newly elected Ocean Hill Brownsville governing board was a veteran of the civil rights movement in the South Name Reverend See Herbert Oliver Reverend Oliver was relatively new to the neighborhood but he had had a taste of what is fell parents were facing one of my sons was above the national average and mathematics but when it came to the schools news here in Brooklyn within one year he was fucking math and I went to the school to find out why and Alabama I went to school I was welcomed when I came to the school here in Brooklyn. I couldn't get to see the principal. Someone wanted to know why I came what I wanted to see him for and that he was not available so I sent percent when I'll wait for him as a parent. If this happened to me today I'd lose it but that was not reverend Oliver Style and about a half an hour the principal came and talk with the principal in told him with the problem was we went and talk with the teacher. The teacher said my son was doing fine. I said he's is not bringing home assignments and he's flunking math and he came here from Alabama and he was the head of the national average and you telling me he's doing fine. Something is wrong as as chairman of the Governing Board Reverend Oliver's first task was to hire a superintendent for the district knew that black people were capable of running schools. I knew that I had come from the south for all the schools were black and all med by principles so I didn't feel that blacks in the northwest and capable of running they could but somehow the system had shut them out father. John Palace was also on the board. You gotta remember at that time. There was no superintendent in the school system. That was black. There was maybe one or two black principles. Maybe a few here and there but all of a sudden have superintendent who was black. New York wasn't ready for them. Pipe Spokane Rhody McCoy was the principal Labus School for students who were labeled emotionally disturbed. This was one of a group squeeze into which difficult kids almost all of them black and Puerto Rican dumped discarded short and the only corner of the system were black men could be a principal at all so McCoy knew the system from the inside and the worst of it can do to black students and teachers alike when he changed ocean who Brownsville to meet the governing board he didn't mince words are games being run on his fraud and a hoax. It's designed to deter you from what your goal oldest this a typical kind of things they do and one of the board members said to me duties thank you are and she called me a few choice names and said Ed. What makes you think you can do this job and we didn't give it a job. What would you do it and I said I is. Everybody's going to have to follow my directions his court everybody's imagination immediately. I mean he came in. He was talking the language that the parents were talking. He was talking about a whole new way of teaching had had to be done and somehow or another it would have to involve parents in the community so Rhody McCoy would be the city's first black superintendent and his first order of business was to hire five do principles goals if you wanted to appoint a new principal anywhere in the city union rules said that you had to pick from the first few names on the top of the list but McCoy was determined to hire men of color yes they. We're all men so he ignored that list the one of his picks was the first Puerto Rican principle in the city. One was the first chinese-american principle in the city. One was white and Jewish one was black and Jewish and another was a black man Herman Ferguson who is then under indictment for conspiracy to murder to civil rights leaders. Whatever the merits of the case Ferguson would later become come known to me as a legendary political prisoner even attempting to make him a principal and ocean Brownsville was a real provocation to the Teacher's Union Ferguson never did get the job but relations relations between the Union and the governing board did not improve when the school year began on the first day of school in the fall of nineteen sixty seven the first day with the first year of community control. The T. went on strike now. Stay with us here. This is not the big cataclysmic strike that we talked about at the beginning of this episode. That strike was in the fall of nineteen sixty eight exactly one year earlier. There was another city wide teacher strike that in many ways set the stage for what was to come according to the Union they went on strike in sixty seven to get more resources for schools in poor neighborhoods like Ocean Hill Brownsville but most people emotional Brownsville believed the teachers. We're just trying to get more power to undisciplined and expel quote unquote disruptive children. The truth is the union was trying to do both but most people Ocean Hill Brownsville saw this primarily as hostile to are there black children and as an attempt to kill the momentum of community control so when the Union went on strike citywide for two weeks Ocean Hill Brownsville did whatever they could to keep their schools open. UFC President Al Shanker took this as a personal affront with or without about the union support the governing board again to govern oh it was a joy to go to a board meeting not only what board members pressed but the community folk was sitting around and they had as much input as the Boardman what McCoy and the board members described sounds like an impossible utopia compared to what we have today or meetings often had two or three eight hundred people in attendance. Can you imagine that and parents didn't just come to the board. The board would come to them. Dolores Tamraz community-wide representatives but there was also apparent representative from each of the schools in the district each school but everything that school so that parents was there every day so you didn't have anything going on in that school that the parents were not knowledgeable about and to didn't support with community representatives pacifists all school and also attended all of the PTA meetings it's worth pointing out that even though figures like Roy McCoy and Reverend Oliver and follow policy most of the press most of the governing board looked like Delors Torres. They were mothers from the Neighborhood Blanche pile had he bishop Clara Marshall Agnes Hanson Elaine Rook just to name a few women especially women of color who do so so much of the work in social movements have so often been erased from history and this is just how it happens those women who had just named we don't have any of their voices on tape gut. That's understandable. These were community people who are disenfranchised with the system nameless faceless who had never been incorporating included even though that children were mandated to go school for them to take on that responsibility was tremendous and they did a Herculean McCoy's leadership had a lot to do with this his office provided training parent members the governing board and everything from educational policy to how to run an effective meeting he encourage them not only to work with their own schools but joined citywide curriculum committees but you didn't teach his resisted assisted their leadership is scanning a little bit because here were parents evaluating teachers and professionals for the first time they've never been in that situation they will always as Joyce by another professional. The first year of the demonstration was really no demonstration because there was so much resistance from the teachers that very little happen according to Father Powers Unit teachers were constantly suspending students for the most insignificant behavior deliberately so that McCoy's office couldn't get anything done because they were too busy busy with parents and kids waiting for a hearing union teachers would take collective sick days. A third of the teaching staff on the same school would call out sick on the same day for the record. I talk to a union teacher from these days and I asked him. Did you sabotage the experiment. Madonna what we would have been sabotaging what he told me they never intended for this pilot program having a meaning and the way we have designed and implemented it became obvious to them that they had to fight it from beginning to the governing board fights back and that fight takes over the city after the break hi is this is. Anthony Care and I'm the deputy director of the center. If you made it this far it's episodes to it means that you must really liked episode one and I hope you're not information mission to yourself whereas mall team working on a shoestring budget and we need listeners like you to all your friends about the great work that you're hearing so if that means telling someone in person sharing it on social media or just sending to one of your friends please do it and if you do really love love which are listening to you can also help us out by leaving our view on apple podcasts. Thanks in junior high school to seventy. One is a nondescript bureaucratic looking building of brick and metal that takes up a whole city block. It was finished in nineteen sixty two as part of a building frenzy by the board of Education. Sandra Feldman was the field rep for the Teacher's Union in the district. I seventy one was a school where teachers were very dedicated advocated trying very hard to do a good job and a lot of insists. Were doing a good job. Fred Nauman was the chapter chairman and to seventy one seventy one nine for stitches school. It was a ghetto school as a ghetto school. It's probably one of the best I'm feeling a little way about his use of the term ghetto school. Yeah I know what you mean. I do think that that's how people talked about these neighborhoods in these schools back then but that doesn't make it right the students the two seventy one didn't think too highly of those schools or the teachers. They didn't have any skin in the game. They were coming in and to make their money. KLOSTER cotton was the student body president. I literally had a male teacher. He would come into classroom with a newspaper what his feet on his desk cross his his legs at the ankles openness newspaper and save to the class. Do whatever you want. I got my education to fear to. Silva was also a student to seventy one. She asked her. We're best friends. I remember a teacher right who he just. I don't know what it was about him and he was a black teacher. No Oh body like this man. He just you know the teachers sometimes that they speak in monotone. It's all one level these there's no excitement is no highs lows. It's just that it's like they're reading out of a book even when they're not it doesn't inspire. You doesn't challenge your imagination. It doesn't make you WanNa think and I started acting out because I had at least four teachers like that and they weren't all monotone but some of them they just didn't show any inches. It was like I can't wait to get home. You know and you can feel you you know when they feel that way so theo began to fall behind in school. I started thinking of myself as somebody who couldn't learn and that one teacher decided he was going to meet with my mother because I was acting now and I was acting now you know so he went to my told my mother that I was retarded. You ooh down your social studies. These teach Eliza Campbell remembers junior highschool to seventy one the same way there was no teaching going on about teaching had just stopped teachers came in in the morning radio goes with coffee and cake and newspapers teaches left the classrooms to place their bets at the track when Kimball arrived the to seventy one in the middle of the school year. He stood out literally. How could you miss the person and we'll help to oversee like six eight than we were taught to call him brother. Campbell that was I literally Campbell Kumble later known as g to where you see this means black giant and Swahili was a fixture of bed stuy life for decades to come. I remember seeing him during the eighties and nineties wearing at the SHEIKHI looping down the street with his huge frame and knock knees but in nineteen sixty eight he was felt action figure not even thirty years old with a shock of green is here what I felt. I was part of the freedom struggle of black people. I was part of the ongoing struggle of the black community to establish yourself to obtain self determination nation to obtain dignity and to obtain Liberation Campbell transferred to Ocean Hill Brownsville in March nineteen sixty eight after he was suspended from his previous school for taking his students to a Malcolm the next memorial program against the principles wishes when I arrived at junior high school to seventy one I constructed a bulletin board and put it in the real hallway and and we had pictures of people like stokely Carmichael and rap Brown who are the heroes of the black power movement of that day we had the lodge poster of Uncle Sam with the slogan Uncle Sam wants you nigger which was a anti-militaristic poster of the day talking about the fact that the United State's government was recruiting young black males to go and fight in Vietnam for freedom that they did not in fact have living in the United States and the kids took to with almost immediately and it became one of the most popular spots in the school. You might notice some variation in his voice here we were working with two different interviews with Leslie Campbell one from nineteen eighty eight and the other for more than twenty years later in both interviews. He felt some kind of way about this bulletin board was up. Maybe like a day before you. Thirteen was calling a meeting on my bulletin boy. Oh Man I mean I'm using the bulletin board to intimidate the kids to indoctrinate the kids kids and Brenton the teachers that know about all this is a different breed of people who hadn't had this kind of confrontation Asian education previously so now I come when the same duties things. This is like what the hell he he's he he got here. He's the next major thing to happen ladies and gentlemen. May I have your attention. Please diners evening more. Luther Order. King was shot at Tennessee. came twenty minutes ago. A guy how to the next day is Friday. The next six days absolute pandemonium. We came into school that morning and somebody had been very busy all night. You have T- Chapter Chairman Fred Nauman. There was signs signs all over the walls the whites of killed their king. We have to take revenge administrative for the district. Rhody McCoy students I reacted because here we are talking about obeying the laws and you know being good citizens and so forth and here's a gentleman who's all over the United States is talking about peace Jason and Tom for the benefit of manning somebody assassinated and then when they thought that it was a Caucasian would assassinate him with made it even worse so I suggested that they bring everybody into her memorial program docking the principal who was black invited invited white teachers to leave if they weren't comfortable with what was being said but those white teachers who stayed reported something quite different from a memorial program was an incitement inciting violence number of people governing board members and particularly. Leslie Campbell is not my fault that someone on from the US decides that day they're going to take down my bullets for when the assembly was over students discovered a young white teacher tearing down Campbell's infamous infamous bulletin board and when they saw her newness they stopped and she was she was mobbed by I bunch of youngsters thrown down aggress was torn a handful of air poke from her head. She's a gruesome that changing addenda today it was a little bit of Maracas you know but I don't think other than this particular teacher being assaulted. Nobody else is now. The teacher was not unconscious. Incentive Asheville someone else who travel lead at the against mount atom run back into the ability to use their hello. This is just the kind of he said she said that characterizes the way people talk about Ocean Hill Brownsville both then and now of of course folks have different opinions but the facts themselves are disputed after the day of Pandemonium Junior High School to seventy one the school was was closed for two weeks to give students chance to cool down a number of union teachers including Fred Nauman had reservations about going back into to seventy one. We said before four-week and go back into that school. Somebody has to say something to the children that we are not the enemy. McCoy said well when I can say anything like them. We went back anyhow by the time the school reopened. It was nearly the end of the year from Rhody McCoy's point of view. The first year of the experiment had been undermined every step up along the way by Union. Teachers girl was held on a hot radiator and burned. They teach US said of course it was an accident he. He was trying to restrain the girl. There was an incident where one teacher was an insurance agent and he would go lock yourself up in a Roman take his insurance been there was an absentee principle. We've been absent for seven years. I mean the horror stories can keep going so when the time came for the governing bowl to begin to look at its teaching staff. It did not want certain the people back into the district. The governing board held their regular meeting on May seventh nineteen sixty eight but what happened that night would have far reaching consequences father John powis US remembers it well on the agenda that night McCoy had put an item to transform thirteen teachers and also some assistant principals. I guess there was five or six again. Okay we knew that there was really no demonstration district going on because these folks with the ones the main ones who causing so much sadness because of the way that they've just weren't cooperating cooperating with the experiment. We didn't feel that they really had our children's best interests in mind. We were asking teachers to make an extra effort to get along without kids to teach our kids if there was any problem problem to possibly visit and the homes well the union. This wasn't a contract. They didn't have to these things and we felt these people were not. They wouldn't even compromise we had built coming in at three o'clock for dismissal Antique Grad before the kids were so we felt that they were making any effort to try to change their way of thinking and teaching and we felt that we couldn't put up with it anymore. The next morning nineteen teachers and supervisors including Fred Nauman each received a registered letter the letter said the governing board of the Ocean Hill Brownsville demonstration demonstration's school district has voted to end your employment in the schools of the district. This termination of employment is to take effect immediately. You will report Friday morning to personnel one ten Livingston Street Brooklyn for reassignment so that's what the letter said but with little meant of course was immediately in dispute and that dispute was the basis for everything that followed the letter was a little confusing the governing board used words like end your employment and termination but then referred these teachers to the board of Ed for reassignment which doesn't sound like termination. It sounds like a transfer trays for something that's accomplished by a high authority who has control over school a in school bay and I say I'm transferring you from school a since. I'm the superintendent. I'm transferring you to school. Be where I'm also a superintendent. But how can somebody Sam transferring you out of this district a to wear. Roy McCoy didn't have any control over any schools out of the district of I say I'm transferring you out of the United States. What am I doing. I'm the transferring Johan firing you. We did not fire these people. We would not fire the nineteenth teachers. We had no power over firing. We have power the hiring. We could not fire anybody so we really didn't have that much foul. It was never quite clear what powers city had intended for the governing board to have but this turned got to be the red line. Transferring teachers from one district to another was something that was very ordinary but when McCoy tried to do it of course that created the the scene ever century the following Monday the teachers who had been transferred out of junior high school to seventy one tried to enter the the building and they were blocked by parents and activists parents and activists been occupied the building overnight so that the next morning Tuesday the transfer teachers tried to enter again again and again. They were blocked. This was high drama and the press took notice. I Columbia University Brooklyn Junior High School one hundred and seventy one who nesn future this could catch on with the kindergarten Jones on Wednesday teachers got into the building but it was empty students from two seventy one st home from school through the end end of the week in protest. That's all we have no choice. Our you're acting strictly on superpower. we have to extract basis because we have no other doors open to us and that's we're shut down the schools in ocean. Brazil Shangqiu ordered all of his teachers out of the district so three hundred and fifty union teachers stayed out for the next six weeks until until the end of the school year so this is now a slap to the community social studies teacher Lisa Campbell and if you know anything about oppressed communities Mutiti if you wanna you the fide him in action and purpose use lab because Mike. Hey you're not even human so that makes them the best at the end of the school year. Rhody McCoy dismissed all the teachers who had walked out of their classrooms on Shankar's orders so over the summer summer. The district had to hire three hundred fifty new teachers to replace them. One of these replacement teachers was Charles. Isaacs Charlie was born in Brooklyn but during the first year of community control Roland Ocean Hill Brownsville he'd been in law school at the University of Chicago. I figured I was GONNA be drafted before I finished and the only way I could think of to get out the draft choice to teach in the inner city so he dropped out of law school came back to Brooklyn and I asked people whose opinion I value where they thought I should go uh-huh and everybody said go chanel eternally us then. That's where the action is. It really looked like history was being made there when he the beginning of you for teachers they set up a gymnasium and put tables around and brought in all of the governing board members in many parents who interested in talking to prospective these teachers and a lot of young people and I guess that time we call them hippies. They had long hair men and women we were used to that. I mean I'll win with the Afros that these young white people with long hair. They wore jeans but they seemed like they weren't afraid they weren't afraid to try something new and teaching our kids it. Charlie did not have long hair and he would not have called himself a hippie but like a lot of these would be replacement teachers he had been active in the Anti War and racial justice movements. When he entered the gym to interview interview he was seated at a table with Reverend Oliver the governing board chairman so I showed reverend all her my resume and he looked at over and he said well it seems to me you're not afraid of controversy. I said that's right and I don't remember what we talked about after that but what I I do remember is that he made me feel like a welcome guest in his home. Ocean Hill Brownsville wasn't just where the action was for white leftists like Charlie at the same time the Afro American Teachers Association Protocol Two Black Teachers all over the city all hands on deck and they flocked Ocean Brownsville for black teachers if you wanted to have an impact on the future of Education for black kids in this city. This was the place to be in the meantime. A judge ruled against the Ocean Hill Brownsville saying the governing board had not proven their case against the nineteen teachers who originally received transfer letters back in May so I'll schenker expected the mayor to enforce this ruling to force Ocean Hill Brownsville to accept these nineteen teachers back into the schools but that is not what happened all I ever heard from John. Lindsay is at you're absolutely right. The teachers are innocent. This never should have happened. It's terrible but I can't force those teachers to go back there because otherwise city will burn down. They will burn the city down. We've got to keep the city cool. Look what's happening in other cities across country and I said mister can't govern the city on the basis of constantly being threatened me. What's the next thing that's going to the one after that. You can always have a threat hanging over your place could blow up. We'll be burned down. I can't run a union that way. You can't run a city that way and that's precisely why I'm GONNA stand up here Monday. September ninth nineteen sixty eight the first day of school for one point one million children in the city of New York or it would have been accepted fifty four thousand of their teachers were on strike Contam- Kingston to shut down the entire school system over one district strict but that one district Ocean Hill Brownsville was open for business outside junior high school to seventy one or mistreat with busy with reporters police officers his picketing teachers but inside the eighth grade was assembled in the auditorium for speech from their new assistant principal Albertan. Charlie Isaacs was watching from the back of the room. It was backed up by about a dozen ATA members most of whom were dressed in some kind of African Garb Dashikis in and like Albert van and Eliza Campbell had co founded the Afro American Teachers Association in Nineteen Sixty four when we're both teaching junior high school thirty five and bits die when ATA members came to ocean will Brownsville from all over the city. I'll van Joan Campbell junior high school to seventy one on this first day of school in Nineteen Sixty eight. I'll van made his entrance turns into a political spotlight that he would occupy for decades to come. We are engaged in a fight for our survival survival of the black race of our rates. It's our people. Do you know what survival means. This is the voice of repeat Colombian founder Ember Charter School in District Sixteen. He thinks of himself itself as carrying on the work of Ocean Hill Brownsville so we asked him to read Alvin speech. Yes we must live together. Make it as a race. We must survive weaken not survive in this country without some very necessary skills all kinds of skills so we can get good jobs to help serve our people. We need the skills we learn right here in to seventy one math science reading typing languages to survive and prosper as a race Lisa people. We need all of these skills now to get these skills for survival. You must respect and listen to your teachers. All all of your teachers be black or white however if they don't respect you we find that they can't do the job. There'll be some changes just move you can depend on that and at the end of his speech. He asked how. Many students listened to W. W. R. L. which was then the city's leading African American radio station will the hands went up and then he shouted from the James Insane and they saw that was pretty unusual for eighth grade orientation later that day Charlie was sent to cover in eighth grade homeroom class and he suddenly realized he had nothing prepared to teach never taught before and I was so wrapped up in the politics of the thing thing. I thought somebody would tell me what to teach. I didn't know what to do. I go look in the window of the classroom door and kids passing notes around throwing spitballs. Playing cards opens during come in in the teacher who's been there for two hours by then is trying to explain explain to them why they should address him as. Dr Something this was very important while the kids are all out of control so when he left and I took over they gave me what I later learned with a small window of opportunity for anyone who comes into the classroom and so I wrote my name on the board and I said you can call me Charlie. Monica Edwards was in his class. That day remembers vividly so we're like okay. This must be a trick. Your name is Mr Charlie. At this point. We know this kind of a nickname. Whatever for for white people so well? He goes one on my name is. Charlie is but you can call me. Charlie that changed the whole atmosphere of the room from day one from like practically second one we saw that he had great great respect for us and truly want to teach the next day the mayor and the Board of Education gave into every one of the union's demands without rally even consulting the Ocean Hill Brownsville governing board so the unwanted union teachers returned to Ocean Hill Brownsville on Wednesday September eleventh. They expect a teaching assignments when they arrived instead they were summoned to a meeting with Rhody McCoy in the auditorium. I S fifty five and that meeting according to Union teachers they were yelled at threatened threatened and ridiculed men from the community stood on stage with violin cases intimating that what was in the cases where not violins but actually guns. Somebody was throwing bullet cartridges at the teachers. There's and others were carrying pine boxes around made to look like coffins. Corp is very expensive and I don't. I don't recall anybody buying any or making any you know. Paul Chandler was young organized in the community at the time and I asked him about this particular prevent and he was skeptical. This wasn't a time of social media but at those meetings there were always people on on the press. Show me one picture just one that has a coffin the understand what I'm saying it was definitely misrepresented to appoint of even aggravating or making taking the situation worse because you got to remember the juicy of the bed and sell more papers whatever really happened at I fifty five the meeting eating was cut short and the teachers walked out escorted by three thousand helmeted police officers thirty-five police on horseback one hundred fifty in plain clothes helicopters overhead and sharpshooters on the roofs of surrounding houses when they arrived the to seventy one they were met by about a hundred parents and activists from the neighborhood waiting on the steps to try to block the Union teachers from Entering Cup started throwing parents into a paddy wagon and things escalated fast deloris tortoise from the governing board was there. I saw a reporter beaten and bloody on the ground. I went back inside today's washboard before I got back out of the job and I looked through the window. I saw him as Hamilton. Get hitting the stomach by a policeman with the stick. They had hit one of our warriors. This was a woman that was a teacher though Mahamat and she was instrumental in a lot of programs in the neighborhood this woman at the time I believe might have been a sixties was struck in the stomach with the stick by policemen and lock down across. What's the street. A line of the black lab is has shown up. I was standing there with folded on as a result of that. No one else got hit that they've at least they didn't do anything they just stood there but no one else was struck by policemen union. Teachers Notional Brownsville had once again been prevented from returning into classrooms so the union went back on strike. The first strike was two days. The second strike was two weeks. Mayor Lindsay was pissed that comes at time and win. New Yorkers have just had enough and there comes a time when all parties have to back off of extreme positions that have been taken an enough of the angry angry voices and the shouting and the marching in the yelling and screaming and think about one million children of our city and about their parents but the angry voices and the shouting and the marching and the yelling and the screaming. We're just getting started at the end of September. The mayor again agreed to send the Union teachers back into the classrooms when they tried to return teachers and students walked out of every school in the district over the following weeks. The governing board was suspended. McCoy was suspended and junior high school to seventy one was closed then the superintendent of schools changed his mind signed. Rhody McCoy was reinstated into seventy one was reopened and Shankar threaten to strike again. If to seventy one didn't stay closed and he did he shut down every single school in the city for the sake of one and this time he said the Union would strike some to the Ocean Hill Brownsville demonstration district was dissolved. Entirely this thing was going would be longer uglier and more consequential than anyone could have ever imagined on the next episode of school colors. Have we come to that point kind of a race war. Is there something that you would characterize as black fascism rising. Is this a district. That's GONNA run on the basis of prejudice and discrimination everybody. Everybody in that community began to play a role in the schools. School became the focal point of the community our teachers. They said this is why why last time I went into the school. I saw something that I thought was so spectacular that I still thought that we were going to win. This is so stupid as to the store to scoop callers colors is a production of Brooklyn with support from the NYU Metropolitan Center for research on equity and the transformation of schools and the Carnegie Corporation of New York this episode was produced and written by Mark Winston Griffith and Max Friedman's editing and sound design by lease splinter Hassett original music by Avery are young and Deacon Board additional music in this episode from Chris Risky and blue dot sessions archival material courtesy of WNYC The New York City Municipal Archives the Henry Hampton collection at the Washington University Library Professor Steve Brier at the Cuny Graduate Center special. Thanks to the Brooklyn Five so new cotto polyester kloster Cotton Sufia Dasilva Edwards and Veronica G Charlie Isaac his book inside Ocean Hill Brownsville teachers education was an invaluable resource and source of Inspiration Nation Leo Casey had Louis Liz Morgan Dan Perlstein and Gerald their follow Brooklyn deep on twitter and Instagram at B. Ck L. Y. N. Deep you can find more information about this episode including a transcript at our website school colors podcast dot. Com Brooklyn deep is is part of Brooklyn Movement Center. A member led organizing group in Central Brooklyn Visit Broken Movement Center Dot Org to join dooney until next time piece

Ocean Hill Brownsville Union Brooklyn Rhody McCoy Brownsville Board of Education junior high school principal Ocean Hill Brownsville chairman Teacher's Union Ocean Brownsville New York City Ocean Hill Brown New York City Ocean Hill Brownsville demonst Shankar Hill Brownsville superintendent school district Manhattan
Derek Stone Why Should I Forgive?

Vroom Vroom Veer with Jeff Smith

51:25 min | 4 months ago

Derek Stone Why Should I Forgive?

"The whole I'm going to go ahead and hit record. So the whole idea is is something funny? We're having fun screwing up. We're making mistakes. No big deal and then look. There's a promo blam it's over and just so you know I never had it goodness okay. Any don't get about any Information saying your social security number or anything. We saw that Promo so you have any more questions or you. Kind of get the gist. I hope I got it. You got a great laugh. So we're already winning so it works. Just have fun. That's the that's the key here and make a promo so stressed about diploma. Unless I'm about the problem I'm like Oh my gosh. I'm going to win. The Promo can't do it. Can't run can't do it. Wouldn't be prudent at this juncture. Okay anytime you're ready. Go ahead shot. Okay Okay Victoria's and ski and I help. Interpreted entrepreneurs overcomes their fear of public speaking and transform the confidence compelling and captivating speaker use and you guys can find me at www dot brilliant speakers academy dot Com. And if you want to learn more about how to overcome fear of public speaking then head over to. Www DOT by victoria ella dot com slash four steps. And it's number four and steps together and you can sign up for my free masterclass and it's aw some it's absolutely awesome. You'RE GONNA learn so much about yourself. Sabotage mistakes about the steps you need to take to overcome your fear of public. Speaking and I cannot wait to meet you there. Well yes gopher and you guys listening to room room veer see. That was awesome perfect. And you know there's plenty of scurrying around in between so good job. My Gosh. I'm going to serious. I was expecting you to like cut me. Something know what's going on now at perfect. Let me hit stop. I'm going to make a new file and I'll be right back okay. Are you ready to thoughtfully? Steer away from your revved up frenzied and far too often scripted life than welcome to Vroom vroom Veer with Jeff Smith where he guides you down the road differently. Travelled by sharing unique experiences with guests who have managed to shift away from life stuck on cruise control and veered their way into a more authentic and fulfilling one in all sorts of interesting and kind of remarkable ways. Get ready to remove room beer with your differently. Traveled Road Chauffeur. Jeff Smith Derek. Down thank you so much for being on room vroom. Barron welcome to the show. How's it going man? It's fantastic. Thank you for having me so you are welcome so tell us a little bit about what you're most excited about. Your Business Today. Some businesses a little weird. It's a niche in the construction industry. There's really kind of hated upon and frowned upon. But here in Nashville we've been able to I guess you'd say scale it so It's called punch work so anytime you buy a house We go through. And you tell the the realtor or the sales agent that you want this this and this fixed and they make a list and then they hand it to the contractor or the seller and. We go do that list. They hand that list to us. And we we basically fix this stuff about five trades also. Yeah so punch. Work is what we do. it's kind of our bread and butter. It's about sixty eight percent of our business. We are however pushing towards We fell into screen enclosures. Back in two thousand eleven and We started doing that. And we're just now. We just now heard of marketing persons. Were super excited about pushing that product. I could've yeah and if you've got a yeah no doubt right. We're in the process of creating a villain for it. Were thinking about Connie Mosquito Joe or something you know him and his band of Vampires. So yeah so. That's kind of exciting marketing stuff and That's fine and there's a new product that we just Kinda came across called quake flashing which is a exterior. You still exterior penetrations with the during the construction process of kind of thing but Basically anytime they puncture a hole outside it could cause a potential leak issue January I had and they created quick vice in created these panels. That have a rubber gasket in you you basically shingle into the house. Wrap and tape it off in a shingle pattern and It seals a-share penetration with with a rubber seal so it expands and contracts with the weather. So we're super excited about where the first turnkey quick installer in the world. Wow so That's pretty exciting. That company's been around for twenty years and so we're kind of on the the really cool rise of that hidden momentum so that company really hasn't hit momentum until you know so hartland. We're catching that on the before the Trans so So yeah that's kind of a society me about what's going on what we've got going on exciting. That's great and your guys are still working even though we are look at corona now no virus is the correct called. The Kuroda Corona no virus. Ally is a comedian Andrew. Somebody who says he has this corona. No no juicy sprays on you. GotTa Cry Honora though The Corona virus is going on in construction. So we're a essential. It's got a nice main Nashville man to be able to draw without getting stuck in traffic. Right tell you man. It's kind of Nice ambience that you but but you know all things considered you know. There's not p There's no meat writes No hand sanitizer gloves right. So yeah man. It's weird Super Weird Mendy. It's a an everyday essential but man a out everywhere. So yeah it's so weird now when you see toilet paper in the story. I think this is like a city thing. So if you're in the boonies like my parents live in like like three hours away from Milwaukee in Upper Michigan yes it is it's FM. Okay the Michigan. Hey there's some beautiful parts of Michigan in Oregon about three times zoo that area or been up to Holland. Saga cut area Michigan fishing up there. Man Yeah and I like being out in the woods. I don't like the fact that it know. It's so far from the airport but you know what are you GonNa do? Yeah is what it is but yeah they have no problems getting toilet paper. They're also run out of toilet paper here in Vegas on the Nashville. Yeah you're in your national. I'm in Vegas but we're both running into this situation where the crazy people are just going out there and buying everything it's like there are people lining up at six o'clock in the morning and get toilet paper. It's not right. And then the pallet comes in the first twenty people have everything in writing. There's nothing left for anybody else. So yeah it's crazy. My wife recently has stumbled upon the secret weapon in Vegas. So don't tell anybody but I'll I'll go ahead and tell you go to places that people don't usually think about to get toilet paper you can get a bit like cvs last of us That's hilarious because I have you know we haven't hit those small places. We kept going to the big places but right down. Yeah it's funny you're in Vegas Craig from Gore. Quick flashing is is in Vegas and he sent me pictures of Vegas House just like a ghost town right now. I'm in yeah. This is just in Vegas January and it's it is it is a ghost town man. It's crazy it's crazy. It's nuts so okay we have to. This is room bear. So that means we have to dig into this whole thing about you being a musician and having a business where you're not really doing that primarily so there's got to be a story there which I lost her. Yeah so where did you grow up? Did you grow up in Nashville? Or did you grow up somewhere else now? Grew up in Mobile Alabama and On the The bay mobile place else Called Donald Parkway so this Dolphin Allen Parkway and Grew up on the parkway and then going into eleventh grade mom Met A guy and moved us four and a half hours north to a small town outside of Tupelo Mississippi called Baldwin Mississippi and lived there for ten years before he moved to Nashville. Okay so so yeah all right so all around the South Alabama south man all around. That's it you're Kinda like well let's see here. I said a Mutt. I'm in Panama City. Florida Tyndall Air Force Base. That's the closest that I got to Gulf coast. I was yeah. I had family on Kiesler airforce base base. Yeah I did I did about six or seven weeks in Air Force Tech School at Keystone. Okay Yeah Cool. Yeah and what is that other? There's a there's a funny sounding there's another city around there. That always makes me laugh. I can't remember no that's not at the end. There's wave land blogs Gulfport Ocean Springs Pascagoula. Pascagoula was have you ever heard of a place called. We gotta we were his Tonka That's good it's an Alabama. All right so yeah. I love that area. That whole like. There's just so many things to do like Panama City we would go to. We went to Atlanta quite a bit. Because you're only four hours from Atlanta. We went to non ORLANDS A lot. Because you know that's just I would never want to go there for Mardi Gras but like any other given weekend was a great party. You know not a girl. Speaking of moderate originated mobile and man. They're they're monographs is a lot more contained. It is a party but it's not like a crazy party. I mean it is a party but You know it's a little bit more family oriented then the New Orleans is of course. I've never been New Orleans so I can't really say I don't know it's fun on a regular old any gibbons soon Friday night on Bourbon. Street is a black right right. Yeah is amazing. No doubt yeah so okay so you grow up and are in so. When did you start playing music? I A actually live with my dad in Fort Worth Texas for one year and at the end of your mom and my step dad had tried to get me guitar lessons before that And just what? They were trying to keep me songs. Achey hard and in all this as wouldn't have in it so I never practiced anything like that. So yeah so then. I went to Alabama Dad for year end that year. That of my dad at the end of the school year in eighth grade they had a talent show. Of course I never heard anything about the talent show. Could I enter anything? Of course I didn't have anything to intern. Talent that about it that trump that point but there was these two bands van and they played one played. Smells like Teen Spirit by Nevada and the played zero by the smashing pumpkins. Okay and I was like drawn. Jake did that crowd when absolutely beserk and I think that's what really I wanted us. I WANNA make a crowd go beserk like that. It's amazing do is absolutely amazing so I pulled that little guitar that my mom had had and it was my great grandfather guitar apple that little thing out me on a books online like low guitar sheets online trying to have a little want to man man. I forget this. I'm learning how to do that. I want that reaction. I want to own a feel that good you know. Yeah I get in so for sure. So so a starter. Plan that eighth grade year than we moved back to mobile with my mom and that ninth grade year in a buddy of mine had been picking up guitar to that summer and Christmas that for Christmas. We got guitars up. We both got guitars for Christmas. And we started playing. We played at the talent show. We entered got got accepted. And I'm Tony Man. I was so excited and terrified all at the same time. I never played in front of anybody. I mean it was crazy and It was just absolutely beserk. Well we got to the talent show to everybody had been. We've been saying. Oh Yeah we were planning talent show. Yeah and I was like dude. How long have you been guitars like nine months and they rely do? Y'All oh neat now. Did you know you can't do that with these embarrassed brother? He's very man. They were just lightness up man and we were both. Just say to heck with that man. We were just like if we're GONNA do this. We gotta start somewhere you know and so me and me and my buddy jo man. We'd get guitars after school man. It was practice practice practice practice. Go to sleep get up go to school. Come home. Practice practice practice practice. I mean we did that. We probably that song a couple million times okay but it was ever long by the foo fighters man so John Good Song and so it was guitar version to lead guitar version so as to do electric guitars knows your melody with Guitar Bass. Yeah so I'm playing lead. He's playing rhythm and A funny story about a man. This this is Kinda Houllier said. There was two girls will first of all when we did. We did soundcheck We we rolled up there. We were totally new BRO. We wrote up. There was some eight inch speakers. An booboo great aunt's yeah and So we get out there with our little bubble great Amazon and jump up there and And we're like yeah this is not gonNa work and so these other two guys that were playing in a band Under forget guiding. Jameson Gun Dean. A Dean says Oh do not from us are ants. May we were like sweet so they might up there and they knew they were doing a little bit. They were seniors. We freshman right and And so in India looks right at me. He goes dude if that he has that amp has a short in it. If that aunt cuts out just reach over and give it a kick it will cut back on a promise. Okay fine you know celebrity rock and roll. Do Oh Bro. It played out just like that road. Not even joking. So we're we're sitting there. We do the soundcheck. And everybody's kind of guy. Yeah cool so they had no monitor so you couldn't hear yourself right? Onstage was terrible so You know we get out there. And they're out there in the crowd the Jamieson and Dean. The couple of other guys are out there like. Oh yeah sounds good. Sounds good out which I'm sitting here thinking wink. Wake Yeah right so So we get into their talent show starts to the school all eight hundred fifty of this five. Abc Rain High School. A lot of you know all these students are in the Gym Dude. Like all of them like all of them so my sister was a senior at this point. And I'm embarrassed for you. She's like no I guess. Well everybody knew who she was. And then my brother was a couple years before her so everybody was all right and so so we were freshmen. And so Do so this. This crazy thing happened because these girls saying these two really inspirational songs you know and and everything and they were slow and all sudden we get up there man. Soon as I hit up to the day at the moment we're fixing on stage. Everybody was sounds like there's a couple of people backstage. Do Don't do it. Man pull out I gotta do man. I'm just going to go with my gut and do it. I was scared to death. I started getting buying now. This did you know screwed frigging okay as we get up there and and Soon as I passed the curtain Imee inadequate star in my hand. Yeah the place went beserk like because they saw who I was and I saw that I had a guitar. My and I mean it was just like and I'm GonNa be honest to man's like ninety five percent. I'm a ninety five percent African American School. So so you know you know so it was just. I was supplied. I was blown away At the response all of a sudden and then I hit a good old power coordination just right got even louder duck and even hear myself think men and so in on that solid beginning at start kind of starts out a little lower. You know It gets are wise. And then it gets into the chorus crazy well When a soon as I hit there's a there's an active slob. If you're a musician you know what that is. There's an octave slot in that part. Going to the course and the little pre chorus part well right at the end of that octave slot where you hit the first court for the course that guitar cut out and reach over not kicked it and then hit the guitar court into the course and just belted it. Because I couldn't hear nothing just built at that course. If raising the freshman students broke the bleachers freshman. The freshman kids wrote the bleachers. I was like dude. Three people fell off. The board broke because I was crazy. You know what I'm saying I'm just going through and yeah you literally the doors off that Jim Essay. You can't you couldn't hear nothing in so much to say that. I actually repeated the first verse again for the Second Verse. Whatever do they can't hear me anyway and then I got to that course again. Have a feeling we sing. Or you're not saying it. Oh yeah I'm seeing. I'm seeing. Okay yeah just Janet so so but no drums bass strait up gets RS. Yeah it was in a little bit so your Rhythm Guitar Guys. Basically just giving you the. He's he's basically the drummer and the Bass player. That's absolutely so he's the he's he's rocking it to with me you know. And and and we're feeding off each other and that kind of thing we get off the stage and I mean people catch us in the hallway. You guys concert and at the moment of me like kicking that amp like right when it cut off and noticing it and making it and then going right into the core had perfect timing. It was so frigging ethic. Is there a day? That's the day that my diction began. Yes I had that day so I had a similar experience. I won't get into the whole story because you know about you but like I had a successful talent show when I was at my first air force base right. They have air force base talent shows right and I did really well as the emcee right telling jokes in between acts basically and introducing acts and Very well received right. Yeah that high. Oh my God it's ridiculous. There is no more addictive feeling or brain state. I don't think. Oh Man I'm tonight. I'll taste it for fourteen years after that. I know it's crazy the Mo that basically what I thought was the thought that I had that night because it took me probably like well into the night to sort of come down off of the high and I'm talking about no I was on cloud. Eight hours yeah. I couldn't sleep cancel. You can't just it's like there's like electrcity flowing through your body absolutely right. Yeah so I was like. Oh my God. This is danger absolutely. It's dangerous feeling right there because then you know what people that do it. Why they're doing it. Sure because there's a lot of shit that you have to go through to get that hit your way more work than being a crack addict. I would imagine I live there but you know what I'm about all right you've got some shit to get that hit yet. Okay so yes okay I get it now. I know why you start out your musician and I do these. Great Story Okay. So do you still play? Maybe once every six months I might pick that thing up man. I still have the guitar that I got for Christmas that year. My wife won't let me get rid of it. It's sentimental of headed for almost twenty years now and so She won't let me get it usually. She's in there doing a ton of paperwork for all this whole corona virus thing Or A my background has molest Palma Blue Guitar in the background so But anyhow so I moved into the dining room today so But yeah I I still. I still pick it up around every every six months or so. It was super therapy for me. I went through. I went through a lot of stuff that I shouldn't went through at will. People go through stuff on their kids. They just right. Now we don't know and so I use it as therapy for real. Oh Yeah I get a one hundred percent of that in and that's what happened when I stopped performing it was A. I had my eight year old son in the crowd and there was about five thousand people. It was actually here in Clarksville Tennessee about an hour and twenty minutes. North of here and It was at a festival was actually at about all the bands and Man That last song I kinda. I kinda got a vibe of that That why I got into it. Was that feeling that just in this last song we have this part and Abridge where it was like. Whoa and he had the whole crowd like seeing him back to you right so the band breaks down everything. And you're sitting in that that just a big anthem singer Whitney you not everybody hanging and for my eight year old son to be there man My my youngest son has never seen me perform. He's he's seven Fixing to be seven in a couple of days and He he's never seen me performed but he's heard my music videos so he kind of gets you know dead was kind of a little small rockstar. You know and saw so right unless Kinda of cool you know but It was rewarding for me because it was like finding out. You know I'm Gonna I'M GONNA get to go out the way that I wanted to go out with a right. A crowd big concert. They sound system big stage and and and loving it and so But I kinda got after that. I kind of got depressed. His it was like something in construction. Started taking off for me. It was provided way better from family than music ever did of course and so absolutely and so I I just Kinda got depressed on a finally made the decision to stop performing in two thousand fourteen right in. The depression really was is that you know it wasn't it was a you know not performing anymore. As the fact that I felt like I had this really good message with. Wow was performing. Which was the forgiveness message and then Okay and what I what I had thought you were letting go of your dream. I get that right and the train right and it wasn't so much. The loss of the dream. Yeah it was a great loss of of felt like I had this great powerful story but are lost the platform to Jillette. I get back so then I started thinking man. Maybe you just need to write this book. And that's that's where the book was. Should I forgive came from so we should talk about that because I love that title. Yeah thank you thank you. I WanNa know the answer. But tell bill tell me. I don't just give me the answer because that's boring for Sir. Sir Gimme the story about where the message came from so because of the I think the The more interesting thing is you know. Sort of the superhero origin story of the the germ that you wanted to express in book right so that was so if I can be vulnerable for a minute. So growing up in a my parents got divorced when I was five He don't we saw that every other weekend. That same amount got remarried. She didn't know This dude but anyway this guy Ended up sexually abusing me In my brothers That's saying that they don't let me saying that I've never as their permission GAAS. Sorry I said it anyway If you need we can't we're So from eight to around twelve That was that was happening in so In the reason we never said anything to anybody was the fact that he said. If you tell anybody they're gonNA they're gonNA take you away from your mom and Which total manipulation be as you know right so so so anyway to believe right right right so you just want your mom and of course you know so anyway so we fast forward you know a couple of years You know mom's got divorced from that dude. We've moved to Mississippi and You know I'm a bitter Kidman. I'm just a bitter due to a before we left mobile man. I got sucks involved with a girl that was three years older than me garnered drug get on Drank as much alcohol's I get my hands on and I'm sure it's great great so And so you're trying to cover up some pain absolutely live in a facade man trying to keep that facade going right. Everything's good on the surface. You know what I'm saying. Just party waiting for a place to happen. You Own San Right and I mean for real and so I I went. I went to When we get to this in Mississippi I realized that this was kind of a new start and This this voice if you will kind of came to me is that. Hey this is start. Feud screwed up and Next and I saw stop drinking and smoking and smoking but drinking and cussing and a couple of days and went to school I met this dude and was like hey man. This is kind of crazy. But he's like. Hey Man you know you love Jesus I was like yeah cool. Took me to a football game. And then that night he went to a small group deal of the next night and I just kind of realized this is where I needed to be and and opened up arms and said you know gone. Mo- May in the man you want to be well. If you fast forward a year later we went to this conference and in this conference. They said you know some. You need to forgive a parent a sibling an aunt or an uncle and a almost walked out and then that same voice came to me told me to stop doing what I was doing. You know same voice came to me and said It's only happened audibly three times in my life one was the time. Said you know this is a new start. The second time was right now in this situation he's going to tell you about and the third time was when I was introduced to my wife. And he said that's the girl you're gonNA marry. This only heard that voice three tonnes Amal voice. I like yeah so And it's been great so when I was fixing a walkout all of a sudden this voice came to me says Derek I wanNA use but I can't because you have all this bitterness towards your dad and I need you to forgive him a Man. I close my fist up. My heart started at elevate and All those memories of all those things. I blamed him for just not being there. You know I felt like it was. His Dad was a father kind of protect us right from all that stuff and he just wasn't there you know and and you know it is what it is so I had So I turned around and asked that question. Wa- should forgive him. You know it was because he pay child support you know. We were walking through the Hallway with a candle and taking cold showers because electricity got cut off. We didn't know where the next meal was coming from. You know those kinds of things in the abuse was happening in him. That no one about it. You know that kind of thing Which was totally isn't his fault at this point you know. He just didn't know he wasn't there. You know you're right with a review of the weekend so so just kind of looking at that and Just being angry and then In the after is the question. Why should I forgive which comes from a place of discontent anger? He that boys came back. Says because I'm the father to the fatherless and man it hit me right in the heart I was like man. I want to know what that was like. So bad for somebody to tell me that I had what it took and that was enough there that that that I said you know what? If you'll give me that I'll give you this in and so I did an about two hours on on my knees Cryan Being broken and and that kind of thing move forward to to that in May when I when I got up a no longer felt that need to live behind that facade and I no longer felt the need to carry that burden around that I'd been carrying others felt light like like like I just unloaded the world's like the puffing of Gun Gone Dawn. Oh it was it was. It was remarkable man and so In so fast forward. I'm a I'M GONNA jump up to two thousand ten okay not business my business. Three years successful You know we're we're thriving We're fixing to stop performing. I don't know that yet but we went back to my mom's house and by this point my dad had had called us. He called me in the middle of the deer. Woods as deer season and Deer everywhere but in the side of my scope so right so And in the woods and He calls me up and he says. Hey Derek you got a second to talk because he never calls unless it was like our day or somebody who was in the hospital and his family okay and so I answered the phone. And he's a K Derek. How's it going? You don't okay. I was like very enthusiastic. Is like well? This is a different call and as yet I'm doing fine and He said he goes. I can T for second. He said yes sure and he said look. I don't I don't want to be known as somebody who walked out on their kids and I I just don't want to be known L. Want to apologize for the way of treating for the past ten years and I want to be involved in your life and my grandkids life and he asked. Will you forgive me? Wow and wow man well see I have been praying after Alcott up off the floor. I been praying. That's Monday. Breyer was like you know. God you restore relationship and free this random call happen and On the phone and I would like to hear the story about how he got there. 'cause that would know exactly. I don't know I never asked him. That's a great. I've never the maybe that's a great conversation was in. Its time as a but I then you marry it with your story to absolutely and so he did that in I told him. I said data I forgive you a long time ago. But I've been praying for this day for a hot minute. You know and and set absolutely. I'll forgive. You know that kind of thing and so Our relationship began it Kinda restarted. In in my son my oldest son was eleven months at the time wasn't walking yet. We went out and seeing that we may. We've had great adventure since man. We went hunting together. We've been to waterfalls We've had a good time so Very nice though in two thousand eleven. Which was that following Christmas? My Dad came down and we were all at my mom's house and I walked in my mom's at front door. Ma met me at the front door and pulled me into the room is because evidently the siblings were all talk in and they were upset and they're crying and doesn't that any other than they think they she said they think he's here just to see you and they want to know why you're so different. And I said as I looked at her and Osama said the difference between them is that I chose to forgive and they haven't and she looked at me like She just found buried treasure. And then said you know you're right gave me a hug and then let me walk back in there with him and so it was just kind of interesting on the way home and long story. I'm sorry no good on the on the way home. Perfect on the way. Love it on the way home. I started to see all this crazy stuff happening so like so like when I was growing up mobile there was a really cool place I had if anybody's from. Drp and mobile. You know where Nancy's restaurant was. There's a little on bay front road. There's this little hole in the wall beach and We found it. You know we'd walk out there and we just sit there on the beach and man. Sometimes I'd laugh and cry and I'd cut up and I'd sit out there and I'd sit there and watch the the the oil tankers go through in the cargo ships and seagulls in the waves crashing. All that in I was you know it was my place of rescue at. Didn't have to live behind the facade that I was living right nice I could be me. In a prayer prayer. After prayer out there just grow up and be a dad and a husband and have cool cars and like a cool. I have a cool house. I WANNA do it. Different and so In Two thousand ten on that way back from on the way back to Nashville from Mississippi in the car a started remember that place and every at that point in time in two thousand ten every player that ever prayed on that beach had came true. Wow the wife. The kids the car the House the House. You know not that everything's extravagant. It was just a nice house is one hundred thousand dollar house but it was brand spanking new. Yeah know and it's twelve hundred fifty square feet. I'm not talking about the bellarmine. Fancy brand new house right. You know what I'm saying. It was a newer car to newer cars. You know that we had an two healthy boys and in a healthy wife and loving wife and man I was just I was so grateful and then on my business did over. A million dollars in revenue kipling back to see what it was that trigger and all those roads kept pointing back to the choice that I made to forgive my dad. There you go you know. That's that's a good message. I'm glad I wrote the book. Thank you I appreciate it. Goodness what I do in the book is the next question most people as I forgive as they they asked but how can I is always the but record. I don't really want to do it right. We want to live in that anger and bitterness and resentment and that just causes your own torment and so in that was the reason why I say that but but in but how can I and that's what I want to walk. People through in the book is is. This is how you do it. You know and rent so and so. That's really kind of the gist about the book. But but yeah I mean that's that's it in a nutshell of how I got to wear 'em in the construction world that's a whole nother story but the an in a nutshell as far as the book goes. That's Kinda wear all that started. Musician was and where it ended and how that kind of came together. I'm a forgiveness for me. Usually when I hear that question right your story is a little bit different but I'm going to throw some stuff at you and just try to get your take on some ideas so when I think about people that I need to forgive for me if that makes any sense sure like and I think you've gotten there I'm just trying to make sure A lot of times people that you WANNA forgive you. Don't because you don't think they deserve it absolutely right. They don't. They're not really worthy of my forgiveness right absolutely because you know they were actually right to serve right about like an abuser. You're not if you choose to we. We can talk about this or not if you want to start if you were to say like think about does my abuser deserve my forgiveness and the answer to that logically is no absolutely don't they don't deserve it but now take a step back again and say do they give a shit about me now. Probably not not right right and I'm holding something I let it go. Even if they don't deserve my forgiveness if I just say hey look. I don't know what they had going on. Then they have their stuff but I'm going to forgive them for me right. That makes sense that makes sense. Yeah absolutely I think it's interesting when you forgive people know that you're not justifying what they did to you right right. You're not you're not. You're not giving them a pass. You're not giving him a pass. What you're doing is you're allowing yourself to move on emotionally to a better place right and in forgiveness is for you. Trump is for them right. You know somebody's crazy business. You know you can forgive them. But you're never gonNA trust him in your business again right now. The different thing. Yeah and so I think that in when we hold our business are forgetting sorry. Not Our business when we hold our forgiveness as a gift to bestow upon people. That's where it's not right given away free right right. It has to be given away freely as in. It's not a gift you bestow upon somebody that's worthy because of the truth of the matter is none of us are worthy right right. That's true you know and so right but at the end of the day at the end of the day you have to hold above all the visit for your life. Who'D ALL WANNA BE. I WanNa be what I gotTa do to get there and if this forgiveness thing is GonNa really unlocked at key. I use this example. I use this example as I was running one day and I got this vision in my head and it was kind of like okay so imagine yourself in a prison. So you're in tingey close in his dingy glit- and it's like something off a poll dark or something you know. And so you're you're in your dark as dark and it's old and it's Franch old place you know. Whatever castle whatever so dainty and everything and you're sitting in his cell and you're ready close and you're just like man. And they're all suddenness character starts walking towards you and they're they're dressed really nice and like the light is following them as they go and as like crazy and then they reach through the thing to the through the prison cell door and they hand you this key in on the key is says forgiveness and then you look up and it illuminates face Mitch. You right and they handed the key in the Qisas forgiveness and then when he says it. When you see that it's it's you looking back at you. The keyhole eliminates and you put the key and you turn. The problem is another thing. Is that all these people that have hurt. You start appearing in the background kind of translucent. They appear in the background right among eastern He. So you yourself hold the key to your prison cell to the door. He let go right. Oh yeah so I mean this may be super spiritual on people but like when you talk about when you look at when you look at Jesus said how do I pray. Says you know our father? It'd be the name of Kim come with done in that he says forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us so many people miss that as we fought right as we part and we get we get delivered over to kind of torment in. It's a lot of it. It's our own mental. Health just skipped over that. Yeah Yeah right you know what I'm saying. It's our own mental health. You're doing it for you right right. And that's the thing is that you guys don't realize that the key to forgiveness is choice right. It's so much of it as a choice. How can I will you have to choose to do? You feel like you've forgiven that person everyday absolutely not I guess what you you made a choice and eventually it gets easier every day. Oh and offer given that when someone their main comes up oh of Donald forgive it. There's no more anger there's no bitterness there because you've everyday you repeatedly tell yourself forgiven. That person forgiven that person right. I had a guy screw me. Out of twelve thousand dollars in business And the day that I was coming I was gonna fly to where he was at to do the marketing for him and that day before he says before you book Your Flight. I'm turning them on notice and I was like. Oh my gosh like I was furious. Like just a couldn't even talk to him on the phone. Because I was afraid what I was Gonna say I was just so angry and a new a new man. If I went to bed that angry I was going to regret it so a all night. Forgive this guy. I didn't WanNA forgive that dude but I'm house angry. I mean it's like you know so you just like stab them in the face with the process saying went to bed. I knew I had to make a choice about choose to forgive him and the next day did I feel any better. No but I told myself a repeatedly about choose to forgive him but she's forgiven day three. Just what I'm not feeling it. So much rafer guess. What is that feelings going away day? I'm almost like Oh yeah. I've learned how to do this. And it's a muscle you know like those aren't GonNa pick themselves up the practice that whole it's not just you're not going to be like all of a sudden like angels and and like being you're not going to be immune to the process but you have to process those because I was you. Do this This allusion to of a whatever. It doesn't matter no no no. That's almost as bad as not forgiving. Just not processing it and just saying oh I don't care it doesn't matter it you're not processing then you're just saying okay. It doesn't matter what I feel doesn't matter. Nah No you actually have to go through the process of feeling like you want to kill the person. That's it's vital right what it is what it has and this is. What kind of identify in the book is that? It's in order for true forgiveness to happen. Something has to die right so when I in my mind and I guess you'd say theology or what whatnot when God looks at me. He sees Jesus on the Cross Rice. So would you look down at that so okay so when I'm forgiven is because Jesus later but he died so that I could be forgiven right so when you look at other people and you you apply that to forgive says the same thing you have to mourn the thought of the relationship where it was going right right you have to so man that guy was going to be a really good friend of mine man but man I have to mourn that and sometimes it hurts it does. I'M NOT GONNA lie. It hurts so like your innocence was stolen from you. It hurts. I get it. It shouldn't have been at. It shouldn't happen but you have to mourn that you have the in in realize when you're processing that study cry man you know you're GonNa Woods Man. It just whatever's wherever you go to the beach absolutely be alone in the car. I'm saying man scream. Hit The standard. Will you know what I'm saying? Yeah and that's and that's that's true. I mean those emotions are real they are you know what I'm saying. They're real and they're tangible. And that's what when you process those when you process and you have you have to mourn that what would you thought it was gonna be. I'm morning what I thought this relationship was going to be. And and at the end of the day you give yourself freedom to move on. I sometimes neither. Sometimes these people are still in your life And you're like look I got. I got a mourn what I thought this relationship was going to be. It's not going to be what I thought it was GONNA be. And then I've gotta sit up boundaries for them to operate around my family. I just went through something like this. Nothing major sure but like I don't even know to tell you the truth. Honestly what I was feeling but it was related to this whole corona virus stuff. This this this thing is real right right. Abs- There's this undeniable to this pandemic thing that's going on right now. Preserved is bringing up all sorts of emotion. So I can't really put it. It's not even forgiveness thing. It's more of a process emotion thing but it all just seemed not so real it's just TV. I'm staying home. I'm teleworking I'm trying to do like not watch the news right right. I'm just basically just trying to get through at like all of us right right right and then last Friday. I had one of my podcast or guests. Podcast guests told me about another podcast. That lives here in Las Vegas. That was sort of in the same community right and they asked me. Oh Do you know Paula? And I'm like oh I've heard a Paul. I know she's in Vegas. I need to reach out to her and get her on my show and Yada Yada and they go. Oh you don't know. She tested positive. And I'm like only add really is she. Okay and I said yes. She's Okay and you need to go and hang up with us and go listened to her podcast on top and she spends like thirty minutes talking about what it means to have a mild symptoms case. Okay and she talked about it for thirty minutes about what it was like for her. Tend to not go to the hospital and be Kobe. Nineteen positive it was the sickest she's ever been in her life. Yeah Yeah and it just scared the shit out of me. That night I could not sleep. I had that you have you ever had that feeling in your chest where you just kind of want to cry. But it's not coming out. Yeah I just went through that and I don't even know what the Hell I was grieving but I just decided. Oh that's right. This is now suddenly real longer on. Tv says next door. You know this is like somebody. I kinda almost no got sick. Yeah Yeah so anyway. And that's what our as we're leading in business you know. I've got twenty five people or so that worked for me and right and win. Every day. We have a Monday morning. We have a conference call with everybody in our team and I are just kind of. I want to be that slow and leader that that confident elected. Nothing's freaking me out. You know I may be on the inside but at the on the outside. I need to put up that like that. That front that you know when the when the waves start crashing right the the Co Captain. He goes it gets real. We're real kept in right and this. This story comes from buddy-buddies a fighter pilot lane being awesome. Do but he's he just says that you know people want to see the real champion. And and when you freak out that's contagious. Everybody is GonNa Freak out right you go you know something right so you guys make sure you're putting a glove on when you get gas you know where a mask if you're around people that that kind of thing so you know just trying to be safe you know. Have Safety in mind. Hey we've shut down our warranty department so those guys are now in production. Excuse me so. So it's it's just a it's real. It's real in those emotions for people are real. People are scared and in fear comes from not knowing when when you don't know something you know that's when you're like 'cause it's so uncertain right you know everything only gosh everything's so uncertain and so that's a fear comes from a place of just not knowing there's also like I've been feeling guilty a little bit and guilty because a lot of me likes part of what's going on I really liked teleworking and not having to commute that makes us feel guilty. Uh Z. I really liked not having to take my wife to the Casino twice a week when I'm really tired after work and you feel guilty you know so. I think you can come up with an emotion. We're going through it in spades right now. So yeah so intercessor yet. I think we'll we'll pull through. I think I think one of the things was that we all had to go through was. Are we going to make it through or is the world going to be gone and I? I think we're GONNA make it right. I think we're GONNA make it. Yeah for sure it more like win. It's not an if it's more of like a win. Yeah everybody's everybody's we're all stir crazy. That's crazy I know here in Nashville. And other we're talking about they were they. Were thinking it was going to be like in just in Davidson County. Which we're in Rutherford County. But they were talking about how the they were predicting that six hundred forty something people were going to die and right now that that number by now I mean it should have been way more than that but it's right now it's only at two hundred so now they're thinking so now they're thinking. I'm yet sucks. That people have lost their lives right. But but the they think they're over the hump on this and so they think that the next three weeks of being home or next two weeks of being at home for people who is GonNa Kinda really increase the chances and the hydrochloric fan However you say that word that long word that stuff's working good for the most part You know so you know. There's some hope out there man. There's various there's all there's all kinds of hope so I think we're GonNa make so as we wrap up. Tell people how they can best get in touch with Derek Stone. How to find the book how to find your website and how to find your business. Yes so You can go to Derek Stone Dot online again. That's D. E. R. E. S. T. O. N. E. DOT online. You can see all my facebook Facebook and instagram link. If you want to reach out hang out. Talk have a conversation. I love that If there's a you know the preorder book is on there so you can hit the lion at the top. There's a homepage in book. Preorder page perfectly. You can click that link and then down at the bottom underneath the picture. It has the length the Amazon linked to preorder I would much appreciate that and just spread the word. I mean. This is something that I feel of. This is my. I think I don't know third or fourth podcast about the book wife had a couple before about my business but this one in particular you know realize that there's such a need for this out there and I just really want to my my. My Passion in life is empower people to change their own situation. No you're right I mean and and so really does open up a lot of doors that whole like learning how to forget. I think is Yeah you'll be amazed at how your life will start changing in style happening to you but for you right and changing your mindset and and getting vision for your life of of where you WanNa go. Who Do you want to be and then using that as a filter to make all your decisions like is this going to help me get? My goal is is not going to help me get my goal. Right and so So yes so. They're stoned online at facebook. Instagram you can go. Check that out If you WANNA CHECK OUT STONES REPAIR REMODEL DOT COM. You can go check that out too. That's the Arkansas Action Company We Really Advertised to builders and construction Track homebuilders is kind of our bread and butter for that. But he F- your Trek Home Builder Costing Manager. GimMe a call perfect perfect derek sound. This has been a blast. Thanks for being so open in sharing your story. I appreciate it thank you Jeff. Thank Your heavenly man to later. Thanks for taking the time to ride along with us. Another episode of Bruise Revere for Podcasting for when show notes be sure to head over to veer dot com. That's triple double E. R. Dot Com. Then that's fun to say and we'll catch up with you next time. Here on fleeing groom Vere.

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Booker T of the MG's: Time Is Tight

Broken Record

55:04 min | 7 months ago

Booker T of the MG's: Time Is Tight

"Few songs hit quite like this green onions was accorded to takes aches in one thousand nine hundred. Sixty two by Booker T.. Then Jeez they were the house band for stacks records in Memphis. This song was originally the B side but once it started making the rounds on radio it was quickly released as the ace is going down as one of the most recognizable instrumentals Booker T.. Along with Qatar Steve Cropper Drummer Al Jackson Junior and basis Lewis Steinberg Burke or depending on the year Donald Duck Dunn went onto record hits like sitting on the dock of the bay. Hold on. I'm coming in Seoul. Man and then the process defined the sound of southern southern soul which was way more gritty in our sound. Coming out at motown over the last Sixty Years Booker T. has been writing producing arranging and playing with some of your favorite artists. Artists like Otis Redding Neil Young Willie Nelson Bill withers and of course has been sampled hip hop like a James Brown songs by the roots Tang clan and others wrote about it in his memoir time type note by note booker. T. South boosted limited funding Hammond C three organ so he could talk and play us through his career Korea. This is broken record liner notes for the Digital Age. I'm Justin Richmond. Here's Bruce Hoddlem. Speaking with Booker T.. From Bridge Studio in Brooklyn I do want to start today. Talking about your new book is tight. Yeah which is fabulous for many many reasons and I think everyone should read. Thank thank you. What interested me particularly was you know? There's this perception people have of I think particularly southern musicians unsold musicians that you guys learned everything in the church or singing on street corners you whereas serious music academic Ustad very hard from a early age How did that? Why did that happen? I think your first two elements of formula Exactly correct The Church Jack. Was I remember singing. Jesus loves me as a little boy in Sunday school in my first solo was in church and then as I grew up a little earlier some of my friends friends I met. Maurice widened sixth grade and David Porter ninth grade and they were singing and do up Greece on groups on the street corner and and I came from a background where my grandfather built a school down in Holly Springs Mississippi and he mandated that his children go go to school for his school and then they go to high school in that they go to college all his kids including my father went. Follow graduated M. I and became a math ask teacher and he wanted all his grandkids. Do same things. I was one of those so it was predetermined that I was going to study and and go to college and as a saved up nine nine hundred dollars on my paper route to that effect studied Latin in the ninth grade. So you know and the music was Came from my mother's side The classical music by my grandmother was piano teacher. She had a piano taught my mother my mother Platelets Debussy Chopin in the house And the music affected me so I got it from a lot of different angles including those I want you meant. When did you realize you're studying music? You started. Think with the clarinet clear. That was the first one I own. The first one I started with was oboe. The first formal estimate but before by a- As a little boy had a Ukulele that got me into the toss kind of account see myself as a guitar player. You See yourself as guitar player now a pick it up. I were using when I'm writing a song. Windy no music was going to be your life. A as a young boy started hearing music in my mind since I can remember various Sounds and melodies and and I didn't know what to call them you know mm-hmm and that I think was the challenge as I grew older what to call everything. So that's a formal education came in you know taking piano lessons organ Lawson's theory lessons in high school. Had to put a name to everything you know so I could communicate with the outside world and these are you know this is pre reintegration. Your school you went to an all black. School went to African American School. Or a saying in the the choir in the first grade at at Order Order Junior high school which was known all all blacks whites and you but the music education was really intense and you took Syria lessons after after school tenth grade starting in about nineteen fifty nine. Thanks and then This is amazing passage in your book where you you are as years later. You working at stacks I think you're doing the arrangement for When something is wrong with my baby the the Great Sam and Dave Song and I think the next thing that happens is you're trying to figure out your your college at that point in Indiana? You're trying to figure out what you're going to play for your trombone recital. Yeah yeah those coincides incidental so you were flying back and forth news Dak sessions from An. You're getting getting an education at one of the great musicologists in the country. I think you mentioned that. Great instance up late. You know the mind as a great you know a combination nation of a church feeling you know new way to the way the notes moving the base and the The classical of combination of those influences in my life but the church I think was the main the strongest in flaws in my musical of make up one of the other influences you mentioned and and this is fascinating to me and I love you to walk me through. It was when you wrote green onions. And I think you're probably nineteen or something seventeen seventeen but you said it's because you've studied Bach counterpoint. Wanted to go to. UCLA or Indiana University so the head to pass a theory. I had to pass a jury to go to Indiana University. They were going to ask questions about the basics of music house. Music put together. Aw That's where my theory class dot it. You know the scale twelve notes in the scale what are they. And what are the the poor J. Those way I moved. Those notes were basically dictated by J s Bob Entrepreneurial Movement in makes sense. We didn't think about it. But it's it's it's ingrained in our Western society. What I just play? That's the way the notes move in other countries. Whatever so in figuring that out I I This this. What if an outlet where the blues came in changing this from a major talk to a minor third that that third one two three about a mile and so green it's capable Instead of the third was a matter of the top move down like a buck because Bach and counterpoint. The top is ugly it moves it moves in the opposite direction. May spock. The bottom moves a while loser while the top moves down so kind of aalto. That's that's Kinda cool you know. And then the changes of course are just regular blues changes that we played all the time you go from that to the beef back to the one lose basic but it has this second quarter instead of. I think it would feel different places like that. So that's basically the history of how green is came. was there a particular box song that inspired that or just it was just general counterpart rules just the rules. We learned you know. Oh and in the major scale And I want to go back to your education and more about Memphis. There's one other great example you mentioned in the book. There's many great examples samples but you wrote the Great Albert King Song born under a bad sign. And you said you picked a particular key for that There Yeah an-and where that came from that. You know that that door open we gotta call new. We being myself apart William Bill that we were we were staffed produces uses at the time and we will responsible for recording. Albert King is coming down the next day so we went into my skin of the night before Friday night rights of him and That came into my mind and William had been working on the lyrics EXC content born under a bad sign. It had been working on that for himself so the came together that night before. But then you know at Indiana had learned about you know the the urgency that you put into a certain keys that we're we're not inherent in in some keys Buzek as A. I'm high say music. Music music parts out for our atmosphere and some some some teas have more emotional content for than ah those so I went to see that. Minor flop deflect deflect same key. So this is different as albuquerque and the way he played his Gospel he pulled his change on those keys. And we got this tension you you know and this this emotional necessity Out of the song and it just makes just planner right here now makes me feel kinda differently. Like something. Ominous is as you you know and you think and that came from the key game from boy from here to and you mentioned that you like C.. Sharp Wagner Wagner. Yeah so pin. You know they were. They played in those. They didn't mind writing six shops. You know they musicians glaring those keys but it had this this This feeling this motion you know and the the blues and that key. It's just unbelievable to it's not a common. It's not a common key for for blues. Though will I don't know it was perfect for this. Listen for our I think a lot of blues musicians when I was on on in Memphis played in in the in the simpler keys you know L. and maybe C or G Z.. Monitor but but when you go to the monarchy's like that that a flat G shot manner. If there's a certain as another element that comes in. It's I guess it's the way the universe is put together the make up of atoms or something says it is so this is more more emphatic. Yeah and so the Borna Bazan see-sawed manner well the same way as so pens concertos was very great. Good good keefer album. He just killed it guitar player. So it's a little easier to move and he's also right handed guitar player Kinda like Jimi Hendrix. So one such an issue you know left handed guitar players have to push the strings but a right handed guitar player like Alba can pull the strings so he had more drink of physical strength over there right on only up the strings so he just he just killed it. It was a bad experience. Amazing Ed I WANNA go back to. We talked about severe academic background. But then you started playing along Beale Street. Now people now know beale street because of the of the Baldwin Book and they just made made into a movie numb but it was this famous street in Memphis where you're from and you tell me what it was like playing in those clubs back then. You're just a kid did YA. I was right off of Bill Steve on her Nando. Just about a couple of doors down now at the window. Upstairs on the second floor was where they will only wants to actually let me and cliff Miller was there on on the place in his in his place so he brought me in. I couldn't get into the club handy which was On the other side of the all that was US Sunday. Middle's Club out to young He I guess he I guess he could have broken. The rules had me in but One that was interesting to me. He brought me on the play bass and I played bass in Gene bowlegs Miller band and and Willie Mitchell Span How how long have you played the bass? At that point. I picked up the string bass In a book of Washington Junior High School they had a base and that some basin in the Combo trumbull there. Yeah by the way. This is probably a good time to pause and say your name really is booker. T. My name is. My name is booker. T. cells named after my father for Criti- Joan on senior who was named after booker. T. Washington news educator and built built a college at Tuskegee was Dusky. ESL Yeah so And you attended booker. T. Washington high security Washington. High School. Yes I did okay so while you. So you're playing these clubs with a rough clubs was it was a strange for a kid to be in there yes. It was on safe allowing there was a lot. Going on on Beale Street Beale Street. was everything from you. Know a prostitution prostitution out whiskey running a lot of stuff going on down there and my parents but my parents picked out a couple of musicians they trusted to watch. It's over may they picked out Floyd Newman to take me home at night and tell you. The club. Aided his algebra teacher but he did it anyway Sudan had been his Albert. You listen to your dad. Your Dad is you know he's a high school teacher. Yeah he's always in a white shirt and tie uh-huh thinks it's okay for you to play these clubs. You know my dad appreciated. My Dad's supported my musical passion. And if I wanted to do it he he sat out. He sat out the club. Saddle so many clubs out in the countryside while I played and he just supported in bought me the instruments and he was my benefactor. You know and there there may be a picture on the book of Hamlin's outs class with his white shirt and tie on his and his point or you know teaching kids to to To calculate yeah he seems seems like just an amazing character he was. I don't know if I wouldn't be here without I mean. He bought the first clarinet and he just he just took me. Put Murray's stories waste drums in the back of his car and thank easily based fit all that stuff in his car and took us to clubs and Yeah maybe that he may be the nicest algebra teacher who who ever lived was great. A lot of people love them and then sixteen you started. It wasn't called stacks than it was called satellite. But you did your first session Shen. Yeah I was fifteen. I was in tenth grade and the guy. Floyd Newman. I was telling you about. was there a baritone sax player but he was also a high school teacher so he couldn't make those this particular session because he was in school and David border came and got me out of school my Algebra class tenth grade class to play for root for some Carla. Oh Thomas who played baritone sax on there. 'cause I love you if I record stacks and And it's got a lot of Baritone Sax that record it does through the whole saw Paul. How many takes did you do? Oh I don't know that was a pretty Ruined take too much time to record that that was closer. I take I think something like that and then did you get more sessions after that do do. It took the opportunity to tell him that I could play piano because it was numerous job to play saxophone. Birtles told SACS I couldn't take it. I like I like how you cut school. Yeah can't cut glass. Yeah so I was there and I told him I could to play piano and I got the job working after school as a session player to that were found on either play piano. Do you remember some of your other early sessions. You're the first one now remember was Prince Conway. Oh my goodness. What was that song? It was a great blue saw. I'm coming home I'm going home. Number is common. Yeah that was the first I and I play the Orleans Solo on that one of the blue saw. Now you you are sitting in front of a a B three Hammond B three. And we've got the speaker in the other room this C.. Three is a C.. Three has got the wooden signs over here. Okay now I was. I was just told this. The C. Three was the church version. Yeah so the so that you couldn't you couldn't see organised legs. Eliza was heavier. What's better yeah now you you talk talk a lot about the be three or the three Hammond That it could make any sound you imagine. What what did you mean by that? Well Awful dobozy can pull out nixed the tones And I don't know of any other estimate that you can do that on a out of can't think of any other instrument that you can change like that. You can't do that with the boy can do do it. Maybe guitars can do. I don't know if they can do it as quickly. Right in the middle. Just hurry and it was about five different songs from from. I'm one note there was there one particular sound that grabbed your was it. The variety guy variety a municipal. My teacher told me when I saw the thing. Her name was Ms Cola tried etiquette lessons on. She said you know you can make any sound. You won't that sentiment it can make it sound like a a big full orchestra clarinet or you know it was what she told me. It was the the opening up of those possibilities. I think suck me in and was she. Did she teach you gospel style or does she teach you know she started with this. I listened with her They will temple clavier. Yes but If he lived long enough he might have written green onions. He would do. We'll be back with more of a conversation with booker t after the break. Hey this is just in Richmond. If you've been listening to broken record and have a thought let's make my own podcast but then get thinking about it and you got to figure out how to get ads. You got your guests and audio WPRO. Well spotify found a way to make it easy and all you need is anchor anchors. All in one free tool from spotify and helps you create your own podcast and assist distribution onto all podcast platforms with anchor you can record edit distribute your own show. And they'll even pair UA sponsors help help you get paid it all works in your browser or right on anchors mobile best of all. It's totally free. Make your podcast with inker today but one anchor dot com slash broken. Right that's anchor dot com slash broken ric. It's really really hard to find qualified. Candidates jobs takes a long time. And there's too. Many applicants got away rap after APP. Just in the hopes of finding a needle Adelson ziprecruiter mixed hiring easy. Ziprecruiter doesn't depend on candidates. Finding you rather find them for you like your own personal recruiter. It's technology identifies people with the right. Experience invites them to apply. So you get qualified candidates fast like your own personal recruiter. It's no wonder four out of five employees who post on Ziprecruiter get a quality candidate within the first day Ziprecruiter. The smartest way to hire see. Why ziprecruiter is effective for businesses of all sizes? Trust Ziprecruiter for free at ZIPRECRUITER DOT com slash broken record that ziprecruiter dot com slash broken We're back with more from booker. T. When did you start arranging and writing writing at stacks that started with Working on David border and as a cases song of Salmon Dave Dave Songs Otis Redding songs they gave me the freedom to Change they're songs around the way I heard them I worked Don Baby They had a different way and I gave a kind of a motown field or change the baseline of me change When something is wrong with my baby maybe and Some of the real working on try a little tenderness. Otis gave me the freedom to work with the days. Parts in the Coral Kotal title changes in that and they will open to my changes. Can you show me what you did on a song. Like You mentioned Carla Thomas. Baby which which is a song she didn't like and then you finally made it work. Wouldn't you do. I uh gave it a a little motel field like that. Change the baseline and change the temple in the melody but on the melon is same as they wrote the words they wrote the words and lyrics same as as they wrote wrote. Did you change any of the cords underneath. No No. It's the same 'cause they will. Yeah with the way it feels now. Were you guys. I mean stacks. Was this incredible factory of hits. Were you competitive with motown. We looking at what they were doing saying. We're going to beat them. Not at all I think we were We we use motel owners as an instructive element Because they were so great so knowledgeable they made so many good good though decisions decisions with their music and it was so so much fun to listen to but we have. We were We didn't consider ourselves in competition so different Clinic we talked about Not Not making the music too complicated keeping it accessible assessable baselines burned wasn't could. Can you tell me about meeting Otis redding for the first time. Yeah Otis was an MBA guy. He was he was really excited about making music all the time he was willing to do everything. Carry the instruments and go get the food and he was the driver for Johnny Jenkins on the banned opposition. First Time I met him he was out on the street loading the suitcases onto the sidewalk. You know they need anything you know. What can I do and then can sing song? No he can't sing us a whole single song. He's never had somebody eroding wanting to sing before no Rhodus. I didn't do that and we let him saying that. It wasn't road anymore. After saying I two lines of these mining sitting next to me and of course then by that time we want to get the tape rolling record this guy. So did he say play this quarter. He starts singing his own. Owes all intuitive He didn't he didn't he mentioned any calls but he started riding on key. Either you had perfect pitch or something. But I didn't have to play in the nose before so he knew exactly what key to singing and and it was his song. So uses an instant US easiest in that way I actually And then you added a lot of different things to his songs longs as Tom dwan he would look over he will. He will look over to to me and he dictated a lot with his mouth. Would harm done here. Would say you know five off go. You would sing the lines to the horns but a lot of the intricate stuff that I did underneath. He allowed me to do you know. Will you just mentioned Sad Song suffer for that Song I can't sing it but you just saying a little bit of it and that's the song you would be a beautiful company to it'll better example. Would be new new. Ought to be free so you know the walk up to that those. Those are the freedoms that that I had to with him was to to to To insert musical elements to help build the air and he would wait for things like that. he was. He was dictatorial but he also gave a lot of freedoms with CAM. Just going to wait for a minute for the hair on the back of my neck to go back down because it was just so fantastic antastic And then there was so much the way you describe it He was in San Francisco for a while. And you wrote doc doc in the bay and then there was so much excitement around what became his last album Just the making of it you sort of you. You described the place being almost kinda not a frenzy but almost a kind of a state of siege to be honest with you He he sneaked it on us the We knew that Stephen Kinda prepare to Steve was kind of a four minutes tax. He was saying the Guy Towers Olis. WERE GONNA be recording these recesses but we didn't know they were going to be stopped sessions crude and we're not going to be song to saw off to song and include include not going home and staying in the studio and ordering food in. We never did that before. That was the only time we ever did that. Status Studio Day after day after day and I think that culminated with that song Sitting on the bay but there was so many great was in just went one one to the other so yeah so there was a there was a middle attitude of maybe oldest at a a premonition that he needed to record those songs immediately without without any you know any delay of taking a night off for a day off for that type of thing and you played piano on. I play piano most almost almost everything though sessions and was try a little tenderness part of the sessions as well as at earlier. No that was earlier. Okay because that arrangement and it's an old song is so unusual even now when you hear it Sir Disarming When a what? How did you put that song together? That was the trip that I made down from Indiana to play on that they my contribution was to To raise the keys Rather than playing it in one key to moves up during the course of the song Oh that's what it was. It was a WELCO Yeah that was the kind of theory type thing it was this part right here in this part here was Al Otis. That was order was looking at Al Jackson. Jackson made these thumps ten. Yeah I think this was one of his kind of foot-stomping masterpieces that he came up with. indictate dictate sang the lines to the horns and In the head this interaction this with Al Jackson Julia the drama. Yeah now when you arranging ranging rewriting out charts for the horns or was it more visit easy. Was it more informal. This one was informal. This one's ahead chart put anything on paper. I don't think we had strings things on this saw strings and we could always tell us to play by ear and just humble last them but were we had strings and we had away string. Players can't do they can't. But usually I would just served clemency book at Otis reddings funeral when you were supposed to perform and you could tough. That was tough That was there in this big auditorium for Otis Weddings Funeral Macon in Georgia and oh it was a song that I played in church thousand towns and I think I had brought the music just in case they got in trouble and I think who was Joe Simon was going to sing and I heard The children walk down and would walk down. I just I just Professionals and left me and it was It was on the near the cross near the cross had played that so many times Me Crawl loans. There is New more raw also to to be the a that's what I was supposed to play. I couldn't think about to say my relax. Will you just play for him. So that's over that his budget did you finally get it out or the music I'll uh-huh and put an accident. Had to put it on the organ play and the ones that saw the notes on the page and I remember now I WANNA talk to a couple of songs you did. You did a lot of those songs. As Booker tinges but sold dressing was one of them. how did that come up. Those those call that Indiana songs drove so many hours so many hours down highway. Thirty seven seven from Indiana this me driving down with around the houses farmhouses elsewhere. He's going through a man strong and always And that's when a lot of melodist came to me when I was driving. Oh north and southbound highway thirty seven through Kentucky and Indiana Seattle Northern Tennessee scenes pastoral scenes Those kind of peaceful things would you pull over and write them down or just. Try to remember birth Just try to remember okay and I WANNA ask about a slim Jenkins Joint As New York City I came up with Ed Milkis on piano. I think ended up playing piano on it in the story about that Sol S.. Seems like every saw has the story but when you mentioned that I we were trying to record cord that Song in New York and It was at Atlantic studios on where cream had was cream. Just becoming coming big act there and I just you know if we were working in here right now and someone came in and sat there and I was coming up with something new. It just told me to lose my concentration so I would say anybody else in the studio. That's not actually working on the record. Would you just please just step outside or just. Don't be here now because I got distracted working on this track down everything time. Tom Came to put the organism. And this fellow comes in. And he's he's walks in. Nobody says he sits down like right over here by the wall crosses his legs who doesn't look at music sits there and I'm supposed to do the organ part right. I'm totally destroy. All can do is look at this guy and And I found out it was Eric Clapton. Talk basically all of that way now. I walked over Tom Down right right there or just eric don't mind. This wasn't a big deal to Tom. They weren't distracted at all junior. Was Tom down. Tom Tasers. I'll just you know. Just go walk back out there and I played that but I could not get my mind off who the hell is sitting in here like that and I ask asked him a few years later when we were down in Texas came to play their Eric Clapton. It had a a guitar festival balance downed. Who was that you? Yeah it was me. He's just wanted to check out the session. What people did that? Normally you know other people did that they had other people coming But I was always so private and so I don't know so focused it Kinda distracted need to have somebody unless unless they were working on the music. Anyway there's another great scene in your book where you play the Monterey pop festival look in the book yeah where where are you You know you guys you there with Otis redding wearing. I'm not sure they were matching suing beautiful suit roots in your credibly professional and go back to your hotel is just like hippies hanging around anywhere. You're likely what the WHO are these people are. We stuck out like a sore thumb. It was amazing mazing but it became this legendary performance. It was yeah we wish we had some other closed because it was we had these suits made it Lansky brothers and Memphis. Everybody went there. Because that's where Elvis had his And they were great. They get suited up quickly and they've they made nice stuff. Yeah but you look like Algebra teachers. Here's compared to everybody. Absolutely they were. They were Green Silk Souks. You know a conservative suits. And that's what we want states that's what we thought was supposed to wear L. L. talks Idea that's what we did You know in Memphis in the time you were the. MG's were held held up. I don't know if they were held up at the time but they are now is an integrated band. There weren't many integrated bands in the country. And you're probably the most famous at that point We conscious of what was going on in Memphis at the time before. For example Martin Luther King Came came and he was killed there but for the garbage men strike. was that stuff not so much conscious of the fact that we were integrated that was that was awesome of a subtext It was not important. You didn't think much of it didn't think much of it that the bass player was wide. The Guitar player it was white. It was not a big deal But you know like I said we were family so we were close you know and it was kind of a big a big surprise to me later when I do interviews and that would be the first question that people ask God. They're more interesting in our different races than they are in the in the music You know as our get questions like that from overseas but no we. We were aware of course that we will have different races but it was not a pervasive issue We we like the way those guys played and they were they were together. They were part of us We will part of them and it. It became an issue after Martin Luther King was killed and Steve Cropper became a bigger issue. Said some things that seem to blame. Martin Luther King for stirring things ZAP IN MEMPHIS. What was that like for you at different times? It was a different difficulties later years. It was more difficult than it was at the time I was unaware that In nineteen sixty a it was a very pervasive. MULTI-HEADED OPT Hadrian working in Memphis against exactly what we were doing. There was a huge establishment. That was a Dedicated to separate people like us and not have what was going on at nine. Twenty six Makomo going on And there were there. Were People in Memphis who didn't want freedom riders to come into town and work towards that and I. I was unaware of it at the time. which is a good thing? I think 'cause you know I think it would have hindered the music making and had been aware of how strongly opposition was to raise his working together. When we come back? We'll pick back up with booker t and more on the complications of planes soul music and the south. Look around it's a wireless world and everyone needs a great pair of wireless ear buds before you go dropping hundreds of dollars on a pair you need to check out the wireless ear. Buds from break on ear buds. Start at about half the price of any other premium wireless ear buds on the market. They sound just as amazing as other top audio brands. recons latest motto. twenty-five is the best one yet. Six hours of playtime seamless seamless Bluetooth pairing more base. More compact design that gives you a nice noise isolating wireless ear. Buds are so comfortable. And unlike some of your other wireless options ray cons ear buds stylish discreet with no dangling wires of stems. CELEBS like Snoop Dogg. And how would he be are obsessed with rank Hans. What's pick up a pair and see what the hype is all about fifteen percents off your order by Raycatena dot com slash broken? I RECON DOT com slash broken record the fifteen percent off Rakhine wiler. It's by RECON DOT com slash pro-trade. We're back with more Bruce's conversation with Booker T. There's a incredible seeing in your book when you you decide. You're going to leave stacks. which at that point is run by Al Bell and You write a song implant forum. Can you tell me that story yeah I think you know it was the beginning of my trying to to increase my awareness in general and kind of realizing that I could maybe think on a different level and I became aware of of this huge l.. Had this call it a monster multi headed monster. That was moving about a memphis. The square was that was Effectively dictating to two races of people dictating the whites dictating the blacks wchs and it was it was Undetectable took to most people. But I think I became aware of this and I wrote the song about it and call. Oh man trouble trouble about defeating this unknown force that you couldn't see in doing it in your own mind and get in getting your mind free. Do you remember the song. There's a man called trouble any follows me everywhere I go. Now Ole man trouble you can get me now all I know so. Yeah it was a song that I did spend a lot of money on a big horn. Arrangements string section Jackson running component. And those those those guys were it. Actually got Stephen Stills recorded a fuel furious later on off his soul albums and see you played this for Alabel now those African American Yeah Yeah and he had become the president. He was leader of the company Yeah it was reminiscent of Sam Cooke SA- change is GonNa come. You know it was nineteen sixty. You could feel it in the air in nineteen sixty eight in the It was a pivotal year for a lot of things. And but this this was the real thing this dynasty that was at work in Memphis it was a it was an oppressive force that that was that was working there there but it was not up at the surface to know uh-huh but he he he didn't have a good reaction to the song it upset Him. He had the same reaction I think that he would have he. I think he mentioned inching. Sam Cooke Song. He was the president of a about a record company that was about to really break open and And it had to make a statement of the company eventually dig make the statement as as the voice of a black America but he wanted to be he he wanted to be. I think a little more gradual than the song would have dictated and It was an interracial company at the time you know it. It wasn't just a black America. Black Record Company. I think he was. I think as I said in the book I think we had the same goal you know Al actually had been part. AWW Dr King's team at one point. We had the same goal but I think we were taking different directions toward it then after you played it for him You went back into the studio. Yeah can you tell me what you did. Yeah we didn't we didn't make a deal that night which was what I wanted? I went to his house looking for a deal and It became apparent allocated space. We weren't gonNA make a deal. I I realized that it was just time. It was time to go so I will. I wanted to I want to Several all my links with the company so I walked into the Control Romance I am. I raised anything new that I had done at that point including that song including that Song you couldn't. What is it you had to tape over? You couldn't reverse detained crying. No and I'm so glad I did. Because they had the freedom they owned all the masters and they can put out anything they want it after it left. So if I was GONNA make any decisions had to be that night and so yes put Raced multiple multiple machines but personal record button And then just went home impact. What California? It's it's like a scene from a novel just these machines running in your and you just leave. It's not a more And I'm glad I did. It turned out they put out many outtakes of the stuff that we weren't finished with that we hadn't even named I heard stuff all right. Well we're not finished with that one. They other companies bought the masters from stacks a fantasy barreds ducks and then they just put out what they wanted to without missing they owned it. So you know if you even a record company you gotta you can't leave anything there and then you went to California yeah You didn't have a lot of money do have you. Didn't I can't remember what you're making at that point it. Stacks like one hundred and twenty-five but weaker so I deal with. Herb Alpert was more than I had made in the Milton members they gave. They made me very comfortable But you you describe yourself as almost being a little at sea after after your time it stacks trying to figure what was next but then you almost immediately discover bill withers in the. Tell me about that story. It was another almost in two years before Bill was brought to me I got a phone call from Clarence friend of Al Bells Clarence had sold old stacks for L. Bell had some stacks to paramount and so L was crazy about Clarence Clarence this clarence bad for a long time. We cut relationship. Although I didn't stay there and the Clarence called. And he was very excited about this guy. In Inglewood there was building airplane toilets and he was a carpenter uh-huh and he wanted me to listen to the songs described him as a songwriter. And the bill came out to my ranch in Malibu with With a big thick notebook full song some some kind of guy was he friendly guy very just like his very happy jokes joking making a lot of jokes kind of want assuming count a little little like Oh this. This was a but basically bills bills mentality. Is that of a carpenter. He's you know he's always looking to build something. He's always doing something in some of his kids houses or changed department in secondarily as a songwriter. Then this person when we walked into the studio he asked me. I had everything like the setup. I had drums baseball. People out from Memphis and radio recorded the song he says. WHO's GonNa sing these songs? He he just wanted to be songwriter former though I saw himself as a songwriter. Carbon off as a side project and what was the first song he sang Adelson's he's gone. So how how long did take you to say. Oh I think you're really good. I never said that but I did. I know that now in that book he had songs also. I didn't get the best. Well I got some great ones but I didn't get lane on me. I didn't get the book Near and then you produced one of the big albums of I think all time which is Willie Nelson Stardust. That come about that was what I was living in. Malibu had over of an apartment and Willie had rented apartment underneath me which I thought was empty. 'cause I never saw anybody down there But one day I saw him running up the beach to read hedegaard. It looks just like Willie Nelson was it was Nelson. He weighed because he's just a friendly guy. Did you know his work by that point. Of course there. Oh yeah new. It's strange and everything. Yeah and I was so surprised when he turned in and came into the gate to to my unit and and he saw me stayed out there and we realized that we were neighbors and that's when we started jamming and he'd come up to my deck. Because I had electric piano right by the window and we jam there and assaults we jammed on dismiss this mess around each other. We're the ones that ended up on the starter's down. And then you you did you played bass on tra- Bob Dylan for knocking on heaven's door Yeah I was a bass player. That was my first real GIG MEMPHIS Got Most of my gigs was on base. But you you said earlier you still regard yourself as guitar player. I did yeah I still I have. I have guitars all the house. Mollema studio so that's the first thing you kind of think of when you're when you're writing that's it. I I had a serious silverstone. That's me playing a serious Silverton on William Bell's forgot to be your lover really You also wrote a great Great Guitar Lick which I don't think enough people know about which is the opening to Eddie Floyd's big bird bird visit fabulous quick and then you you sort of hint in the book that the guitarist were wanted to stick to the Oregon like they didn't they didn't want the competition Exactly that's asked me on the silver tone. Yeah that was a sears guitar Yeah Wow then you ended up working with Neil Young Sinead O'Connor drive by truckers walkers he drive by truckers. You did a You did you read it to Jackie Wilson Song that became a big hit for ridicule for Rita Coolidge who is your sister-in-law opponent and that point number huge totally change that song and it became a big big had worked. Jackie Robinson Jackie not at the Regal Theater in Chicago Entertainer. He was dynamic in that song. Just but but I often sometimes Asana in a new different arrangement will come to me. MHM that's what that was. I had recorded that myself and Rita heard it and I didn't know K.. And then you got a new album which is called time. Let's not call time. Time is tight but it it. It's a no-brainer note. And it's a companion to to the book. Yeah and what inspired you to do that. All the chapters are the same as the jobs. It's chapter titles of the book the songs on note by Note 'cause I love. Which is the first chapter of the book? And it's the first song I ever played on the studio Tax Axel Matt in the first chapter. So it's the first in the last We made a new recording of calls. I love you with every McCain from the stax museum you know they have some great talent there. When young talents the stax museum in Joshua debt or debt and not you know some of the American idol winners in some of the new voice? Winners and tie Taylor is on it. Singing these arms of mine and my son Ted who is my new accomplices has to two songs on there. He's he's go to guitarist now and and and songwriter and It's it's It's a composite of of of a of of a lot of the chapters of the book. is there more new stuff other people. You WanNa work with now. Oh yeah there's a new album coming with Ted Teddy Jones. My my son is kind of like well. Every song is different but On the new album note by note there is Maybe I need saving that. We wrote together and then that's paralyzed is. It's getting a lot of good airplay now. We moved together and There's a there's a Matt Burner of the National Sent Me Twenty songs a few months ago. Ah We've recorded data and I'm really excited about that. A new album called Serpentine prison. And he's he's out now isn't it knows not out you know. Oh can we just finished the production on a book He's he's done a lot of work and With some really great music. And he's the one that I worked worked with the ON REPRESENT MEMPHIS here New York with the roots with Sharon Jones. They they did that do it together right. That's where we met Good while ago and we become friends And you mentioned this in the book. People expect to hear green onions. They expect to hear the hits when you see them. I don't know what it's like for you to play them but there is a great story about about President Obama when you met him. Yeah we were doing Especially the White House and the president was on the back of the house waiting to walk in usually abandoned expected to play hail to the chief and I happened to be playing green onions and he and his wife in the first lady eighty started walking in will actually Kinda bopping in to green onions. Got Film they got on tape and He expressed a preference for a whenever. I was around to walk into green onions. Wells a hill to the a dog Beautiful though that saw aw booker t's memoirs out now we should have checked out booker. T. Dot com to see when you can catch him and his band on the you can check out some more music by visiting broken record. PODCAST DOT com where we have a playlist available for you to listen to while you're there sign up for behind. The scenes. Broken record is produced with help from Jason Gann Brel meal. Bell Leah Rose or pushing industries clean. Music is by Kenny. Beats Stay tuned for next week's episode with Richard Russell X._l.. Recordings just enrichment. Thanks for listening.

Memphis booker Booker T Indiana Otis redding High School Martin Luther King Al Otis motown Carla Thomas Booker T. Sam Cooke William Bill Tom Bruce Hoddlem New York Seoul Steve Cropper
The Do Real Men Recycle? Edition

Slate's Double X Gabfest

57:21 min | 1 year ago

The Do Real Men Recycle? Edition

"Hey, I'm Amy this the host of men up a new sleep podcast at investigates where we get our ideas about manhood each week guest will tell the funny, embarrassing or sometimes disturbing personal stories that will help you figure out what we have to learn and unlearn about being men also want to hear from listeners like you, as we sort through all of our own personal messages to get subscribe to man up in podcasts or wherever you're listening right now. The following podcast contains explicit language. Welcome to the waves for Thursday may sixteenth. The real men, recycle it. I'm HANA Rosen NPR's invisible in the New York studios. We have June. Thomas senior, managing producer of the plate, podcast network, hydrogen. Hey, HANA and Noreen Malone of New York magazine. Hi, noreen. Hello. Hi, so have either of you used the gender switch filter, yet, on Snapchat, which Noreen I know you're excited about, I'm not excited about it. I'm interested in it. I feel like it's some nefarious plot by the government to like, have all of our facial recognition data, like upload snapshot is we're all just giving everything away because we are so curious about what, like all of America's like gender curious where we're like what, what I look like as a man, like what, what I look like a wig with mascara, like humans are so easy to trick. That is genius. I love that. I didn't even think of that. That's very very. Very good. I've been going down official recognition rabbit. Holy was looking up like facial recognition mistakes. And you know, like states like Florida have been faked facial recognition forever. And the Bronx people get arrested or the way they do lineups with facial recognition anyway. It's all a little scary. But that's a good theory. That's a good theory. Yeah. I feel like whenever tech company has you do something fun and cool. And like, you know, it's, it's always a plot. Two years later. This is where I get to be the killjoy saying this is some serious bullshit, like the idea that, that being female means that you have, like make up. And like, you know you look so shiny, shiny and Dewey and being dude meteorologist square jawed and, and hairy, like, sometimes some, some ways, like, yeah, that's not it's, it's isn't a fairy as to, to give us weird ideas about gender, if there's enough areas plots going on. That's it. Yeah. Yeah. I was thinking that, that, like, it's very like in-cell view of the world. It's like man house square jaw. You know, it's like it's totally retrograde while seeming to be this very like progressive thing where everybody just plays around with gender. It's actually exactly the opposite. But I have to admit, though, that although I've never used Snapchat, and Shirley, never will, I am kind of curious how it would make me look because I think like oh, I've always wondered what I would like that. And I've never wanted to actually do it so. But I'm not going to I'm not going to my friends were sending around photos, and it was all, basically, like they're women, putting the woman filter on Snapchat. Just wants me to wear more makeup. Actually do kinda good. But yes, if it's an affair plot. And just just to say this is not journalistic evidence that it is it might be from the, the beauty industry. They're all in their all in coats. Yes. Yeah. Well, that's not even one of our topics. So, so let's move onto the actual topics. We are going to talk about New York Times magazine cover story by we'll Hilton about his cousin who tried to kill him. And what his life journey says. About American masculinity. We'll talk about the zero waste movement, and whether it's women's work also, we're going to talk about the abortion wars and the new creative boycotts proposed to oppose them. And then in our slate plus segment, June Thomas. Do you want to tell us what we're going to discuss in sleepless segment, we'll be asking is it sexist to criticize constant Swu the star of fresh off the boat for her so self pitying complaints that her series was, was reupped another season? Here's a sneak listen from that segment. America loves a diva everyone who doesn't have to work with the diva loves exactly. So I feel badly sort of for the people on fresh on of the boat, but made me like are more. Yep. If you would like to hear that segment and to support slips journalism, you can join slate plus the first two weeks are free goes to slate dot com slash the waves. Plus, okay. So in the New York Times magazine this week writer, we'll Hilton tells the story of his relationship with his brutal violent cousin who nearly killed him one day and through that story, his disenchantment with everything he learned about how to be a man in America, and how it ruined him now this S as much more beautiful in the reading than it will be in the retelling. But why don't we try and just lay out the basic plot points? I have to say, I think the essay is quite beautifully constructed. I urge all of our listeners to go and read it maybe even read it now before you finish listening because it unfolds in this way in which the cousin kind of hangs over the story, as this brutal mystery right like you see the violence coming. But you don't know how exactly or where it's gonna come from. And it just kind of bleeds over the story from. Beginning to end that is that fair? Yeah. And indeed from the title, which is my cousin was my hero until the day he tried to kill me. So, you know it's telegraph from the very title is not a mystery about what's going to happen. It's just the, the way that he tells the story, he manages to kind of hold you in suspense and kind of keep you driven toward the end even though the kind of, you know, it's a Colombo kind of situation where we know what happened, but it's all about figuring out why it happened or trying to do that. I don't know if he's quite a successful as I think he thinks, but we'll get to that. Okay. Yeah. I mean, the reason I described the essay that way is because I read it a few times, I loved it and thought it was beautiful, and it took me a while. It took me a few readings to love it, but part of what was important in my understanding of it is the way in which the violence, just kind of permeated the story, but was never fully explained Noreen. What stuck out to you about the essay they're the essay is a combination of? Kind of this long narrative of, basically, a single day mixed with a memoir of his life, which was his relationship with this cousin mixed with kind of these digressions about American masculinity. So which parts struck you. Well, first of all, I think I had a different feeling about the essay than you did, which is that I felt that it didn't quite earn its conclusions. But so, so let's walk through what, what he's actually revealing. He reveals a lot about his life, so he describes growing up in Baltimore. His family is sort of, you know, in some ways very progressive. Right. They have deliberately stayed downtown during a lot of white flight. But at the same time his father sounds pretty physically abusive of we'll Hilton. So, so that's his background, there's sort of this traumatic childhood, and then you know, he was bullied at school for being sort of nerdy. He has a complicated relationship. School because he's a. White kid in predominantly African American school. And then his cousin who I believe is from rural Pennsylvania, sort of almost like a cliche of American masculinity. Right. The cousin like the cousin collects weapons, the cousin, you know, I think he talks about how he's cousins body seemed as if it was made to throw a football right? The cousin is like brute force, enters his life. They become sort of strangely close the cousin does things like holds a gun to the head of a kid who's dating the girl that will has a crush on in high school because unlike is always a violent force. They go to college. He's like a deranged bully, like he lightly out of control. Is the way he described him. He's a bully. But also, like deranged a little bit like unstable there's just an era of instability, and unpredictability about him. Yes, they go to college. They said is to say that we'll goes to college and his cozinne kind of goes along with it and goes to another college. But then. If I'm remembering correctly. But then kind of. Yeah. Just kind of moves and joins him that which seems like it seems like a very, very, very close relationship. So in this way that almost seemed to be me to be romanticizing this period of life. They, they are very destructive. They party so much that we'll get kicked out of school. So they're the cousins paths diverge, the cousin goes into the army and will goes on sort of a seeker's journey. He moves to New Mexico. He grows his hair long. He gets tattoos. He starts wearing skirts around like Tibetan, Buddhist, monk kind of get up situation all around, and feels sort of free. He moves back to Baltimore has relationships with men, right? He experiments with his sexuality. And then he and I wanna talk about that separately needs to. I think that was sort of a I thought an underexplored part of the sl. But obviously it's history, he can tell it how he wants, then he meets his wife. He knows why from back in high school, but they sort of begin their romance in Austin. And it's very like gen X kind of thing or they don't really have real jobs, because he's a journalist traveling all over. She's a grad student these seem to spend their entire day, sort of exercising and cooking and being in nature together. Yes, sort of almost codependent sounding. And then they decide they're going to move to West Virginia after a hiking trip or Virginia, the then the decide they're going to move to the, like the blue flu ridge mountains of Virginia. God. Okay. Then they decide they're going to move to the mountains of Virginia, after a wonderful are you really criticizing yourself? Forgetting the mountain region. Feel like it'd be a bit harder. It might do it detail. There's just like I don't know how we're gonna unpack it without all the right. And I hate when podcast don't really tell you what's going on. Okay. So they moved to the mountains of Virginia, where she can't work because she is like a PHD in art history. So he becomes the breadwinner, and that's when everything in their marriage falls apart. He's working twelve hours a day more than he becomes the breadwinner. They like lapse into traditional gender roles and a pretty hardcore way. Once they have kids, so she really is home taking care of the kids, and he starts to this is what happens throughout the essays it, you feel like he's kind of jumps onto a track like he jumps onto kind of, like nine hundred fifty s husband track, you know, and it's like he's sort of finds himself there. And he's looking at himself in the nineteen fifties husband track. But he can't get out of it. He starts to feel all the feelings of the nineteen fifties husband track, which is like, alienated from his kids, he stays way as long as possible. He goes on month long trips like he starts to kind of in. I mean, a lot of this is about him, and habbing rolls that feel not quite right in his skin, which is I think what he's saying about masculinity. It's like you have these tropes, you slip into these tropes. And these tropes, are killing you. And so this is another one that he does is the one of husband and yet, and yet, I think he's, I mean, in his own sort of telling of it seems like he didn't just slip into it. You almost sought it out right in the same way that he then seeks out his cousin again. Right. Like after his period of searching, there is something in him where he just wants to inhabit it. I mean, it he's the one it seems like from the way he has told it, he's the one pushing them kind of into this relationship into this version of a relationship. No. Definitely seems to me. I mean, maybe I'm not sure if we're quite ready to, to get to our, our view of, of his kind of putting so much on masculinity. But to me, it was like, yeah, he made choices and every and there are times. When things were getting bad, that it would seem like he would as you said during he would seek out about outcome. He would seek out he would make a bad choice. And there seemed you know, that was of the pod light he sought out his cousin who had been such a destructive force in his early life. And when things were bad instead of trying to make things better. He seeks this terribly disruptive violent negative energy this end this person, and like finds solace with him and becomes, like his best buddy in this weird way of life. I can't even imagine about talking with him for hours at a time, like talking with him every day, this, this file in negative, man, what I hear you guys say because that leaning on masculinity, and the troops and masculinity, he's giving himself an out, he's evading his own individual personal responsibility for a lot of the choices. He made in his life. And instead, the essay kind of leans on str-. Lectures means on structures that pushed him in that direction instead of on his own choices. That's not exactly what I think, I mean. Sure. But I just think he's sort of under explored. I mean he underexplored why masculinity fascinated him. So. Right. And it isn't just that he's slept in or leapt into these traditional gender roles right. What he and his what he and his cousin bond over is like home repair, right this, like, I, you know, I took the electrical wiring out, and I redid the whole house, and here's the here, the products that I use, and they talk for hours and hours and hours about the like the tools that they use which is really sort of interesting form of male bonding. If you look at his career, and he, he makes reference to this he, you know, he's written sort of for swaggering men's magazines. He's he writes about. He writes a lot about the military about sort of heroic men. I mean he's obviously attracted to certain version to exploring. Certain versions of masculinity, and his professional life. And he does I mean he does of give you the clues. Right. If you were you know, he, he gives you his traumatic childhood. He gives you his exploration of his sexuality, but the latter question I mean, again, this is like, you know, who am I to say, but I sort of feel like he presents it in the piece, as just like I was twenty two and I thought I saw a handsome man across the way, and I thought, well, why not, you know, and I don't know. I would imagine that, that maybe wasn't the first time that he'd been attracted to men or been confused about his sexuality as an adolescent and, and could that have explained. I mean, this is very like one oh, one shrink. But, like, without of explained, like all of the sort of attraction to the most obvious versions of masculinity, that he was trying to work something out in himself and maybe still trying to work that out in himself, right? Like I'm asking him to be overly didactic and talking about the role that that played. But the way he presented like, oh, I just I dated men for a minute. It felt very like. None of it's time right now, someone like a twenty two year old might say that, and you'd be like, okay but twenty five years ago. I'm not quite shows. Exactly the same. See to me. I didn't have the response on. I'll just denser HAMAs question. I, I don't think he was excusing, but choices by putting it all on masculinity. But I think he he sometimes went to easily to masculinity. When when bad choices were whereabout, much more than that. Like I to me, he was telling himself stories, he was telling those stories and saying this is about masculinity, when, when it was, I think much more complicated than that. And I and that seemed disappointing to me because it had been this big complicated nuance story with this, and then the underpinning the explanation feels much too simple. But to talk about his sexuality to me that was more like, I, I didn't have that reaction to me. It was more. He, he is a man who tends to get into roads like to follow pass full more like to follow railway tracks and. And this was a period of his life when, when there was no track when he was just off. Wondering and he phoned you know he finds something that was actually quite meaningful to him. That was something that was like something that he just phoned on his own that he explored on his own, and then he got back on track, and it's for him, it seems to be getting on tracks and just doing what he's supposed to do that gets him. Imperil how you have been holding your tongue while we've been talking. No. I mean to me, this is just the, the most successful moving essay by man of the kind you read by women all the time, which is that in your soul. You are confused about which part of you is you in which part of you is social roles acculturation that you just can't tell and you start to doubt your own even something as deep as your own sexuality your own attractions, like your own desires and wishes because you just can't separate what the culture has. Is put on you. And what is you? So, so to me, this, this was just his life long struggle with that. And his cousin what I initially was frustrated by in the essay or what I what I found unsatisfying about the, the first time I read it was weight has cousins just mentally ill. You know. So it was hard for me to think of his cousin is like standing for something because the way the story, ultimately ends, you're like the cousin I thought it was going to be about the home set like his cousin found out about some Ghaith like something like that. But no his cousins just ill. But, but in the end I decided that, that was the most satisfying, because his cousin is just this like on loosed irrational force in the world that you're consistently drawn to that. You don't fully understand your relationship with, and that is ultimately, killing you, which is, I think the way women talk about femininity lot. And so, and so I think that's why I was moved by. Because it it's kind of unresolved. I don't think he knows. But there's just kind of a distance between him and himself, which, which I could identify with which, I don't I don't think I've read a man quite put it that way. But masculinity the way you put it the, the cousin is a force that he himself doesn't understand, or whatever. Very articulate thing you said, that's great. And that's convincing. But the fact is that his cousin isn't force is cousin is man destructive. Violent men and for me, you know and and he said in the in the title microcosm was my hero. And then yes until the day he tried to kill me, but why we he never, like okay it's the poll, but I have to say I know much higher many times. I read it. I don't think I could understand why he was so drawn to his cousin. I mean, and even know after his cousin, I don't have we even got to the point where his cousin beaten, you know, pretty close to death. Calls, very serious internal injuries, and yet will Hilton says my cousin isn't mentally ill. He just snapped and that to me is incredibly irresponsible that to me is like, if it was a force, if it was some sort of societal force, that's fine. But we don't hear like is his cousin locked up as his cousin. You know not that I'm all keen for being locked up. But I want to be sure that his cousin is not going to harm anyone else is his cousin still with his family, his, his wife and kids. Okay. Like that to me is, like, it's all very well to talk about this force. But this is a human that you have set up here, a very destructive human. Where is he known? Why did you let him up? So he's he doesn't say, I don't think he quite says, so baldly. He's not mentally ill. He says he's not schizophrenic, because the detail that led to him beating his beating will might have made you think he was gets a frantic. Right. That he was hearing voices. What, what he does is set him up someone who had had a pretty traumatic experience in the army and had suffered in. He doesn't sort of specify what kind of assault. But I be that's not actually totally doesn't really report that. Oh, says seems like he you know he admitted to that and that felt important, but yeah, I, I'm inclined to, to say that, like all if you've seen active duty or if or if you frankly, if you've been through, like basic training, you have probably had some trauma in your life. And I read it that way that the that you could you could actually sort of your thinking of like the traumas of masculinity inflicts, like it's almost like his cousin has had those two at the hands of the army, or, or whatever who knows where his came from deeper into childhood. I don't know. I mean, I think I think I'm kinda with HANA that he does he functions as both a person and a metaphor. Right. Because like we, I'm sort of repelled by the persona of the cousin. His wife was right. Why would you why would you be attracted to this kind of person who, who just wants to talk about tools and guns? Is right. But that is like there is, I think something in will that, like is just drawn to it in a very primal way, that I'm just not drawn to for whatever set of cultural and hormonal and biological, the Kounose. I just I do not want that, but, but I actually do think that kind of works. I mean, Honey, you kind of convinced me more about this. Essay, I just as an editor really hated the last like three paragraphs or so where he gets a little bit didactic. Unlike tells you what he what the lessons are that he's drawing about masculinity, and how he's trying to like, do it as a good father. I think it would have been much stronger. If that had been done with a lighter touch, like I just recoiled at the sort of like teachable lessons like hit you over the head. Here's what this essay meant kind of thing I did too. So this is to stipulate. This is a very good essay. It's like the kind of peace that you read that you that. Yeah, the, the writing is beautiful that you then cannot stop kind of chew. Over with your friends with your colleagues. It's, it's a it's that kind of piece, I just want to say, though, that I think masculinity became an excuse in some way. He you know, the fact that he reveals all these terrible choices that he's made. But he did make some really awful choices. You know, not always alone like moving to the to the woods or to the, you know, to very isolated Virginia was crazy. Partly buying off of a duplex in Baltimore. That was a complete, you know, money pit that was a terrible decision, especially when they've been talking about who they had no money and he's supposedly working, twelve hours a day because they really need money how the hell did they fly? Realestate now masculine coal, but not really is like there's these terrible choices and yes he puts this frame about masculinity. Which is it explains a lot? But to me, it's like it's it's over easy to say masculinity men, when you know, there are many, many forces at work here, and masculine, it's a very interesting exploration of muscular entity. But I think in the end he lent on the New York Times lent a little bit too hard on this the explanation for a lot of really bad decisions. I don't know that he's letting himself off the hook, but I'm very interested in the idea that like I think he's pretty hard on himself. And I think what he's trying to do in. This is put on public hair shirt, and I wonder what his wife and his shrink think about that which is incredibly judgmental of me, and I hate when, when people say that about us as women do. But whatever anyway. Yeah, I I'm all right. How are we wait last thing are entering an era of men like using toxic masculinity, as a? Way of getting out of stuff like oh, I know I did this horrible thing like but, but it's, it's the culture. The culture made me do it. You know, I mean, I don't know an I do, like even after everything I've said that maybe seems like a positive thing, ex- explore your circumstances. People explore the tracks that you put yourself on explore the excuses that you use. So maybe that's not a bad thing. Yeah. I don't actually think that would be terrible. I think you might be right in that we are entering such an era, but I don't think it's the worst thing you know, because it can only last so long eventually grow tired of it anyway. So listeners, my cousin was my hero until the day he tried to kill me. It's in the New York Times magazine by we'll Hilton read it and tell us what you think at the waves at slate dot com. Before we get to our next topic I just want to mention that on Saturday, June eighth. If you are in or near New York City, I highly recommend that you take the chance to hung. Out with us for a special. The waves meets outward brunch. At slate day. We'll be on the high line. We will be boozing at ten AM. Yes. Of course. That's why you live in New York City, and we will have some amazing guests. We will have MS crack an amazing drag Queen, who was a contestant on repulsed drag race. And also just just the first lady of New York City, Shirley McCray, and it's going to be an amazing day. You can learn more and get tickets by going to slate dot com slash sleep day, twenty thousand nineteen. That's June eighth be there. All right. Let's turn to zero waste. If you look on Instagram, you'll see very particular version of this euro waste movement, the effort to live life without waste or packaging, you'll see beautiful kitchens with, like Goumas homemade lavender, cleaning products. It's beautiful and particular and very, very time consuming, and mostly done by women. So how did your waist become another lifestyle? Women have to execute perfectly. I. Spent a lot of time on zero waste Instagram last night, actually in the last couple of days. How about you guys, I? So I, I think of zero waste is a Pinterest movement, actually. Right. Okay. Tell me. So tell me about your way since the grim. Oh, I like my heart dropped. I hated it. I was so sad. I mean, honestly, like like I lived in a hippy group house, I have spent my times in hippy group houses, they're disgusting. Like the idea that they're like beautiful. You know, the whole point is that you get some freedom from static labor. It's right point of just like you know, like, you know, putting your beans in a jar is that they don't have to look perfect so zero waste Instagram. Just looks like every other Instagram. It's just like really, really really beautiful people. With really beautiful hair wearing really beautiful clothes in really beautiful kitchens and accept the captions are just, you know, plastic kills the fish, that's zero waste Instagram is so fucking depressing anyway, because somebody school me on this. No, I got obsessed with this. I had never occurred to me that sort of recycling. Zero waste were in any way gendered, but of course they are. Okay. So I had seen for a long time, sort of bouncing around the internet, you there would occasionally, be a viral article about like this woman put everything she threw away for one year into one Mason jar. And of course, it's a Mason jar right? Like the symbol of like back to the farm modernity. Right. So it's like every modern convenience which yes granted killing the planet modern, let's just stipulate for the sake of this conversation that most of our modern conveniences are credibly bad for the environment. But so you're sort of rolling back, the call, though, I will say they were good for female liberation which talk about, like xactly was liberated by the washing machine and by the various like just earth killing things. That is also a part of this story. It was women and it's continues to be women in India and China and all the various places where modern conveniences are being introduced so that women can do something else, besides can they're fucking jam. Exactly. So that's step one of this. All right now. No, no, no. That's, that's like hugely important right? So, like, in this, it's, it's culturally fascinating that in this moment when women are like Megan, you know, just like running everything all of a sudden, there's a movement for. Yeah. Just like an old fashioned kind of kitchen thing to go on. And as a woman without a dishwasher. I say like this. This movement is not worth it. And then the other thing about it, if you're using zero waste, it's it doesn't matter for the environment. Right. Like you can make the argument that by being. It's not true. It matters a little bit doesn't not matter at all the new renounced gun well in a very, very like statistically insignificant way. Right. Like, like let's concentrate on changing emissions laws. Right. That's the thing that really matters, shortchanging cultural norms does matter. And that's a slow movement. And actually getting people to feel like, you know, a cool person doing it on Instagram, maybe does build up cultural cachet, but in a real way like. Whatever zero. Waste thing you're doing is about feeling at peace with yourself. So it's about for many of these women that seems to be about purity and perfectionism writing like I haven't sullied the earth I haven't sullied myself, and then making it about the earth allows you to not be selfish in your quest for purity and perfectionism, right? Like if it were, if you were so, I by glass containers to store my food end because I don't want plastic seeping into my food, because I. The winds is brought to you today by arm and hammer closed control capita. You know who I love my cats? I love kipper an SI prepare to go on vacation. I'm kind of preemptively missing her ho else will I be reminded of the joy of beating? No creature is quite as articulate about the goose Dettori pleasures as a fungal cat without kipah to remind me of the importance of taking time to kick a noise of little ball, down the hallway, we'll, I remember to stand up and walk around without a display of cat, yoga will, I know to stretch from time to time without cat sits, I would I have such concrete proof of friendship. I guess I love kipah but you know what? I don't love cleaning up. Kip is which is why almond hammer created new clothes control litter this no cloud of nasties. When you scoop, it's one hundred percent does free free of heavy perfumes. And it helps reduce airborne Danda from scooping. So what happens in the litterbox stays in the litterbox new cloud control capita by. Arm and hammer more power to you. Selfish and wanna live as long as I can write. It never occurred to me that, that was about the environment and I felt like do f-. But, like, I, but there's a way in which if you make it about the environment and not about your own, like insane desire to live forever. You're a better person, and you're like a more acceptable woman, because you're thinking about other people instead of yourself. I, I don't know. I just had this really strong like os, zero waste explains everything. And then there's the other half of it, which is apparently all these studies that I had never realized it existed say that men are less likely to recycle. Men think recycling is this girlish thing that in itself was fascinating because I actually think of environmentalism is a very male thing. But it turns out men, get all this sort of, like, you know, they're out in front of the cameras talking about big picture, environmental things, and saving the forest and all that. But, like actually recycling men are. Our weirdly, allergic to sorry, one Lonzo, I have so many, I'm just restraining myself here. Okay. So so one last thing about this. Is that men the, the sort of movement to cut back on your sort of consumerism? Right. This is not actually just a female movement, which is Icees zero. Waste is kind of part of that in addition to being about the earth, but when men do it, it's about financial freedom. There's this very famous blogger Mr. money moustache. There's a great New Yorker piece about him. My brother got obsessed with them a few years back. So I'm like onto Mr. money mouthwash, but he basically like wants you to be able to quit your job by forty by freeing yourself from the constraints of consumerism and like, you know, living in all these ways, we're you use everything, but that is framed in just such a different way. It's about being powerful. It's about like conquering, and beating capitalism and its own game. Instead of like just making having a small footprint as possible. That is the end of my random also being enslaved. It's like, yeah I'm just so with you because it feels like the, the number one crime, being perpetrated right now on women is this confusion between beauty wellness virtue, and commercialism like the inability to and power and the inability to distinguish between those things, and how in the end, it winds up feeling like enslavement somehow like you said, you know, and for not that big an impact, like for it's it is. I'm completely with you. There's like there's kind of a broad, you know, there are, there are things that happen when the culture gets on board with an idea like in, in some vague way. It's not that it's totally useless, and it's not that the individual acts are totally useless. Like, if you think of countries that are actually zero waste like the Scandinavian countries or that have adopted as you know, more, like zero ways truly recycle ethos. They have a lot less of an environmental impact, they pass better environmental law. So it's not. Not meaningless, but why does it have to be zero waste? Right. Why can't it just be less waste, unless it is about less seriously? It is impossible. No. Exactly. The word woman, led movement wonder if it would be that it's like anorexia of consumerism or something if you don't if you Cain. The standard see as you'll recall that was my ticket. Mary condo, too late. There are all of these, these, like these trends that, that people let John to that really are, but, like just being unreasonable just going to extremes in a way that like yet really paying attention to waste and not consuming things unnecessarily great. But why does have into a Mason right, right? And I mean right. Like, let us remember. No, sorry, do you guys remember no impact, man, who is the first zero way sky. I was sleeping von Lee back. There was like a big times Matt. I can't remember what major outlet he was in. But I feel like he was the first voice in the zero waste space several years ago. And then he wrote a book, which was called, no impact men's anyway, that headline was about toilet paper like it was gross. You know it was not beautiful. It was about him trying to live without it was, like I just remember the kind of like the feeling you had reading about the the lifestyle he was inflicting on his family was a feeling of daily grossness, you know. You know, like no paper like where the food was coming from. It was like, you know, he couldn't drink his coffee. It was like a grunt. It was just like a bear man, grunt. You know it wasn't the beautiful thing that this is now. And I have to say like shit. So we're now we've now been so critical of these lovely ladies. Well, here's the like it really is a to me. The problem is the extremism like so my I guess, laws on the west coast, who live in the, the in rural Oregon, and yet they can, and they grow things, and they are actually very self. You know, I've I I'm so none this word that. I can't even think what this is like self society, self reliant and you know what it basically that's their job. Like yet. They don't spend much money in stores. They don't buy many things because they make them or grow them, or but, like counting is such labor like picking the things and work. Looking for like a solid week, just with boiling pans and Mason jars, and like it's not fun. But then, yes, you put all the food in the cellar, and then you've got beans. And you've got pair like all of these things that, yes, it's something that people have been doing forever, and yeah, maybe it's useful to, to, like, keep that in mind and not be so wasteful. But, like I it's not a accident that I live in New York City like let's, let's I don't see why. I know like we yes, I'm all about these small changes being more conscious. But come on. If I wanted to be counting, I would be coming, like, we don't all have to come is, I guess my view of it. Well, and we don't all have to shop at H M, and like dispose of our clothes to wear, right? Like there is somewhere in the middle like, we don't all have to be your relatives or throw, you know, and step away from getting and spending. But, but, like, I, yeah, I have to say, I just this something always pops into my head that maybe isn't relevant. But I remember once being it's a store in England with my mom and dad, and it was a supermarket where they would just they just had the plastic bags change. No, because of the does the laws of changed, but they would just be plus take all the plus bikes that you need. And they would always take extra on. They put like one thing in a plastic bag and go home with, like, you know, twenty plus bags when they could see everything in one plus bog and, and rage me, as like why do you do the? And they said, well, there, why should we do? We've never had anything. Why shouldn't we get back and like that was silly? But, you know, they were poor and they just want. They didn't want to be the ones that had to give things up. So maybe we do have to light lead from the middle class, bourgeoisie, and like show that, you know what being able to have twenty plus tea bags is actually a desirable outcome, like that's not success. And it's not a matter of like depriving yourself, but I'm afraid that zero waste does feel like depriving yourself like just lift sensibly. Don't make it a contest. If any of our listeners wanted defend this euro waste movement since none of us have stepped up peas rights slash lecture us at the waves at slate dot com. We look forward to hearing. You know, I, I had queued up a kind of what I normally queue up and abortion, which to make a list of the laws in Georgia, and in Alabama, and then I subscribe to the Washington Post and I took the Washington Post in on the metro this morning because I didn't ride my bike, and I, I'm just gonna read, you is it, okay? If I just start this segment by just reading you. The, the newspap- this kind of I felt like the straight recitation of what happened in Alabama yesterday is more powerful than anything that I wrote up myself, okay? Now, Gabriela Bama, Alabama. Lawmakers voted Tuesday to ban virtually all abortions in the state, including for victims of rape, and incest, sending the strictest law in the nation to the state's Republican governor who is expected to sign it the measure permits abortion, only when necessary to save a mother's life and unyielding standard that runs afoul of federal court rulings. Now here's what those who back the courts, say it says, so this is the guy who wrote the Bill says this Bill is about challenging Roe v. Wade and protecting the lives of the unborn because an unborn baby is a person who deserves love and protection. So, so that's the moment we're at at a place where states states in the south also Hieaux are falling all over each other in competition to pass the most strict abortion laws that we have seen in a long, long time. And on the other side we have a real. Cultural protests happening with TV and film production companies saying, for example, that they won't film in Georgia, which has become a popular location for filming. Which by the way, I didn't know. Did you guys know that? Yes. No, you didn't. I have a friend that an actress alyssum Alano calling for a sex strike. Okay. So let's just start. I mean, let's just let's just state as the waves that this isn't this is a moment. We have not seen in a long time. I mean these kind of it's, it's so obvious that I that I almost have a hard time being afraid of it. Like I almost have a hard time. Imagine play out the scenario in which the supreme court even consider taking up laws this blatantly on constitution. But I think but I can imagine them taking up other laws, but not these. But then I think that, that is a big mistake, like so earlier when the, the so the law in Georgia, I mean, is there is this, like weird race to make the, the, the most extreme law? And until Ella Bama pastas law Gioja was in the spotlight because it completely rewrote its abortion law, and it has. As Martos of stone pointed in slit, essentially made it. So the women who, who take a pill to abort a fetus, which is the most common method of abortion, these days, or doctors who perform abortions would be subject to criminal prosecution. They could be prosecuted for murder, and other extreme criminal acts and then people advocates of, of ocean denied this, they said no in the in the Washington Post and, and has Mark responded. It simply isn't true. There are so many people who are denying the truth of these bills, because they seem, so extreme and you have, like the, the Alabama lawmaker, who you quoted who would just openly saying this isn't attempt to get a challenge to Roe v. Wade, which is cleared. The Georgia Bill is to, and yet, we we're acting like, oh, no. Nothing's Luca here. It's just just talk talking, this is just posturing this wouldn't happen. But you know what it will? It hasn't it will like the Georgia laws passed the Alabama laws. Plus, they haven't taken effect yet because they've got these like weird six month periods before they actually take effect there absolutely about getting a challenge to Roe v. Wade and I don't know why advocacy groups are, are so keen to, to deny what they are really a boat. And I yeah, I don't I don't get well here, there is actually a reason a reason which Emily Basilan will surely explain on the political gabfest this week better than I ever could. But it is it is that, you know, these the that the generally when, when the higher courts have a dispute. In other words, when there's a disagreement in the higher corns, but Georgia, and Alabama all in the same districts and so the, the higher courts are likely to strike, these bills down, so you need something a little you need something in which there's at least a veneer of disagreement, like the Louisiana law, which requires doctors who provide abortions to have admitting privileges at local hospitals. Like at least there there's enough nuance that there's something to. Date. There's like a win. There's an inroad like there's a way into that law. There's someplace where courts can disagree with each other. And this can make its way up and get slowly eroded like this precedent, which is cited that's labor law case, which is cited as a precedent for how the supreme court is going to take on abortion. That is slowly eroding. It kind of one little precedent at a time as opposed to in one fell swoop. Now we could be wrong, but it's like wiggling away. It's just about changing the conversation. Right. Like, like the this Georgia law. This Alabama law will never become the law of the land products now. No, it won't. But it but it's now in the conversation, and, and even little ways of changing the conversation like in Ohio lawmaker's are referring to, you know, second trimester abortions, as late term abortions, and that's not actually the medical definition. Right. Like that's actually when a lot of people find out about genetic irregularities. So the it's just little ways that the conversation is getting shifted. But so. Here's my question or frustration. I guess why is the left constantly reactive right? And reactive in, like fairly, in many ways to bid ways like the sex strike is not an answer to, to this nor in my opinion is, you know, boy, cutting Georgia, nor even in some ways is just donating to Planned Parenthood. Right. Like people unless have this ethos of, like personal action, right? Like we're just gonna do you know I'm, I'm gonna like give my fifty dollars to Planned Parenthood. And so I will feel like I've done something, and that is, of course, if you believe in abortion rights, hugely important. And yet, like the reason the right is doing is this is they have like planned out, you know, not tactic strategy for like years ahead, and they're working to state level and why why can't that happen. Right. Like where I mean sure shortly like donated miss an abortion rights groups gets you there. Part of the way those people work on that, but still I just the overall. Feeling. I have is that the left is always just like getting angry and kind of doing nothing. This is something that's come up over and over again, on amicus slates podcast about the supreme court and the law, the Dalai Olympic is the host of that over and over again, it just seems to be undeniable that the people on the left liberals, simply don't care as much about the supreme court. It's hard to get people to say that don't but when things like Merrick garland seat being denied him is essentially one of the big issues in the election. People don't float to the to the voting booths. It just seems that yeah. The liberals don't have that same kind of idea of the supreme court and the significance on the importance of the supreme go at the top of their agenda. No matter what they say, actions, don't seem to support that. Yeah. I also think this is all true. The things that you guys are saying, like, I feel like I don't have ground to stand on because I'm not sure, but I find it hard to believe. That there that there isn't an entire infrastructure of pro choice, political action groups that have been working tirelessly in Georgia, and Alabama for decades to prevent these things from happening in just aren't successful or don't have any, inroads, like Schorr, like our celebrities might call for dumb things like sex strike, or whatever. But that doesn't mean that, that nobody on the left cares about the supreme court or is, if nobody's saying that nobody. On the left. No, nobody nobody in their right mind would say that nobody on the left cares about the supreme court. But evidence, the support including the two thousand sixteen election when there's a clear reason to be very concerned about the supreme court and partly liberals didn't all vote them. Well, I also think it's like the way the electoral map work. Yes. Right. Like electoral college. Yeah. If I mean, even most Republicans don't care about abortion, as much as the sort of extreme wing of the party does. But that's the base rate. Right now, the extreme wing of the parties, the base in from you need those people to get out and vote. That's how you're gonna do it is by making abortion, an issue in the campaign, and the way that population distribution works in the United States means that, like, even if you care ton about, you know, abortion rights and the supreme court and you live in New York like you can't do that much about it and not to sunlight. I mean, I know this type is soda, I've like by six times, as a piecing slave wrote, but lily lift bro has a really strong piece in slate today about how these bills these, these things that pass in places like Alabama and Georgia can be traced to these increasing steps that Republicans take to, for example, in Georgia, disenfranchise, large sections of the population that the no governor Brian Kemp was doing all kinds of tricky things when he was the secretary of state, and was running for the governor of Georgia's. Like we seem eve. Even you know, in lily's piece just lists a whole bunch of these small little things that you can just kind of off, as I know. That's just some little little thing that happened in one stay or that some little sin. That's more just like a procedural problem. But there's just the whole pot of these things, I in many parts of the country, predominantly the south, but that we, you know, we conscious, right these office, like crazy people being crazy. These are real threats. And I, I understand the Georgia law will be challenged and the challenge will almost certainly pass, or the, the low will not be allowed to, but the fact is the legislature of Georgia. Best, an insanely restrictive Bill and Alabama did an all across the country. There are these bills that are passing. And we can't just like, you know, no, biggie. It is a biggie. And I it's, it's, it's maddening to me that we are also reasonable like that, that's not gonna be so what do we do? I don't know. Can we can we talk specifically about the response of independent film, companies because that to me is a is a good place to discuss the what we do, because it raises the issue we're essentially creating to America's where you have one, America. That's it was so like the cultural elite utterly dismissive of this back words place, which Stacey Abrams. Pushed back against, you know, she said, please don't do this. I mean, partly just out of love of her state, but I think there must have been some part of her, which might feel that this is this is not quite the right way to go and of setup a war between the tweeting, cultural smug leat, who make movies and Backhaus words, Georgia is not gonna help. Now I'm not saying it's not going to help. I'm just like that was that was the feel underneath this David Simon versus Georgia campaign. I do think there's, there's one there's an important distinction between even the chances of a boycott in Georgia, and what happened in say North Carolina when North Carolina passed its bathroom Bill. It's anti transgender bathroom Bill. There were a lot of calls for boycotts. And they were from individuals because it was about things. Yes, there were things like the NCAA NCW was going to, you know, not hold a tournament, there were, there were threat site. That, but it was also a lot of individuals saying, I'm not going to go to North Carolina. I'm not gonna spend dollars in North Carolina, and that would affect a lot of people with the motion picture industry. It is basically a few controllers at few big companies, and small companies people independent produces, like Mark and Jade, plus Christine, vet Sean David Simon, they can say, I'm not going to make my shows in Georgia, but the really big companies, you know, the big trade industries, they are not saying, we're not gonna make our, our movies, because, you know, it's, it's there are many, many. To make movies there, including most of all big tax incentives. So it it's just not the same kind of broad based boycott. It's basically in the hands of a few people, and I just don't see it even working as well. I think I Stacy Abrahams view is much more convincing to me than those people who in North Carolina said, don't boycott that it's different. I also think that it has a potential in the long run to be counterproductive. Right. I totally understand the impulse, you know, why would we reward state is doing this and yet at the same time if what if what is creating the political conditions in our country, for this kind of thing is the increasing sort of isolation of certain poor areas that then sort of doubled down on, frankly, retrogade values it, if what we're trying to do is like choke off any economic stimulus to certain areas of the country that only makes them more. Isolated more likely to see this all as a culture war, and if it's culture war, and the Hollywood liberals are, you know, are like hurting their livelihood than they're gonna fight back. I it just seems like a recipe for everyone just doubling down on their own side, and the conditions that have created this just getting worse. Yeah, I don't know what to do. I think really saying what's in these bills is something important, not denying. What's in them? And yet, you know, we're talking about the chances. It's not a relevant that the there's very little chance that they will actually take effect, but these bills passed, and they have, what just what they have conditions in them. They have that are really hard to believe, and yet they're there, and I just think like being realistic about what these things are saying is important. All right. Listeners, we need some good ideas of you activists out there. What should be done if these aren't quite the perfect ways to respond, if you don't want to deepen the cultural divide. What are good ideas of what one can do in the face of this unprecedented assault on abortion? Please. Write to us at the waves at slate dot com or tweeted us at June. Thomas at Noreen Malone, and at Ana Rosa. Okay. A recommendations Noreen. He wanted to first. So I'm recommending what has now become a cliche for Slade podcasters to recommend. I think you recommended it on. I think you're husband recommended it someone else did as well that the reason I read this is because of all the slate recommendations, but this could hurt by Jillian. Medoff medoff, M, E D O of. I, I tore it through it this weekend. What a great book. So it is it is a sort of humane look inside an HR department, at, like a data analytics, like polling company, just the most corporate environment possible. And it's an HR department, sort of indices Ray and like, frankly, the entire department behaving inappropriately during the economic downturn. It's great if you work in an office, you think about all these things that are so stupid and corporate jargon all the time and, and yet, they are the stuff of your life, and the way that your personal life, like, of course, bleeds into your work life and your work life. Of course, leads into your personal life, and she sort of takes the tools of not a chick lit, but, like like a Jane Austen sort of view of the world, right like social novel and applies at not to peoples. Love lives all though, you know, romances a theme in the novel but to their work lives and. And the way that owed office can become its own ecosystem. So if you're at all interested in novels of work, or if you work in corporate America and know that everyone has more of a soul than they are allowed to express this could hurt. Great novel. Wow. It's a very tender and strange and just such delightful book yesterday with you. Okay. So I'm going to recommend to books one book, which I'm reading which I love and another book, which I want to read an image, equally interested in the book, which I loved just called milkman. It's the third book by Anna burns at simultaneously, about Ireland and metoo. It just an oppressive relationship between a young woman. An older man was a man Booker shortlist, it's out in paperback, it has one of the most original voices I've ever read anyway. But for those of you interested in the troubles, it's it takes place in an unnamed town in Northern Ireland and is very good at the sort of background atmosphere. Six and it's just fantastic. The one I haven't read but him so interested in. So if any of you out there have read it. Please. Let me know if I should read. It is eve, Ensler snoop book, the apology, have you guys read about this yet? She's essentially writing out the apology. She never got from her father, who abused her for all these years. And I just love the way she talks about it, like it was I've never quite encountered, something like this, like, she never got an apology from her father. And so she writes one, and it is incredibly liberating for her. And I think that dynamic is just really interesting. So I've read a bunch of reviews about it this week and looking forward to reading it June. So I'm afraid mine is a bit of a cliche because I feel like a thousand times this year I've recommended things that I've listened to on the BBC I player radio. But the most amazing of the mall, something that I was absolutely obsessed with and kinda recommend highly enough was something I never thought I would certainly never never will read. Never thought I would even experience in any format. Was Warren piece by Leo Tolstoy, and it was done on the BBC in ten one hour episodes, and I was absolutely transfixed, and I kind of understood the appeal of this amazing Buchen. It's much too big for me to ever read. But no, I have a sense of what it achieved. And, and, and just the gripping story that it told and I just can't recommend it highly enough has some great, British actors Pattison Joseph Lesley Manville, John hurt Allen Armstrong, Harriet, Walter, and then some whose names, I honestly didn't know but who play the, the women of the family, and who are really amazing. It's beautifully done is this. I Don this new book. I don't if you've heard of it Warren peace, and it's in ten parts on just fantastic. That sounds great. All right. Well, that's our show for today. Thank you to our producer, Daniel Hewitt, a production assistant Alex perish for June Rena. I am HANA Rosen and the waves will be back with you next week.

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Should Barr be disbarred?

Skullduggery

1:13:10 hr | 2 months ago

Should Barr be disbarred?

"A Michael isikoff chest correspondent for Yahoo News and I'm Dan. Kleinman editor in chief, of Yahoo News and a quick reminder that you can follow us at skulduggery Pod, and by the way. If you've got any questions, thoughts ideas, you wanNA share. tweet right out us now. Let's get on with the show. The order came from William Bar early. Monday evening. The Attorney General of the United States walked out of the white. House spotted hundreds of protesters in Lafayette Park and ordered. Park police officers some on horseback to clear them out. What happened next seems destined to become one of the iconic moments of the trump era. The park, police and other federal officers on the scene you smoke canisters, pepper, polls, riot, shields, and flash bangs sending the demonstrators fleeing from the park, many of them choking for air, thereby allowing president trump to stroll over to Saint John's church across from the park, so we can hold up a Bible for a photo op. What does the scene tell us about his attitude toward the protests and is larger view about the use of federal power to enforce his vision of law and order. We'll discuss with a member of the house. Judiciary Committee Democrat Jamie Raskin in Maryland. Hamill talk to to Amazon whistleblowers about the revelation that the company prepared prepackaged new spots, touting its purported record for safety that wound up unedited word for word on TV, channels across the country corporate propaganda, masquerading as news all that and more on this episode of skulduggery. Because people have gotta know whether or not their president's a pro bowl. I'm not a crook. I told the American people I did not trade arms, but hostile. My heart to my best intentions still tell me that's true, but the facts and the evidence. Tell me it is not I did not have sexual relations with that one will be no lives. We will honor the American people with the Truth and nothing else. I'm Michael, ISIKOFF chief investigative correspondent for Yahoo News and I've Dan Kleinman editor in chief of Yahoo News, so we like historical analogies on this show and. I was inspired by our old colleague John Harris the editor in chief emeritus of politico who pointed to to. Events in a tweet this morning one was nineteen thirty two herbert hoover orders. General Douglas MacArthur to clear out the bonus marchers from Anticosti. Thousands of World War One veterans. Who'd come? They're demanding their bonus. Nineteen sixty eight mayor Daley of Chicago unleashes the Chicago Police on the demonstrators at the Chicago. Democratic convention in that year and now we have an event that will probably rank up with. With both of those and that is William Bars. In order to clear the protesters out of Lafayette Park, so trump can have that photo op at Saint John's Church. This one really struck a nerve. I think with a lot of Americans and in fact even with people inside the trump administration and we saw just today on Wednesday as we record this podcast that Defense Secretary Esperer. Spectacle has. Started to backtrack and backpedal and walk away from it. You know it was frankly there. Something obscene about it to US essentially military force, you know we're GonNa talk to Hunter Walker who was actually there but I believe there was national guard on the scene as well to clear a path to that the president can go and pull off a totally political stunt in front of a church in fun of the Saint John's Episcopal Church, the Church of presidents to both show a show of force to show how tough he is and that he's not weak. Weak, but at the same time brandishing a Bible to appeal to evangelical voters, we should point out that the Justice Department insists that the decision to expand the perimeter at Lafayette Park had already been made, and then it's only when bars strolls out moments before the president has that walked to Saint John's that he sees that hasn't been done orders that it be done, but we've got our colleague. Are Walker on the phone here? He was there that night saw the protesters as they were being driven from Lafayette Park. Hunter tell us what you saw. There's a lot of pressure I mean I. Guess the first thing to do is to situate myself I i. have been at the protest every day since they started which was last Friday, when protesters breached the barricades and Lafayette Park which is just across from Saint John's Church really between the Church and the White House off H street here in in Washington DC so I've. I've been out there every day, but you know I. You know normally report on on civil unrest in the streets. I'm. White House correspondent, so I get the White, house. Pool reports and essentially we either receives citywide seven PM curfew in Washington which has been instituted amid the violence and unrest. We've seen with some of these protests. I was heading down there at. Half past six, or so to report on the enforcement of the curfew, and as I was walking on the fringes of the park, seeing what was largely peaceful protest including no one thing I was photographing. When did it start? Young people who have missed their graduation in light of the Corona virus have been wearing graduation gowns. These protests I think to also highlight that sort of African. American people are often represented in more urban clothing when I following these incidents where there were killed. So, literally, photographing a couple of these guys in A. Graduation gowns and I start hearing these periodic explosions. These booms that we've come to know your Washington. It's amazing. How quickly this becomes routine. Are you know tear gas and Flashbang and again? You know we're of used to this. So I don't think it's a huge thing. And all of a sudden. The crowd is searching all around me. And I see this contingent of Park Police on horseback. And in front of them I believe or these guys in sort of black gear. There's a slew of law enforcement agencies on the streets in DC, now including the national garnered including. ATS and Ta Drug Enforcement Agents. I'm not sure who the people on the ground, or but the park police were behind them on horseback, and they just started firing the tear gas canisters while they were also hitting people with batons and shields, which really been studying about this in the You know I guess twenty four ish hours or Date is anymore. I think forty eight hours since then you've seen the park police. The White House, the trump campaign allies such as Fox News is Laura Ingram. Deny what we all clearly saw and say that there wasn't tear. Gas used to disperse these people from the park. Yeah, they're saying. It was some other chemical agents, but it wasn't tear-gas, although it seems a distinction without a difference. Yeah and I I should be clear up. Sorry I'm there so much again? There's so much to unpack you, but you know part of the reason I noted that I'm a White House reporter I was getting pulled reports from the White House. Press Pool as this was happening and. I'm literally seeing the email alert on my phone pop over these these images and I'm looking at through the screen of cheer. Gasping deployed employing me that president trump was on the you know was I, speaking in the Rose Garden, and then on the move from the White House to Saint John's Church, which had been somewhat burned in the basement during Sunday's protests so essentially, and I will never forget this time the according to Muriel Bowser the the mayor of DC the disbursement with tear-gas. tear-gas began twenty five minutes before the seven PM curfew, and exactly seven oh one with tear-gas, still wafting through the air president trump and his entourage walked out of the front of the White House to the church through the park where they just been cleared, protesters had just been cleared with the tear gas. Hey, Hunter! I think we've got a clip of that video. You made that night. We're going to play it now, so let's take a listen to this. Chaotic scene is playing out. Basically as the president is set to speak in the Rose Garden. This is the backdrop to his remarks. So I'm not clear. If those devices! are going all around me. Are Coming from the protesters from the police. Protesters have thrown fireworks. This seems way larger than that. Yes. These our police. Pepper And tear gas incendiary devices. So There's tear gas in the streets. Fifteen minutes ahead of the citywide curfew. As protesters are being pushed away from the White House complex. In advance of president trump's speech. I posted up the video because it to me in light of again the trump campaign the park police, you know conservative pundits, dismissing the objective reality I had this. You Know Ten plus minute unedited cut where people can see exactly what I saw. They can see the multiple colors of gas because again as you alluded to Mike One of the. Defenses here is that this was some other gas? This was smoke canisters. Those are usually. Those are usually white and less irritating. They can see and hear my own irritation. Even on the fringes of this they can see protesters running irritated by the gas, pouring water, so I. Really. I I took extra time and took the step of putting a long length of footage up. Because again we're in this place where people are trying to deny the objective reality and I wanted to make sure that everyone saw what I saw, so they can understand the reality is. Puncher, have you been able to confirm what the US, Park I think it's the park police. It said that they actually warned the protesters and gave them an opportunity to disperse on their own before they had to take more. Aggressive measures, do you. There may be a fog of war situation here where some of the purchases may have heard it, but others didn't. What do you make of that? You know and as I was saying. I think in this time of you know frankly misinformation coming from official sources, it's so important more important than ever that we journalists are really precise and detailed in our information, and as I was earlier, you know high was just coming upon the park at the moments that this began right so I don't know if potentially you know closer to the barricade between law enforcement and the protesters they had made. Made some type of announcement. I certainly didn't hear it myself and the other question I have. Have you had a chance to follow up with any of your? White? House sources because there is reporting out there that people inside the White House and they're saying this anonymously are appalled at how this all unfolded that this seems to have shaken. People who are actually working in the White House this episode. Dan! I A reporter value, my sources, I value keeping things off record. When I say they will be, and that is all I have to say about that, but what I will say is that you know the parks department. A lot of people are latching onto this official statements and the parks department that they used smoke canisters instead of tear gas and it's. It's a bizarre distinction to me. Your gas is more of a colloquial term referring to a suite of lacquer maters your attention, and technically technically you know multiple encyclopedias, and even the CDC identifies pepper spray tear-gas. Right I don't go that far, but but. But this was clearly tear-gas again. Yellow and white smokes the parks department said it's not what what my understanding is. The Parks Department has a pretty unique role in DC given how much of the spaces of the federal spaces in DC are under their jurisdiction, they actually are giving equal standing to the DC Metropolitan Police Department and people I've spoken to believe there's no way that this incident could have begun unless parks department had deputized other agencies. It was the guys in black ahead of the Parks Department officers on horseback who were deploying tear gas, but from what I've heard. There would be no way that. That parks department wasn't leading that. Even if that's not correct, it was clearly coordinated. Parks was unquestionably involved and I think you flight distinctions you know. Was it see six or another chemical? Lack remainder you know. Was it parks or parks behind in helping the guys who did it? These distinctions are way less important than the fact that anyone can open their eyes. We saw live television. Even Fox News is saying that protesters were tear gassed in the park just ahead of the president coming out for a photo op hunter, it's called an all of government approach, but I do want to Just tip my. My hat to the superb work. You've been doing chronicling what's going on in the streets of our nation's capital we you on the other day when it was pretty harrowing, after the looting and rioting took place, Sunday night, but your updates on what took place on Monday is are invaluable and Keep at a man and stay safe. How are we know you have to go? But you do have a little bit of breaking news, which maybe you can just very very quickly. Tell us about what you've learned from some of the protest groups. Yeah, I just want if I if. If you if you guys will indulge me, I, want to interject because Mike made a great historical analogy earlier, and there's one that I have been thinking of extensively in the past couple of days, and it involves Zimbabwe the late Zimababwean. Strongman Robert Mugabe and you know. When he took power in Zimbabwe in nineteen eighty, he was at that time at Darling of the left who thought that he might be this great African nationalist populist figure any hosted this independence concert Prince Charles was there to hand off. The country and Bob Marley was actually one of the head performers and he wrote A. A song for the occasion and there were crowds at the stadium and in Gob. He's troops, just a grisly aggressively to your guest, everyone. You can read about this in the Marley theocracy. Catch a fire and Bob Marley was apparently on stage getting hit with this. Tear gas. Just like you know permanently disillusioned. Him Somewhat unscarred him a big supporter of Mugabe and African. National Movements in general and I. Bring that up, just because yes, we have analogies to this in American history, but this is spectacles. That I've seen know within the past week here in. DC are really like something out of another country really. Really like these stories strongman that we've seen over the years but yes. Dan I'm sorry. That's not what you actually asked me. One thing that we're I. Believe Momentarily publishing on Yahoo is that a group of the protesters to veteran activist and actually a young woman was one of the park land. Survivors from Florida has come together. They form the group Cullum certain citizens and their airing a list of demands both national and local including charges for all the officers involved in Georgia Floyd's death charges for the officers involved in the march, killing Brianna Taylor and criminal justice reforms including marijuana decriminalization these. These people have told me that you know they. They've seen everyone chanting in front of the White. House we all have and they were very eager to make sure that there was a concerted and coordinated message, including demands to go with these protests and maximize well. That story is already up I've already tweeted it so congratulations and I will just say coming back to Bob Marley. One of my favorite of his songs was I. Think from the album survival was called so much trouble in the world. So that's where we are. The late Great Bob Marley hope there will be no burning and looting tonight and. Let's hope so stay safe. Take care of her. We now have with US Jamie Raskin A. Congressman from Maryland member of the House, Judiciary Committee and regular skulduggery guest Congressman Raskin. Welcome back to skulduggery well, I'm delighted to be with you guys. I hear as the republic hangs on the thread momentous times, so let's start out with. Attorney General Bar, giving that order the other night to clear the protesters out of Lafayette Park your reaction to what you've seen about and what you know about it. Well I looked at that scene and being a constitutional law nerd as I am I said they just violated. The right to peaceably assemble the right to petition for redress of grievances, the right of freedom of speech, and then also they really burden free exercise when you think about it with the president crashing church, and then wait in the Bible above his head, so I tweeted out immediately. The president just violated the First Amendment to clear the street, so he could go and violate the first commandment essentially created a God above the Lord of the Bible himself him and his political agenda and meantime wiped out the First Amendment Rights of all. All the people in the street and the event has really been a breaking point for I think millions of people across the country to see that we've got somebody in office who can act like just in an old fashioned tinpot dictator, and used the military to crush dissent move people out of the street as they exercise their constitutional rights, and then go and wave a Bible over his head. Now as you know, the park police is put out a statement saying that they had intelligence out potentially violent acts by some of the protesters that. Some projectiles being hurled at some of their officers, and they gave the protesters advance warning to clear out three occasions, and they refuse to do so well in America, we have a system of individualized due process, and we don't believe in collective guilt, and we don't believe in mass punishment. That's why officer show then should be prosecuted for second degree murder, but he's being prosecuted for manslaughter. They're supposed to the charges today, Congressman. A. Announcement that and then the other officer should be charged with aiding and abetting being honest, but the other officers on the force they should not be prosecuted for it, and similarly if somebody throws a rock and breaks the window arrests that person arrest that right wing provocateur don white supremacist. Websites that are sending mount their arrests that person and cart them off whoever it is, but you don't wipe out everybody else's free speech rights in the process that's completely phony and artificial and people understand that congressman, a couple of quick follow up questions on that event. One is get your thoughts about the role of the Attorney General Role, giving the order to disperse the crowd at my understanding is there were no law enforcement agencies are directly under his jurisdiction. Perhaps he was directed to do this by the president. President maybe the president has the constitutional authority to do that. But what is your reaction? Turn General bill bars role in this and then I want to ask you about the military role. After you've answer that question well. I suppose we haven't learned that much new about attorney general bar except the depths to which she will go I mean he's a fraud. He's a charlatan. He's a sycophantically the political hack. He has no respect or love through our Constitution and the thing that define our country, but the irony. Irony of course was that a week or two before he was posing as a great defender of the constitution against the governors and mayors who had public health orders that was too much for him, so he there he was egging on the right wing, who are showing up armed Melissa Mun protesters like at the Michigan capital, and saying that these people who are just exercising their civil rights and civil liberties. Then you've got hundreds of thousands of nonviolent peaceful protesters in the streets, objecting to police, murder and official. Official brutality, and at that point they revert back to their law and order norm, so to speak and decide. They want to crush the dissent, but you know law and order starts at home, and it's Donald Trump's interesting law and order he should stop pocketing millions of dollars from the government in violation of the domestic emoluments clause with all the money that they're directing his hotels golf courses every time they go there, and you should stop pocketing millions of dollars. Tens of millions of dollars from foreign princes kings. States in violation of the foreign emoluments clause what you make of the fact that Defense Secretary Mark Aspiration, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mark Milley General Milley were were present with the president's in front of Saint John's Episcopal Church milly by the way in full battle fatigue, the president has never distinguished between military and civilian authority, and would not be able to give you any explanation of how they're different for what the profit relationship is under our constitutional order. And we saw that when I think he was in Paris and witness a field day parade, and decided that he wanted to have the military perform like that for him in connection with the fourth of July he also does not. Not Distinguish between his personal political agenda and the official business of the United States. So this is why it's a work in a moment of tremendous danger as his polling numbers plummet, and he loses support all over the country and a big majority of American people have turned against the fraud of his administration. You're a constitutional law professor, your thoughts on the president's threats to invoke the insurrection act to bring in the military to police streets around the country. Well, the the concert analogy interaction actors never been tested in the Supreme Court I don't think it has been tested certainly not for a long time, and this goes back to I believe it's the eighteen o seven Thomas. Jefferson's administration, yes. I mean if the Congress had the authority to cast at it had the authority to it under Article Four. Section for the Republican Guarantee Clause I don't have in front of me, but it basically says the united. States so guarantee to every state, a Republican form of government, and that's not by the way a Republican Party form of government. It's a Republican form of government and that the state legislatures can ask the president to send out the. The militias to put down domestic violence, and if the state legislature can't condemn, can't meet than the governor's can do it, but all of it hinges constitutionally on the action of the states, the president does not have the power to order a military invasion of the United States or of any individual state or in the individual city or town which is why it requires the action in order for there to be a federal izing and a Deputies Ation of the Guard to go into the state. So you're saying the president cannot invoke the insurrection act on its own. It has the only in response to her request from one of the states I think they in order to conform to the constitution. Now the president does have the power to federalize the guard on his own in order to prepare or Or get ready for a crisis, but he does not have the power to send the guard into the states without the petition of the state legislature or the governor in the event that you can't meet although I think he may have the right to do that in the District of Columbia, which is you know as a federal? They've all right, and then that's. That's a different kettle of fish. Of course, because is congress exercises exclusive legislation over the seat of government, and the president has traditionally exercised. The is traditionally exercise that control so I think that's probably why they decided to do it in DC and to target the protesters there all the more reason for people in DC to get the hell out of that situation. Situation and to become a state, and to stand on a plane well quality well actually I want to follow up on that congressman because you grew up in Washington. I I know that you're a passionate supporter of home rule. One of the things that I think has not gotten a lot of attention. Maybe overlooked somewhat. The Washington Post reported that the White House. To, take control of the police and effort that mayor. Rejected, but would that have been legal I mean I, think as a federal clave law says that under certain emergency conditions. The president actually has the authority to do that. But what do you think of the White House actually pushing to take over the district of Columbia police force well, I would argue that that powered not absent congressional action it's. Article one section eight clause seventeen says that Congress exercise exclusive legislation over the district that has become the seat of government by the session of lands from other states, so private thing would not have any unilateral authority to do that. You know we know from the steel seizure decision that the president gets his Howard in only two ways, either directly explicitly in the constitution like he's got the power to veto legislation, and of course, then to suffer an override, his veto by the House the by the House and Senate or the president gets his power through a congressional delegation of power. So I am unaware that Congress has ever said the. The President can exercise unilateral control over the Metropolitan Police Department. And that was precisely you know the kind of government that that was transcended in nineteen, seventy three with the DC home rule act I, mean there were three commissioners basically rammed the district before nineteen seventy-three, there was very little electoral self-government popular self government by the people there, and there might have been those kinds of powers before and I seem to be Rick. recollecting some images of the president sending National Guard after the assassination of Doctor King to put down different kinds of protests, but I don't think that the president has that power now I'm not aware of it. I to push back a little bit on. Research in that, it'd be unconstitutional for the President to invoke the insurrection act on his own. Of course. It was last invoked by President George. W Bush in the LA riots in Nineteen ninety-two, that was in response to a request from the state, but it was also invoked by President Eisenhower in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven to protect the little rock nine the African American school children who were trying to go to integrated schools, and that wasn't done at the. The request of Orval Faubus the segregation as governor of Arkansas. So you know the the president may have the authority to do this whether it's wiser not is another question, but I want to come back to William Bar for a moment I. Remember I think it was no more than a month or so ago. That chairman Nadler of the Judiciary Committee which you're on had announced bar was Gonna come before the Committee for a hearing we haven't heard. Heard anything more about that sense. Why hasn't bar been called by the committee? Well, you know we're between a rock and a hard place. We assert an absolute congressional right to every citizen testimony and got includes the Attorney General and anybody else that we call traditionally. This has been a realm reasonable people negotiating. What makes sense I mean? Obviously we're not going to make him testify for twenty four hours, straight or something like that, but at the same time he must. Must Come and testify about what's taking place in the Department of Justice. The president has rebuffed I think over sixty five or seventy congressional subunits, and the man's for information and requests, and we are litigating all of this in court, so we know exactly which way it will lead if we started showing subpoenas to attorney general Bar, but did didn't bar agree to come well the yeah, I mean. He said he's company every time there. There's a reason camp come. You know whatever it might be. You know it might be Koga Nineteen or So we I mean he's demonstrated. He's not serious about coming before the House Judiciary Committee Congressman I I'd like to just switch gears for a moment here and talk about the seemingly intractable issue of police, brutality and racial bias in American policing, and you sit on the House Judiciary Committee, and after crisis like this Congress, often tries to institute reform through legislation, so let's talk a little bit about what Congress might do to deal with these issues and about specific. Specific legislative proposals that US support that you think ought to ought to Pasa-. One would be legislation that would ban the use of choke holds. Another might be lowering the bar for federal civil rights, prosecutions and police brutality cases talked to us about what you think needs to be done on the legislative front, and what you think has actually has a chance of succeeding great and I. See why you say it seemingly intractable the problem of police brutality it's. It's because it has been so historically entrenched that police forces have felt in so many places. It's so many different times in our history. That drafted Americans have no right. The white man is bound to respect as the Supreme Court so delicate. Put in the dread Scott Decision finding that dread Scott could not sue for his liberty, because he could not be a citizen within the meaning of the diversity jurisdiction clause, so yes, that has been the baseline pattern of. Of American history on the other hand, it is not intractable in the sense that we know exactly the kinds of things that to be done in order to make it better, and there are lots of success stories around the country. I mean take Oakland for example which used to have nine or ten police killings of civilians a year, and now is down to zero. Because there was the political leadership in place that said we've got to act in order. Order to address this problem and there are things that we can do, and generally they involve categorical bright line rules we do not use choke holds for example we do not use other mechanisms of its fictionalization as a law enforcement tactic well, that works that without one way that you work to dramatically reduce the killings of civilians you integrate the police forces too aggressive, affirmative action and diversity efforts that works, so you know we already have a list of about? About. Fifteen or twenty different things that need to happen if we're going to get serious about this problem, but do we allow police, departments, states, and municipalities to get there on their own or do we need federal mandates well I think we're GONNA need to struggle at every level of government at the local government, the state level and at the federal level, and I think history teaches us that. If you do it just at one level, it is not. Not Lasting and enduring I mean that's kind of the story of the reconstruction. After the civil war where you know, reconsider the descending federal forces into the states for the purposes of transferring land and or and voting rights to the the free play population to African Americans succeeded as long as they were there, and then there was a political deal ended, and then you know the redeemers took over and the many of the southern states most of the southern states. States just slipped back into all of the habits of political white supremacy, and here's a great book by its Wall Street, Journal in Douglas Black men. Yeah, slavery by name with which you know describes that process so I think we're GONNA have to do it at every level. Well we can do at the federal level is. We can be conditional to federal police funding that we send out to the states to make sure that their use of of. Lethal force is restricted to only the most extreme necessity and believe it or not. Most jurisdictions still don't have that in other words, they don't have a definition of when you can use when the police can use force or even deadly force against the population, so we want to define that very clearly that will be categorical rule, and then you cross that then all bets are off in terms of what happens to you, but we've got a a bolster and strengthen. Strengthen section nineteen eighty-three civil damages against officers, so they don't get off scot-free and by the way we need to do that against ourselves against the federal government, because the right wing courts and the supreme court have been undermining the so called bins. Remedy is your ability to get civil damages against police officers, FBI, and so on they violate your civil rights that's been whittled down to a shadow of itself, and we've got gotta greet some light back into that. all of these federal officers who are now unleashed on the street to understand that it's can't be a field day on the the people. How `bout as one condition requiring every cop and every police academy would be competently. It's going to have to watch the George Floyd video and describe exactly what those cops were doing. That was wrong. Well. The the video definitely has a profound effect on people are seeing it as you can tell from the hundreds of thousands or millions of people who've taken to the streets in non violent protests against. Against what took place and there are a lot of police officers by the way a lot of law enforcement people who are taking a knee and are participating in these protests, and so that's an important point to make, but generally your point is correct that the it's gotta be a critical aspect of training, not just treat people in a decent and civil way the way that you would want a member of your. Your family to be treated if they were to protest or they were arrested by the police, but also making clear to them, what the very clear criminal penalties than civil penalties are for violating it because they're in these cultures of life sensuousness in violence on so many things so many police departments for a long time, and we've got to break that culture and make people understand that all of us who are in. The public service are nothing, but the servants of the people and you don't abuse the rights of the People here in American, democracy visible are the masters. Is there a opportunity here for bipartisan legislation that could also passed the Senate as well I gotta say I was cheered by what the ranking Republican said today on the Constitution Subcommittee of. House Judiciary Mister Johnson movies. He started by saying that he watched the tape, and he could not conclude anything other than it was cold, blooded murder, and he said and I wrote it down, and I told him I was going to quote it on him. We need transformation transformative solutions for systemic change, so I I want to take them at their word here you know. Some of them have already decided that all they wanNA. Talk about is the Ludik and the the violence which is I think you become wrong way of thinking about this. You know there. We don't know first of all we're. The looting and violence is coming from it's. It's gotTa stop. And we were all opposed to it, but what the vast majority of people in the streets are out agitating for reform of the police department, so we don't get similarly excessive violence and antisocial behavior by individual backups back to attorney general bar. What would you like to see him do right now. What is he not doing that? You would to see the attorney general to at this moment. Well I needed that that is such a fantastic hypothetical. It's hard for me to wrap my mind around that The let's say we had a real attorney. Then he would take advice from you basically. It wouldn't happen, but but imagine we had a real attorney general like Eric holder, their colder first of all probably would be in the streets, trying to calm the situation, but then he also would be working closely with Congress to say, here's what his worked in different jurisdictions to dramatically lower incidences of police, abusive civilian rights in, and here's the package that we're going to send you over from the administration. We love to work with the House judiciary. Committee in coming up with a comprehensive package. We would not be on our own instead. You Got William Bar out there. As the conciliatory to Donald Trump figuring out how to shutdown protest out in the street when Donald Trump. Trump finally emerged from the bunker and figured he wasn't too scared to walk across the street to pick up a Bible. He's never opened a day in his life in wave it over his head you know, and all of that was concocted and choreographed by William Bar so William Bar in a better world would be disbarred for his repeated attacks on the rule of law and on the Constitution and the Constitution for William Far. Just like Donald Trump means whatever he wants it to mean for his political purposes on any given day well, the Congress doesn't have the power to disbar him, but then you have the power to impeach him. Is that something you would support? It, you know it's all a question of of allocating our energies at this point I mean we're in the fight of our lives here to defend American democracy and the constitution into civil rights and liberties of the people, and if I thought that was a productive way to go that there was any hope of it in the Senate in that might. Change the bellicose and belligerent in unlawful policies administration would do it, but I i. don't have any real hope for the Republicans in the Senate and I I probably don't think that that's the best I don't think use of our time right now. I got one final question on a subject. We amazingly haven't touched on. And that's the COVID crisis. You Represent Montgomery County which is one of the wealthier suburbs in the country, and yet remarkably as I understand it montgomery. County has the highest rates of Covid in the state of Maryland, which has very high numbers. Why is that the case and what is being done about it? First of all I represent Montgomery County and Frederick. Frederick County and Carroll County so I have both a suburban district very suburban, which is Montgomery a very rural district which is caroline kind of a mixed district Frederick? which also is politically kind of purple, she on in the middle full looking Koga, nineteen attack to everybody I mean I thought it was absolutely sinful and unforgivable when Republicans started to say that this is a blue state, disease or Mitch, McConnell said Oh. Oh, well, we'll let the states and counties and local governments go bankrupt. I mean that is the most unpatriotic sentiment I can imagine anybody expressing in the middle of played. You know now in terms of Montgomery County I mean I have constituents all over the county who have come down with covid nineteen. We have a lot of nursing homes in Montgomery County and we also have very large minority communities that have fallen disproportionately victim. Victim to the disease especially right around where I live in Silver Spring and Wheaton and Langley Park and so You know who's getting it now. The frontline workers and people who have to go out to work people who were living in more densely populated housing in apartment buildings. People who have to use elevators you know, congregate down at the mailboxes I mean it's just like New York City and of course in New York. Not just in a poor people's disease affects everybody and we. We've got to try to unify the country around fighting the disease. We need precisely what the administration is given us, which is a national public health strategy organized around aggressive testing contact, tracing quarantine, and then public health measures, and it's been scandalous the way that they've moved to reopen business and restaurants and bars without getting the virus under control, the very scary situation kind of crazy that the last question and the only question about a pandemic. You know taken the lives of over one hundred thousand American. That's that's where we are in this country right now. But Congressman! Good of you to give us your time again and. We look forward to having you back on the podcast many times in the future could I look forward to it and know that not my political party or any leader I support who's shoving around the reporters in tear taxing them right now are the media are the People's best friend, not the not their worst enemy. The thank you for what you do. It's no secret that our worlds has been interrupted. World interrupted daily Podcast, telling stories of coronavirus and its impact on the economy. We want to cover the issues in the macro global economics, stock market, and our political climate also cover the micro stories. Maybe the ones you don't hear as much about in the news media. We hope you'll listen and be. A part of the journey subscribed today on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. We now have with US Marin Kosta and Emily Cunningham the to Amazon. Whistleblowers. We had on a few weeks ago. There with the Amazon employees for climate justice, who had a lot of really eye-opening things to say about Amazon and there are new developments over the past week. Which is why we want to have them back Marin and emily welcome back to skulduggery. Breath, so what really grabbed my attention? We had the great discussion a few weeks ago. About conditions in Amazon warehouses during the Cova crisis, the firing of the two of you for speaking out about problems within Amazon Amazon counters beyond firing the too few by producing this video masquerading as a news report about all the great things Amazon is doing to protect its workers and this Amazon produced news report then shows up on over a dozen TV stations around the country I. WanNa talk about that, but let's play. Play some clips from this Amazon produced TV spot that aired as a real TV spot on some local TV stations. Millions of American staying at home are relying. On Amazon millions of Americans staying at home are relying on Amazon millions of Americans staying at home are relying on Amazon. Amazon has transformed its operations in response to cove nineteen to protect employees and keep packages. Flowing Amazon is transformed its operations in response to Kuban nineteen to protect employees and keep packages flowing companies, employees, safe and healthy. The company is. Employees, safe and healthy company is keeping its employees safe and healthy was. It's really it's. It's funny on the one hand, and it's really kind of terrifying other. You know. Is Sort of brainwashing in plain sight you know in and they decided that that was okay to just read that verbatim. I mean that's not. That's not real journalism and we should be very concerned that. That many stations and reporters and news people were willing to just be like fed like a fat boost. You know it's. Pretty shocking your thoughts, emily. Yeah, well similarly to It would be funny if it wasn't so appalling devastating, and when people don't have the real information, people's lives are on the line, and so it's not actually funny and Amazon's head of PR, Jay? Carney used to be a journalist for many many years, and it's really disappointing. When journalists turned to basically the dark, and are willing to spend lies and misinformation swore prophet rather than protecting both workers, health and public safety. While we know Jay well. We competed against him when he was in the Washington Bureau of Time magazine and we were. Working at Newsweek Mike First. Of all I gotTA. Say you disappointed that Jay? Didn't try to didn't send one of those transcripts to skulduggery. Field Day lampooning it. But I should point out that I did reach out to Jay Carney and the rest of the Amazon PR team last night to let them know. We were GonNa do this episode and asked Jay and his people a bunch of specific questions, one of which was on the scripted TV spot why Amazon felt the need to script new stories for local TV stations, and from Jeff bezos is perspective as owner of a newspaper. Would he ever permit? Company scripted stories to run in the Washington Post and. Did Not get back, but he had one of his minions do so who gave us a bunch of statements that I want Marin and emily to react to and the first one in response to the questions about the video, the on the record statement from an Amazon spokesperson, no-name identified quote, we welcome reporters into our buildings, and it's misleading to suggest otherwise this type of video was created to share an inside look into the health and safety measures. We've rolled out in our buildings and was intended for reporters who for a variety of reasons weren't able to come tour one of our sites themselves. What are you folks make that response. It's so transparent. It's like almost as even deserve a response. If Amazon really it wants transparency, why isn't it releasing the number of Kobe cases in its warehouses why it's not releasing the number of deaths of warehouse workers if it really cared so much about transparency so much about the truth, why aren't they providing that information? When it has been asked Berry directly numerous times by numerous news outlets, and I had just point out by the way that obviously the Amazon spokesperson did not addressed the particular question about why the? The company felt the need to manufacturer that video. Feed it to TV stations, but go ahead mark, but they also just always have their convenient glossed over response like you say it doesn't address the question. You know just like when you ask them. How many covid cases in their house? Well? That's not an important number. We're just not gonNA. Share that number, because it's not an important number or why we were fired, they broke numerous or any any of the eight people that were fired. They broke numerous policies. It's all so hand wavy and it doesn't. It doesn't sound truthful I wish I would make just clip of of all of the Amazon exact lugging around stumbling around, not answering the question of how many Kobe cases are there and it's like Oh, well, that's not important. What's not important is not important to you. Maybe but to those workers to their families to their coworkers do the public. It's pretty damn important and. That import everybody else's reporting numbers. That's all we hear all day. Long in the news is numbers so I don't know what's more, cynical or much more appalling, the cynicism of the Amazon. Pr Department put out scripts like this to. Local outlets, anchors or the news outlets actually running with it I mean it does say something about the kind of poor state of local news in this country, and their resources are pretty badly dried up and I guess they feel the need to cut these kinds of corners, I wonder, do you know if now that these outlets and these anchors have been exposed? have any of them come forward and acknowledge that what they did was a mistake i. Haven't heard that, but it's possible. But I I haven't heard that just to close the loop on the failure to release the numbers needless to say my second question to Amazon last night. was what can you tell us? About? The numbers of people who have been infected and died in your warehouses, working in your warehouses, and the response from the Amazon spokesperson on the record is our rates of infection are at or below the rates of the communities where we operate. We see that in our quarantine rates. Quarantine rates are a critical part. Part to understanding what's happening in the workplace? So they did not respond to the question of how many they simply said. The rates of infection are at or below the rates of communities. Where we actually question, not I would ask Amazon's. Let's have a third party. Independent Observer look at those numbers and analyze how they're counting cases, and and really look into that because I if they're not willing to release the numbers I think we should be very skeptical of any information that they're telling US exactly. And we know that that's true. It's the same thing that they also say that there bar lately seems to be. We are as good as the worst person in the room. You know we are at least as good as the worst person in the room. They say that for the same. That's their same argument for. Are you paying workers enough? Are you giving them enough sick leave? Are you know? Since when is Amazon's bar? That low I mean, they're the richest come down, but by the man and we're talking. We're talking about human lives. We're talking about people. These aren't just numbers. These are people's sisters and daughters and brothers and ankles and grandmothers. These are people that other people love and I. Think it's so important to talk about how racism is a part of this that indigenous communities in black communities are dying at such higher rates, and there's such a big portion of Amazon warehouse workers that are black employees now. Now there are people of Color and day are putting their lives on the line in right now. When you know, we have George Floyd murdered by cops in. We have this kind of disregard for Black and Brown lives I, it's just it's so. It's hard to stomach, and it's completely wrong and needs to be. stood up against so Marin Emily the other thing that happened. Is that Amazon held a virtual shareholder meeting and you're able to attend it. There were a bunch of proposals that were made I. Think you were able to have your voices heard a little bit. Take US inside a Jeff bezos Amazon shareholder meeting. What was that? Like? What kinds of opportunities did you get to have your voices heard? And what do you think it achieved the first thing that was very striking, and not surprising was the huge PR megaphone. The meeting started out just blasting about how Amazon is doing such a great job during this time of covid and keeping their workers safe. was that with videos? How do they? How do they blast that out yet? They played a video. Just video, but I felt like it was. Videos they spent. For how much time that the annual general meeting was shareholder resolutions were proposed and voted on. It was a huge, very significant amount of time, and it was. It was just infuriating. They had things like had a worker on Saint. Something like it's like a chocolate factory. Tackle, it was emily. Even overboard on protection overboard is so much safety happening. And so meanwhile, the L. A. Times just reported on the death of. Harry Santoso Kusan Evan reached out tomorrow night two days after the story broke of us being fired, saying that his had passed away four days prior, and he was just quote sixty three years old, just on the edge of retirement, it had a little bit more money before going into retirement and contract with Kobe and went into work, actually sick with Kobe because you know. Amazon doesn't provide health insurance. Many of US employees in died and infected his wife as well and so his son Evan, who contacted US didn't even get to say goodbye to his father. was his father's job. He was a warehouse worker. Warehouse worker where insight cornea and I think Irvine, California. Yet, he had just started another contract, so he was only a week or two in when when he died, he had always wanted to be full-time so that he could have more of that more of the benefits and more of the security, but he would always get off seasonally as the work went down, so bazo spoke at the shareholder meeting. Tell us what he said. Well I wanted to say to the other the other thing sides safety in the warehouses during Kovin the other you know megaphone moment in the meeting. Meeting was climate, so they were blasting about Kobe and climate and I think it's really interesting, because those are the issues that that we have been pressuring them on and in some ways it's really positive to think that it. It sounds like they are actually responding without admitting that they're responding to us, but they're. They're hearing US and responding to us, and they know that that those are the two places where they're week, so they're really trying to build their story that they're doing a great job on both of those. Say in the meeting. You was asked directly something like a where these workers and it wasn't just Martin who were fired for organizing for better working conditions houses was warehouse workers, actually that came first and have been fired for organizing simply for having basic. Safety conditions like cleaning the warehouse. Adequately I mean very very basic things. People were targeted and and fired her standing up and in Tim Bray the the VP the Amazon. Vp who resigned over Amazon firing whistle blowers. He mentions that the people that have been fired has been people of color or women, or both in all of the workers in his blog post were all warehouse. Workers were all black employees, three black men and black women, and then you have than Ihor two white women, tech workers, and so yeah, so anyways he was asked directly. Simple lakes are these workers being fired for speaking out, and he said no, and he repeated the lines that had such the last month. People can speak up, but that doesn't give them immunity to break any kind of policy that they want something like it was as Bray said his black host is brexit nation blog post, the justifications for firing Marin I and the other warehouse workers are laughable on top of that. There were fifteen shareholder resolutions. Off Fifteen of them were turned down and the response is always. You know from Amazon from Jeff. We're already doing that. It's sort of a real out of touch arrogance. Even in response to you know we had an environmental justice, environmental racism, shareholder, resolution and the responses. We're already taking care of. We're already doing that well. How would you know that you're doing that? When you're not even talking to the people on the ground, it's like they're believing their own PR spin, so one of the things I mean I, assume those resolutions get voted down because you just don't have the votes I, mean bezos probably I? Don't know what percentage of. Fifteen fifteen percent, and then you have these big institutional institutional shareholders, but I wonder if as part of your activism what you are doing or might do in the future is to try to organize among shareholders to see if you can make any dent there and and. Try to just a little bit of kind of shareholder activism, and whether that's a strategy you might pursue. The shareholder resolutions even when they pass their non-binding, but what they do, do send a powerful message to companies about the interns, shareholders, and so last year. When we did our climate shareholder resolution, there is to firms I'm forgetting their names, but they basically have ninety seven percent of the proxy advisor market. So you know all of the companies they don't have time to research all the different resolutions, so they hire these kind of firms to to advise them on how to vote and these firms. Firms cited with us on our Schaller resolution last year, and so it's really about I. Think Shareholder Activism. There's many different dimensions to it, but it's about sending a signal to the company. It's about, but it's also about mobilizing workers in the public, and because it's it's out there, and it has these very reliable things that okay, at this date that you, you submit the state, they have a chance to respond so that there's always are already sort of cycle built into it and so i. I I think that shareholders are important part of the Knicks, but I also think that you know workers are a big part of that as well as different community members, and so for this year we partnered with an organization in nonprofit I believe they're nonprofit in inland empire called C. C. J. and they are a group focused on environmental racism, because our research showed that eighty percents of Amazon's non tech buildings so like we're houses are in communities that have a large percentage of people of. Of Color in them, and so you had like twenty thousand trucks per day coming out of these communities that are hurting the long health hurting cancer rates are up all of these things, and if you think about young children being exposed to this kind of pollution, we have two people from our climate group who were raised in this part of the country. Right in this area. This zip code and one of them describes need. Their mom could not open the window when it was hot because. There was. A, like this black dust like on window sills in their home. If you can imagine his breathing in this kind of air every day, Harvard study showed that people with reduced lung capacity are more likely to die of Kobe. So this is all related, and of course these are in black and brown communities and are treated as sacrificial domes. We had two kids from VAT community. Speak each url. Resolution is given two minutes to speak during the meeting and we got a couple of them to join our. Our two minutes to tell their story directly and it was incredibly powerful. You know they have all of their friends have asthma. Their mom works in the warehouses. They don't feel that she herself is protected. They don't feel that her is valued. You know this is what they grow up with this is this is everybody's life in that community. You know it's really sad, also like Amazon say. Oh were being these jobs. Actually the jobs third bringing are not good jobs. Temporary jobs there be part Teichmann. Daydream are on your body physically hard on your body and no health insurance. As you pointed out the last time, contractors don't go a community agreement so if you're going to be coming to our community hurting our community, we need you to do these things to make it more manageable for us. When we had you on the last time you had some fascinating insights into basis himself You're a senior product designer. You said that in the old days Bezos was very accessible would even go into the warehouses and help. Package Some of the the items that people were ordering, but that he's become increasingly sort of removed and doesn't do that anymore. Was your sense of bezos attitude during this fair shareholder meeting? Did he seem to be taking the criticisms and complaints seriously was he brushing them off? Give us your sense, 'cause you know him of how Bazo 's seem to be processing. All this I have not heard any openness. Openness to this. It is all deflection I don't there is no admission of possibility that Amazon has done anything other than what is absolutely perfect. There's a real arrogance there, and it's not the kind you know. There was always an arrogance at Amazon. Then you'd have to have a certain amount of arrogance to get to the place where Amazon has gotten to Jeff, has always been like. We're not gonNA, worry about. Shareholders Wall. Street isn't gonNA short term value. We're going to keep going to stick to our guns in our path and our and our. Plan and you know in that has borne out to be true. He's definitely a great corporate leader. CEO I don't see him as somebody who understands how things land on people. He's not someone with a great deal of empathy or intuition about human beings, and the more he is allowed to sort of run free, and not have those checks and balances from people who do have the capacity to sort of see humans as humans, not robots I think he gets into really dangerous territory while Amazon has been very well position done very well in this age that we've been in, we are heading into completely different transformative time that our values are being reconsidered. Our priorities are infrastructure because scientists from around the world the. The United Nations have gathered changes. scientists are saying meeting transformation in our societies at all levels from our technology to our values, and so you know incumbents and people have been doing well in this time. Really really really need need to listen to others and to see what's coming. Because big changes are already underway and we're GONNA radical transformation I'm interested in that. Emily because I was GONNA. Ask you how you guys would define success in this struggle that you're waging and I guess the other question that what you just said. Props to ask. Is You know you talk about things are changing. People's values would be reconsidered transformational change, but bezos meanwhile is making nine million dollars an hour. He doesn't seem like he's changing a lot. I mean what makes you say that he is going to have to change? And what makes you optimistic that this transformation is going to happen? And is there anything that you have seen so far? In terms of his behavior or Amazon's is a corporation that gives you hope that things will change why hope is not will. Rely on my help about anything to do with Basil's himself I just look at the world me like if you looked a year and a half ago, degree new deal wasn't anything anyone knew about, and it was sunrise movement and other youth activists that took that by storm, and then you had the force the Democratic contenders for for President Hugh. Really push climate forward. You Have Greta Turn Berg, who started as one person in front of Swedish parliament, just one person with one sign, and now you have new millions of people around the world. World both huge antidotes on this is before Cohen when we could still march taking the world by storm, and you just look even product design and s curves as far as you infiltration you know before there was like hardly any cellphones anywhere, she and then it started to gather Lynn Boom. It just exploded same with electric vehicles. It used to be the sort of luxury high end sort of thing that people did, and now we're seeing automotive companies do full on full electric, and so this is where if you just look at the even. Even the market when you look at the market win, it's now it's not going fast enough, but the market itself is showing that wind and solar are outperforming oil and gas and will very quickly take that over. We're already seeing the a peak in an oil. So that doesn't mean that we don't. We still have to have the policy in place because we'll still have oil dependency unless we have the policy behind it, but this is where the entire world is shifting, and it needs to shift, because more and more people are waking up. Up to these extreme weather events, crop failures, all kinds of harm, and we know that it's only GonNa get worse and worse. I want to correct myself. I said before that Bay Zone fifteen percent of Amazon stock. It's actually I. Just checked eleven percent worth about one hundred thirty eight billion dollars at least as of a few weeks ago, he did have fifteen percent, but he four percent went to Mackenzie bays his ex wife as part of the divorce settlement, so just want to be precise about all things we say on. SKULDUGGERY Marin go ahead. Response to to that question, and and also in response to you know. Are We considering organizing shareholders? The other important audience at these annual shareholder meetings are investors, and what gives me hope is that we start to see money moving from big oil into or just out of big oil, because it's becoming a liability, people are understanding beginning to understand the concept of stranded assets and. Ensuring? These companies who are going to? Be In. Big trouble in the next. It's like as if you were in investing in its best or something like. Insanity like this where the world is going EEC these? Financial wonks on the news talking about how your they're out. They're out of oil and gas, have you? This is even before the pandemic started you. This is like oiling gas, brilliant, death-knell, new a when in capitalism when the money moves. The power shifts. Recently said that they had their cloud computing business in artificial intelligence that was helping oil and gas companies to accelerate oil and gas extraction, and they are now out of that business, unfortunately, Microsoft and Amazon still in partnership, and in bed with oil and gas companies, helping them in addition to find new wells that used to take. To find now takes about at eight hours row. Let me just drop in here I. Think Marin. You said when the money moves, companies respond well. The fact is that more money is moving to Amazon today I. During this Kobe crisis than ever before, and the company is getting wealthier and base os getting wealthier while his warehouse workers, some unknown percentage of which are getting sick We don't know, but it's an important story. This is a company that we are all increasingly reliant on during this crisis, so It was great to have your perspectives, Marin and emily thanks for joining us again and I will say that anybody who listens to this podcast. Will be one hundred percent sure that we did not get the Amazon. Public Relations. scrimped. and. Maren and emily were definitely off script and I. Think will remain so so thanks. Of course, of course we're losing the chance to get any Amazon advertising by keep having Lauren and emily on, but we'll take that hit. Thanks next to him abuse. Thanks so much. Thank you for telling the sugar real story I would say. Okay. Thanks Yahoo News. White House correspondent, Hundred Walker and Congressman Jamie Raskin joining us on skulduggery. Don't forget to subscribe to skulduggery on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts and tell us what you think. Leave a review the sure to follow us on social media at skulduggery pot. We'll talk to you soon.

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1016: Live from SF SketchFest 2019 (w/ Imani Gandy, Ify Nwadiwe, Carl Tart, Zeke Nicholson)

Yo, Is This Racist?

1:18:54 hr | 1 year ago

1016: Live from SF SketchFest 2019 (w/ Imani Gandy, Ify Nwadiwe, Carl Tart, Zeke Nicholson)

"Yeah. Joe what's up, Hello, faster tempo? For now. I don't know why the music or us, just okay. Great by. Hi, we're here. My name is Andrew two. You're listening to a podcast. You're listening to a podcast you probably right. I mean, good point. We don't know for sure I heard it could be a video my brain slammed face first into the wall ready. I was like I can do this. If I I think I told myself if I pretend that I have energy, I'll just have it. Yeah. But I don't I feel like that's how I got through high school just faking. Yeah. Just like, yeah. Hey, this is the show. Yo is this racist. Okay, fine. It's a podcast about racism racism questions. It's a hell of a special guest. Do what what's going on? See mostly you just got back from Vancouver. That's old news Andrew that happened long ago on Saturday. Oh, welcome home. It's just like I left it say the same. It's nice to be back. You got a birthday this week? Yeah. Everyone wish Andrew a happy birthday. To to the mole thing. That you immediately started singing, I would've why don't you just got to? He's just got if someone says happy birthday is time for the happy that. Wow. This is that's it. That's all that's happening this week. Right. Just birthday ear birthday birthday. Currently. What can people do to celebrate your birthday for you man rate and review on I tunes? Take the survey. Take listener survey. Oh, we got. We'll we'll do the last part. I it's just so producers it doesn't have to have a a connection. Oh, we forgot to do this. We got a pins in the merch. Pin? Beautiful cute, cute and beautiful. I mean, we easily could have had one to where today to take a picture for the I could have there's one in my car, but I forgot. Easy for some effort full for others. I'm not gonna go to my car ever wolves car. Now. Once we drive it here they own it for the duration of our record ago for the rest of the year. Okay. That's your wolves car. Now is this like one of those multilevel marketing things where they give you a car like Mary Kay. Oh, no. This is more like a cult situation. Yeah. I'm just signing over all my property to your wolf. Cool. Cocoa cocoa. What are you getting return? Peace of mind from podcasting. Sounds like a sounds incorrect. It sounds in Iraq. Oh, you really you. Really hit the skepticism wall real quick on that one. I was once having dinner with a few other podcasters that everyone was like how much do you guys talk about your podcast in therapy to be like you're burning up that expensive as time about this bullshit? No, this is my therapy. I know like my therapist, I need to talk about deep issues real shit this shit that is peddled out for entertainment as where I get through my surface problems. Oh, yeah. Then you can get to the real dirt on let me see it's alright, it's racism news time. Boy, I like this new this new marker for the segment, we clip out. It's racism news time. Yeah. Someone someone put that behind some music or something just use that as a drop. Yeah. We could be like the Doboy us what they do. Yeah. I did their show. It was really fun. Everyone. Check it out me. And my buddy, Alex Kleiner. Show co host of the supergroup. Yes, we had a great time. With those boys. We went to native foods. We did not have a good meal, but we had a fun friendship. And then Andrew nice all them again in Portland. So I was like I've now seen these gentlemen, three times savings dummies were friends in LA term friends time. That out the Doboy. Okay. So the first one let's go soft news. I right. I know they say if it bleeds it leads, but we're not journalists if vaguely comforts starts, so I don't know if this is comforting. But this is another way him police if it's familiar. Yeah. It's the earlier one good good almost that's almost good. So why from Massachusetts called the police on a black man dog for humping her dog at a dog Mark this was in Attleboro dog park in Massachusetts. And this lady he was mad that the dogs are aren't people can't reason with them. And the owner was like everybody's dog howls each other, and she was trying to get him to leave. And he said he wouldn't leave. And he's filming the whole thing. He's a former attorney. That's only significant because like he he knows the law. So I'm assuming he also knows the dog park rules like I think dogs just be humping. So let me stop you right there. I'll clear this up dogs be humping. Okay. Great fact. Great. So this lady was I don't know. Maybe his dog was helping her dog in a way that she didn't like particularly. But what ended up happening? She put this man's life. At danger by calling the police on him. Thankfully, nothing happened. The cop showed up, and thankfully, there was not an incident. But just got to say it when you call the police on a black person, you are disproportionately endangering their life than if you call the police on your I dunno, white landlord. So these petty things, I know you guys know this really I'm just saying it's you have the sound bite for your racist relative. When you go hang out with them. Well, and it's also like, you know. Jussie smollet is currently being accused of a false accusation. This woman is going to face and nothing. Yeah. And sure there's elements of it that are different. But also just generally speaking like why people who needlessly called the cops. Yeah. On black people or people of color, never face anything other than embarrassment. And even people argue the embarrassment is too much. Oh, yeah. People get mad that we have a video of her 'having terribly. And I'm like, well, then stop if someone ever pulled out a camera on me, I think I would just walk away quickly or like think about it like, oh someone else thinks this is news worthy. This is like broadcast worthy. Am I doing something bad? Just don't you. Don't be racist in public. Can I ask you have you ever called the police on someone? I'm asking you this cold. So no, even call the police. Call the police I called the police once in a public park because I was witnessing a domestic dispute. An I stoop I was really young, and I stupidly started to get involved. And then I was like, oh this is dangerous for me. 'cause there's a big strong guy. And he's like hurting this woman. So I called the police, but I was I remember being like, I mean, I remember feeling okay. About it. 'cause he was white. That's a terrible thing to say. But I was like this is not gonna die off this. Yeah. Chances of dying off this are infantile. Yeah. He could kill a cop. And the odds of him dying are very small drilling. Yeah. But it is. It's a weird decision that you have to make to get involved in something like that. I called the cops one time because I guess like, maybe it was a truck or something had left nails all over an intersection. And they were weirdly pissed at me that it was like, hey, this isn't exactly emergency of to know what else to call. But there's like ten thousand nails at an intersection right now. See I mean, it's kind of is ten thousand nails. All you need is. That's also what how I initiated the call. Like that. They were like, sir. You've a great voice. But please you're tying up the line. I do have a great who else. Do you call when there's ten thousand meals on a highway. It wasn't the highway. It was just like a street in. What is when I was growing up as a kid. I I would say, I don't know. I didn't know call three one one or maybe a nonemergency. I was it was the fact that I called nine one one. But I think they're sure I once called three one one on a possum that wouldn't get off my front porch. I couldn't get in my house. What is three one one non-emergency? Like, there's a power line down. Oh, maybe not every city. But in Chicago, four one one that's information. Because that the time is that the popcorn lady. Should he be trusted to God Deum struggling today? I feel great. Phone number. Okay. Let's. Speaking of a symmetric information outrage treatment Ilhan, Omar she is accused of using like anti semitic dog whistles in two statements. Now, look, I think it's like reasonable to criticize and point out that the language is dog whistle whether it's intentional or not like fine by ninety seven percent of the criticism level at her is wholly disingenuous coming from right wing people who support Neo Nazis. And also, you know, there have been plenty of actually people in ninety. I I saw tweet those basically like she's not even the most like outspoken like and not anti Israel. But like a, you know outspoken critic of Israel in the Minnesota congressional. Delegation. The other one's just a white, dude. Yeah. The blackest she's a woman. She's the Muslim. Yeah. She's clearly being singled out for reasons that have nothing to do with her statement. And again, it's just like awfully rich coming from people who against straight up support open Neo Nazis. Oh, yeah. You know, someone some Washington Post asshole racist road at op-ed that was basically claiming she's as bad as Steve king that is revolting as ridiculous. Maine. So yeah, I, and I, you know, so the I mean the hair to split is it's fine. If you think that if you feel those comments were anti semitic. It's not proportional. What the amount of criticism? She's getting right? And thus, you know, I mean, I think like just there's there's a line. And currently I feel the line is so overwhelmingly disingenuous in attacking her that like, look, that's that's them's the battle lines on really because there are so many racist, bigoted, homophobic, anti semitic statements to choose from among so many other white politicians. I mean, AOC pointed out, Mark meadows. Former statement that he wanted to send Obama back to Kenya. Like there's video of that. It's not that long ago. And that's like indisputably racist. Literally, he said, I want it. Let's send him back to Kenya. Or wherever he came. I'm so he like doubled down on the raise them. So that is indisputable. But his anyone is there is there a resolution on the floor about Mark meadows. Of course, not. No sorry. I I guess I should say not indisp-. This god. I mean, obviously, we're already in somehow plotter. I'm sure we'd fucked up something, but. What we say? Or what I said about sort of? I guess what? I mean, what the indisputable comment is that like there is much less dog. Whistle cover. Like look. I don't know Representative Omar, like, whatever I think, you know, her comments easily could be out of. Like of awareness ignorance, whereas telling saying Obama needs to go back to Kenya is only races. Yes. It is mentioned no ambiguity. There's no confusion about where he actually came from. Because you know that he would not be allowed to run for president. If he was from Kenya. So that is meant as a racial. It's clear. Who knows do say that? All right anyway, fuck fuck again. Fuck ninety nine percent of the people. Most vociferous -ly criticizing Representative Omar fair. I mean and speaking of Mark meadows. We gotta talk about him trotting out. Low shaking go wig Lynn Patton up there next to him during the oh my God. Yeah. Can you believe this week? I just had to look when I was looking at Mark meadows. I was like I also constantly very deep apologies to Mark summers. 'cause I in conversation this week, I have constantly conflicted that too and I keep saying Mark summers all week. Yeah. This I forgot that bright, AVI. Okay. So we clearly little disorganized because our brains do not comprehend time passage, but yet so once again, we have internal problem on ios racist. Which is like ninety percent of the people who listen to this podcast think we don't go hard enough on people, and we were to hand hold him Bubba where on the other hand. Like, most of them are not most some a significant portion of America. Can still wine about being called racist after they do racist stuff? Like trying out a token black employee friend to defend on Trump. That's like somebody said that this is like saying, well, Charles Manson can't be a murderer because I live my whole life known him. And he never murdered me. Yeah. I'm still alive. I mean, the fact that like some like d d minus like grade school argument like I have black friends, and again, employees, not even by employees is a defense against your obvious racism is pathetic. And, but that's the world we live in which is why sometimes I, you know, this show is just like sure it doesn't do anything to convince these people because they are such fucking bigots and idiots that they think that that's a compelling argument. But fuck. You know, consider this a podcast as a way to you know, gird, your loins for the fucking battle. That is evidently going to need to happen with these people. They're fucking racists. That's all I also. I mean, let's go over Mr. meadows. Yeah. Statement he said, I asked Lynne to come today in her personal capacity to actually shed some light. She says that as a daughter of a man born in Birmingham, Alabama, you guys know where all black people come from the fertile crescent. But for black people Birmingham, Alabama that there is no way that she would work for an individual who was racist. There's no way there's no way we've all worked for someone who was racist. Even if you didn't want to there's somebody above somebody, you can't if if any black person in this country could say that they have never worked for. I'm like, then you you worked for your dad your whole life. I truly don't know how that's possible. I'm gonna go ahead and say this woman's dad. Maybe not maybe not the greatest individual. But it was I mean it was completely insensitive. He did get called out about using a black woman as a prop which he did do that. That's crazy. Crazy. He like cried. When when he was accused of being sorry when it was pointed out the racist. Yes. When it was that this action was racist. Didn't somebody say he has a black children who cares? Yeah. That's also one of those people that think that that that insulates them for many races here. Yeah. It's it's it's I don't know. It's pathetic. They have no real arguments ever because they, but this is also why you can't let the, oh, it's just what's in my heart thing because that lets the racist dictate. What's racism, and no, no? I also want to point out. I saw a lot of tweets people were bashing Lynn patent about wearing sunglasses on her head. Did you see those people are like why she got sunglasses on her head this isn't appropriate? And I started feel weird because the the comments started to tinge a little like white people who don't understand black hair. And I know I just teased her for being shaken go wig. But she is wearing those glasses to hide the closure on her wig. So I'm just saying white people. Learn a little bit about our hair before you start going in. And at least go in the right ways on us, like a talk about her hair for the right reason. It's just a it's just a quick wig. She grabbed she didn't have time to really blend it. So it's just hiding. The closure. We've all been there. We've all been there. What I'm saying? So don't criticize glasses criticize the fact that she's showing up in the first place get outta there. And then finally in. Racists, and then come on Asian people news. So fucking Alex Jones was on Joe Rogan's show too. Big it idiots. Alex Jones, it is customarily heated terrible shit. He he said native Americans genetically go into group thing. He's a disgusting racist. But among the other things in his rant is he said that people have Asian heritage. When they get into a fight. They all there's a, quote, they all sync up and our robots and have no fear. And then, you know, basically, you know, went into this tired like kind of like essentially like this weird stereotype about Asian people being sort of like a hive mind kind of thing is that a stereotype about fighting. I've never heard any of this crazy is that a stereotype about Asian people in general, there's there's something to do with. I think it's like born out of like the World War Two sort of like, the kamikaze thing this idea that like, oh, see this is how could a culture these people are so mind controlled it. Just kind of you know, this this fear of collectivist societies and brings up socialism and all this shit anyway, racist trope, go to Asia everyone's terrible individual there. But. Not just like here for them. Yeah. It's it's everyone's in proportion everyone's dumb in the same proportions. Everyone smart in the same proportions. Everyone's nice and kind and terrible in the same proportions. But. Like, so then this is where listen, and this includes some people who are genuinely consider friends, but now on our friends a lot of people on a lot of Asian people on Twitter were like did the kind of like, oh, yeah, we're voltron. Like, oh, he let out the secret. And I would just ask Asian people if we could just when racist shit like this happens about us because because stereotypes about Asian people are complex, right? There is the clear negative ones. But then there's like Asian people are smart Asian, people know karate kinds of shit where like that big. It's you know can be like to complement. And then, you know, obviously, the smart thing is really just, you know, dog whistle for like, your, you know. No. Well, yes that too Asian people are nerds Asian people aren't like they're smart with numbers. But they're not, you know, so they're socially awkward, those those sorts of tropes. Right. It's it's not actually compliment. But again to me way too, high percentage of Asian folks are like we are smart, and it's like. Just fucking don't don't embrace that shit. I I hate when Asian people are like what ninjas are cool whenever like people like bring up like ninja shit as with relates to any Asian person. It's not actually cool don't embrace it. Just talking. Don't don't do it. Also. It's the tired take it is a little tired. This all I mean, this will always go back to me beating the drama of no-one's, a comedian one is funny. But okay, I'm just going to say, you're you're the thirty on this. I'm not well, you're more than thirty than I I just thought of this take. But isn't it? Is it some people's way of coping there for that? Of course, there is I'm too hard on everyone. I just wish that wish it was less. I would just like as soon as I saw this this Alex Jones take I was like, I know exactly what the first draft Asian Twitter. Take is going to be share. And we need final draft or even a second draft settles for second. I know what you mean because it is like the black people are cool tropes. All black. People are cool and strong. And they're like that denies are complexity and doesn't allow me to have a meltdown an entire perfect pet myself. Yeah. Well, the thing you see a lot in comedy is like, you know, black male comedians being like, ha ha there's a stereotype about us having big Dicks of unite do though a laugh like a cheap laugh, and then you're like. Yeah. Still not a good stereotype like don't do it. I just feel like embracing the stereotype, I I maybe I'm in the minority in a minority here. But at least that Asian sterotypes shit. I'm just like, I it doesn't work. You can't embrace it in a way that works. You know? Yeah. Especially if alternately the the negative side of that serotype type is you're just a nerd that has no creative originality when you show it by being a nurse. Agreeing with Alex Jones don't don't fucking give him that. And it's I don't I know. It's just a joke. But it I just hate joke. I don't I hear you. Maybe it just is like a think think about if this is really the joke. You wanna make don't let this be your first draft reaction. Just we could all do just want us all do better. That is very true all of us can every way Asian people. And I just wish wish we had better take. Sometimes. No, I'm sure that comes from a complex like you're talking about the stereotypes being so complex and wanting to at least embrace the ones that seem on their face somewhat positive to be like God, can I just diffuse the litany of shit that comes at me that so negative by at least making light of the positive one. So I'm and I get it. And I also get why it bothered him. Also, we're not all good at math. I'm better. I'm actually very good at math. What are black people known about with academics? Do we have stereotypes about academics? Assume they're mostly negative just that we are all. We're all here basketball scholarships. Well. We got a really fun episode or kind of wrapping up our we're we're out of black history month. Oh, happy white history. Eleven months happy women's history. My shout out to salons for drop in that album on the cusp betwixt. The two thus uniting them in a way that says white feminists, you could no longer leave us out. That's what I'm deciding her album dead. It was a political statement. Oh, correct. At midnight on the night that the two became one. Does that make sense February became March? She says Christ anyway, go listen to this passage of time. Anyway. Yeah, we got our amazing show from San Francisco sketch fast amount of candy if you wanna away call tarts Nicholson, it was so fun was very fun. We had a great time a great turn out. I mean, San Francisco's a great home to sit and talk about injustice, so. We I. Let us know if we were to me all the white people the audience, they loved just kidding, how many supportive nods that you can't hear. Yeah. Just imagine all the support of nights. After six years of phoning it in the boys of Hollywood handbook having new approach to their show. They're going to try just they weren't trying before weren't trying before effort full. Try hard rain. It did seem like because when you see them in in real life in the hall. They're very different. And then in the room. It's like manages, this seems like hardware. They're sweating. It so hard whatever this is what the paper says. Now, I'm going to try harder. Stone describes host Sean Clements and Hayes Devonport as two distinctly not famous people who give listeners advice on how to make it. In hollywood. Listen this month to hear the biggest guests in the show's history. Besides us like weird, Al and three other people who've already been booked ethnically. They've been booked already plus Stitcher premium subscribers can hear live episodes from their boys gone bad to our every Friday starting March eight. They're only trying for a month though. So if they start to crash around week three not their fault. It's probably guess probably blame it on the guest. Check out Hollywood handbook on Stitcher, apple podcast, or wherever you get your guests. Holy shit. Oh boy. Wow. This is a credible. I thought I thought you guys we're going to be mad about how many times I said, Sanford Frisco. She's a senior legal analyst for rewire dot news. She is one half of team legal. She host the podcast, boom. Lord. Please welcome Imani Gandhi. Hey, girl. Hi, everyone. Welcome. So you are ABA area native or just a local right now a local right now. Where'd you where you from originally Philadelphia? Oh nice. Really? Good. Good improv. Yeah. I mean, I've never had a good cheese steak. I. It's my fault because I was having them in Chicago. And I was like why are we trying to do? This don't do that. No don't do that. Don't do that. All right counterpoint. What they're all fine. Every tuesday. All t stakes. Don't matter. We are going to go to the next segment of the show the part that I'm going to guess everyone laws where we listen to people's wack ass voicemails about their racism question. Any of them were left by people who are in this audience. Did you get San Francisco specific ones? Oh, that is something I easily easily could have looked up. We did for Chicago area codes eight one seven six one two nine nine now. Andrew forgot Andrew forgot to write one down, and unknown unknown known could be and unknown very much could be none of these. Let's start with. Unknown where the hell are you? Let's go I'm white and I had about ten years ago, which was ignorant, and I regret it. But I really came started offense with this black woman who saw some old pictures 'em Facebook and got really upset, and then you realize that even though I took my hair down, I'm still causing harm through these pictures out into the world via social media, but when was removed them, I also realize that the leading those pictures, also or racism number of Portland relationship from my past, including a romantic relationship with a black person. And also, formerly made some friends, and like the people that I was spending most of my time with really large chunk of my life, and many of them were by people who worked at my hair, and I worked on there. And which is healthy. I mean, we were community, you know. So here's my dilemma, it seems to delete pictures of people that tagged himself in good times. And I wanna remember without giving them a chance to keep those memories. Feels wrong to reach out to people that have not stayed current with like an ex just a burden them with this conversation because I feel guilty or having had dreadlocks if you haven't yet when I should do with these pictures to hear that what is the most respectful way to cause the least amount of hard. Thank you. Thank you. All right start. The only actual right answer is a time machine to go back and never have gotten dreadlock. Exactly. That's the only acceptable. You've got a doctor who this shit. I just go back. Dr Who did or my thinking of sliders? Wow, that's lighters reference. Now, we have been trolled because this is word for word. The quantum leap episode where back in time to shave off his dreadlocks. This is true. Right. That got us. They got us this time, man. Okay. Who enjoyed that? That was probably the most distilled white guilt. We've had in one voicemail at a time that was so much. Yeah. What do you think this woman should do? I mean, she had the dreadlocks. It's a thing that already happened. I feel like I don't know maybe add a caption to the pictures being like, hey, I'm white and I should have had these injured lights in the first one. Racing them. I mean, you know, it's kind of hard to race pictures of yourself, especially if it's pictures from the past memories of people that you love, the friends and yada yada, yada. At the same time. It is a little bit of marriage to be out there white with dreadlocks. So maybe just put a note. Make me generator just putting big white letters. I should not have had. Yeah. That's something the face when you realize this was bad. Yeah. I don't know. These things like the goal going forward is like the least harm, right? So like having the pictures Mike having the pictures still out there in the world is like causing harm to some people because she said her black for now saw it but leaving. But also calling an ex and being like, hey, haven't talked to you in a while. I remember when I had dreads can you like that's also causing harm to the early interrupting that person's day maybe harm as strong of a word. It's emotional labor. Yeah. Someone with their white guilt. And sometimes you just don't want to write to watch sliders. Just wanna watch sliders on the DVD collection. I almost feel like shouldn't she if she has any pictures in her possession, that's easy to delete. 'cause then you don't have to contact anyone. It's just a personal thing just to lethal shit. Just leave. We don't call the other peo-, leave them alone. Obviously, the I yeah, it seems to it's just one of those things because ultimately the thing I liked about this question liked about. This question was ultimately, it was about can I delete shit off of Facebook. Yeah. Yeah. Delete the whole thing. Speaking of that's obviously the real answer. Does anyone here have enough power? Either hacker was or Facebook corporate wise to just go in and just like Photoshop other hair on this lady for her. Oh, just do that. Because that's why we're in French fringe Frisco right for the tech people. Yeah. That's why we're here. Yeah. I guess just I feel like she should delete things. And I don't really care if she like loses these memories with I don't know that I feel harsh about that. Here's my other question for for everyone on the stage. Like is. I feel like there's so much hand-wringing from white people with dreadlocks that it's kind of gone a little bit like this can't possibly be the most important conversation. Do you know is that my crazy like there's so much like, oh such a thing? I'm so sorry, like just like the prostate prostrate themselves. Straining themselves. I don't know is it like to too much like like this begging pleading for forgiveness is that like does it. Can't this be quieter? Just the caption being like, yeah, I recognize that it can be harmful to have dreadlocks, but I had them and I learned from. I think there's something to be said for not a racing all of the bed shit. All your bad tweets, your bed, Facebook's, or whatever. Because like show people that you've grown. You know, what I mean show people like, yeah. I did some dick things back in the day. But I've grown in. Here's what I've learned as opposed to. You're right. The endless handwringing really anyone any favors lot pick a position and go with it. I think and I mean her friend who got mad about it. Like, I think there's an easy way to handle that to be like. Yeah, I'm sorry. Yeah. I'm sorry. You get to be mad. You're not like, hey, just let your friend handle it and don't keep going to her. And like not saying that woman did this. But I'm a magic she probably did it just feels like there's. There's going to be. Shot out to Sheila, y'all didn't climb for Sheila. There we go. All right. Here's another second reminder. Make sure you write down your question. We're gonna keep harassing your asses until you do it. Okay. So sure background. I'm a lightness teachers teaches at primarily African American school. We're working on our black history month program, and we're singing lift everybody's which if you look on the NWC p is called the Blake national anthem. I've been calling it the black national anthem because I'm why but everybody else has been calling it by its proper name negro. I didn't know because it's not. Word, but it's pretty cool. I just wanted to hear some opinions on the closeness of the neck user and the appropriateness of please house. Thank you. You think he was kind of like the nigga nationally? That'd be pretty fucking bad ass. NWC wrote the nigga national anthem. She's trying to in schools. She's like, I don't wanna say we're national anthem. I laugh a lot at white people who think that the word negro is the word nigger, I think that is very funny because it's not. It's not that word of an I don't know you go. I don't feel like you need to redact the word negro. No. I mean, don't call someone. Exactly, right. Don't call some of that. But like just like the national advancement for whatever colored people like hall person colored person. But like, it's just the name. Yeah. I think what Andrew said it's a lot of just white liberal hand-wringing over thing that you could you could be hand wringing over way, more important stuff. Like, it just feels like this got to be this can how high in your consciousness could this possibly be? Maybe this person's hell awoke and the last last. Once I worked as negro nigga thing out like I'm good. She literally says like, oh, it's not the word, but it's close to it and blank. And I was like what's the blink national way? I don't know what that is. I didn't know that lift every voice was the black people national app. But like I trust the end Lacey pe- that's on their website. Like, also, you can have a conversation with your students about it because her classes majority black or entirely black already close the file, we're not we're not gonna listen back. We have literally I don't think we've ever once listed back. How could we we don't have that we play the Cape one time? And of course, I snap it in half. That's it it. So thank you for your voicemails. We appreciate. But I do feel like it's also an opportunity to like write the word on the board. And be like, hey, guys. How do you feel about this? Let's talk about it. And let them kind of. I don't know. How old they are? No, I'm envisioning this lesson with a white lady though Friday to black student. It's not ideal if she lets them lead. Yeah. No. There's ways put I think like all this stuff. There's ways to do it that are right. You can say negro in a way that is not you can save black in a way that you're like, oh, I know what you mean that African American to be honest, same African Americans. And also a lot of black people aren't African American. No, right. So they just call all black people African American. But now that's not necessarily. I can't remember where I saw this. But definitely like I saw someone write or say African American Canadian employees. You like you just that's what you know. American means black to you. Then this person. In American Canadian. And that's how that's weird. It was truly truly incredible. I once had a choir teacher on the in the vein of things that you're not meant to be teaching. But you do anyway. So if she so if this one wants to do her negro class lesson, maybe it's not a great idea. But I had a choir teacher when I was in third grade, we were doing a medley of sting songs. Back of ill. And the news ninety so that's right. When everybody was like sting tantric sex sting was analogous with sex in like nineteen ninety five or whatever that was. And we all like, you know, fourth grade or something just buzzing sting isn't that the sex guy like what? And finally, our choir teacher just turned around on the chalkboard. And just wrote s e x what do you guys think about it? All just like, I don't think we're supposed to have this curriculum yet. But it what like it got us to shut up about the obviously teaching very hard. But I do think there are moments. Where I think teachers take big swings and are prepared for the consequences of like, I'm just I'm gonna show these bastards. What's up? Kids are fucking wild. They'll beat you at anything. Oh, and in my stupid redneck conservative town. They won't beat you. They will then go tell their parents who will call the school. We got the damn RL Stein goosebumps books banned goosebumps, guys, the scary stuff in there is like slime, and like maybe a ghost of your pets as line, and it will relieve churches in the town where like this is the devil. You guys can't have Harry Potter books. Got the same tree cannot Harry Potter devils the devils. I do love the devil though. So. Who among us does? We're all. We're all widow biased. It our own ways. Oh, man. Well, obviously, we could have prepared for this a little better. But I'm just going to get right now anyone from the audience have a question. They want to ask a race yohe's this racist question, the ones that you are currently writing on your cards, which we know you're doing anyone wanna do one. It's okay. Yeah. Come on up. Come on up. We're gonna use my mic. Yeah. This is tight. I'm going to totally eat it. Oh, yeah. Co yet come on literally up where you go. What I guess I meant down there up. But yeah, come on up. What's your name? My name's Stephanie. Hi, Stephanie Stephanie. Here you go with your question. So hi, I'm white. I live in Oakland. That and I have tee-shirt problems. So I brought my t shirts. So these teachers that I love this is a visual negro. I don't know if they're cool to wear. Okay. I love this ready. Yeah. Okay. I'm going to narrate. Yes. All right wing out the gentleman's. This is a visual component. I love show. This is the best show we've ever done. I bought this grace Jones concert. This is awesome studio. Fifty four era picture of grace Jones with Hafer, boob hanging out. Okay. It's your hands. See it's in the back says her name says studio fifty four so that's one white lady wearing a half naked black woman's body on her chest round of applause, can she wear it. So trick a trick. I know but only because I want you to give me that shirt. Second one will see if I get to keep this one this illustrated by Mariam client, stall, who's a local artist, and this is beyond safe from the formation video flipping the double bird. Yeah. You can't wear that one. You want it? I want it. Are you giving it to me waiting? I don't know that one that one strikes me is different. That was that was a little bit different. Because it's so unique to black women, and it was so it's so current like grace Jones is kind of a throwback, and it's kind of vintage, but you know, I'm not mad at you wearing either of them really really mad unless you're gonna give them to me in which case, I'm very upset. I have I have a bonus one. Yeah. It's a little bit of a long story. But I'll make it quick. I was at a yard sale with my dog who has an all black head. This is important. And there was a little like somebody had like a little Tam with black dreadlocks costume, and stuck it on his head. And I took a picture and I was like come to our yard sale. Ross Henry wants you to come. And then both my husband over there Korean-American and a friend of mine who's Iranian. We're both like I think you should take that down. And I kept meaning to but before I did my twenty five year old niece. Got it put on a t-shirt. Oh, no. No. Why wouldn't why do you so many t shirt? What is you? Brought it. Okay. Good. Oh. Only wear it in the house. I wear to sleep. I can't wear this out of the house. Right. Yeah. You knew wouldn't want to this. Irv escalated because for sure that got to go. Dog even looks like he's like you shouldn't be doing this. Thank you. I'll get ready to. Thank you. That was kind of like brave and thank you for letting us like roast you a little bit. Holy cow. Well, let's do. Let's do one more voicemail. And then we'll bring up the panel panel got up from fucking Michigan y'all Tani pick one. Oh me pick one. Do they say the names on them kind of? Okay. I guess we're going to do. I don't remember this one. I don't remember it nail. It. Andrew and get I will try to keep this brief eye witness on art that use shocking or inappropriate phrases to nail home point that may be worthy in the long run or not I've always been a really big L of fellow fan. And I love the song Oliver's army. However as I've grown up. It makes me really uncomfortable. Second verse has align. All it takes his an itchy trigger. One. More widow one less white. Contract song is about the evils of British empire. And the phrase is used to the priority against Irish Catholic as a satire. They obviously really growth. So I don't want to be one of those people who things along the next cue to say that word, how do you feel about the message of the song being maybe in the right place. But using a phrase like that to try to nail it home help. No nothing about that's good. I mean, have you first of all it's not satire reminds me of the John Lennon. You know, women are the niggers of the world where you're doing is. You are comparing some Don downtrodden group to a historically downtrodden group and sort of like playing like oppression Olympics kind of thing. And I just feel like using black people or a word, that's denigrate. That's pejorative of black people to make a point about another white downtrodden. You just sit. It's all wrong with me. So it's not necessarily her. That's the problem, but Elvis. It was like to speak to him is he L out. It also I mean that John Lennon quote, also like ignores the fact that there are black women. They're not going to him. I guess JK John Lennon viewing sorry. Andrew. I hate the Beatles. Everyone. I mean, that's fair enough people love them that like they're fine. We don't have to Archaea. I mean, I there's a little bit of like. The especially with Irish folks where you're like that like the oppression of Irish folks in America went away. So thoroughly that is a little like it has to be just this fucking time capsule at best when which shit like this tried it out. And you're like, okay. Yeah. I blamed gangs of New York. Yeah. Right like unless you have like a fucking top head on in your time machine with the mustache like we're behalf. Era. So thoroughly at so many other euros have happened in the intervening years that it's just like just let it go. Gotta go. No it extended a little longer because I was still I think is singing about Iranian people in the UK, which is different. It's different deal. But it's still but still they're still not. Yeah. That's my favorite. So like ever every year around I'm gonna guess Saint Patrick's Day. Yeah. On the ios as racist. Bog? I get a bunch of Irish people being like. White people have been oppressed Irish were slaves, and it is like no y'all weren't for indentured. Servitude is very different than slaves and slave by other white people like what are you talking about fucking lunacy? Anyway, I committed say that there's a lot of things that people call satire that just is not like tire you have to be punching up. It's never never satire. It's just not. It's never and usually people are using satire to cover up. The fact that they made a really fucked up joke, and so they're trying to cover up the offensive. I was just kidding. How you doing? No. Is this woman asking if she can sing the song? Or if she needs to not listen to it. What does she asking thinks? She's asking if she can say that word. There's no, yeah. You can't say the word, you gotta modify lyrics. There's so many songs we all have to modify lyrics. You know? No, no, no. Actually. Yeah. Tony does mean, y'all. I mean, there's plenty of songs with the F word for queer people. Oh, oh, yeah. That's in there. We're not going to like am. I throwing out the whole album. I don't know that's up to easy for me to throw a elbow by probably never wants to. So who cares? Yeah. I mean, there's like David Bowie has lyrics sometimes where you're like, I mean, which one is life on mar five years. He's like he says the queer threw up at the site of the black or whatever. And you're kind of like whoa Bowie at the air right there. I know it hurts your heart a little bit. I mean. There's of course, like historical context shit. But it's like how valuable is it? I guess is the real question for me. And I've always netting out it and not that fucking valuable seeing all music generals. Just hey music. Andrew hates music. All right. All right. Did we hope that woman? I think we might have actually helped that woman. You know, we helped we helped Stephanie t-shirt shirt lady more than anyone else. I know. Thank you. To that. We should start asking people to bring weird racist shift from their house. That's a recipe for this. That's what I was gonna bring like KKK outfitted be like this. Buying out in the in the early two thousand I thought it would be funny to like EBay purchase like all the like racist Asian shit. So I have like a little tiny collection that stuff and boy that that bid did not age. Well. We've got some guests on the best thing about sketch fest is that there's just so many great people always around, and that you can rope them into doing your shows because we're like what else are you going to do besides get very drunk so comeback stage, and they come be on our show. So while you guys are passing those up. We're going to go ahead and welcome out our three panelists all of whom are from the sketch group improv group, he do both. Right. You want to be called sketch. Improv improv group, they're all from the group. White women. Please welcome Zeke Nicholson Carl tart, and if he Wadi way. All right. Oh, we got to go one mic for you guys. Oh, okay. The plight of the black man we deserved three microphones get one to split between us let. Yeah. Do. Two microphones. If you how you doing? Doing good. You know woke up hot Ray to go. I saw you at what feels like four hours ago Dave aggressively, mediocre Chinese restaurant in north beach. Yeah. It was bad all around. But it was after you guys Andrew did daily zeitgeist last night. Joe, you're really fun show Superfund. Yeah. We at that great plan of trying to convince them the servants beer after two. Yeah. Yeah. We went full high school. Yeah. The didn't work. Spoiler alert by enter the hardest. I've ever seen in my life. It was a hard. No. And part of us were like me, and my friend were there, and we were like these waiters hate us when iffy an Andrew show up. It'll. And then they'll be nice to them. And they seem to hate you guys even motive did not do. Oh, more hard Zeke. What's going on was up? Hi, how are you? I'm good has your sketch. Vespa I had a full night's sleep last night. Brag. So I feel good. I'm ready to let me say it'd be here. Thank you. I was just thinking, you know, what's pointing like we whenever you come out on a show. Like, this you greet the people that are already sitting down as if you haven't seen them before. Yeah. We saw you backstage. What I you like I hadn't seen you. I assumed it was for them. So they so what a friendship we right? Yeah. Yeah. It is a funny. Little weird piece of theater that goes on at the beginning of. Yeah. I don't know. That's just what was striking me in this moment. Right there. Peek behind the curtains or that was a fake ass hug. Carl what oh baby boy from the beautiful island of thing. I did not have a full night's rest last night talk about it. I went to the after party at the Speakeasy did a whiskey tasting. A few whiskey tastings tasted a few whiskies. What's it taste like in burns? It burns right now to beers in the saints plan right now that. There's a couple of y'all out here, and everybody's forty-nine fans. What is that? Dance is the the only way I could disrespect people in audience. You will not come on here and start sports shaming people. Oh, forty nine van. But now, I'm ready to party. All right. So thank you guys for being here and Imani. Thank you for staying. We gave her the option and she said, yeah, I'll stay with you guys. So we are going to get some advice, but we don't like to prepare things, and we don't want. I don't know. I guess we don't want to actually like be helpful. So this is called uncomfortably fast advice, which means it's going to be delivered real quick. We're going to ask you a question and give you a Brock's. Mentally what we decide fifteen seconds to answer. We'll go one by one. And whatever you say is I know gospel, and the people have to live by it over saying, correct? Yeah. All right. Cool. Andrew you got good job. Everybody look at all this question shit. Thank you for all the fucking questions. You guys are a hundred times better than Detroit. Yeah. One hundred. One hundred times better leash shit. Are there we go? Okay. Okay. So the way we were going to do this is I'll read the person goes. So we're going to switch off. Yeah. We're going to switch up here and watch the time. Right. Okay. So when I finished the question, you will have fifteen seconds to answer where mix it up this. First one is going to be four Karl here. We got person says my fiance's family is Jewish his parents and him are not practicing when we scheduled our wedding. We should've given typewriters. They. When we schedule our wedding. They didn't say anything now family members are saying they aren't going to come because we unknowingly scheduled it during a what? Jewish holiday this has mirror handbag, but. It's probably do holiday. Is it bad? If we don't change it. Fifteen seconds Carl don't change a win. You already schedule that way when you wanted to do it. They wasn't practice before why they want to practice right now. Win all of a sudden they want to practice. I don't like it. Have you win housing it? And that's it. Thank you. Carl this ask which Jewish holiday is it's the mirror handbag Jewish holiday. All right. I'm away lady who teaches social deletes who's this for the okay. I was ready to go. White lady shows Justice. Here we go teaches social Justice issues in my classes to a primary Latina class. Some of my students say they've never experienced racism. Can I tell them they have? No. That is correct. Nine seconds to spare according to the rules. You will be gifted nine seconds. At the end, you need it. All right, ready. If he your question, how cheeses quickly, okay should Asian American actors only take parts TV film that are written for their specific ethnic, background example, Chinese actors playing Japanese go care to the difference. Anyway. Keeping all the way funky. It's not me. I can't you know. But y'all can't live. No because that's just more. Because when when someone writes Korean American in the script, usually why do they don't know what they talk about pre. We'll give it to. Jesus christ. Okay. Monday tells about a time we were racist. Got it. That's just put me on blast. I called my mom dirty ones. But she is. You did it. All right. Never said. That about my mother, by the way, she's a lovely white woman. And I love it at death. All right. Andrew this is specific to you. Andrew what shampoo do you? None ever people. Don't. That's not if I don't do that. Don't do. I'm just greasy you shampoo. All right, Carl what's the least racist city in the US lease raises city in the US. Ooh. That's gotta be tough. Every city in the US is very race. I'm gonna go ahead and say New Orleans, Louisiana. I think everybody gets along there by the party and drink the Anna. That's my answer. Final question finance. Y'all do have that you got rid of that couldn't some of the confederate statues, right? Louis Armstrong, statues everywhere. Tony. What is what piece of financial advice? You have. Oh god. A piece of financial advice. Put all your money and gold bars. I don't know. My dad tells me that's why you wouldn't go and back thing. That's bad advice or get a higher business manager. Wow. All right. I don't know pick one. All right. So many questions. Okay, zeke. Yes. Can we talk about cultural appropriation virtuous versus cultural exchange? Also, Andrew you're hot. True true. Fan. So we can match it up. All right, Zeke abrasion versus exchange a quick, I think you need to consider the power dynamic differential in exchange versus appropriation, right? Like sometimes the exchange can happen between minority groups, but you still check in with the other group and make sure that you're doing it in a way that feels comfortable to them really time. So sorry. So so often oh. So sorry. Your answer was actually very good. And I ran out of time. So we can't count did. Did did have nine, but I had nine seconds for John. Got us on a dad. Also, let me give hot take on Andrews hotness. All right. All right. What's next? Okay. if you know if he what's the wrong for white people. The karaoke the wrong est song it's gonna be that nigga national anthem, right? Also sorry quickly. My favorite thing that white people do to sing those songs is replaced with word nigga with friend. So about friends in Paris or. The one that that that works, bro. Tip is. I like when they say Mabere because that works neighbor. My neighbor kid mother. Jiggle my neighbor as there. Do one thing took if he's time. It's it's it's a teammate. Thank you. I'm jumping onto yours later. Cool. We'll tell you which one. All right. What's up next? Okay. Tony is the Netflix reboot of Carmen sandiego racist. I haven't seen it probably. Yeah. I don't know. It's probably fi-. Hopefully, it's fine. Maybe it's great. Is it a cartoon? It's cartoon, right. I mean. Fucking netflix. Come on. Yeah. We don't try to trap us. About that. So everybody when that article came out, of course, everybody jumped my mentors like all shit teeth and Carl doesn't care to call the chief, which is based on the lovely late. Great Lynn thick Penn. Which is a great. He's done it on comedy, bang, bang on all kinds of it's a beloved character. We'll be so inappropriate from me. A man to go in there and immortalize this lead woman with very offensive oppression and fresh. Right. That belongs in the hallowed halls of comedy, bang bang. The place where Russia is entertainment. Just kidding. I go on there. All the time. I saw this. When I was like, I got to bring this up at some point. But I was watching the sources apprentice in my hotel, and there's a scene where they're searching for this like artifact or something and woman of Asian descent picks it up, and he's like trying to know where to go to Chinatown, and it just a Chinatown. And and like I was like why did they do that? The question is why were you watching your hotel? Well, because you know, it was on. All right. Hang. Okay. That is correct. This is free money. But it's a dress to celebrities. So so really to all of us equally. Yeah. A lot of ways it's import to knowledge. We're also everybody's okay. Yeah. Let's let's all take on our celebrity posture. This person is asking if we see you in the wild. Can we say, hi? Yes. You want your fans to say? Hi, sure. People go. Hey, I love your podcast. Yeah. Right. Appeals hard to miss rightly hard to miss. We talk about places. We don't want them to say. Hi, like, if I'm in the bathroom therapist off like therapist waiting room. Don't do that at the gym at the weeds store. I don't know. Place that you wouldn't wanna be talked to you by like, maybe a stranger don't talk to strangers. But otherwise, I mean, oh come up to me before there's quick story. So there was a shooting in my neighborhood. A while back it ends. Well. For what the shooting in my neighborhood, and the cops were just canvassing the neighborhood talking about like, oh, did you see anything anything? So this this black woman comes she's like, are you angry black lady are you on Twitter? I was like, yes. I love you. I'm like, okay. But who that murdered? So that was really fun of my Mike. Yeah. If there's if it's a crime scene. Don't talk to us. All right down the we say, hi where can people say? Hi now when I'm on a date with my side. When I'm on a date with Tony cause I'm her side. Yeah. The chief is my side. Zeke. When can we say, you could say, hi, I think just being read the room? If I am trying to go somewhere. You know, not in shitty way. But like, yeah. People will follow you. Yeah. Yeah. Not crazy. Crazy. It's just like it's the same things that you would want normal person. Hello. You can say it was to me anytime like always both be if there's like a small older Nigerian man next to just talk about dope by tell my dad, I'm up to stop. You know, just really helped me out. Okay. You want people to make you look your dad also had a cop story too. But mine was worse because he was like low key profile me. We're out of hotel in like, I guess some shit went down. And we're like, oh, let's go. Hey, I was like, yeah. He was like where you guys around here. Five minutes goes. I know he's like do BuzzFeed videos. Oh that is the best. I love getting profiled. And then it turns into a fan meeting rates. Because you know, he went back to the precinct told his boys. Like, hey, that guy drink milk in thirty seconds. Oh, he's always on your twitch. All right. Let's do some real fast. Holy shit. Okay. Only give you ten seconds now. Okay. What do you do guy says your exotic if you're black go find somebody else? Ding, real quick. Do you want to rant about cavenaugh? It is just a yes or no question Justice. Brett cabinet just as Cavanaugh could be heaven. Yeah. Yeah. And I have will again. And this person does say I love boom lawyer. Hey, everyone. Always Carl is it a good idea for white people to wear black lives matters in s fine. Leeann ally. All right there we go. Zeke where does the money get her hair done? Ask her. Listen to black women. Black women in the audience Orioles imaging studio, call her up hit me up and she'll hook you up. Nice. Is that an Oakland San Francisco? Oh, she works in San Rafael, the ultimate beauty salon. Okay. Hit her up. This is not about racism. Anyone can answer by buzzing in with a convincing buzzer noise. Not about racism, what was up with the audio for the SF podcast promo. What what was up with it? I just wanted to make that buzzing noise. Thank you anyone ever pitch for what was up with our technical difficulties. Probably Cody Sigler fucking it up because he knew we were going to. Boom. It's been in LA throw it up the last three days. Yeah. He's not. Well, man, you take shots at zig the answer to this question is, of course, we didn't care enough to make the audio good. Injure name your top three worst, Asians. I'm gonna go with my my aunt who married. Why don't go Michael? That motherfucker on Twitter that was talking about how we should forgive these kids, the racist kids, and Elaine Chao still we still handle late show. The worst anyone can answer this with the buzzer noise. What's good way to find new friends that are people of color without being weird about it? Yes. If he I'd say, you know, best best thing is to support black art. If you show up to like, you know. Improv improv show, peach route six black men, go out to karaoke with us after there's lots of black people there if you go to jockeys concert. I'm sure they'll take it there and just by shirt, just you know, just like if a trait in the natural way, infiltrate natural way was here last night. And none of y'all win. Shameful? This is a statement. I love it. It's written in marker. It just says white girls. Get there early to save seats. To weigh in on this one time. That is correct. I witnessed this all the time on a southwest flight. You know, and it's not specific to white women. But it is common amongst I would say, but just like they'll just be a person like a scarf just place like to save that seat y'all know how southwest works. If you didn't hop your little ass on your phone at twenty four, hours and one minute, exactly. Till your check in lawless. It's you don't get to have your friend goes save your seat. So I love I love to just be like, oh, I'm going to sit here. Like, I don't ask. I don't say that always someone sitting here that gives them a chance to go. Yeah. My friend, but she's back in the Seagram about your friend. She didn't sign up time. She never found out. Karen, karen? She took your c. No, they're wrong too. So I just go sit here, and I just smile away for them move their scarf. It works every time. But then so you just have to sit next to someone who hates you for the we use to. I assume everyone's mad. I'm they're just so much hair. They're just like. Here's a tough one. What makes you smile smile emoji? What makes you smile? Oh, don't say racism. Drinking beer in the afternoon. Yeah. Afternoon beers. Correct. Teething I'm gonna let Amani read answer this 'cause it's actually serious one. That's a good one in kind of an expert in this area. Are abortion restrictions race driven to a certain extent. Yes. There are white folks who are concerned about race suicide. And so I believe that they are using abortion restrictions. They're saying stuff like black genocide, and there's so many abortion the black community because they want to a strict abortion in order to get upper class and middle class white women sort of bit white women to have more babies. So I do believe they are raised driven. I don't believe that anti choicers actually give a fuck about black babies right there. We go. Why does why is it the more? Like you like breakdown stuff like that. The more seems like that, man. I forgot the show. You know, the Hulu joint with the with old girl from eleven twenty two six. It's actually real top. We are closer to that than you think. Book. Sad strapped gets. We also. Protection? Right. Oh, well, maybe it's time to ask this when we will hopefully have uplifting advice advice for win racism starts to make you feel defeated. Anyone have any advice for when we feel defeated constantly know that you as a person who color. Have you experience racism, you are the most resilient person on this planet? You can go through anything and everything because you are born and bred to do it especially for sorry for singling out. But are black people like since we've been here we have been so beaten up and so put down, and it's in our blood to just constantly keep continuing the fight constantly and also by gold chain. Also on real talk. I think that for black people like every day that you're alive and struggling is a day that you are being revolutionary. Yeah. And then my mind, I think in his very it sounds funny. But it's very true for me. What like keeps me in the game is like just like looking at black Twitter and how they can take the most fucked up shit going on and have fun with him. And I think that's just like a thing with people of color where it's like we've been struggling for so long. Your drink. Like we've been struggling for so long. But we're like all right. This will pass. Let's just have fun with it while we can. And I think that's something that I'm starting notice with our new woke hour is coming in. And they're like, why are you all not mad? It was like we met. But we also started die from high blood pressure. So. We gotta have some fun. I'll say just quickly I think seek comfort in other people of color and understanding that their struggle in many cases going to mirror your own. And I think that that is not raise specific. But rather anybody who sort of lived in an instance in which they've been marginalized I have found it to be very settling to be like you to. Thank god. And that's it. Yeah. If you see him on the street and to piggyback off of that. I like that too. Not quitting your struggles with that of someone who's marginalizing different way. But sympathizing sympathizing with that, I find really encouraging. So while you probably shouldn't say to a trans person. Like, oh, I get it because I'm black because we don't it's it's different. Everybody's is different. But it is very comforting to say like, I think I see what's happening to you in like, here's what's happening to me. And like we can talk about it. And then that bridges gaps and makes people feel less alone. If you can't find exactly the the black person are exactly the person who's your demographic. And for black people who don't live in majority black areas. Like if you're living in in a particularly white area. No, we do improv where? Where around our countrymen at all times. But like I have found that Twitter is a really great resource fine. Other like minded people and to just commiserate so social media. I think has brought a lot of black folks together. And that's why we're gonna take over or. That's why we found you drink beer in the afternoon. Yeah. Waste. And I think it's just obviously that every white person in here is going to need to hide us in the apocalypse. So. I guess get those extra rooms comfy protected if that WI fi signal need like a repeater. So the wifi goes into the secret bunker. Yeah, that yeah. That's good. Why people hide us? Yeah. We just we say allies, we mean like in a military sense. That's just want to very World War One the wording allies, just get them bad. Nets. Sharpened. What do you do with the band? Jesus. I don't know debate net. Look you guys for more information on what is or is not a bayonet. That's right. Tune in next week. Maybe we'll talk about it. This has been wonderful. I wanna go down the line and ask you guys to tell everyone where to hear see more of you. If you're doing more shows tonight that they can come to Carl tell these people. Dammit. Call on all things social DAM MIT REO. Ario bayonet is a fried doughnut coveted about a shout out. Up. That was great really great. Do you like to be around because that was great? Yeah. I'm at DJ's Zeke on everything. Yeah. If you already way, I why in WMD I E ON Twitter and Instagram if these on twitch, and he nerds in here. All right, cool out expect expect those twitch prime subs. I feel like that's the only way to get back at Jeff Bezos is giving me that free money from Amazon. I easy on Twitter. I will be on tonight because I got to play some destiny I got some weeklies to knock out and paying that is actually a video game character with guns for heels primarily on switch. All right. Those are the real nerds the rest did laugh at that. I love when if he talks half the time understand like thirty percent of what he's saying. Till at angry black lady on Twitter and Instagram. Listen to my podcast, boom. Lawyer you can read my stuff at rewire dot news and destiny. Well, we wanna thank you guys so much for being here. Thank you to a money for helping us Wade through these questions. Thank you to y'all for answering. These silly sometimes statements that you all of our audience for writing rewind. You did so much better than Detroit Detroit. No shave Detroit. San francisco. Thank you guys for coming out and supporting us, thank you to all of our listeners for being just great. I mean, this has been so great to have the show grow. And do these live shows that get bigger every time we go. I don't know. It's been awesome. Thank you guys. Just catch phase. Yes. Thank you guys. Hell, yes. Thanks once again to a Monte Gandhi. If you want to call, tarts Nicholson, they were hilarious. Thanks to the entire city of San Francisco. Yes, thanks to everybody thinks to our. We had some helpers come out for that show. Thank you to Julia and Alec for helping us out with some backstage needs. Thank you to sketch fast. Janet, Varney Stratton. They just run the greatest festival it's so warm and inclusive and fun and who so fun. It's it's you can tell when a festivals run by fellow artists and creators, it's just so like focused on making sure everyone has a good time and has what they need. So thank you to Janet for that. It was so fantastic. Go do that survey. Still you guys survey. Again, we're we have been made aware of various issues of it on Twitter where sorry do I can't write it for you guys. 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S1E137: SHMS 052820

The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

2:27:21 hr | 2 months ago

S1E137: SHMS 052820

"Yet include a one in the a good morning everybody got got lost each and everyone is a go back. Thursday is Thursday may twenty six twenty twenty forty eight minutes after the hour features Nj Long By. Kohl's glow way. You get your morning started right only place. Will you get your morning? Starting brand new chat room was Loud Dan calling the numbers five seven zero eight two six nine five zero. You know what it is broadcast. Radio DOT COM IHEART. Radio SHOW MORNING SHOW DOT COM. Connie Worldnet radio or podcast plot. Balm's at also the Almighty facebook live. So we're in the building like share the show with truly appreciate your singing. J on a throwback Thursday s to E. N. Y. C. J. In how are you today? Good Morning Shawn and doing great good morning to everyone listening. Have a wonderful show for you today. We are going to get started with from Patriot. News with Sonny J. I will let you know what's going on locally and nationally so make sure you stick around for morning Barbie you give mornings cine good morning. Everyone here am Bethlehem broadcast to you from right. Now it's about sixty eight degrees the highest GONNA be seventy seventy but it's to be cloudy in the possibility of a little storm storm a little drizzle here but there so it going to maybe light rain in New Jersey. It's sixty five degrees seventy four for the high and a cloudy little finally right now but it's going to be cloudy today so it's going to be a little year in knows. Your degree is going to be seventy. Three and same is a possibility of some rain Avenues you have go out. Please take an umbrella in Atlanta is sixty eight degrees at the highest going to be eighty once a day in the light drizzle and an of storms sometime in the afternoon sixty four in Chicago. Seventy seven cloudy and in Miami Eighty two right now eighty seven for the high. It's going to be studying the wall Sixty eight of Strasbourg and cloudy in Los Angeles. Sixty three degrees eighty four. The high higher mostly cloudy. That's where have for you all today. What's it look like where you are coming from the show have show featuring Finney J? Will you get your start exactly where you good morning started right only place on earth where you get your daughter right only place where you get all this morning love since you against your smartest auto you get the morning buzz. You're going to get the morning buzz today. And I guarantee each and every one of those folks that listening today that show head we'll be buzzing before nine. Am singer does us. You have for yes in the nine o'clock hour. I have sunny skies where I'm going to let you know what's going on in Hollywood and entertainment news. Stick around for that. Yes and they will be little Harvey House Sports. You guys state to say. Don't go nowhere because you know going to do. We're GONNA sing our anthem. Where's the heart set won't be going? Show you guys some love. Thank you so much for spending time with us this morning. We really appreciate your book. Were we do since? It's all school back Thursday road to back to the morning drive. Dj Nine TJ. The most dangerous stocks of this guy have to go and come back. I can't really hear Barbie right so hold on in Johnson. One A- everything. I don't know why have such a problem coming in and you're in now. I know but like every morning I had to come in like three just to hear Barbie own. I get some hyped. The iphone because remember when I couldn't open the APP at all. They had told me they were like they just did a up the iphone going in a different way. So that's probably why on forgot we're online. I what I'm saying that they are Barbie. Since they're not have this at the game was probably made on hand. Something else other than your enjoys android folks. Don't complain about it. Have nothing comes worry about. You know. They're fine with actually just a word. That's the ultimate goal adver over. We saw some reason would happen when you know using since the regular show then something has to go out injured team you know. Sometimes you ginger running. I hate that. Yes Jason just bite into even to blow out and drink. Ginger Ale Ginger and they can't keep the ginger on shelves. Your earth time to buy Jinju Cocoa Right. Every morning I salute in there's stall immune system today to keep us to strengthening episode. We gotta go back to those caves quota. Okay and how you talking about bragging about your immune system system as they'll don't ever guys are sharing the show to do just a friendly reminder like this show your wall you no matter of fact let me put on my wall. But Singapore we start us. That was daughter. Was Many parade Blah. Gives you a little something on the best mom ever directly from my daughter? I don't want to Brag generic fires at about fifty miles an hour. We didn't slow down. He is he gonNA say narrow fire he was like because I gotta go back. I gotTA GO BACK PLOT TWIST. They weren't really coming into my house no going to neighbors. He's achieved their balls organized. It that way up so sorry applied as that careers are reduced job. Driving around twelve year old house and bridge small loved to doing shout out to thousands of awesome wanted me and their volunteer department. Looks Okay did you did you. Did you ask this question? I see you have the whole hood following behind under the Family in France only big I would. I'm so happy birthday widow. I you know what? I'm just surprised that they were all on time. That is the old I was like. Please let there be more than one call and not be by Bob Bobbing. Because nobody's said that they were definitely GONNA be La- put out the invite and you know everybody was like okay. All that's nice. Nobody will be worry. Stuff happens and everything people Wednesday house think. It'd be like a while when I go out just to drive by but you know you have some that stopped. You got kids out. Just it looked like one of those videos about to go viral. Now you guys. You're but they wanted to say hi but it was good as you know. She had a great time. So thank everybody that came. It was really great called. That was behind defy. Sean the all black call with all Black Tennis. That was that was scary. Vehicle was my best friend. Red Cow All will total to take ten so called. That's how we ride though going to be a drive by for real this this chick got the drive by car car car. A YEAH HUSBAND. Three kids ask for personal out vehicle when she going out to have a good day a week from that husband and the kids. That's what she's on this show. This is when you put this when the husband put his foot down as as a as a leader of the how. You can't run around with your wife out there with Limo tints senior on a vehicle. That's dark colored vehicle will limo tents. Tech was too dark. Could you please relate to your friend now I would never hats. Take those limo tents or take take take. Don't drive a down thin. She'll go check me them again. I gotta go just darkened. They won't bother you but that was still. They won't bother you but darkening won't bound true but you know when you're driving by. I feel like cops that pullover for pull you over for ten like come on Bro. Like how like even if you get it like the same that you're supposed to get the right light. How is it any different than a shade darker just being condoms? Irving with your eye. You wouldn't know so you just blowing people over with ten inches beyond some kind of power trail go back to go back to the car and you gotta look very carefully. Go to the video at my friends. Purpose alone for us it was Q. That was a great look position Sydney. That was a great look for your daughter. God bless not a good look for your read. That is a particular car Barbie Cologne that I would. I would walk three miles before I get into a car. That has limo tints. All through the car of the Goblet look at black. May even at fifty five years. And I'm supposed to be at nine. Britain and black men age wipe pollsters. Say hello to me but in that cynically relay a message to your friend. I'm GonNa get you some dark tens and you've got a Red Card Sean. I WANNA get my senate and hopefully next week if I have time. I can't stand regularly. Bills Have Barbie has a black archer. She would've got on our. Bobby listen to me and this is not boss. Man. The website to regulate over there that household refrained from the dot tents on the black car. You're black female women on the Super Dr Annalisa to stop this. You have the manufacturer of windows on the call. You have a very nice car. Don't shoot my design. Tama student. Get a shake. That is as an excuse. This change the excuse to let everybody else know. Look at me K. You know I do. I think it's thirty five to thirty five hundred. Hey there bro. Glow you're you're a grown woman with a glonass of bigger grown as big giant Sun. Don't you don't mean you don't need the whole limo. You grown do not. I don't I don't go to do rby. We'd be right. Gone pulled them from ten. Thank God they can still see my car evening night. They can still see the previous call party. Cologne had had detects on. But listen leave. Leave you Carlo. Stop Stop stops this. You have a knife point. Driving around the black tend to the nice look. Real causes to art with two seconds documents to see would is converted as a hotel car but don't seem because a real man. I'll smashing the call without the tant. I'M GONNA make you walk by C. C. Put in that work. I don't get gross. The that is legal warning. You still fasting right. I'M GONNA eat a Burger today for you right at like twelve new. Do a chat room. Could you put a number one in the in the in the comment box if you for the Limo tints or number two this is this is totally ridiculous number? One Limo number two GOLIC's. Let's see what the chat say anyone every car I've had I've had I've never got over because they can still see in my car. No I fully from me. I don't do super dark. The is a black female driving in a black car or read Kara. Whatever car I had. I don't go dark like Dan or Cologne. This is not the comment for you and anyone else this black or brown to be running around with no black liberal tents or any kind of tents on car right now in the current situation. That's going on in Scotland. Please please be Michael Arm. Colo big giant of the power power shave your legs where the ones that come up your whole base number one ring some ears grown ass person and say you love the limo crazy in the streets or number two. You're grown responsible adult and you just drive your car. I'm not having on Turkey Burger. I'm going right. We're the world free ninety nine of the death cut it out the world's come into in eat Hamburg. Nobody wearing about Turkey. The Turkey Cocoa. She's doing because she missed the week. The borough please God knows Ala knows what's gone on a week so you don't have to make an gets coming. Would you want you trying to get an a plus plus from Allah girl? He knows you didn't. You're having come on the current climate. You know coke all over the place. Firefighters doing drive us for twelve year olds and women WANNA sound world. Joyce five guys is expose nasty. How degrees china-taiwan. Maybe they use. They used around me. It's I love it over here but they're expensive. You want you. WanNa everything separately. Pay The free base separately the geography here. Not The person. When I came in I got what order it was like. Whoa what will come? That's what happens when they African Americans go into Babylonia spot. Acton don't let me tell you I don't know why they're so expensive are they considering like gourmet. You answer the questions. You answer the question right this because they said they make patio. This could well done that. Saw cheap beef is they used at seven thirty BMW OR SIXTY FORTY. Five percentage of of would you cover? You should not seventy third low. Would you be interested in twenty eight? Allied like ninety seven three. You know a handwritten at princes trying to get April plus from extremely come on. Y'All point you won't Gob lesson he's choking on your rights are thank God like I normally listen. It's your out forty five to expect any degree sheet because right twenty six to six but job. We got city I got. I gotTA worry about spending cheese of getting a good boy walk out but I just wanted to say thank. God gives y'all the Barney show Josh flowers this morning and the wage and so this is your to do hold on hold on hold on. You still are past. This is a grown man a smoker marijuana. First thing in one Year TAKE THAT. Adra man feel you are you like Cj Hook Crew. You smoked allowed. You do the loud. How does that work? Okay listen what I got medical Melvina cataracts act up back goes out so I down so maybe I wanted to get extra so city. I have a medical marijuana card as well a well and it's not I don't have the stone idol run smoke marijuana while you're over there medical marijuana get your jerome. I have a medical marijuana card just like a joke. But what you reach Your Highness. Then you those time to watch the kids out here a give him time to do whatever they want to. If they get up at seven do there. They will still going on my daughter's working. I'm watching the kids a while. She worked on his Co. Could wake so our I get up. How movie here too hard for at I know I got a crazy thing. Why kids in Jim? Zoa Be meant to be offering paired with a five zero so scout buying so wait. Wait a minute. This is so when you wake up morning. You go your daughter's house and you watching your daughter's kids so when you wouldn't allow them in with the with the we when you wake up in the morning. This is the first thing that you thinking about like how how have been the one that you wake up and does that has a player. Eric damage herniated. Then my back so walk me because of that Flemish stories and I'm not taking pain meds or anything along. That by breakfast consists but a Komo. Sports tablets drops in the morning. When I wake up from my pain I take my pills by medical mel life. Just stop spot north. Because I'm not driving but they've changed stocks when pie fly. How does but Catholic? I should fine thanks to the city so sitting thing with imposing J. With America the medical marijuana card and going to the dispensaries and that you become educated on chemical of the marijuana which is chooses definitely educated ones but question to you is and then once. You've done a safe to say that you high as hell right now right where you know. I can't watch on Maryland. Happy so I WANNA coming now. Do you do you partake in the afternoon with marijuana. This morning Mike don't try and somewhere out and I'm in. I usually get my forty five minutes to our get behind the wheel again note. I'm saying Romney's stalking choking or when she saw the merged that rattle off more power to Ya. Cities is sounds sounds like literally. He doesn't want to feel the pain and and he's doing think well listen. We always you give me the name to your doctor. Brawl Card and one more day will and then one more thing set you can hookups in the Barbie will the guys do you work at the five guys let fourteen five God register so we get we we get the hook up? You know what I do. Know what nobody Barbie Barbie insignia grown women and whenever they come to New York they will pay full price. Would invert the hook. You don't speak for drew. Oh really like free nights do what you gotta do talk to Drew Ponte five guys. My taste puzzle won't allow me to have five of the Finnish blood before they understand. And it's not brow interfering. You finish finishing your lighten finish kids. Don't also I think pointed this. GotTa get back into the of a shit so things student waste. Who Do this thing about the community peanuts? I talk a lot about his dealer smashing. Gluco the direction. The show is going now. Drew through right keeping damage. That is really the x Ray from the X ray. Goblets loved drew. We love you work girl where you at it is. I didn't even know we left. But we are back. It's a throwback. Thursday may twenty eight point nine twenty eighteen minutes after the hour. Welcome back to kicks in new wing this morning. Starting right chat rooms is wide open. Or if you dare call in the number seven zero nine eight nine five to a broadcasting live radio. Dot Com radio show him on the show dot com comedy world net radio or podcast platforms in all my facebook. Please like in share the show we truly appreciate. Bonn Cologne on a throwback Thursday. A good to see you in. What's the weather away home? Bobby castellet Chen. I want to make sure that cocoa didn't Tacky A. It okay where goofy gop tumbling bobbing weaving Sh. Hey yes here. In Bethlehem guys. It is sixty eight degrees. The highest going to be seventy seven a little. Cloudy with the Senator Pout. Slow over here in Strasbourg. Sixty eight degrees seventy four behi- in mostly cloudy is going to be a little bit of Sun here. Hearing there as well sixty in Newark New Jersey. Seventy Four. We the high also. It is cloudy right now with the possibility of a chance of rain sometime in afternoon. Sixty six in New York City. Seventy three or four a high cloudy afternoon rain as well in Atlanta. It's eighty one degrees. I'm sorry sixty eight degrees right. The highest wants to be anyone. There's a light drizzle. Oh but there will be more is going to increase heavier. Storms around one two o'clock so has to be out. Please be careful. Sixty four in Miami eighty. The high six eighty two in Miami eighty seven for the high end sunny sixty four inch. Chicago's seventy seven for the high in cloudy and in Los Angeles. Excuse Me Sixty. Three degrees. Eighty four high and a mostly cloudy. That's where I have for you all. What's it look like where you are coming to? You live this show having each misdemeanor Jay. We gets more started writing. We have a cash at. Please donate to show. The cash is Dallas S Harvey Morning. Show was to have a website. Shaw Money Show Dot Com and we'd like to thank everyone for your overwhelming donations. The last couple of weeks. Thank you so much. We truly appreciate it. Sidney J pesce what that wounds some love We should have did it half an hour ago but folks call them. We're talking but it's on is nothing but love on his show to creed was much love to you. You enjoy the show. God bless you haters you salute. Payton watching the show. God bless all stars in the Chapman was practice smoke lockhart inject he and there s Arado Chattan landline is he ouaga. Santiago shepherded Jones Wanda the A Veneta George Henry. Munt in the jump. I see banana either. How that is here in the building. Vince young nuts here. I'm to everyone in the chat room. Let's show each other some love. I feel good. I'm excited today. I hope you guys all God bless. You got hard threat. Took the heart in the heart sensing. Let's go turn down for blush. Cage with offset a with hot with hot sex with her gentle with arts jail. Who who look look. Look what I'm GonNa do that apart. Your heart set in the heart city. Let's go down to blush with heart. Check with off tournaments Gal. Who Look Heart's on where the turns out heart heart. Zach hot sir. Jack who of a new sing one song? They're not. They're not building citizen owner. There you go. That's all we just got variety guys. Let's see in here. We have a yonder. Ni- end the bill day. What out younger. Hey Mike three justice grassy as he street justice. Who was in Audrey Johnson's in the building? Good Morning Audrey our you this show. Brow Alibaba. Hey Asti Good Morning John the Logan. Hey Beautiful Dr Anne Tell. It's in the building. Good Morning. Dr Taylor Kareem Louis Hickory. The overseer is in the building. Hello Martin Princess. Hey Good morning. Mr RABBITS EAT Veneta. George Henry is here. Come on and Cheryl Trot minutes building that morning. Cheryl Damon Gonzales Stephen. I'm sorry Stephen King is here. Hello Diane Hogs He. A Diane Hall is and be built in good morning from Johnson. Era MONDRO Meghann. Regino is known Maggie. Marcus Mr Emoji. Johnston is walking. Clogging Bobby Maggie this young lady that joined the group right. Yeah this the young lady. That's about alone in that loves the urban right. Yeah as this woman. God bless you young lady urban on. I feel a Maggie Maggie Maggie since. I've never smashed a Maggie. Thank God for those for those women sitting. Maggie can't say I have go. I'm still young mark not really time to do. You got nothing but time baby have okay be interested in watching Senio myself. Math Omega can't would occur second what is the ethnic. The dominant type of matching was in the room. You would coach me out commits to handling your business by Szott offer. That would be interested in you know seeing that. Show wouldn't wanNA watch smashed Maggie on when nobody's that allow you to. That's a little too close and personal. We Wanna be would that affect the relationship between the three of US source Indian are like ooh then whatever. You're missing out on all the foot. I'll be a party pooper on this weren't kate. Same James Chapter. Three for seven. Could I've been I've been the girl I've been the hell not. I've been held nine times same shots. Fan Raise your hand. So much bobby. I was in Hell in nineteen ninety when I had my wife. My ex wife in the side chick Krugman at the same time. That was a hell right there. I'm sure that that was my daughter was born on a Monday and my son was born on a Thursday and one in the Bronx one in Kansas State. Would that was that was held. Walk Oh my Barbie. Somebody got holds a camera. They get trump dabbler memo gets bogged. Would you like to watch? Won't you Cam Yard Meghan? Dan Trump I we had perverted. And look while you know sort of like this so marcus emoji Johnson arm. You don't have to worry about going to hell because you can't go to church anyway. Cocoa won't allow maybe church is Matt. Guide is that we got in here. You are the church. I'm on Church every day. The send me a problem for me. Thank Redo been inside myself in. There's no way that God lived here. There's no way there's no way I'm sorry. Don't know that honest theon. I look like you on this show right now. You're in between Sydney and myself. Happy me what Barbie Lucifer closeted knew anything still. I've noticed that I as you say. The Power Christ. Be With you their own Johnson. I can't sorry who else we have the show at Hayes Jones. Go money unless you natalie right. Hey Natalie drew says you wake. You're baking della address. Gamonal Beautiful Marcy Ramose if immovability in good morning marcy lease Scott. Terribly Bill Lee. The Sean James is here I should. You comes Hey Goro Double Free. Ninety nine am he. Oh what more I love you. I think the guy that I love you because I said it's you April rank the buyers just joking. Fiji's Kim Black is in the building Mr Black Good morning powered. Patterson is here. Paul Past Davis is in the past. The the power crisis can tell you that oversee the Shiloh teachers the out get. That sounds so fast he he got his save favorite actors. 'cause I've been the hell away really knew should you johnny? Where BOO is in middle? Hey John was that what you bill farmer is. Hello Eric Morning. Net Net net Serrano. Hey beautiful squeeze you. Yes I just want to squeeze show Chris you end up building grads although wait a minute wait minute. But you can't see our senior math show my goodness. I'm a face you when I see you. Just Plug Sean Donna. Roseanne vio ratio is in the building. What I'm wearing his name drain. Moneymakers wasn't doing changed. His name was on. Hey who didn't Joe but Joe? Hey Boo Kim Kim with here. The savage is in the building. Y'All what up cam expect. Hey Valerie intellectual assassin Maher is here one bad battery arena harvey. Hey Baby Harvey Good Morning. Show you a mess in the. What UP SHOWING PATIENT. Shayla Hall is here. Hey Shannon more in row. Mr Sensational hat is in the building. What hey down in Harris is here hello show than in John? J G gathers is here money come on Robbie we Have a responsibility on this show. Love Mr Sensational is back on the market for Try To link up with somebody that we all know. There are certain requirements relative like Sydney would say only that. He's you tried to hook up day. Yes I'm going to try to hook get this this. He's awesome in ghetto. We all in about three minutes. You know what I don't trust me. I doubt Army general together. Say Bobby most men. I hate to break this news in the on the latest. Going to get mad at me. I don't care. Seventy five percent of men get over relationships in less than about maybe maybe seventy three hour. He's back in all cats. Okay well we'll send you know what you have a lot of beautiful frenzy day. That don't have kids. Want a chat. Room was average time of getting over relationships. One is less than three months could a number two of his over three months. I don't care men hug on behalf of the time. They have to women in their relationship anyway. So one is bound to be a casualty too. So they really don't care they really. Don't we know that already men number? What Bobby said she disagreed? I think maybe this whole personal spirit but men put a number one in a chat room if the lie about it they might internalize a little bit more but they're ready to get up under get another woman on top of the next finally admitted would go to my number. One is under three months number two. If this over three months under three months I give it four. Don't Santa's longer than four weeks twenty nine days? Ling's could you put in a chat room? And does it take you three months? Get over relationship or number one for three months under on to this over three months Holliday. Did take you to get over. Your relationship was under. Bobby was married for fifteen thousand year different. I was twenty years insect mini. So it was. It was over three months since the baby back in the day about it debating come through last night in the caravan. Yes God blessed. Did He have? The girlfriend will actually came along city relationship under three months or over three months. I definitely it's over three months. I'm sorry to hear that. Okay anything like this before you get emotional. I just want to live though that you can follow us social media the John Harvey Wedding show featuring the team that we broadcast off of. Please make sure you like and follow it. Were also on the. We also have a group page. That's on face of the Sharm. You WanNA show featuring the week at team grew the group is what's up you definitely want to be in there we also have Instagram's on have you morning show we are also on the iheartradio platforms so please make sure down that if you don't already have it. It's a free APP. You can just search for Sean Harvey Morning. Show follow and also light this video like this show and throw it on your wall and groups. Now you are enough that you can share too. My nephews saying say three months. That's crazy who's GONNA say he get over stuff Italy outta sight outta mind. That's we drums. At least I know be crying. Like crazy Blah drill baby please can be safer Saito in the Prince of view that his prior relationships what he could get over. Oh three months. Can we exclude April out of this workload has been going to take them three months integrated over? He can't talk about his prior. You know event adventures with his girlfriend's back in the day because y'all women get sensitive. Sussman moves through talks about past relationships. I believe that my net you before April easily. Get over relationship in less than three months. Maybe I'm too. I think guys get over things really quickly. We Bury your feelings. It's really I think it depends on the relationship if was in a long term relationship. You're not getting over that person in three months or less than three months. So y'all stop with all that action that 'cause y'all crazy and rarely do depends because if it was if it was a quick smash you all grow but if it was a long time you know Dag on where it was going to take you more less than three months. Get over cheek. Okay now stop. You always be extra be showboat trying to be because they hit you with the whole years. What are you talking about? There will give out my face. I would not do have there was just one chick used to deal with in. Long Island with superstorm. Sandy went down and we broke and that took a minute for meeting it already because it was purely. I think it was Bobby Klein. Think it was more sexual because it was like she knew what to do you relationship but it was just sexual. I can never imagined sexual like compound the time like. I'm thinking about this chip but that's the only because shoot game was crazy. Leg Dangles was great. Use woman us. Let me tell you a whole well. Let me tell you. That's my call as you to take notes from this chick I used to go over. Her House bought along and she used the habit t shirt on. That said Shaun Slut. It was on the t shirt. That's right is not slut. Go Hashing Bobby Cologne. You're not bill off right to each their own hers and God bless both we are now have a now now now knew who. I loved the death right now. I'm GonNa hit her up and say I'm GONNA need a shirt that says so everybody. God bless a former chat room member week Mr since on the moon well hollow realm. What's going on talking over title? They call it. Okay let me explain to you without all the things. All it takes is votes of no hanging of fun of going and find themselves Guy Bash night now on you're doing is being in lust that's it anyway can get underneath. Let's settle that while completely. Forget about them person. You're not you're just masking with. No giant aren't go overseas taking all three months because John Horgan with no five. Depending on a house relationship relationships were relationship guys broke up by doing nobody but active very recommend changes. Some New Hangs Being Felony Kingdom. Covered the spades. Go on to the power of the poem is off female over my bag over here. Instances listen a ladies. Well is dropping some heavy knowledge on the perspective of all this and I hope you'll dealing this information because we say surely own coin it takes of you. Of course you right. It's lust but that lust takes us to get over relationship. That's what it is. But he absolutely my a lovely honestly. I had to totally agree with you. You put the thing in the man. Klaus on the name of the is ridiculous. We know that. Sorry I'm not saying that. They will have sex with the person. That's not what I'm saying. But you're just listing at that person you you don't really have feelings. That's so you just masking your Berit. He's changed riveted over their relationship de weeping two years that'd be your and maybe that banana out of this battle like high. New Women have five women of go back over to the count. Hold on a second hold on. Is Your Body count under over five now is I? Don't have cows gloves I got married. I was with the same person from seventeen. Until what. Thirty thirty Xavier's and high school. So yeah my mighty cows quite low count is under five bobby cal. I've lost. Count Epa seventy-five spill you. I've been I've been. I've lived with women that I can't remember what city stories by. Cj is your body CAL and Bobby. I sympathize with Joe. Your Body count number. I think is ridiculous. You need to get count up. I'm doing quite well long. You need more men to discover body. Cologne city is now the body. Count over over by. It's over five but under Tom that that means she's been about fifteen. Let's now it means you know what we'll well. If I was simple it was talking about and we had that discussion and her body count was under five. I think will remove myself from equation like like say at what Bob. Unique for on review had bought. Just don't this is my hard right. Be In my room. You just. Don't tell him I this real so I would say that trust. There's anything wrong with people live. You WanNa beat at present most do I do not use if the whole thing over about well. But that's what under that? Absolutely right in Bobby Moore a reserve in definitely respect but I think barbeque alone is audience. This is about the put some Limo tints on a car. This is ridiculous. I think people fall in love. Sort of like the whole thing I think. Barbie least virtual she was with the Latino male twenty one years made a power crisis can tell you. I think Bobby Colocia go. This is just my opinion. Well go on a man run after cocoa rally by looking at you looking at you. I'm grown man. I want to share this with you. I strongly suggest that you go on a this. Could possibly you could get the ten. I want you to go on a by men for the put an end up. Twenty twenty twenty one because I think other men need experiments. The bobby long settled down with. Also he just love the anyway by. Yes I do only only you to experience more. It doesn't make it doesn't make you experience more men more Cologne. You been with for Latino for twenty one years. My God born list. I want you to go on a little run. It's nothing wrong witty. I say five men barbeque alone in one year. Just just wipe out. Just just right out and then settled down. That's just my opinion. Because that's the magic. I spilled a half off the invaded by you know. By if they open doors that dope experience men always been you know what one is very rb relish. Right it will open up some doors but listen. I do agree and chat room. Could it the chapel? Can you put a number one? At Barbie of five men run before she liked it. Now one with a Barbie. You want in Syria. I think like Wabi. Maybe I mean you know yourself boated anyone else but well-mixed a really good point. Maybe you reserve that way because of limitations. I'm not judging like I said I was with twenty five woman in two thousand that sure. Let me express my body. Count is high does not me? I'm unexperienced you regret it. I was I Hispanic in Reiki joining. You'll be in the same poll. Reservoir impact isn't that the one with it. He's absolutely by even though you've been with the Latino over the Latino men or creepy before the made me just listened. God bless you. I think that the bobby. Thank you for your honesty of all. I really appreciate that. Five men Bobby Layman Journal now Leagues Spray. Why the Hell Open Ladies Link Laws so rain so much thank you. Are you right in your mind right now? I've got. We're all your the mustaches. And all that listened to that coming in the next fifteen years I dated our wax Olga. Currently Bronco you're very attractive. Young lady just like senior is why member. Listen legs in a chat room. Put a number one if you've been under five min put a number two if you've been over five minute be. I think you should take this tape. Wells suggested Vegas really good suggested Dayton Dot Net what we use to use any more down at least do three me go eat this. Nobody knows you know what you know what I'm Gonna I'M GONNA. I'm GonNa applauded Mike. Brady my girlfriend into Chattan. Veneta George Henry sees put a number two. She's been with over five minutes. I'm talking about God. He taught literally workout. Okay listen to Brown on the list leaving the house. Now with the same Peterson. Seventy five years. Listen to her. One shooter going out there. Bobby GonNa live leave. You're doing I will. Have you been crying since the Gulf optic crying? He's relationships is November. He's just been rain a class. That was disappointing. A good you have to away. Call Regan night. So it's not really like driving elk. Have you been in any an inverted text messages? Anything like that. He big head knucklehead. Any of that. I guess I don't know what things were. All what you know. Laver you've got a my emma out I'm not a People say about this little and they really didn't know about wowing good. They were very happy and now they know my only caught up. They lay any feelings. Be Known. Will I think it will make sure look when I got the relationship at now that I'm not religious? Actually that can't be informed people that very happy and I your girl new and felt that energy why I was saying relationship with over what she was saying his finger coasting on. I bet you weren't whatever around by the people around when they saw that frank of way way over. I'm like all go work out. And they make all navigate all so you made you make the facebook post on social media. Polls that you is not a thing that hopes of that stat insinuated. He was not like it would want it all the I can guarantee you that I will beloved horatio. Gonzales has been more than more over five minutes. I want to. Hey of her way she'll knowledge ma'am. I'm like dissed away. It's about five that when they're all the little girls and and and that was in line sledding. Everything ignored I. We all experience life instead of rejected. The inbox is and all that just one or two going out there. Just liberate yourself for year and then going and sell down on that bobbies Chanda. Logan has been with wanted five men. They've been with more than five a Lynne. Lynda Jacobs beloved mother. She's been with more than five minutes. I hope not order Buffet Goblet. I quit great at the see. How hope love well so much? We follow his earning. Everyone you know the going through. We follow his journey one quick break and in the news. What have you been with over five men in your lifetime? Put a wine over five man. Little One underclassmen one. If you're under five men in your lifetime and put a to with your over five men and mom. It should only be. I'll give out gay city. Are you serious heart? Because she got married when she was seventeen array and then they were together for moment. Met My Dad. They had this beautiful glorious creation. I mean they've been in my life harder knowing anybody for at least thirty three years so I think there's too much wiggle room in there for her to be doing much traveling back towards the city coming whole deal with this issue. Only three men and I think that the beloved your mother Linda j God bless Linda. We wouldn't even be all show explain benway scene. Say she's been a look by she's going to explain. Bill Will Land Mama's something. There's always out while the life. Tops IN J. Those those verdicts smashes. Where may be? I'm just guessing. Linda might the extra quavo whatever and something went down and then she over their office and you know the the male will whoever. It probably went out one afternoon. Quick smashed she got on. I would not put that pass. You know what it must've been when she got divorced from her ex-husband husband because the seventies was awhile so so so I I'm before she met my dad. Maybe other than that. No right mom since I've been born no no I don't want back no city. Jay is allow. You know jar probably understanding. Were up one johnny. Charlie Manna. Why would you get mad at your mother is? She had over five minutes lifetime. When you had almost fifteen twenty increased every time he say appreciate your honest over five under ten to attend. It's Okay Spring. One thousand nine hundred ninety nine and it's city but only by the grace of God while colonus day. My blood came up. Clean All Times Savannah. Not there was a few a comment. Std's in good taste. There's also some casualties of the war with you when you go on on a front line more in that way because Michael Grasp the I now kid on were still weren't great. I'm suing were Bobby Hurrell like I love railroad. Actually not his between growl and I when I started. Radio was a general manager of the radio station that I started because I used to look at well. Like he's a great radio personality to know about rail but what I do also holly very honest and he is absolutely right. I will admit along with hollow. Breaking News Sean. Harvey Has Lost. Count of you know what I think to. A lot of guys aren't having sex earlier but I know a Lotta an eleven. I'm like what is wrong with these people were molested. How early teams thirteen. Fourteen years old. I know growing up in a lot of guys I know has six two at thirteen fourteen. I was like okay. I watched my mother had all my neck that was happening behind me was on playing. I could barely go outside when I was growing up. You know the baby of this are seven and a baby about our fathers fourteen at the time. They weren't playing no games with me. All message and Reynolds was like ten years or older than me. They were playing. No Games. Mallow tell formal or go. Would it be safe to say that your father had over by one? My father was hold on for the Daddy was Roy. You know made an after. His hand show did that. Maybe it was nasty rows zero. I'm sorry he was thirteen along. I started late. I've started sixteen seventeen and having good. Sean glazed I mean I started at seventy in? It was the only one for quite some time. Yeah my bogging Kamal Like Man. Willie. I sympathize. Which in your movement Allgood Trust me? I have obtained wooden something. Yeah one one you deserve. But that was. That was like six years ago. I. I'm good now bobby. I'm GonNa give called Code dose of reality. I'm GonNa let this. I can't I won't bet on my life on at that baby. You'd better believe he was over five women in that same period. I'm so sorry to break this newsy ability if I it was not good too. That's why in just a few Kessler. He was when he wasn't I don't think he wants. But Hey I'm not a psychic right. And that's what justifies you on the run. So Bobby feel free to beg about at least take about it and don't listen to the show and our we tell you my best. You will tell me till not the best what I wanted to do. She will be awful if I did. She will be on for those any balmy search. You'll everybody calm a chat room member to weep the most respected this guy. Don't give a damn about the cocoa. He makes money around clock. Did he got another chance gets his head and the curbside service a good morning. How Are you challenge? Team is good then. God bless meant we here. We still doing our thing man. This is all good. That's call the shot anybody on the shelves. Thank you brother Goes. Have you been with undefined? Women All the women lifetime go take you were under five women in your lifetime or over five women of that not walk out of ancient hostile. I've been five by thirteen. Movie goes to the right going to do. I got then. Maybe like listen. Well my son. Who's very high? Then I see only been. She's been with less than five min. Forty years over change over here was hey wait a minute wait a minute. I assume that you and I in Rela. Somebody albumin in the chat. When that actually lost count? Okay not now Kalki count. I walked cal ago. Is Your Cup wait a minute? You advocate for women to be under five ish but you lost count. That's being selfish. Grow giving Talk about when you got a body like don't affect just on the same play broke city. That is not even true. Betas come out of a giant. It's another man speaking. He says it is a double standard us. Two women that had a body kind of like twelve with that she on the twenty thanked out. No she take respect to two years or so. I die gosh out city jeep. You fit in that range into early thirties. And you've got a body count about fifteen so you're good that even people to not be monitoring people's bodies if you are healthy person sexist supposed to be an enjoyable you decide to do that with multiple people. You're doing this. There's nothing wrong people. Talking about women are at all of that. All that is life. Women have babies right like none of what is happening in four. The pressures that women have to go through and speak to a so now I gotta lie about my sexual experiences so I can get just you know be we arlene old and Holo goes we had on this stuff for them just said that she gave you the passwords to the door on my body. Cow Isn't like I have many have Lindsey of opportunities. I have the opportunities. Now I choose not to go there route one wants to buy armies do have your it goes goes do you bobby is forty years old body count undefined. That that is that doesn't turn me on VK. No ON BODY COUNT. Undo spied wrote a right. You'll political like one on the war like it's not many women out here you know who is over forty when nobody show late okay? I'm Bobby Listen I care about goes we gotta go here. Believe you when you try to me. Say Wolves probably won't say just cleared it up. There's nothing wrong with enjoying your sexuality is nothing wrong with this mash. It's nothing explore also son enjoying your sexuality doesn't mean that everybody either great you do you feel comfortable with that. Is What is being touch with private showing. I'm experienced. Well why don't you surprise? One of these many folks in in box and gold him back. Call Them. They'll come through. I just WANNA to smash. We Truly Lycee Holloway to what. He's a frigging. That was only our mighty counts. Barbie freaky levels are low with only five body counts. We're knowing Meghan having multiple sexual make a free Minnie's noack community. You can do this thing you do with fifty men one main fifty ten or twelve men to learn things Wabi. Trust me when I tell you or long speaking before experienced because nobody can't dump me. I'm not experience with bagels. Lets do the inventory. Body count is low. And you don't even watch porn was no my phone. Just I charge you I so were you at. The show is boiling down to know. I think I let me use your phone right now. We're coming back. We're coming back in one minute. If it doesn't come on by the time you come back to US giving this morning celebrated the anniversary of being a mom for Alcohol Leasing. Love also took come. We are back It is a throwback Thursday Thursday. Made the twenty twenty two thousand seventeen minutes at the back. Sean have the morning show featuring cj longer co host barbeque. Loan Week. It's start back Chapman's please. Call it by seven zero ninety two six hundred zero probably real quick. If you don't mind quick. Weathers of what we're going to play cool in. J thank you sure. Hey guys here in Bethlehem right now. It is sixty eight degrees the highest. Going to be seventy seven. Today is cloudy right now. Going to be cloudy pretty much. The whole day and Strasbourg. Sixty eight seven. Four for the high cloudy mostly cloudy little pieces sunshine in certain areas. Sixty five in Newark New Jersey. Seventy four with a high cloudy with the possibility of some showers later in the day. Sixty six in New York City Stanley. Three four behind cloudy with afternoon. Rain OFF OFFSET SIXTY EIGHT. Atlanta eighty-one high a light drizzle going on now. But it's going to change into a storm sometime linked to you have to go out. Please be careful and Miami. Eighty two degrees the highest going to eighty seven today and sunny sixty four Chicago. Seventy seven point high in cloudy in Los Angeles is sixty three degrees. The highest to eighty today and mostly cloudy. That's what I have for you all the way. You are coming from showing how we want to show featured Sidney j right and claw where you get your more started the only place on earth where you get your please like the ship. Shaw Marshall Beach in the wake of team page and also visitation also our group. Hr months feature in the wake of team group. Okay now do we go into some front page news hour wanted know? Only Cindy J. A. S. to the e double indicate denied. You got the front page. Lose your job. Cain to the ESCA the indicate that now. You've got the front patient JAL probably give me with. Y'All y'all thank you good morning. Everyone I do have some front page news for you. The first thing that I'm going to start with is going to be twitter. An president trump. They got a little bit of what little problem yesterday. And it looks like based off of that the trump administration is gonNA come down an executive order today. The trump administration is fighting back against twitter's attempts to call out misinformation in his tweets. Today he looks like he made the statement yesterday. Yesterday's voting and twitter back checked what he said. You know how they'll point you know. This is not true saying Jasmine ever union. The first time that twitter has ever done this of like sort of like when lease got put up the video and we got the notification from facebook that was the president of twitter of censorship. After the plight of fact check to two of his tweets about Alan voting and even if he was open to using federal powers to rain in the platform He is a twin announced an executive order today against social media companies. But it's unclear what that will include the twitter CEO. Jack Dorsey responded by the fact check measures. Don't make twitter the arbiter of truth. Dorsey and his company has been criticized. For what some see as some people are saying that conservatives some people are saying that social media platforms are trying to stifle conservative news and they're creating an algorithm to keep conservative views low. That's what they're accusing social media platforms up so we'll see later today. What trump will say about this on the President? Singlehandedly can't shut down social media like you every five seconds any you know. It's they wear my guest show as Washington. Why worried about twitter. What they finish the amid all falls in the realm of the Federal Communication Commission and the President even though he does have these powers do certain things it takes a committee post to say. Yo Shutdown baseball no one eight. This and this is exactly why I keep saying everybody get out there and vote because now came forty five is trying to dominate takeover social media. It's not it's never going to happen and I mean and doesn't it cost to as I write though. They're so big on the to thank my right. Yes so we can't. As an individual shutdown social media social media has seduce some something some kind of criminal act or or just start like say say at facebook turned into a a pedophile site. Then that will shuttle on that now right talk not knock because of individual president is mad. There's no way to do not kill we. Will we have seen some pretty amazing things happen shot? So let's see what executive orders going to talk about. China has approved. You know we haven't really been talking about China Hong Kong because basically when the cocoa have right people in the writing and all that they like. They like just kind of fizzled. Now no sending Louis stopped me. I don't know the one that sent by your rights. Go out there. Doc would cause protests. Now that the cocoa cocoa came they came back to win in the movement. So do what they wanted to live so they fight another day. Data was GONNA come outside. The protests is Co. virus in the mess with Shine you can't expect them to stay out there and protest and you was the one talking about saving Hong Kong to say this and save that looking real crazy on these streets kind of what happened with Hong Kong now right now. China is has just approved. This was a when it's their you know their their government National People's Congress or something like that. They signed bill yesterday. And it's a controversial national security law on Kong for people that don't know Hong Kong operates under this thing where it's like it's it's separate from China so mainland China has its own rules and everything like that. It's like two countries along by the people for mainly they can't like a Hong Kong resident and Deacons mainland China. And everything. They just deal with their own things than South God. You're going to my. Adhd man stop. This was your stop this on. Call a city in the capitalist country main China's the city of country they undoing rule to govern themselves without interference from mainland China. That was an answer in their own with the United States. So that was there so it was operated like its own little but it is happens any But now that they have now this treaty or whatever they had this it was up. I mean they said it back in the ninety s now it was up so now the Hong Kong government has put in place a new national law which basically is like. They can't talk bad about the government basically put them under mailed China's rule. They can't talk bad about the government can't do all this up now. A lot of people in Hong Kong of course. Now they're coming back out there stipple. They want to protest against this new law. That's coming into place but mainland China is pushing back saying that this is only gonNA affect the the one percent of people that decide to talk out against the government or protests like that they said that the majority of Hong Kong people will be fine on the. Us has said it would impose tariffs and sanctions against China for for doing this in Hong Kong. But they said that they're willing to take their chances on that because it would hurt Americans more than it would hurt China. Probably a new so much for everything right. So what's going on right now? Happy about me to be further. Unrest is always not. Then you tell you. Something's going to happen. The Chinese government is going. Wipe everything off the table. Get about all these agreements they gonNA come in there and they go shut it now. In Hong Kong is going to be a city in China. Rest data these laws for since the ninety gun. This is a not going to have not have a capitalist country in communist country is done get me so get of Hong Kong Americans and all that because the Chinese government is not putting up with this no more and no pauses absolutely right. Cindy before you go onto your next story. China China China's shining shining China China China China China China whether it's China China. So if you want to trade we got a job with China China just like China van from China China China China China China. We more than when you take lists more than one hundred thousand Americans have now died in nineteen in less than four months so almost twice. The number of Americans lost during the entire Vietnam War and about the same number that died nationwide during the flu. Pandemic in nineteen sixty eight on average nearly nine hundred Americans have succumb to the disease. Every days is the first known virus Debt was recorded on February six. Even then the numbers may not paint a complete picture of the damage since some victims. Like those who die in their homes and nine hospital right never have been tested for the virus and states. Still don't agree on how to report. Deaths were many. Americans are absorbing the toll of the crisis Infectious Disease Expert Day. It's almost certain we'll see a second search of the virus when the summer ends grabbing you know as June the state of Pennsylvania Broadcast from we are the arts -fensive that you go to the green phase. I believe my county we're in. We're in yellow right now. No Monroe County in rare that we were yellow so in June faith will be green and people will be able to be yellow June. This is it said June fifth that it would be open right but I think it would be in the yellow as instead of green check that this is the sad part bobby cloning. Everyone knows the King. Forty five is worrying about his twitter rant. When yesterday it was announced that over a hundred thousand people have passed the king forty five with even mentioned that or go on of have oppressed and share like his remorse and and and being loving caring to over a hundred thousand people who by the way have passed away in the last hundred days. This man is making this a political issue. He's making A. He's threatening the social media sites. He's doing everything he's blaming China. He's doing everything to try to the because there's also the election he's the thing off of what's really going on right now. We hit a grim milestone yesterday and the people the twenty percent who folks who voted for Donald Trump four years ago picking. It was a joke. I hope these people reconsider and come back to the Democratic Party of both Joe Biden to get his ass out. It's sad and this is tons of scarves bought Columbia nurses and doctors volunteer. That live in different than you came to New York to help because of the shortage of nurses and doctors get sick and passed away. Come into New York to help you. Damn the by the King. What even a knowledge this on this somber day yesterday he me even mentioned on your because you don't care who was in Cape Canaveral waste. Some spaceship was going up in the. Nobody gives a damn about reviving goal as been postponed. Go Out and Bowl. We gotTA GET FORTY FIVE OUT. Outta here absolutely. He's worried about twitter. Polls and one hundred thousand people died of Kobe. Cocoa in a hundred and twenty days a forty should be thinking about talking about is how to get a bar a vaccine. A social business and demand won't wear masks publicly this this this pleaser vote because we gotta get this guy out of. He didn't mention that one announcement yesterday. About one hundred thousand folks passing and out of he didn't make an announcement. Yeah just let's add another ten fifteen thousand because undocumented folks who passed away at home nobody knows about it. I'M A put a number ten thousand on you. Absolutely right. Get forty five. I and he's all about himself and he's the King of the election. Yes and is right. We are in the yellow phase right now. And they said I'm sorry. In the May twenty-ninth some counties the ones that went yellow. I like Eerie Pennsylvania and like up out west. Pa They're currently Right now and by June fifth all the rest of the counties will be yellow. Well that's in Pennsylvania. I think there's like forty seven states that are open now mike regularly but they're still encouraging people wherever they are open to wear masks. We'll good Bobby Cologne able to go back to that Salon Zinni. You'll be able to do what we go get. You hear this a lot. More women out here guys lines are growth like you could have one person in the salon at all your need all getting ready to every woman in on earth need to get they here. 'cause y'all walking around here. I don't know what I'm what of your hairdos cocoa. A lot of fall cost text messages. Am ON AL like wait. I'm looking at time. You like. She creek run out there and get your head. Become tired of looking at your right family stopped to pick up trash bags during a drive family. They're being praised by bullies. They stopped to pick up. What's supposed to be two bags of trash only to discover the bags help nearly one million dollars in cash? Okay big family. There's sands family and went for Dr last Saturday to escape. You know everything went on and a car in front of them. Swerves out of the way of what looked like a bag of trash so they accidentally ran it over instead of just leaving it got how in the back of their truck and drove away. Now they soon saw another Obama egg laying in the ditch nearby. They grabbed that one to their great Samaritan dried. They went like cove it. You pick it up bags on. What fake maybe trash on the road. It's kind of weird weird. You have picked worse on the side of the road before when they finish their drive. They throw the bay white bags away. They noticed something that looked like mail in the bags. So upon further inspection they discovered the bags full of money inside the bag. There were plastic bags and they were addressed with something that said cash vault on it. So the woman who was a teacher and a mother to she decided to call the county sheriff's Office. She moms have who goes to her church and he told her to call the sheriff's office and they said they'll the right to do. The sheriff's department collected the cash which had been lost in transport and turned it over to the US also service and investigators. They are working to determine where the money came from the Mosier sent. They have seen lost money being found before. But never of magnitude big certainly had situations where a daily deposit from location has been found on the side of the road. People have turned that in. But nobody's ever turned in a million dollars in cash young town. She has family. Because IT'S CASH. It would be my it would not have made it to. Nobody's burying school undermined. Danby okay. Now turn on down you know what sometimes low people do this you guys about the. I told you guys about the Kim. One hundred thirty thousand dollars next to the ATM. No you know you raisins drought your you the US. Also you always said he stories periodically from time to time the Babylonians they like to give the money blacks and Latinos we not doing it We keeping the money. I said it plenty of times. I don't care what people say on taking that money. A million dollars in change in cash on keeping it. I'm GonNa live the best life. I'M GONNA donate money to do all that. I'm not giving. I'm not going faster. The my pastor can kiss my black is. I'm not doing that. Keep the money to keep the money. And I'm a goal with my life like I said before it is not my responsibility that you were able to complete your task at sure John. That's mop you couldn't secure the literally. Vo Bag and how many times of people say this? I wish going to be driving. Find a bag of money. Like don't these ever say that. Well I out like when I'm driving on the road. Good listen and they literally found that now now one but yes thank homer city also. I'm so grimy coal would nobody would know that I had to say nobody knows every night needs to turn in the money to something. Psychologically wrong with them and I was this. 'cause you're still limited your yacht with you. I'm not turning in no money. The only way I would turn in the money because I actually was in in a building. Say Lobbied is forty five cameras like if I got. That is cameras around you read. Why didn't she just hold it though? Wait if you worried about it. Being somebody's wait for news to come out or something like that wouldn't take us back out for. Yes maybe one dollars as. She took a snack for herself. I would like to believe that before. She turned it in. She kept us that right and May and on top of that. Imagine I mean for me for me. Personally you personally pause. I would feel even all that returning all that money back like a week later. I'm still paying my ran on and I still. Do you know doing the normal financial things that we go through and every day that would be more at the present to me than anything else. No we are keeping the money you're right Barbie Acheson mule of keeping that money. I'm going to do the right thing with the money and you know giving charity all the things that needs to be done to keep my call but I am not responsible for somebody else doing. Jank that somebody paid you. Do you made them. They pay you thousands and thousands of dollars to be a security guard to take money point. Eight point beat you up that mud baby and a lot of our chat members. Say That's the blessed from the Nolan and look. I need blessed me wealthy. Do it gets the will be. This would be unsolved mysteries twenty year. There's no one with no. I'm not turn it no money and that's it and how did she feel knowing because I'm sure she turned it and thinking? Oh they know exactly what's supposed to go to and they're going to get their money but now to know that there's an investigation and nobody knows them feel and you believe you go to church and you know this is a blessing for you said the law. La De Blasio. I laugh need now. You can say what you by the lower but my Lord just blessed Shogun dollars. Okay that one. I truly agree like sometimes. There's a small town say things like Yoga. No hold US money for thirty days. No-one claims is three hundred dollars. Issue Yours please believe me. Someone's going to claim of dollars in that time period. And that's the prob anyone and you know what? Cj one point five billion I'm a goal gumbel purchase. Some Fresh Regina ask his body count in man. That's good. No that's all I have by news and what's going to get out of here. Thank you so much Free safety everybody. Check your moral compass. What would you do? I'm not turning in China's sites China China's look at what China's to China China. That was in that Nice. China China China China China Showing Yada Saga I love showed China China China China shine China China China Guy now China China. China's you either sinus out China China people say you don't like China like China China unless you're China China all the time China talking John. China's shine China now China China China China very well saying China China Cycle was not to lifetime China to me China. Jonah charge China China China. I don't WanNa hear this. I want you to remove yourselves from since China. This is your time to bill out of this thing. I'M GONNA list China. Chait me all you want to leave China giant. I've been saying China. China China China China China China China China China China China China China China China China China. China's try people from China. They love me. China China China. They said like I love Jackie Chan. I love China China by the way China China with China China China. Back you love. China House was going to say you've been doing a tremendous job with the sports lately of thank you keep up the good work. God bless you you Lee. I'm not okay. He's very you. Okay Lavish case. That man's voice like nails on a dag on chalkboard. Oh I just wanted to know and just what would you say about what you said? You couldn't stand what that means voice about China China China's China whether it's China China. So if you went to China to get a job in China China China China. How goodness the? Nfl guys is testing protective The new helmet to add protective gear for like a surgeon who film or something on it with any five material so when they start back there are the season you know in September you know. Hopefully they'll have new gear to protect against corona virus and they also WanNa have all players tested prior to going on to players. And you know anybody off with teams tested prior to start the season to make sure everyone is healthy and Compla- you know they don't they don't want to have no problems when it start back so the NFL engineers and equipment. Company Oakley are testing prototypes. Right now modify version of in ninety five facemasks to hope the contain material that protects against the helps protect against the corona virus or any viruses period period. So I think that's pretty you know putting them so they gotta wear the and they're gonNA wear masks while the trying to incorporate some type of material into the hell me so they had the mass anaheim past the hell out if they didn't exactly person football to me is already bonn-cologne already watered down. It's not like back in the seventies were at Vegas Day right back seven years in the eighty s and ninety s where you clothesline somebody through somebody on crown. It was like watching. Wwe wrestling you. You touch the quarterback on time next thing you know a penalty is a lot of defensive op. Insight into the poker ball is about two levels way from being flag football. So thank forty fifty sixty seventy masses. Let's get out the let's play. Football is a contact sport. There's no I don't take your temperature wherever I I think there should be the gays. Who got the Kokubo putting it? It's going to be a cocoa. You have an injury report. You guys are the this guy can't play because he got the Koko also mass and all this extra spring on the helmet and fault founded on the uniform. Let's stop this. Let's play ball. Cocos Cocos on the ball field. Do so be sure and other the players get to come. There will be no FOOTBA periods. So would you want them to be somewhat protected or not? Protect what we've been. Obviously it's been cooped in that. We don't really meet very city. Been SAYING SO. You know what we must be. Everything I say. Exit wear masks. Bobby Clo- I walk almost every day three to six miles per day I. It's hard for me to win. GonNa have masks when I'm walking wedding. Sometimes when you're not around anybody you don't really need it. But being imagine Clinton football I can't Paulo suffocate. Still trying to work out. You know the only an fantasy so. They're not sure what the modifications going to be just yet. They just hoping to incorporate the material of the the surgical masks or the ninety five zero into the the helmets. So they're not exactly sure exactly how that's GonNa pan out yet about. This was scares me the most the NFL football players colossally stupid dreads that control over the over the helmet. They made the get rid of those dreads because the cocoa is in the. I don't like football players board Cologne and they go onto the market. You put a pitcher or anyone in a chat room a pitcher. Nfl with the long shreds per truly out the helmet. Sending Jay is very nasty and is very bizarre for an African American man with these the ones that hang on vk some so calm down to the back but where are they supposed to go. Sean City Allied the Dowager as they let me Nice in knee locks all they all snappy The dreaded need. These guys are millionaires. They keep the the hair Condition the dreads going all the way down today. A claim football. I think this has let somebody step on the drudge. Snap necks my God and you worrying about the masks. We need to get to cocoa dredge. It's not in the dried Sean. All over the place focal cine continue on sococo repellent on the dreads. Sure now mayor. Who is one of the doctors for the for? The team was saying that the players is not liking that they will have to wear masks because they won't be able to function properly. They can't they won't be able to hydrate and keeping taking your mask on and off it's I that's not safe anyway. Because you're touching your your mask you supposed to get rid of the mask once you touch anyway. So that's not likely so. They were saying that the wear masks is probably not going to be. What the aiming for the just trying to aim for something to go into incorporate into the the helmet itself wages something more knew what the F. Ulis have the helmets the buzz or Howl snap down there about the barbecue. Were article on. Why don't we just also wall into the come out with a vaccine? That CJ says you refused. Because how can they play? Football would amassed on. They get this. I'm sitting there well. They won't have actually mass on own under there. They oxygen oxygen they slap on that. You do have escape that maybe the cocoa wasn't blessed. Maybe might knock that W NBA out of the whole situation. Now really don't need it now. Don't even start till next summer. They'll be they should be good. The Coco she'll be going by Tom. Wnba started again. They right there in the stands. Let's go ladies is singing? Say I haven't heard anyone advocate for no WNBA. I hear NBA act. Can't ask the average age I hear SOCCO. I hear baseball football basketball. I don't know WNBA. We don't even need it at this point. You soon soon come like I said you want me to watch the WNBA. You changed those names. I need the Boston. Baby makes us talking the Seattle sluts. The Houston played. Play the Seattle Stilettos. That's what I want to see continual only one. This is a little college little low college story and at the math of George. George Floyd Dent the University of Minnesota on ties with the Minneapolis Police Department. I didn't say we know you're not reporter yesterday that he was Yours was the guy the young man who was killed when the police officer Prima suffocated the guy when the same week a black man and Minnesota to be pinned Dow by the Minnesota Police Department. The University of Minnesota moved to cut all ties with the city. The city's police department. They issued a statement on Wednesday of days after the incident saying that they usually use a police department to secure all a major event. Like the football games you know all the concerts etc etc. Say They are no longer the police department for anything they will use. It is outside contract outside service to now secure locations. They are very heartbroken. You know in a Paul off video in the actions of the police department so I applaud. You are s right. Take a stand. They in the agree sticking by on the of incidents that's been unfolding so that's good especially. Ballantyne Ray could possibly lose. They like whatever they feel. He never know if you have a lot of racist police. And you know you in a predominantly African American school. You have a lot of minorities going through your school. They made you know it may happen on your on your campus at one eight minutes and then to be held liable so they protecting. They sounds pretty much saint absolutely. We will very emotional about this story yesterday about these young men at passed away and that they should. I don't want them of this city down black false. Running like Ya'll neighborly. Don't bear young naval understand the. I thank you bobby. Those great look for that story and I totally agree with with the police. Department with a black folks can't win in the target stealing. I know that you're mad. I'm frustrated to a know we all law but to go around one mega kill yesterday off your protested but burning down and still in everything. This is not the way to go to peacefully believe to peacefully protest was going on shocking WANNA show. Cb Barbie News about boy. He's also cousin even back. Inform with our Indiana Pacer Jackson metrics. They actually he's like oh call each other twin cousins but look you. Steve Teamed UP BIG UP. Podcast out there that it goes once a week and MRS unfortunate and I didn't know that they will cousins of but don't burn the whole city down lease. Aubrey was a cousin said. Nfl players so we talked about that a few weeks ago. Yeah well thanking. Thanks so right. So they're not going to hire the The the University of Minnesota is not contract and these of this organization. Now the and that's how it was done but black poultry. Perm the whole city down. The packet hit them and then vote. You got a vote in a package of black folks. Please admitted Minneapolis out going now. They're going to burn that whole thing down and it's going to be. Countless may be not going to be good so again. I think the only thing that stopped I think about you with the sports right. Yeah that only thing that's GonNa stop this of no nephew don't increase in down on. Is they need to today. Arrest all these offices today. That's today really today. Forget about the Special Commission and committees and prosecutors and all that arrestees officers today and this will stop because of the frustration that we have in the black community. I'm not co-signing. The behavior lack folks stop. I saw videos last night. A black hole and in talking. What are you one of the target or why people in Black City of abalone is to show shopping abuse in Minnesota right now? Would you run into target list Babylonia stone? These them there s control when show shopping call. Everybody might grant a anyway throwing on showing your way about met learning all city. I streaming thing Fan Oleg with basic needs to just ask stores goods ruining the man to travel further out for bid. They really watch anyway. Having over. We've the call the police when you don't score your own home with someone. Knicks may things in my few by football night and they say then you see these police officers. Leave your Western data. Think about this arrest. Connect supposed to appease the peak if a difference between being a west and being convicted right easily could be convicted of applied externally found that guilt though a wet convicted of so okay. So would you be? What would you think that the black community and abroad commuting Latino community and some of the Babylonians would they be okay with a Western these officers today? Nobel right to time to go to trial a pain. The spot wake conviction. Okay hold on a Chevy wanted show Sydney Barbie over Monte Sean. I'm Scott on everybody. This is this is trees of you know elise. And I'm speaking to the COPS and I've been a victim of salad as my brother actually WANNA cleese against the New York City. Police Department some breaking his jaw had that completion of positive. What needs to stop. Having streets the way they train the beliefs the waiver municipalities train. The police to change. We are among living in a time of twenty. Thirty forty fifty. So don't argue that they have and the way they trained the a big change. What we we talked about of silence go because getting to be go check and white as they put on the their blue and they won Smith's on each other Dow. I just thought to say that. Much loud enough respect. God bless and again it goes back. Who was talking about yesterday. Sting Bobby. It's more it's more up to me. It's not a procedural thing. I know juice talking about gated. I respect his opinion. This is racism this racism. This has nothing to do with the BOOB. All the silence the procedure of being a police officer like we talked about yesterday with Mar- police officers all the colds. This is this latent racism racism. This cop was so races that he killed a black man now in front of everybody else he could get care. He didn't even care. Man was holding everybody. Kim Schism is that receive base. The base that's what we saw says grew water the policy of being a police officer of respect. Everything that he's saying. Yes more better police in within the academy this. This is racism. This is a generational thing like we talked about yesterday. This is a generational thing. Somebody's police officers deposit races. Bagram GRANDPA this goals way back has nothing to do with policy of me and that was clearly. We saw undeniable undisputed. We saw that when this Babylonian officer his low we had his me on this man next and we gotta go on Cinnabar Everybody Ground Way. We would like to said no remorse at all on. This has nothing to do with policy. You gamble when he's sitting with his knee and neck and his dam was his pocket like he was just sitting. And everybody's filming it if I was that his neck everybody's filming and black out with his racism has it has everything to do with anger but had everything to do with being a racist police officer. Everybody in this man's family is racist. Every everybody in the other. Oester the my Asian friend. He's racist to that Brown but we go either. That say real quick. You know. I've watched this morning right in. La In smashed a police car. The police caused granting lapse every Evan Officers. Not like that because you know my daughter is watch you know but the Taliban has changed a little bit away she look at but you know everybody officers are not bad but if you are officer you are a good one. You stand by. Jet Is an corrupt as the bad ones who do dirt so yes we know they may not be bad but if you stand by and allowing just as guilty theory because skin because they turn on own officers then you then you then you are officer then you are. You are in the same category as the one who that man in my book in my is in my opinion and being a black a thing which is which is the girl boys I call. It was already a sergeant you know sitting with no no no you know. I mean I don't think I mean I don't even know why certain people would even put themselves in that environment. You know what? I'll say an emmy now Anderson. This officers oh I want to be good. But what was going on and why. Pd offer training. Yeah but officers are not like that right but if the whole of the way because my every professional even hospital they deal with different officers with different people because like if your your doctor your work training you look for underlying conditions would usually hoop has that or whatever and all to also all of those are background to help you deal with certain situation when people so imagine orbit up in police. There's talk you talk about how these communities are what these people usually do. And I things that day. Great Great lose their put you more the mindset of how these people words you'll continue to work in an environment where that is happening right one place thing that's just what is but when it's all that but you end up doing the long you doing the right thing. You know go talk psychological valuation given the they need to sit them down a agree well again you know. I didn't even know this Brown this case the news ninety riding in Los Angeles. I don't a this is not gonNA help the situation with the ride and really honestly I don't I don't I mean I understand like men that like like the feelings because this is a part of me sitting you press that button and then I'm GonNa go crazy too because I know I've been through all of this and I've victim of police. Brutality should have thousands of time. A Long Ju twist I get it but to go out there. This community is not going to help. I'm not gonNA advocate for the guy of a cop car at a cry and fell off and left other come up with guy and he has yet run smashes the back windows again Again you might be right psychological evaluation or I say on the ninety day this is the this has nothing. The richest is racist. I mean everybody's thought lobby when they on that's just what it is when they see black people or like one you watch a cop a coffee shop somebody his first response because it is the shaking his head or something like that white copper man over us like well no because his racism took over all that racism. That's been in. The bottom of his soul. All came out right all of us to see it had nothing to do again policy. Police Hauling on backup man the Asian. Do I hate to say his name the same way the same mold level billy racism? That's all this is is more. Nothing back operatives. Pull up if a person's a person body you stabilize. They make us wait. Flipped out like it was a piece of meat. We all. We all will follow this story because we need to know like I said today Ground Mike. Grassy this call about the arrest of this. I think that's something that was stopped as arrestees office Nobel Nobel none of the regular procedure Nobel West Brown going and walk that give you. Don't mind I go. I let now. That was a great story that in in the show. We appreciate your I. Listen we go into rule with. We're GONNA postpone away pushing the Logan and out my nephew to stop hosting a God. Bless OUR WAY AT everybody. Come on come on. See you guys later Happened Break Day. God bless your body let's go.

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[Unedited] Isabel Wilkerson with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

1:50:03 hr | 2 months ago

[Unedited] Isabel Wilkerson with Krista Tippett

"Support for on being with Krista Tippett comes from the FETZER. Institute helping build the spiritual foundation for a loving world. FETZER envisions a world that embraces love as a guiding principle and animating force for our lives, a powerful love that helps us live in sacred relationship with ourselves, others and the natural world learn more by visiting FETZER DOT Org. I'm KRISTA Tippett up next. My unedited conversation with Pulitzer Prize winning journalist. Isabel Wilkerson there is as always a shorter produce version of this wherever you found this podcast. Thank you so much. That was beautiful so good evening. Welcome back to those of you who are returning. My name is Rik Jess and I'd like to call on my partners in organizing this festival, Evan Gurnee and Fred Bunsen who I don't know where it is right there. Good awesome so. Of the Center for Jewish Studies at UNC Ashville and I'm a member of the English Department and together with my dear friends and colleagues in co conspirators. We have organized. What is turned out to be a really extraordinary two day festival called faith in literature, a festival of contemporary. Spirit Evan. Evan is a colleague of mine at UNC A. Was Lucky enough to participate in the process of recruiting and Hiring Evan, and I've been really so honored to get to work from him and learn from him since he's arrived and Fred is the amazing author of soil and Sacrament as well. It's another book and many other pieces of writing Fred is the director of the food health and ecological wellbeing program at the Wake Forest University School of Divinity together right I got it right good, and so we partner together UNC Ashville and wake, Forest University School of divinity to really bring this fantastic event. You so thank you to both of our partners. I'd like welcome. Now. Chancellor Mary Grant to offer us a welcome, and she'll immediately followed by Fred with a few words of welcome from wake forest. Thank you rick and welcome everyone to UNC Ashville for this wonderful evening of conversation and enrichment I'm delighted to be able to open up our space here to do these things, and I'm even more so delighted to have such a great colleague like Rick. Chess held around of applause for quick. One of the wonderful things that I get to do in my role of of being chancellor of this university is work with tremendous faculty and staff on this campus. And so when I came to UNC Ashville about a year after being here, we did my official swearing in. It takes a while. They WANNA make sure it's GonNa work and so I asked Rick To. To. Say A few words on my behalf. And he one of the things that was common was to give a benediction or something like that, and he wrote an absolutely lovely piece that was entitled Not Benediction and and it was just beautiful, because it worked off of the words of the motto of our school, which is part of it synthesizing quite a bit. We look towards the mountain, and he just wrote this absolutely exquisite piece. Which I think describes what we do every day here. At a Liberal Arts University, we help our students to think deeply while looking up to the mountains. At the same time, it's a very special place and to have all of you here over the last few days has been a treat. It's been a delight. It's been an honor and a privilege. This is when we do our very best work and public higher education in Liberal Arts when we bring people together to think to engage to take that pause to reflect, and so it is indeed very special that we do this as a community. Community and we open this up to our neighbors to our friends to our community members in do it in partnership with our good friends, at WC, so it is just a great privilege to have all of you here and to spend this evening with wonderful office. We're going to do five flash readings. I'm very excited to see what that is about. When I walked in here this evening, I will admit I had a little bit of a panic because Rick said Mary just changed the program up a little bit. We're going to begin with music. That's when I panicked so. Alicia, I'm so glad it was you and not me because it turn. It turned out beautifully. But to be in this room this evening with such talented writers authors, Thinkers Im am just I can't wait to hear and be enriched nourished by that and to be in this room with both Krista. Tippett and Isabel Wilkerson to national humanity humanity medalists I think that is just really amazing and. I will have to do a little fan fan gushing here, Krista. Began every Sunday with you and because we are in this listening area with WC. Every Sunday morning at seven am I start my day with a cup of coffee and listening to Krista Tippett and I think it's because in your own words. You have talked about the power of Radio of having these intimate conversations in a way that makes it accessible, so thank you for doing that and for enriching all of our lives and for being. Being here in Isabel. It is just such a thrill in an honor to have you with us this evening, so thank you for being here. At UNC Ashville. Thank you for this special weekend a tremendous. Thank you to our partners at Wake Forest University into Rick Chess and Gurney. It is a pleasure and an honor, and I welcome you to UNC Ashville. Good evening. So. I'm up here officially to welcome you on behalf of the school divinity. University, but I'm kind of A. not, very institutional guy, and so by way of introduction and welcome I want to read one of. Maryland Robinson's excuse. Me Maryland Nelson's poems from last night. If you weren't here last night, you missed a magical evening with Marilyn Nelson and I'm sure we're in for another magical evening tonight. But I want to read a short clip it for one of her poems. Abu Yaacob said. We talked earlier about celebrating life in a disenchanted world. About how to enchant the world again. Part of Rian. chantant comes for being attentive to our senses. Living in this momentary world attuned to its everyday texture. How it looks smells sounds tastes and feels. But we must be attentive to and at the same time detached from sensory experience. Things have value in themselves, but they are signs of something else. Words and things are always leading us on always talking about something beyond themselves. Things things and words are not a cul-de-sac. They speak the language of signs the language of the absolute. And says I think about what we're doing here tonight. I think that's a great little process. Of caring for language of Rian chanting the world. And of remembering that our words can reach toward and sometimes briefly grasped. The absolute. And I think to do that. We need institutions that serve those ends. So I'm really grateful to our institutions that allow us to do this. To. Our hosts and to my institution, Wake Forest University School of Divinity. For allowing us to to sort of stretch, the boundaries of what these kinds of institutions normally do. And to gather together like we're doing tonight to thank you and welcome. Thank you Mary thank you Fred. So tonight we're going to hear six of our writers who will read from brief passages, a short poems of their own, and so I'm going to invite us all to open our ears and hearts to receive the work. If you're interested in their full BIOS, you can find them in your programs and so please writers come and join me up here at the podium. Reading, from soil and sacrament. I love making compost. The Bright Green Freshly Mown Ri-, vetch and clover. Steam arising from the pile on a cold morning. The smell of the forest floor in your hands. There's a secret joy a kind of charity to be founded this act. Transforming pile of grass and dirt. And old leaves into an offering of humic mystery. On those days I become a priest dispensing the elements to a microbial congregation. Lord take these humble gifts. Grass leaves soil, make them be for us the body and blood of the world holy vessels of self emptying glory. All things come of the Lord of the known. Have we given the? After months of heating and cooling. And turning the pile of well cooked humus is ready to spread onto the soil. Into that I plant speckled trout, Lettuce Curry, squash sugar snap peas. which feed the hungry people of our community? The People's hunger could be slackened, but it would never end, and all the while the secret life of soil continues the gift waiting to be found. Like a ceaseless hymn of praise, the cycle goes on with or without you, winter and summer, rain and drought seat, time and harvest. The process of creation beyond your control that has been in motion since the foundation of the world. It's a song of life that sings even when things around and within you, no longer seem certain. choirmaster. I require of you. The fat man, the fodder, the spastic drooling on her sleeve com chain smokers bring the death boy and his grandfather. Where's the man with the artificial voice box? I need him now have. rappers come call them. Get them here. Assemble the children and their cats and dogs, I want the list and this section on my right call. The nurses at the nursing homes to wheel the bedridden, and I need the coffers, and the burgers right here beside the shrill oh ladies. Run to the door one last time. Call people from the street. Any who come are fit to stay. The Hour is upon us. The in the back row have already begun. They're Ruckus. The yodelers and the Karaoke enthusiasts can hardly contain themselves. This is the Gloria poetry. If, you can sing, saying if you can only Croak Croak like you've never croaked before. From a book of Carols Carol of the infuriated our. The stab to the heart that is such music, the light beyond brightness that is such site for the sake of this season in the stories I will see my wars with God tonight. I will choose with open is the talking beasts, the white, the snowdrift Christmas rose the legends of wandering a better way, high hill in desert for what God knows. Someone turned the rose tree to across and the army's thunder independent central song such the ancient sorrow. They who stole the stories. Have the stories wrong? What saved the old ones in the tangled bland amid assorted enemies is what saves still see the white stag in the tangled, would the cross and the rose on the same Snow Hill? We are saved our infuriated our by cutting softened by beguiled by the newborn tempest, quick to arm motherly, murmuring to him child. My Child. A tutor twelve year olds for their Brian Bat mitzvahs, and this is about a twelve year old girl who had been based on her birthday, signed the portion about the woman accused of adultery. Who has to drink this disgusting potion? How To sail? Scrape at the curse off the parchment. Stir the broken letters into a jar of water. Make a woman drink it. Thus said Elohim But why the said Molly twelve years old. Now. I was the teacher. We sat there to black flames in a room of white fire. We were sailing on a wind that passed through the open window of a room next to the marketplace two thousand years ago. I cannot describe God in the same way that I cannot describe a picture that I am holding a millimeters from my is. The picture is made strange and unknowable, not because it is just inch, but because it is so close. or I cannot describe God in the same way that I can't describe the collections at the Metropolitan Museum of art. There is too much there for me to describe to come out of the museum and tell you about the one Blue Bowl I looked at for an hour does not tell you about the museum. That is the hush of negation, the interrupting reminder that you can't hazard a description of the museum because there is always so much more to be seen. GAW Is nearer and more than I can say. Of course gods refusal to be described, is in some essential ways, unlike the limits of description posed by the museum gallery or the picture I'm looking at you hard. There is excess in the museum. As there is excess in each one of us. Could I ever exhaustively describe you or myself? God, resist description because God is the one who is what God has, and the one in whom, and from whom all beings have what they are. which is not true of the museum? In spite of everything Roan Williams. We go on saying God. This dance between saying and UN. Saying is the way we know. It is God about whom we long to speak. Thank you so much Fred. Luke, David Alicia and Lauren. In God leaves moving novel the Beautiful Possible. Congregational Rabbi Saul carom explains to his wife, Rosalie one of the reasons. He reveres Leonard Bernstein. He explains to Rosalie. How a single large gesture! The sweep of Bernstein's hands at the perfect moment, his own arms that's solves. Arms raised to offer a blessing at the end of services. Can blaze a hole through the sky and change the direction of a life. With their work, Isabel Wilkerson and KRISTA. Tippett have blazed many holes and change the directions of many lives or changed the way many of us understand the lives of others with whom we share this American this human experience. Pulitzer Prize winner Isabel, Wilkerson is the author of the warmth of other Suns The New York Times Bestseller and winner of the Twenty Ten national book critics Circle Award for nonfiction. Brings to life one of the epic stories of the Twentieth Century through three unforgettable protagonists who made the decision of their lives during what came to be known as the great migration. The book made news around the world when President Obama chose warmth for summer, reading on Martha's Vineyard Twenty Eleven. And two thousand twelve. The New York Times magazine named warms to its list of all time. Best books of nonfiction. An early twenty thirteen the New York Times Book Review declared that warmth was published only two years ago, but it shows every indication of becoming a classic. Wilkerson won the Pulitzer Prize for her work as Chicago Bureau chief for The New York Times in Nineteen, ninety, four, making her the first black woman in the history of American journalism to win a Pulitzer, prize and the first African. American to win for individual reporting. The, judges of the Lynton History Prize conferred by Harvard. And Columbia universities which Wilkerson one for warmth described the work like this. Wilkerson has created a brilliant and innovative paradox, the intimate epic. At its smallest scale, this towering work rests on a trio of unforgettable biographies, lives as humble as they were heroic in different decades, and for different reasons they headed north and west along with millions of fellow travelers in powerful lyrical prose that combines the historians rigor with the novelists empathy, and I'd have to add with the poets Lyricism, Wilkerson book changes, our, understanding the great migration, and indeed of the modern united, states. And just a few weeks ago. Isabel Wilkerson was honored once again when she received the two thousand fifteen national humanities medal awarded by President Obama. KRISTA Tippett was also awarded to honored to receive the national humanities medal awarded by President Obama in two thousand thirteen. Much beloved for her inquisitive illuminating interviews with theologians, philosophers, physicists, writers, dancers, activists, environmentalists, spiritual leaders, and a wide variety of serious gifted men and women, whose work has a powerful impact on the World Krista Tippett is the author of three books speaking of Faith Einsteins God and our most recently published book, becoming wise an inquiry into the mystery, an art of living. Following this evening's conversation with Krista Tippett in Isabel Wilkerson books will be available. Thanks to Mala, props bookstore and cafe for purchase and signing the book table is in Carmichael. Hall right across the way from Humanities Lecture Hall and I should also note that almost all of the writers from the festival are still here, and they will also be happy to sign books, and they'd be very happy to sell a few books as well. As I said last night. This evening's conversation is being recorded for possible broadcast as a future episode of Krista Tippett Award Winning Program on being which we can listen to at seven am on Sunday morning. If we have the strength to get up, and if we don't have the strength to get off, we can listen to it anytime of the day day or night as a podcast on their incredible website. But we can listen to it here locally on air on WC Q. US sleaze. Join me now and giving the warmest welcome to the extraordinary Isabel Wilkerson and Krista Tippett. Once again, an overwhelming introduction and a beautiful beginning beautiful with those readings. As. Important as the fact that we've both won the national humanities medal today that we both loved Star Trek the next generation. And I think possibly. The Nobel Committee should consider. A posthumous award for gene roddenberry since they're expanding the definition of literature. Just lost my pen. I'm so happy to be back here tonight. And this is an extraordinary event. And I kind of got lost in this book once again this afternoon. The warmth of other suns. Which Isabel Wilkerson published in two thousand and ten. This is. It's an epic act of reporting and writing. Thank you so much. Over fifteen years. Yielding a majestic work of narrative nonfiction. It's the story of. The migration of nearly six million people from the south of the United States to the north, one of the biggest under reported stories of the Twentieth Century told through the Lens of three lives. But this is history that touched on every American in some way. And that is also route, and that is also revealed in these pages. But as large as this exodus was, and that Biblical word is APT. There was no Grapes of Wrath written to commemorate it, and that's really what what Isabel Wilkerson has done for all of us now in the twenty first century. It is a book about the human spirit. It is a book about truths. We forgot or didn't pass on. But that speak to and shine a light on the human and social crises that are newly visible at the heart of our life together in this country. It is also a book about the Eternal Human Drama of migration that continues in our time here and around the world. And you. Yourself are a child of this great migration. and I wonder if you could just talk a little bit about that, and also you know I always asked this question about the religious or spiritual background of someone's childhood and I think that as I've As my cumulative conversation has progress, I have a much more expansive imagination about what that is. The spiritual background of one's childhood. So I just wonder. If the fact that your child, if this migration flowed into what you now might imagine as the spiritual background of your childhood I do think that they're intertwined I. Mean I'm I'm a daughter of two people who uprooted themselves from the old country of the south. From different states and relocated and remade themselves in the new world, which was Washington DC for them. And In doing so that meant that. They were kind of leaving behind parts of themselves in order to take on this new persona I mean that's what my parents often do. They take on the identity of the new place that they hope will work out for them. No guarantees a leap of faith into the unknown. when it comes to the family background, it so happens that my mother's father was a Baptist Minister Oh. And my father was in Georgia and my father's. My father grew up in Virginia also in a Baptist Church. But his church was so formal and. Controlled and traditional that even the Episcopalians thought they should loosen up a little bit. And while they didn't, they didn't carry on. All of those formal rituals When they got to the north, they did pass on the traditions in the traditions of of You know going forth and forging ahead, no matter what. Of Dignity and grace and family, of striving always and also overcoming, you know always overcoming setbacks and rising up. in in spite of all that it also happens at my father was a pilot. He was at Tuskegee. Really And he actually was, he actually taught. Tuskegee airmen. He wasn't airman and he also taught. Did, flight training for them. And I think there's something about being the daughter of a pilot that makes you feel that you know metaphorically you could fly to. I like that. So. Let's just establish just quickly like the facts, the contours of this of this story. At the start of the Twentieth Century Ninety Percent Black Americans were living in the south. By the end of the great migration, which is. From Nineteen fifteen to nineteen seventy. Forty seven percent. We're living outside the south. Is it is this nearly six million people. How is that heart? It's probably hard to count. It is I mean the the general generally accepted number is about six million. That's an underestimate because a lot of people would not have been captured in the census to begin with right, people would have come up and then found that it didn't work for them or found that it was too difficult to make the adjustment and then returned. Yeah, and so there are there are estimates of you know as much as eight or nine million six million is what we can affirm. And this sentence from your book. By the time the great migration was over few Americans had not been touched by it. It's hard to imagine what our country will look like. If there hadn't been a great migration there, depending upon which aspect of our society WanNa think about certainly in popular meaning music music was reshaped by the great migration. MOTOWN exist as a result of it very gordy. His parents were from Georgia. He migrated to Detroit where once he got to be a grown man, he wanted to go into music and He decided that he didn't have the wherewithal. Go all over the country. They didn't have to because they're. They were in Detroit. All of these young people who had come up. With their parents have been born in the north, and they grew up hearing the music that hit sustain the ancestors, the despair tolls, and the Gospel Music and the Blues Music and they decided they wanted to do something different and he. Hit Daddy. Innovative Yeah tradition, so all of those people in a Diana Ross and and smokey Robinson all of those people are descended of the great migration. Jazz is a creation of the great. Migration Steve is the loneliest monk John Coltrane all of them were children in the great migration, and basically that was one of the great gifts to the country in the world that came out of this migration. When it comes to politics, red states and blue states part became that because once these people when they were in the south. From being able to vote prohibited from being able to vote, so migrated south, and then went north and west they were as immigrants are today brand new voters who had never been on the books anywhere else before, and the Democrats got to them in these places like Chicago and the Chicago election of nineteen forty was the was the African American vote meaning the newly arrived people who had never voted before who helped make the difference for a really difficult very very tight race Franklin Roosevelt was facing his third term and it came down at believed anonymity. Illinois was a swing state. They had the Democratic National Convention. There that's how tight it was, and he won by the margin error of the the number of African Americans who had arrived in the north during before the last election. That is amazing yeah. So the title of the book is the warmth of other suns. which comes from. some lines of Richard Wright another. Character product of this. Experience as he was about to leave Mississippi for Chicago in Nineteen Twenty seven and I'm just going to read it. He wrote I was leaving the south to fling myself into the unknown I was taking a part of the south to transplant in alien soil to see if it could grow differently if it could drink of new and cool rains, bend in strange wins respond to the warmth of other suns, and perhaps just perhaps to bloom. And one thing you wrote. I won't ask about us that your mother I. Mean You so many years writing this? And of course you don't I. Think Book is like it baby and you can't actually name until you can look at it, and so it's not. It was not a predestined that it would be called the warmth of other suns, but your mother who also again. Again as part of this story new from the first of his head to be the title, say something about well. The thing is that it was. It was an an unnamed orphaned child for the longest time that I was working on and yeah. I worked on it for so long that I. Think a lot of people in my life wondered if it would ever happen. Fifteen years. And interestingly enough to says an aside one of the people in the book George Starling, who was a deacon and his church. New York. He said. If you don't finish this book soon, I'm going to be proof reading from heaven. And and. He was right Oh he was. He was right, yeah! So for the longest time it didn't have title and people would be asking me. What's it called and as long as I couldn't give it a name? That's almost as if it didn't exist, and there were enough. People already wondered if it was going to happen anyway, and I happened to be Go with me. I was reading a certain point a book day mean. Mean that there is a tremendous amount of research that had to go into it, and I went back to the actually annotated version the original book by Richard Right. He hits his autobiography. It's called blackboard currently, but it originally was going to call be called American hunger. That was what he had hoped it to for it to be. It's an interesting story about what happened. when he submitted, he had difficulty getting. It accepted to buy the book of the Month Club, which was a big deal at the time, and they said they would accept it as long as he only included the first half which was about the south, and not the second half, and so we had to race to come up with a new ending, because there was I mean it was trapped in half, and he came up with these this distillation that can happen when you're under that kind of intense pressure the combination of time. Urgency creativity genius all coming together, and so he had this. He had this very hastily. Put together new ending, but in the current edition that we have which is everything the entire book. It's not there, so it was only in the annotated version that this as for the footnotes for people are interested, such as I was completely totally interesting. There there it was and I saw this passage and I say this passage was in that and his pal was in the annotated version. Of the of his autobiography, right? And you shared it with your mother. I. Did I mean she was? She was interesting, I mean she she actually this. This entire process of working on this book of delving into this. Painful part of our history was really difficult for them I mean most of the people in that generation did not talk, and I've since talked with met people from all over the world, who are the children or grandchildren of people who suffered? Right it's it's always that. It'd. Be Defies words, and they just don't talk I think there are a lot of reasons why they don't talk, but in any case. It was difficult to get my mother to talk. She was one of these people who was not talking and I at a certain point. This gave up and just thought that she wasn't and I just continue donald what I was doing. She wasn't in the original planning for how I wanted to do this book on some level, it wasn't necessary because she was never gonna be the protagonist. About three people following different paths as you see in a book, but you know wanted to. I wanted and would have enjoyed hearing her side of it, but she was not talking and so what I started to do with. I just began to read what I had to her. And once I began to read what I had to her. Something was activated. Something was triggered in her I. Don't know whether it was just simply memories i. do think that, but I also think there was a kind of almost a rival whereas we'll wait a minute I. actually know something about this. And she started to talk and Aso. I would share. I began to share more and more of it, and she had this way of recognizing instantly. What something should be There's something beautiful that you wrote. About this naming it, he said he wrote the question of the title. Set me on a course. I don't know if you wrote this or said this in another interview, but the question of the title set me on a course of trying to understand just what the sun means to us what it gives us, and what it takes to defy the gravitational pull of your own solar system and take off for another faraway. That is absolutely true I mean I. I actually once. I narrowed it down to that. Seminal poetry from Richard Wright the question was will. Looking back on it now at the seem so inevitable, but at the time I actually spent months and months and united take time and thinking. Oh, well, should it be just? Should it be? Should you need the entire phrase and then I started to think? what is the sign? And what does the sun mean to us? And I really did you know it became a powerful image of what does it take to leave not just your planet, but the force of will to leave your entire solar system for another one far away that you can't see. where? You don't know what will happen to you. And that was that was what animated my sense of connection with them. I began to channel. These people are such a deep connection to what they went through I, even at a certain point began. Going to vintage clothing shops and looking for things from the era I mean I. Really I just felt I was reading the newspapers anyway. I was thinking about what were they wearing? What were the what were the advertisements they were they were supposed to. You know. What kind of medicines were they thinking about? You know the various maids and things. I just got caught up in it. Yeah I think it's necessary for this kind of work. It's almost like method writing as opposed to method acting. Yeah right well. It's clear. I mean immersion doesn't really do justice to what it must have taken to write these. These stories that. That tell a larger story and I. Think even just what you said about this on its cosmic story almost. So maybe! Maybe before we keep going. Maybe, you should just briefly, and I think that briefly is going to be hard. Just introduced these central characters who you chose. I wrote you talked somewhere that you spend eighteen months of interviews more than twelve hundred people to find these three protagonists, and just interviewed seniors at quilting clubs. In Brooklyn senior centers in Chicago bus TRIPS TO LAS. Vegas with seniors from Los Angeles, scouted postal retired postal workers and bus drivers and AARP meetings on his outside of Chicago, and it goes on and on and on, and then you chose three people. They're just briefly. You know. Obviously we're not. Everybody hasn't read the book. And we could spend our whole time talking about these three people and we and I think we're mostly going to focus on really the larger story that that they have helped. You Tell but I do think we should just hear a little bit about who they were. Just introduced the three of them. If you. Don't mind I'd like to I. Say that there is a you might say spiritual. Instinctive decision that had to be made I, and that was whether I was going to go to the archives I to whether it's going to go the people. I chose to go to the people I because the archives would always be there, but the people wouldn't. and that was a huge leap of faith, because that meant I was going almost completely blindly, and this hoping met I, would be able to pull together a narrative without really having done an extensive amount of research ahead of time, but then they became my tutors. They became my guides through this era and all that they had endured. So what I ended up doing was I ended up doing. It's people you know twelve hundred people that I interviewed, but essentially that was a casting call I was listening people for the role of being protagonist in my book and I went to the places that you described, and then after hearing so many stories I. Mean there could be you know there. There are many people who are actually in the book. who were who would have been? The protagonists, but they they didn't make it in the final three. So but they do make an appearance, and what's beautiful is I actually will hear from some of their families, even the people who are just listed in the back. They just so appreciate it so I narrowed it down to about thirty. Any one of the thirty could have been the three, and then I settled on the three, because ultimately I was looking for. A combination of people whose experiences in the south and where they went to the north, and the journeys that they took the reasons motivations circumstances would complement one another, so the first to have left, who actually I should also say that I was looking for people who one who would have left in succeeding generations one. Succeeding decades, so it'd be one per decade, and that was to show rather than to tell you how long this went on, so the first to have left was someone who left in the thirties, and that's item may brandon glad knee, who was a sharecropper's wife and a lovely thing about her? That caught my attention. The very first time I met her was at. She confided to me that yes, she had been sharecropper's wife, and yes, they had to cotton, but that she was terrible at it. She was just off. It was such a lovely notion to me because we just assume that because they were assigned this role in the caste system that they were all suited to it that they you know, we can't I don't know whether we people assume that they liked it. I mean like liking. It was not an option anyway, but they were not even all good at it, and she was terrible at it, so that got my attention. Her family's story however was that one of their relatives was beaten to within an inch of his life. over a an accusation of a after the accident didn't commit and the proof that he had not committed that this theft. Came the next day when the thing they thought he had taken turned up those Turkeys, and they turned up the next day, but he nonetheless been beaten to within an inch of his life, and had to go. The men in the family had to go and retrieve him the planters, the planter and his associates came, and basically kidnapped him, and then beat him. Nothing was going to come of it. You didn't go to the sheriff or or anything, so his her husband decided that they needed to get out. They couldn't leave as easily as it might seem they had to. Carefully plan their strategy. Not Tell anyone they had to keep it quiet and then, and only then could they actually leave? She said was. He didn't tell people you were going until you were gone. Stat was one. The second one to leave was that was from Mississippi to Chicago? I shouldn't say the second went to leave. Was George Swanson starling who had been very very bright man, and hat, a few years of college in Florida is where he was from, but the money had run out for the family The father did not have anything further to send him he did not. African Americans are not permitted to go to the state schools. They can only have gone to the African American school wherever they could get in. And anyway once he was not able to stay in school. He had to return to the work of the people in the place where he was from which was citrus picking the work was dangerous It was the pay was was all but nothing and he. He recognized that they were being cheated. Cheated horribly for what they were doing. And he said about trying to organize them so that they could get a little bit more for the hard work that they were doing for the dangers of when people were these trees were forty feet high, and people would fall out of the trees and you know, break a limb, and nothing was done of it. for his involvement in encouraging people to stand up for themselves, the planters and their associates. Plotted to Lynch him, and he had to flee for his life, and he went to New York. Where he ultimately became a railroad man, and was hurled back into that world of back and forth, and was an eyewitness to the very migration that he'd been part of. The third person was Dr Robert Joseph pershing foster who, in the time, since the book has been out he was a character anyway, but a lot of people have very strong feelings about him. When they read the book he had been a surgeon in the army. but it turned out that when he returned, he'd been the Korean War. He when he returned from the war from his service. It turned out that he could not practice surgery in his own hometown of Monroe Louisiana, and so he set out on a course to to journey out to California where he hoped he'd be able to live out the life that he dreamt for himself He had a family by that time, and he but he as often as a case in migrations, the men will sometimes set out on their own and sort of scout out situation and he did that. But it was a very long. It was a very long drive as anyone would know but he ran into. heartbreaking. Heart heartbreaking rejection on the road out to California that made him question whether he was doing the right thing and question his place in the country. Overall, he couldn't stay places that over and over again he would. He was turned away from hotels, and he was turned away from hotels, time and time again and this was out. What decade with this? This was the nineteen fifties this one thousand nine hundred. And he like many, I mean like law. There's a there is a A an artifact that's getting a lot of attention now. A book which is referred to in the book and that was in some ways. A guidebook was sort of a triple a guidebook mapquest. All of this combined into one. And It was something that was necessary for African Americans as they were making their way through the country traveling without being able to. Find places to sleep no guarantee of being able to get gas for your car, no guarantees of wear, or if he be able to eat, and so these were all of the the hazards that they faced and this this green book was created in Nineteen. Thirty six by this postal worker in New York Victor Green. Who Beautifully as he printed, his first copy said that he looked forward to the day when it wouldn't be necessary. So in our you have. I think just. The notion of refugees and migrants people you've said that the the language of political silent, and is absolutely apt here for. For what people were undertaking? And it's just not. As, much as we know a lot of these stories and a lot of the things that were wrong. That feels like a new recognition. It does I think that because it happened within the borders of our own country, we don't think about it as first of all. It was kind of immigration although these were the, this is the only group of Americans who had to act like immigrants in order to be recognized as citizens. they were forced to to seek political asylum within the borders of their own country because they're there. They were living in a caste system in the south, did not recognize their citizenship and some of them travel farther than than current day. Immigrants Might, but that was really not the point. The point was that the country actually was kind of two countries in one, and that's what they had to do and I often say that the that this book that they've you know. The book is viewed as being a book about the great migration and overtime. As you know as I've talked about it over the years I've come to realize that it's not about migration. The great migration is not. Not about migration and really probably know, migration is about migration. It's about freedom, and how far people are willing to go to achieve it. This is the means that they feel. They must take in order to find freedom wherever they can find it, and and for that reason I think that the focus on migration where where whether it's. We're speaking about the great migration of this era that I'm speaking of our current day. I think that we. Often misjudges. Do not understand what's happening because we're not recognizing really what they're wanting their motivations and also seeing ourselves in them. Yeah and. You know again. I mean you've pointed out. Things like. Driving past a white person or the there were black bibles and white bibles and. That it was illegal to play checkers with a white person and then on the other. End of the spectrum, the one thousand nine hundred gubernatorial candidate Mississippi, who declared if it is necessary, every Negro and the Negro on the state will be lynched. So this is these are the conditions under which people were living, but in the book and I think there's something. This book is such A. It embodies this paradox. That people that that writers know that storytellers know that radio actually knows that the more particular. You can get with your particular your story. The more universally, it can be received in the. That that others can join their life and their imagination with what you have to share. And so some of the moments. There were these moments for me in the book. that. We're just so human, right? There were so relatable that made all of these other horrors. Come home, right, and so one of them for me was. Always name's. Robert Joseph pershing foster because he. Changed the! Name he was using right so but Dr Foster. Who went onto become this brilliant doctor. So when he's a child. fire breaks out in the basement of his school. And the city just said that they weren't gonNA. Replace desks and the teaching supplies, and this is a kid with a beautiful mind. Who wants to learn and? At the time, a local woman says well know we shouldn't do that. Because if those negroes become doctors and merchants or by their own farms. What shall we do for servants? That that this intelligent boy is growing up with that and another just another moment with George Swanson Sterling was. You asked him. what he hoped for in leaving and he said. I was hoping I would be able to live as a man and express myself in a manly way getting chills without the fear of getting lynched at night. and. Even the way it comes to cross I, mean he? He didn't say it doesn't sound like you. said it with a lot of bitterness or drama, it was just a matter of fact, not not even that much emotion because it was these were the facts of their lives and. At that time when they were growing up in this time, period was a very long time. It was the end of reconstruction until the nineteen seventies. Encompassed someone who was born at the you know in the eighteen eighties and passed away in the sixties known nothing other than this, and so these were the facts of their lives, and he didn't. He was not emotionally wasn't bitter. It was just a matter of fact statement of what it was. He was up against and why he felt he had no choice but to go. He I. I ran into a lot of people said they didn't think they would've. They would've lived if they had stayed. There's actually a tremendous amount of fear that a lot of parents in the south had for their children if they were. They were extroverted and opinionated children if they were spirited and. Know there was a need to rein that in I mean in other words childhood itself had to be controlled and repressed, because it could mean their very lives, and so he grew up under that and his father said well. If this is if you're going to continue doing this work, things that are doing its best to go. And one of the one of things that happen in this great migration. Is that It's spread people all over this country. You mean people places that they went. There had not been a significant African American population right when you look at. The African American population of all of the cities in the north, Midwest and West are result of this. We're seeing the manifestation of that Seattle or or Oakland or Detroit wasn't. Wasn't none of those places where they were at the time and a lot of them are are filled by people who felt they had no choice that they would not have lived at. They hadn't gone now I'm KRISTA. Tippett and this is on being today and with the writer start again. Sorry never here we start again. I'm Krista Tippett now no laughing. I'm KRISTA Tippett. I'm KRISTA. Tippett and this is on being today, and with the writer Elizabeth Wilkerson at the faith in Literature Festival at University in the faith in Literature Festival at the University of North Carolina Asheville. What did I say Isabelle? Oh okay boy this last days. It's really not usually this bad. Why did I say Elizabeth all right? It's a derivative, so it's actually okay Isabelle, I loved her name is. I was thought if I had a third child. It would never expect thank you. I'm KRISTA Tippett. I'm Krista Tippett, and this is on being today with the writer Isabel Wilkerson at the faith and literature. Festival at the University of North. Carolina Ashville. So something else. Something that was disturbing to me and I. don't even feel like. I feel like it was just again so matter of fact, but so I I lived in divided Europe in the cold war-era and I I have. I lived in a place where people were stopped from leaving the place that you know we're. Where the border was meant to keep people out in rather than out, which is so bizarre. and. That actually was happening now, too, but what? What I also found really disturbing about the dynamic. Is that on the one hand? African Americans were being lured by the north as cheap labor. It's it's kind of. It's you know so? That is a reverse of the dynamic. We're seeing for example in Europe now. They were they were desired as cheap labor. And the south for the same reasons was. We're keeping people in. That's shocking to me. I don't know I shouldn't be shocked, but just. Well. I think that A lot of this actually is not it's. It's out there, but it's not commonly known and one of the things that I hear most often when I go out talking about this book or people right to me constantly, and it's the same phrase over, and over again I had no idea I hear it over and over again from people who actually were alive at the time that some of these things were going on part of it as You know as we were discussing before. Is that a lot of people just didn't talk about it? If you think about it on both sides of this caste system or this divide, there was not much incentive for anyone to talk about it i. mean on the one side you know people don't WanNa. Really think about the awful things going on around them, and those who were suffering from it and and had escaped the burden their children with. It was like post stress. Trauma these are people who were deeply profoundly traumatized, and it passes on through the generations, which is how it reverberates to our current day. UNADDRESSED. Stress and trauma can evidence itself in so many different ways, and so that's one of the reasons why people might not have known about these things I mean, I, myself, I mean of course, too. Because I didn't know, I was doing the research and there were there were so many things that I was discovering I was overwhelmed with the things that I was discovering I had no idea I mean how could any of us have known but to get to your point though The the elaborate mechanisms to maintain the this divide almost it borders almost on. If you if it weren't so deadly and and sad, it would be almost absurd because the what happened with the trains when they reached a border space, and the trains had to, they were going into free territory of Illinois after crossing over You know from the neighboring. Neighboring state from Kentucky. Depending upon what part of Illinois there in and they have to actually uncouple the the trains because the new place doesn't have the segregation, but the old place had the segregation, so the segregated trains had to be pushed to the Samurai. This is a version of crossing between East Germany and West Germany when Iron Curtain divided Europe. I make reference to that that image because they were crossing over into into another land with different laws, different different expectations and the border areas where a place of great uncertainty I. I found myself. saddened for them that when they ran places where they putatively were free, they would be when they crossed over. They were afraid to move into the integrated cars. They stayed where they were. They were going from the south to the north, and they've crossed over the border into Illinois into Ohio. They were they were afraid to move they. They didn't want to draw attention to themselves. It had been so. So ingrained in them the restrictions that they wouldn't even take the chance, and so it takes time to overcome the unconscious absorption of the caste system into which they had been raised and born, and it's not like they were being welcomed with open arms when they landed in northern cities now many of them. Sadly, the great is that they were brought in strikebreakers, by the union by the companies who were trying to break the unions, and and so that meant that one of the great tragedies of the twentieth century is that there were all these people arriving in these big cities the North Industrial Cities Detroit Chicago Cleveland Buffalo all of these places, and there were people coming in from parts of Europe Eastern and Southern Europe for example and there were people coming from the South African Americans all wanting the same thing. They were the same people from small towns and the countryside. They left all that they knew. Kinfolk mothers and fathers and sisters and brothers, and taking their chances greatly faith into the unknown into these harsh and anonymous cities and there they are pitted one against the other one group is permitted to join the Union to work in these jobs. They were stratification of the kind of jobs that people could do in the North African Americans arrive with with. Know in some ways with saddled with a visible. Visible stamp of cast, and and there were places in Milwaukee, for example that said No african-american many places actually said African Americans would not be hired, but they could actually they would stop them as they were walking up to the factory gate because it was visible. That, they were African, American, and so as it turned out many of the recruiters representing. You might say the north they wanted. The Labor. Of African Americans from the south, but didn't want the people. How do you do that? Right right. And again. To think of. To think of this in terms of other refugee and crises and immigration immigrants that we think of I, mean the story of so we don't you know again. We don't think of these as people who are crossing borders of language and citizenship, but the story of Jesse Owens. Right that that's not the name he was born with right tell. Language could be an issue, right? What was his name, his name was James Cleveland Owens. He was from his family was from Alabama. They were in Alabama large family they were. Frightened for him, because he was small, boned and frail, and the youngest of the of the family, and they were worried for what's GonNa? Happen Him because share cropping is tough. Tough backbreaking, you know sunup to sundown job work. And they were not being paid for. They were working for the right to live on the land that they were farming, so there was not really money coming in, and they were worried for him where they happen to be was they were in a part of Alabama where everyone around them was whispering, African Americans were whispering about this place in the north. Call Cleveland. And this his parents chose to name him Cleveland. James. Cleveland Owens The family was divided as to whether they should go, but the mother prevailed and they went they once they arrived in the north and he went to his first class. The teacher asks him his name and he says J. C. which is. What they call them short for. Cleveland and the teacher speaking differently in the north than they spoke in the south, which is what I would say that maybe language actually was a barrier. didn't understand him and just call started calling Jesse, he went home and told his parents what happened in school that day they started calling him Jesse to. What we have! Their attitude was. That must be what they do when you go north renamed your children. So I wanted to read a little bit of Another moment for me and this brings us to our moment and moment in the book. That was just heartbreaking was very early on. And it's when you first met item May in nineteen, ninety six in Chicago. From the open door in the vestibule I see her. She is sitting in a in a cotton house dress on a baby. Blue Plastic covered easy chair by the window. She is looking through a parting of curtains at the St Circus below. There, they are all scuffling beneath her urban drug dealers, falling down sweatpants, bullying at their feet now bent over the driver's side window of a late model sedan from the suburbs, fourth graders, doing lookout for men who could be their fathers, young girls with their stomachs swelling already. Middle aged men living out of their pontiacs gangsters. Who might not make it to the weekend? She lives on the second floor of a three flat on the south side of Chicago I want to say before say this. She is a remarkable joyful person. But this is a heartbreaking moment. To know that this is. This is what it became for her in Chicago the Promised Land. It's a reflection of the structures that they confronted upon arrival. It's all the things that you know that sociology and political science and the history. Come together and show us. That they arrived. Invited but not welcome. They arrived. Making the least for the hardest work, they arrived Consigned to neighborhoods. That in which that were declining, that had been declining from the moment. They arrived me I'm talking about the beginning of the migration, the subdivision to subdivided Cold water flats that they were living in the originating part of of where these people are living upon arrival. And they were making the least amount of money paying the highest rent because there was no competition there, this was not an open market they were not African. Americans were not permitted in any of these cities to live anywhere that they wanted or anywhere that their money would take them making the least paying the most for their for wherever they were living, and he's decrepit places. They were Little in the way of upward mobility, many of them were attacked because they were brought in strikebreakers means. Is Everything going against them, but you can imagine. And then what set in place the reaction to the arrival of these people? Were then efforts to further isolate them and restrict them to these hemmed in roped off places in every city that they went to all of us who've been to? North, though exactly where the arriving they arriving district arriving neighborhood of people, the great migration would be because that's where it's the oldest broken down neighborhood in all these cities usually not well positioned by the railroad tracks, or near the that you know it's. It's almost like a refugee camps of now because you go refugee camps around the world now and you hear the word refugee camp and you'd think it's tense, but in fact where you have refugee camps for generations of people have been living. It looks like. That's exactly it. I mean that's that's such incredible. observation that you're making that is these were refugee camps created in our American cities, and as they sought to expand our if they manage to save whatever they could from these jobs and a lot of them, this new research about the great migrations coming out, showing that they actually worked multiple jobs, so that actually the people who arrived. There's a lot of fascinating sociology that came out of this that they were. Because, they had known nothing but work. That is all that they had known in the south. I mean that was, and they were not being paid for their hard work. The opportunity to get paid for your hard work meant that they were more likely to work. Even harder as immigrants often do working multiple jobs often, and that meant that they actually were making more money, not a lot in general terms, but they were making more money than the African Americans who had preceded them had already who had grown in you're to and who had grown weary of the fight, so they had come in fresh blood wanting. Immigrants Sphere has high, and so they actually were making more money, but it wasn't going as far because there were so many coming in flooding these neighborhoods that were actually being hemmed in and and pressed against because they were not able to spread out that they were paying more because it was, it was It was a seller's market, and that was the world that they had entered. They were living in the vice districts. I mean all of the things that make for. Every possible disadvantage that you can have going in, that's what they were facing. And so the city's what all these cities ended up. Doing was created further barriers. They created restrictive covenants which meant. For effort for white for white residents or white homeowners. Even if they wanted to sell to African Americans they were restricted as to being able to sell, because there was this covenant on the deed that said it could not be sold to African Americans. Other groups might have been included as well but African Americans would surely have been on there. There were there were then also read, there was redlining. That meant that African Americans they if they sought to buy a home. The existence of African Americans in the neighborhood meant that the place was that that neighborhood was disqualified from fha loans for the people who were seeking go that meant your existence by definition, prohibited you from getting a standard mortgage, and so they would then get mortgages on the second market and secondary market, which meant that they were paying exorbitant rates. This is sounding very much like. Two thousand six in two, thousand, seven for us now, and so this is all setting in motion, all of these forces that were making it even more difficult for people to succeed in these big places, the referred the receiving stations, the refuge, the cities of refuge for the people of a great migration. So? Between the time, you first published a book in two thousand and ten and today. These have been years in which. We have been forced to confront the fact that. With all the laws that were passed with the progress that was made, there's so much. So much unfinished business. And in fact that all the progress had. Wasn't there. and I wonder how you you watch. What has risen to the surface I mean I think the good news is that we see this. It's not unforeseeable anymore. It's a moment of reckoning. and I wonder how. Having traced this history seeing this, you know being able to see the origins of. Some of these dynamics that we're facing now again. How you how you have understood what is happening now in ways that perhaps you wouldn't have you done this research and delved into this. Story. Well. It's it's kind of reminded me that you know. Our country is like a really old house. I leveled houses. I've always lived in houses, but old houses need a lot of work, and the work is never done, and just when you think you finish one renovation, it's time to do something else. Something else has gone wrong. And that's what our country is like and I feel as if when you have an old house and there's been. You know some some you know Crisis. Storm. Of some kind. And you have to check your house and go into that basement and you may not want to go into that basement. But if you, you really don't go into that basement, it's at your own peril. And I think that. Whatever you were ignoring. Is Not going to go away. Whatever your ignoring is only going to get worse. Whatever you're ignoring will be there to be reckoned with until you reckon with it. And I. think that that's why we're called upon to to do where we are right now. I'm also reminded. There's a tremendous amount of new and exciting research on the sort of this is foundational in the DNA of of our country. Which is what? This book is about to. It's about the caste system, the artificial hierarchy that was put in place before a great great great grand parents. were alive. It's something that we've inherited. It's not something that we wanted. If you're on the the beneficiary end of it, you didn't ask to be on the beneficiary end of it certainly, if you're on the the targeting targeted end of it, you certainly didn't ask to be on that, but this is where we are and the new exciting. Exciting research is showing that you know these these are unconscious biases that exist in the DNA of our country. We are have all been exposed to it. It's really is if you know something that you know to be exposed to. The culture means to be exposed to these unconscious biases, and I think that it's calling upon us to to reckon with this finally. the fact that the disturbing thing about where we happen to be right now, is that yes, these things are unsuitable. But that does not mean that actions being taken I. Mean we see that? So many of these cases are really not. They're not being prosecuted. I. Mean Some of the answers are not actually. I don't know if it's a better thing or not i. mean now that we have the evidence for this incontrovertible I mean. How can you not see this and each case that does not get acted upon I think deepens our own. collective complicity in the send just injustice I. also think that you know we have to recognize how we are all being victimized, too by these images of of death. You know African Americans you know these are these are deaths that we're actually seeing human beings American citizen by arm citizens who are dying before our very eyes, and what is the effect that that's having on all of us collectively? Is that inuring says that numbing us to the to. Black death is numbing US an enduring us to the maybe helping us to to feel that actually it's not this is acceptable as it making it acceptable on some level because you see something enough times it normalize it and I would like to think that this would never be viewed as normal. I mean here's a striking. Terrible statistic that you that you know that there was a lynching every four days in the early decades of the twentieth century. And it's been estimated that an African American is now killed by police every two to three days. I think. I also find great hope in the science of implicit bias, this also just US understanding our brains, and if you want to see it in the largest possible perspective, it's this possibility we have in the twenty first century of wholeness of really understanding ourselves and our wholeness. I think. I've never thought of. It is in terms of people getting inured to black death, but I do think something that happens. Is that these images are. People feel so paralyzed by them. Right so it's so terrible. It's so inexplicable. And you have no idea how you could make a difference. I I would agree with you I. Actually find this new researchers is why described it as exciting? it parallel work to the idea. The use of the term caste system which is a term that anthropologists us and the twenties and thirties when they were talking about the south and in particular, but I think it definitely expands also to the rest of the country because it is still the south is is is a. Part of the United States. So this is our collective inheritance. I think that what's freeing about it. It's liberating because it takes it away from the personal. This is not personal, right. It doesn't mean that there aren't things at each. And every one of us can do our personal lives to in how we comport ourselves, and how we reach out to others, and how we treat those around us and other actions that we might choose to take politically or otherwise, but it, but it also means that it's it frees us from the twin barriers to understanding guilt and shame near right right because it's not personal and a caste system is a structure that we. We have inherited that we did not create that we don't. There's no point in pointing fingers about it, but it's something that we recognizing it is the first step toward toward dismantling it and recognizing unconscious bias is the first step to to finding ways to inoculate ourselves from it, and to recognize that it's not personal it's it has nothing to do with being a good person or a bad person. It means that you've been. We've all been exposed to the same messaging. And As much as You know the dynamics here abroad. There's a lot to be. There's a lot that is Is a fearful backlash kind of fearful and frightening resistance to this knowledge. That also comes from those primitive parts of our brain. But I. Feel like the success of this book. And books like Michelle. Alexander's the new Jim Crow, and coats to she uses a term cast, too. Yeah about the same year we didn't neither of. US knew about the right right determined to use our independent research separate. Came to the conclusion that that was the appropriate and precise term to describe. The the way that we live in the world in which we live. And the way people are engaging with this book this tallying of a truth and work and Tana. Hussy coats this book. I feel I I want to take that seriously. Because there there is, it does suggest. An opening to knowing this and to grappling with this and I mean you said to me, what would you show? Everybody your book? This is it. Miles on, it looks like a Bible. And and you said to me now that really all you do I, mean you? You're Pulitzer. Prize winning reporter, but all you do now travel around. Accepting invitations to talk about this in rooms like this, which makes me feel really hopeful I mean, and it's kind of a narrative of. Another kind of energy that's present in this moment that we don't. We don't tell ourselves that story of right now. But I don't know. Am I reading that into it? What's what what has been your experience of being out there with this material? I, will you know it's? It's actually been all over the world and I I. I think that The store, the the the universal human story of these people, the you know the the fact that people can identify with these people. Allows Entree to see some really difficult aspects of our history, so it can be read on multiple frequencies. And I think that the frequency at which people approach it works for them at that time, and then people will tell me they read it again, and then they see it in another way, and that's part of it. But the response has been just as he said it's so encouraging. I actually was in in Singapore Talk about this book and I was speaking to a group of high school students who can be sometimes challenging and I I usually like to give them. Examples of people who they can recognize thrown were part of the great migration, and but I didn't know how well that would play there and. So I was. I was giving these clues and I said. This is an individual who was was guitarist, and his his his mother was from Virginia, and she migrated out to Seattle and the hands shot up in the back. The student thought Jimi Hendrix and I was just thinking my goodness. It has just really truly Migra Emmy. The culture has migrated and appreciation for how this has unfolded, and the impact that it's had has resonance around the world. Michelle Obama is also another. Good it just you know this person in the center of our culture. Is just a great story of the product of this product I mean there's so many people tony. Morrison August Wilson's. They'll watch. Washington I mean they're so so many people are that you could you could. That's one way of recognizing the impact that it had because ultimately what this migration was, and I think people are are identifying it is that it was it was really the it was an uncorking. It was an unleashing of this pent up creativity and and genius in many cases. Of People miscast in his caste system. You know you think about those those cotton fields and those rice plantations and those tobacco field, and and on all of those cotton, fields and tobacco, plantations and rice plantations were opera, singers, and jazz, musicians, and poets, and and professors, defense attorneys doctors I mean that's a this is the manifestation of the desire to be free, and what was lost to the country. Because for centuries you know for two hundred and forty six years of enslavement and I I have to remind people twelve generations of enslavement. Twelve generations of enslave. How many greats do you add to grandparent to get that back to sixteen nineteen until eighteen sixty three? And that gives you a sense of how long. All of these people were MS cast into an artificial hierarchy as to what they were permitted to do. you know or risk death if they did not do that and you know so that that I think that people are more open to hearing that now and one one. Know fact about this whole idea of where we are right now you know to sort of cosmetically I, think in terms of the where we are as a country. Is that when it comes to this history is that? Enslavement and then Jim crow lasted for so long that enslavement alone we have not no not no labor this way. Adult alive today will live to see a time when enslavement, the time of enslavement was equal to the time of freedom. No because it lasted for two hundred and forty six years. It's been about one hundred and fifty or so years since. You know since enslavement ended since the thirteenth amendment and you know we're looking at another ninety five years from that time right, and so that shows you that this history is long, and history is deep. You know when you go to. Other countries go and other parts of the world in Europe or in the other places, and the history goes so far back and in the people in Portugal can still remember that you know well. There was that. There was a catastrophe and you know the fifteenth century haven't gotten over that yet Iraq You know think about how this is really not that long ago in a sense of generations in the sense of of even. Sort of I would view it almost cellular memory in the bones of people, and I feel as if this is not something that should be dismissed. I was actually I actually was also. Encouraged by the fact that after the the Charleston Mother Emmanuel, shootings for the Commonwealth of Virginia, rose to the occasion and the Richmond. Times dispatch said. You know the the editorial board said that there should be a truth and Reconciliation Commission and that it should come from. It's a come from Virginia, which was the capital of the confederacy and it. The the solutions lie in the South I believe I really believe that the solutions lie in the south. I wanted to read. Something that. was, a blog a minister in rural new, England if you do this. It's called. It's called faith in the ordinary. And so I think it's a man, but it could be a female minister in New Hampshire Third, third-widest state in the US the with the white population of ninety six percent. And a state that borders numbers, one and two main at ninety six point nine percent Vermont at Ninety six point seven percent. We have to work harder to make these connections. If you haven't read it, try and find. A book called the warmth of other suns by Isabel Wilkerson. It is hands down the best work of nonfiction. I've ever read. It tells the story of how the Jim Crow laws, and their accompanying attitudes shaped the lives of three black Americans who came North during the twentieth century when I was reading it I, kept saying over and over again I had no idea I had no idea. And then he says we may be clueless and awkward the subject of race, but we know what the Gospel demands that we keep working at being better neighbors. I think about that so much these days about this work of knowing our neighbors who are strangers and that that in fact is the. Is the immediate work that in fact is not. It's not evident how we do it because we're so segregated in so many ways in our communities but it's possible. And I I. Wonder People must ask you this question I. Wonder How. If. There's advice you give or thoughts you. That's terrible or thoughts. You have about about this work of coming to know our neighbors who are strangers of being neighbors just that. Well I think I wanNA to start to answer the question with a fundamental sad recognition with these police, shootings, and then get the answer. And that is that there's so many things disturbing about them and the videos are showing them, but I think that you know people can disagree on. What the officer was thinking of what the what the circumstances of his arrival what he saw what he thought, and he's a split-second decisions There are a lot of things going on. And often they there's a there's a refrain that comes across it, says I feared for my life I didn't know didn't know it in no feared for my life. But I think the human question. In, that is disturbing and hard to reckon with is what is happening in these cases. After the person is down. And I think that. All of us have to think about what is it? What is it that we're hearing? And what is it that we're seeing? Why is it that basic human response to a person in distress? Why is it that first aid cannot be ministered to people once they are bleeding on the ground? Where is the threat once they are already near death? Why can't they even if they're not? Equipped and I would assume that an office of the peace would be a quick, but I'm I'm not an expert in this, but even the basic human response to take the hand of someone whose life is slipping away from them and to comfort them. That is the essential missing piece which is empathy. Empathy and recognition in the common humanity of another person, and as I, said we can disagree on this the circumstances and the details and the so-called facts of of the situation, but after the person has down, whereas the humanity I think calls upon all of us to recognize I think the need for radical empathy, and I think that empathy is a word that that gets used a lot, but I would challenge people to think about what does that really mean and for the is not pity. Or sympathy in which you are looked, you know MP Pity of you're looking down on someone and feeling. Sorry for them. Simply you may be looking across at someone and feeling bad for them empathy, getting means getting inside of them, and understanding their reality and looking at their situation, and saying not. What would I do if I were in their position? But what are they doing? Why are they doing what they're doing? From the perspective of what they have endured. And that is an additional step at their multiple steps that a person has to take to really be open to that. And all. In all of. These discussions about what's going on now We're so very divided and we're focused. There's such a focus on other and other can mean all kinds of things, and so people will often say. Why is it that those people do that thing? Why is it that those people are doing this over here? And in my view? There's only one answer to that question. The only answer to that question is why do human beings do what they do when they are in that situation, it's not the people those people it's what to human beings do, and it calls for radical empathy in order to put ourselves inside the experiences of another, and to allow ourselves the pain. Allow ourselves heartbreak allow ourselves the sense of hopelessness whatever it may be. That they're experiencing, and it's a difficult thing to do, but it's necessary. I think you know. I think one of the reasons that we're in the situation that we're in our countries because you know the laws. Have laws have been changed you know. Lots of laws were passed actually in the eighteen sixties. Right and they had to be. Revisited in the nineteen sixties and why is that? Partly I think it's an indication that the laws are necessary, but not sufficient and that we recognize we recognize that the laws can be changed if the hearts have not changed. And so I view myself as on kind of a mission. To to change the country, the world, one heart, chuck time, and it's a tough tough tough thing to do. I mean I. Feel as if is the last frontier, and because we have tried so many other things and the laws. We've passed that we thought were written and grant we see can be erased and are in peril. If. If as a collective, we not recognize why I also believe it in the time of working on this book. I it's it's a multidisciplinary their sociology psychology economics. All of these things are in there, but I think the foundation of all of those of all of those disciplines comes down to the history. When you go to the doctor. Before you can even see the doctor The very first thing they do. Give you all of these pages to fill out. And they before the doctor will even see you. He wants to know your history. He doesn't WANNA. Know just your history gene wants to know your mother's history. He wants to know your father's history right. They may go back to your grandmother and your grandfather on both sides, and that's before he will even see you. You cannot diagnose a problem until until you know the history of the problem that you're trying to resolve. And I think that that is why the history is so necessary to getting us through this because we keep repeating history over and over again right because we haven't we first of all people don't know it, and they don't know it in order to address it and they feel it's going to be too painful. I think you know you were asking about this book. And how it's moved around in the world, I think this book is proof or the response to. It is proved that it's not as hard as it has to as you might, it will be. That actually you can find it. Not just enlightening but healing. But I think part of the reason. You made it not as hard as you opened up the that it's not as hard as it has to be. A city you humanize the history. Right and I think that this minister is onto something when they say we need to see our neighbors. Because, actually, we can't I mean there's so much you said just said so much there, but scientists actually helping us in. Changing your heart is a synonym for overcoming on unconscious by straight I mean. There's things that are these things that it's becoming more conscious about what's going on inside us. And then working with that. I think I just lost my train of thought. But. The. Week, Oh, another thing we're learning is that. Empathy is and this is a problem with journalism. Frankly empathy is not triggered by a statistic now. It's triggered by not triggered and we should talk about this before we finish by now. Millions of people moving across Europe absolutely. In search of survival and freedom, and just the ability to create a life for their children. We, cannot we. We cannot take that in, but we can take in every once in a while. The face of one child and that. Enables us to take in the. Enormity of the tragedy I mean I, feel like everything just set also. Explains how and this is something where I feel like? If we could frame it this way we could. Reckon with this better. This is not this moment ran is not just a social crisis and not just a political crisis. It's spiritual places as much as we have to deal with it at those other levels. We have to deal with it at this level in terms of who we are because really that's all that's left I. Mean we have dealt we. Konami gets dealt with the laws. Get dealt with these are things that are there front and center and I think. that as a species we know to do we know how to do that. Yeah, it's the spiritual aspect. They human. remained the human heart and examining at. Allowing, US ourselves to feel the pain of others. You don't WanNa. Feel your own pain. Why would you wanna feel someone else's pain, right? Yeah so. I. Think it's an act of love, an act of faith to allow yourself to feel the pain of another and. I think that's also why we have to accompany each other, because it's not something that any of us welcomes to feel that pain. But we do know that if we. Take something like that on together. It can be bearable so I mean that's why I feel like so important to have a group of us in this room together. Thinking about these things together. Gosh, there's so much else we can talk about I. Do want to. I do I. Do want to say that as I was reading this book and again this is this is not something you could imagine two thousand ten. I was thinking about the refugee crisis in our midst now. And it's not so much an American crisis, but it is because we are all connected, and of course we have refugees coming here. You told me last night a story about. A woman from agree yeah. Yeah Yeah! It stays with me and actually her daughter is here in the. Amazing reminded me of. When? The? Press it by saying that another thing about my father. My father had been a ski airman. And after the war, they found it very difficult to find work as as pilots. No one would hire them as pilots. Even they were considered among the best. that it come out of the war, and so he had to remake himself yet again and. In Doing Matt, he chose a totally different path. He became a civil engineer, so my father was literally a builder of bridges. And I carry that tradition, and that part of him into the work that I do, and it's only in the Times. This book has come out that I realized that that's the reason why constantly made these this gesture throughout the book to immigrants and to recognizing that? The. The people are great migration. These African Americans who many people might have been told that have nothing in common with a totally different. They're this or they're. That are actually actually did the very same thing that the ancestors of so many people in this country did. But any case I when the book first came out I didn't know. What was going to play out and I There is I was giving a talk on Long Island. Really bitterly rainy day but it was extremely one. It was a wonderful turnout, and at the end of the talk there was a very long signing line. The book just been out. There's a lot of excitement and at the front of the signing line was very diminutive woman, grandmotherly figure She had somehow elbowed her way to the front of the line. I don't know how did that, but she was she. Her arms were filled with books. That she had bought. She wanted me to sign them. But her eyes were you know were. We're red and. She was saying she was saying I I. Just I just cannot talk about this book that I just read the book I. Just I just but I just cannot talk about this book. She said if I start talking about the book I'm GonNa cry for sure. She said I can't talk about this book because this book is my story. She said. I'm an immigrant from Greece. And this is my story. And her name was Anna Steph, Anita's and. I don't think she would mind if I mentioned it. I ended up going. Just was so floored by that. We got our pictures taken. It was a lovely moment. and she said she was going to have the rest of our family read it i. then had a an event in Brooklyn. She showed up at that again. We you know we we. She was in tears. I was in tears. We have never really spoken because we're always just like you know in tears. And and that was that. was that bridge across the artificial barriers? That's a communing across the expanse. It's it was it was this beautiful coming together? That was so many things have come as a result of this book, and it's one so many various awards and notes but but that was actually within my heart. My hope that it could cross boundaries and I've had many many many experiences similar that there's a man of Pittsburgh. Who wanted me to sign the book on page. He said. This is the reason why I love this book, and it's because of a word you put on page whatever the page was to contain or whatever it was, and I said well. What's on that page? And we went to the page? And he said it was Serbia because his grandfather had come from Serbia to Chicago and it meant so much to him to read all the way through this book and. And then suddenly to see his the country of his ancestry there, and he wanted me to sign the, but he wanted me to sign the section. One of the comments from one of the EPA graphs from Richard Reid in which Richard Reid saying you know warily. We arrived from the you know the station and we are holding our our suitcases close to us because we are green, we are new and we're frightened in this new place. He said that was my grandfather arriving from Serbia and that's what I want you to sign. So I have had so many experiences and I think as reader what this opens up in the imagination is. The lot the lives of of beauty and Struggle and nobility. That are in that those crowds that we see and you stop being able to see them as crowds as as abstractions refugees. I WanNa read There's so much else we can talk about I. WanNa read actually the last paragraph of the book. And And just district flecked with you a little bit on that. Yeah. Over the decades, perhaps they're wrong. Questions have been asked about the great migration. Perhaps it is not a question of whether the migrants brought good or will so the city's. They fled to or were pushed or pulled to their destinations, but a question of how they summoned the courage to leave in the first place, or how they found the will to press beyond the forces against them and the faith in a country that had rejected them for so long. By their actions. They did not dream the American dream. They will it into being by definition of their own choosing by definition of their own choosing. They did not ask to be accepted, but declared themselves the Americans that perhaps few others recognize, but that they had always been deep within their hearts. And so you trace these stories of these individuals. These particular stories of this universal drama. and I wonder. And you really as you said, what did you say you channel these people in her brain? And heart and heart, and so how? What what? Did you learn. What do you carry around with you about? About what it means to be human through these lives that you carry with you now. I really have came to believe and to know. That we all have so much more in common than we been led to believe, and that we have been sadly tragically assigned roles as if we're in a play, and this is. This is what these people do this. These people do this what these people do! And the tragedy is that regardless of which assignment you had been? You had been put into. That might not have been your strength at all and I I just have gained in such. This has been out for six years. I spent fifteen years on it. researching and writing it. I have never grown weary of talking about it every time. I talk about it. I gave new appreciation and gratitude and amazement at what they were able to do. One of the things that I hope to do was to bring the invisible people into the light they. They never were be written about. We just skip from in civil war, civil rights in this entire part of our mayor of our country's history and their lives generations, actually of people skipped over not recognized, and I felt that that it deserved its own place and recognition I believed that you know the sort of bringing the invisible people. The light would help all. All of us to understand and see ourselves better, because we've been so affected by what they did, and what these people did I mean by sheer force of will, they were able to make the emancipation proclamation live up to its name in the in their individual lives to the degree that they could. It means that they were able to do what you know what? What the you know, what a President Abraham Lincoln was not fully able to do, and they were able to do. What the powers of be north-and-south were not really fully able to do and they it was about their agency, and they're making a decision for themselves and declaring themselves to be citizens which they had always been, but it never been really truly recognized. And I wanted to tell you that you know we I was talking about these people from other different backgrounds who feel such a connection to them, but to the people now. A woman who's she said I may reminded her was exactly like her Norwegian grandmother. I mean so. but Very unusual things that that has happened that seems appropriate for the conversation that we're having. Is that So, many children or grandchildren, children primarily of the great migration have come to me and told me with the sense of healing and completion that this book was the last book that their parent read before they died. And you would think that it would be incredibly tragic and sad, but it's the exact opposite. It's this was the they were great. The the the the children were grateful that their parents had had the chance to read this before it was too late. Remember these people who didn't talk about their experiences that it's also it's not i. mean these three here. You show how people continue to create lives full lives. Even with these circumstances and through these circumstances. And you don't know how to react when someone says. This is the last book that. My mother father read before they died. But they said was such joy and gratitude, and they say that it allowed them to come to terms with all that they had endured, and to and to give their suffering some meaning and to. That they had not been alone, but that they have been part of something bigger, some connection to you know immigrants around the world other people who'd come up from the south as they had and and others who had. been able to. Express their freedom and their individuality, and in the way they had chosen the that it was a peaceful and their view, fulfilling and healing way to have left this planet and. That means so much to me I mean these are always letters of thanks and gratitude. There's something new, said Oh. You talked about how? Part of what drives you as an aspiration to find strength in the discovery of what is true. And I think what you're describing is however hard. The truth is. It it does complete us it isn't it? Isn't path a necessary path to? Well. I say, but it seems to set some people free, yeah! That's a great great last word. I, Thank you so much and what a delight is!

Krista Tippett Isabel Wilkerson writer Fred Bunsen Pulitzer Prize Detroit Chicago Wake Forest University School Twentieth Century UNC Ashville Illinois Chancellor Mary Grant Isabel Mississippi Wake Forest University New York President Obama Evan Gurnee Rick To
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"Vocal father. And the better judgement. Of this wise man. So the voices I'll get up and go to my father, and so we practices speech is what I'm. GonNa say. Father I've sinned against heaven and in your site. I'm no longer worthy to be called your son. Make me as one of your hard men. There's chain. Dripping from that statement I am so unworthy. I'm so undeserving yearly even Oh me a roof over my head, but if you will please grant me a place back in the shed where the hired servants are just. Just that. So much better than this. That's what I'll do. Verse Twenty. So good. Love to preach, this is our moment right now, folks. This is the moment, so we got up and he came to his own. Nope came news neighborhood. Nope came to his room, came to. His father came to his father. His father. His father. And while he was still a long way off their ears on the porch. That's you. Think of what he does love it. When he was still a long ways off his father saw him. And felt compassion. Look at the first response rather than on a show that would never I'm gonNA put him in the corner for the next three years. He going to be on probation for at least six months before he gets any booed from my table. No, Oh no, there's grease in the story. The father felt compassion for him, and he ran and embraced him. As parents, it's a temptation to rescue the prodigal rather than waiting patiently and allowing pain to do its work. You're listening to insight for living and Chuck Swindle Studying Luke fifteen titled when the funds stops for parents. To learn more about this ministry visit US online at insight world dot org. Check is here with an important closing comment, but I as we conclude another week of Bible study together I'll take a moment to tell you how much it means to chuck, and all of us had insight for living whenever we receive your feedback, we know that you have lots of extra pressure on your household right now with the global pandemic demanding so much attention, but even so we're thrilled to hear that insight for living continues to fill a void for many who have little access to Practical Bible teaching. Recently we heard from one of your fellow listeners who said it was five am when I was on my way to work as a registered nurse I was sick to my stomach, thinking about what I might encounter, and when I turn the radio on irritating Daniel, you said no matter how dark and scary, the lion's den is our God is bigger. That was exactly what I needed to hear. Thank you for the reminder that fears can be tamed when you give them to God. Well, these sacred moments are made possible through the power of God's word, and the many men and women in are listening family, who financially supported insight for living. Thanks for your generosity, especially during this threatening pandemic crisis when men and women around the world are looking to insight for living for comfort and encouragement. Chuck. Turn on your radio or your television and there's no shortage of advice for staying healthy these days you know the drill, take your temperature. Wash your hands, and as you do, sing happy birthday twice. And, by all means, don't touch your face I know I know these disciplines are all very important they truly are. But INSIGHT FOR LIVING MINISTRIES When I'll tell you that we're here to help. I'm referring to a much different role. A different kind of discipline you see surviving covid nineteen takes far more good hygiene and hunkering down at the house, and so we're doing what we've always done. We're teaching the Bible. We're pointing to the timeless promises of the Scriptures. We opened the word of God and we show you how it relates to every part of your life even. Even the survival of a global pandemic for Millie Corona virus has met. We've instantly become full-time remote employees and fulltime home, schoolers or caregivers for our kids and grandkids, and maybe for our grandparents. If you feel like you're drowning in these stormy uncharted waters, you're not alone. We're going to walk this journey with you every step of the way, and so just as I promised to deliver insight for living to you every day. I'm asking that you reciprocate in your faithful and generous support. please. Don't allow. You're giving habits to slip so that our daily visits can continue uninterrupted. Hey let's do more than survive the pandemic. Okay, let's try, but let's do that together. To, give a donation, just follow these simple instructions from day. And by the way. Thanks so much. Thanks Chuck to respond today. Call us if you're listening in the United. States style. One Eight, hundred, seven, seven to eight, thousand, eight, hundred, eighty eight. That number once again. One Eight, hundred, seven, seven to eight, thousand, eight, hundred, Eighty, eight, or you can give online at insight dot org. Here more biblical wisdom from Chuck Swindle about what to do when the funds stops for parents Monday on insight for living. The preceding message when the fun stops for parents was copyrighted in two thousand twelve, and the sound recording was copyrighted in two, thousand, seventeen by Charles or all eight. Are Reserved worldwide. Duplication of copyrighted material for commercial. Use is strictly prohibited. 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Why have thousands of aspiring authors teamed up with Christian Faith Publishing to publish their book because Christian, faith. Publishing is an author. Friendly Publisher who understands that your Labor is more than just a book. We provide authors, freedom and flexibility throughout the publishing process, Professional Book Editing Award winning, design and some. Some of the highest royalty structures in the publishing industry and is always you'll retain one hundred percent of the rights yearbook was looking to find a company that I could trust one that assisted in the editing process completely off the most important qualities that was looking for was a publisher who was honest and upfront. No hidden costs are fees and owning the rights to my own work. Christian faith publishing will publish market. Market and sell your books in all major bookstores online booksellers as well as specialty Christian bookstores call for your free submission kit eight, hundred six. Oh, seven, oh six, six, five, eight, hundred six. Oh, seven, oh, six, six, five, eight, hundred, six, zero, seven, zero, six, six, five. That's eight hundred six. Oh, seven, oh, six, sixty five! You're listening to heartland newsfeed radio network live twenty four seven heartland newsfeed dot com. This is Mario Andretti, you know me as a racecar driver, also a meals on wheels volunteer I raced against the sport's biggest personalities, but I've never met more vibrant amazing people than the seniors served by meals on wheels. You can make a difference by dropping off a hot meal and say a quick. Hello so America! Let's do lunch volunteer your lunch break at America. Let's do lunch dot org. Brought to you by Nielsen Wheels, America and the Ad Council. People been saying to your friend. Get a different face and posting on their feed. They're super ugly. The thing they save them online are cruel, and they're not true, so tell your friend. I'll stand up for you. Don't. Know someone being bullied online you can be a witness and make a difference by letting the world know it isn't cool. Am I letting your friend know you care learn more at eye bullying dot. Org brought to you by the Ad Council. I'm bobby like with today's car clinic minute making it to work on time maybe hard. You're listening to the heartland newsfeed radio network. Line at Hartland NEWSFEED DOT com. This is supported by advertisers and contributions by. On facebook, twitter and INSTAGRAM's. Service daily newscast for June the night twenty twenty I'm Mike Clifford former officer Derek Show van formerly charged Monday with murder in the death of George. Floyd The Washington Post. Reports of Chevron appeared via video conference during which judge set bail at one point, two five million dollars without conditions or million with conditions. The hearing coincided with a final public moral in Houston for Floyd, who will be buried next with mother and a cemetery in Pearland Texas. Kentucky Republican Senator Rand Paul, is the sole holdout in Congress on legislation that would for the first time recognize lynching as a federal crime. His decision has sparked growing public outcry both nationally and at Home Democratic State Representative Reginald Meeks of Louisville says. His community is disappointed in Paul's decision especially amid the massive protests, an national rage over the police killing of Louisville resident. Bring on a Taylor and we here in. In, Kentucky people of Color people of conscience on are not at all unfamiliar with these tactic is not uncommon for him to step out in of the community and claim to be on one side when his actions speaks of called the Emmett till Anti Lynching Act, the bill passed the US House nearly unanimously, and has the backing of all senators except for Paul. Who says he opposes the legislation because he? He believes it's written in a way that potentially could allow for excessive prison sentences for minor hate crimes I'm Nadia Ramleh gone for now? The bill remained stalled in the Senate more than forty seven hundred people across the country. Mostly African Americans reportedly were lynched between eighteen, eighty, two and nineteen, sixty eight. What is considered to be the last public execution by hanging in the US occurred Owensboro Kentucky in nineteen thirty. Thirty six in Massachusetts state legislature. There may soon vote on the end of Life Options Act. The act is limited to mentally capable terminally ill people expected to die within six months. It would give them the option to get medication. That would allow them to pass away in their sleep. Dr Roger Klickler is retired physician in foul mouth with incurable prostate cancer and a longtime advocate for medical aid in dying. Guy Suffering since something those people. Over seventy percent of the people in Massachusetts are. Medically Guy Klickler is referencing the most recent poll about the issue from two thousand thirteen, he says the biggest obstacle to the bill, passing his opposition from some religious groups, nine states, and the District of Columbia Allow Medical Aid in dying I'm Laura Ross Brow tellem reporting this is PMS. Despite the COVID nineteen pandemic census happening right now advocates for people with disabilities, stressing the importance of being counted, the economic impact of the pandemic could mean sharp budget cuts at state city and federal levels Margie Trapani with the center. For Independence of the Disabled New York or Sidney points out that census figures are used to determine how resources are distributed to states and localities, but people with disabilities often are overlooked since. Since the census is only done every ten years. We are locked in to a count for a decade. We can't afford to be disadvantaged that for another ten years. Everyone should have received a census form in the mail and this year. It is possible to complete the census process Lou. The government website at twenty twenty census. Dot Gov I'm Andrea Sears reporting and the pandemic has also made collecting signatures for ballot measures. Measures Electric trickier a coalition effort to convince Colorado voters to approve a dedicated revenue stream for schools and other public needs is launching dozens of pop up stations across the state. Scott Wasserman with the bell. Policy Center says initiative to seventy one would raise taxes on Colorado's earning above two hundred fifty thousand dollars a year, but cut taxes for everyone else. Even before the pandemic we were. You know anemic funding major public. Public priorities like schools and roads and healthcare, and it just so happens that by being the tax codes fair. We can actually fund the public priorities that every Colorado relies on the state, Wasserman, says low and middle income Colorado's pay, a substantially larger percentage of their income in taxes through income sales and property taxes than the top five percent of earners initiative to seventy one is projected to generate up to two billion. Each year proponents behind a competing initiatives say cutting taxes by a fraction of a percent for all earners, regardless of income level will boost the economy by encouraging investment and job. Creation I'm Eric Gladys. Finally Are Mike Bowen tells US progressive clergy are finding new people to connect with as a nation confronts a host of turbulent issues including in southern. Wisconsin Reverend Tanya said ago Pan leads the Janesville United Church of Christ, which she says has a long history of activism and outreach in the past few years. She says the Church has been more outspoken about welcoming immigrants and AL G bt. Q. Issues the pandemic and the civil unrest following. Following the death of George Floyd are adding to that outreach. It isn't only members of their own congregation that they're engaging with our church, for instance draws interest from the millennial evangelical young people who have young kids right now. Who who desire to make a difference in their world. This is my Clifford for public service. We are member, supported and online at public news service DOT ORG say we have a difficult time ahead of. But if we are to be prepared for it, we must I shed our fear of it. I spent here without fear because I remember. I remember that I am here not because of the path that lies before me, but because of the path that lies behind me. I remember the hundred years. We have these machines. And after a century of war, I remember that which members. US make them remember. Out of me. The Year on declare your independence ears talk here in Honecker Integral Phoenix. Hanukkah New Hampshire Oh and it's a very nice i. like the you know. It's a seventy mid seventy degrees sleep in weather of it now I understand. The snowbirds in Arizona. Phoenix they. They come down about October into about Tober. Thanksgiving I mean before Thanksgiving and then they they leave when it starts getting hot in in March April, and I can see that's what we're. GonNa do we'll be chasing nighttime weather temperatures? In the mid seventies upper seven of your cousin, because because we can't and now that we're up here in new. Hampshire today this afternoon. We take the bus in. Get painted. Oh, it's GonNa be Neil so now. I got I got to pull out George. Carlin piece was like he goes. Yeah! You know you got your stuff. You get your stuff going vacation Hawaii and you got like a smaller version of your stuff. Then then you want to hop on a plane. Go spend a couple of days and you get a you know a mini version of your smaller version of your stuff. You know so now. We got it like got all our. Many version of stuff in the RV and now we gotta go into it on Jay's trailers, painting it and it's a mini version of our stuff. Stuff I'm I'm getting get down. To what are you get down to? The. Pocket knife in a toothbrush. What are you get down to your many version of your stuff in your life? Well, that's kind of what we're GONNA, be talking about is when you get you. Start getting down to you. Know wh what's important. What? What do you need to make sure you got the view of you? Know I took a little bit of yesterday. And we started looking at because we've been busy. I mean it's it's head down. Plow Farming Mechanical working doing you know it's it's. It's Jay's place. Man I mean there's there's like stuff to do and. So I took a little bit of time and went over the past week on premiums Phoenix. Now I just found out this weekend at a good friend of ours. That's been in jail for whatever as long story but They done those and. His wife has been. Printing out every. Day. All of the stories on Freedoms Phoenix and sending to him. What you're GonNa do read a New York Times, so she goes. Yeah, that's how he knows what's going on. That's how you need I tell you know what's going on freedoms of the for human dot com. If you're at the top center, join us. Subscribe. Get the newsletter 'cause damn one of the what I was watching this morning. Is Project Veritas. You know these guys that go in with hidden cameras and people inside the media inside law enforcement inside government are inside these different activists. Whatever the heck they got, a guy infiltrated ANTIFA. Goes in then. T faggots recruited he. They contact you online. You seem Kinda like you know with the program and social justice. Warrior up and meet you. Where a white shirt and have a certain kind of water bottles sitting in starbucks, and we'll take care of secret handshake. Hide out of whatever. So they go in, and what are they trained in them to be thugs that go through fight training. They go through Of break this out of do that out of cover. What posed aware what to do win kind of near. You're on the payroll. And I've gone wow. Wow that you know you know this stuff is going on, but to get inside and you knew eventually that was going to happen. Somebody who's going to be able to expose these guys to do what who's doing it. Why are they doing it? You know it's a it's a mind. There's some going on, and it really became obvious to me when we came out to Massachusetts Bob and I last October. When we came, and that's why I made the decision to go on the road. You know doing taxes see. The bill's going. No, no, no, no, no hell no I'm there's something we know. There's something wicked. This way comes. And the one thing that Bob said he goes. He goes well water. What do you mean he goes? Think of all the people that you think that. Are you know got it together when they either were brought up on well, water got away from this city. Sludge sewage added to fortified everything. Body doesn't need mine four. Whatever the hell you know, and he goes Yep plus the recycling water. Of course they re Tarazona. You know reprocessed to water which I. Don't mind that you know clean, but I mean. It's got all these drugs in it from people going to the bathroom. You know it, just you know. The solution to pollution is dilution. Except when it's your kid, and he's just doing the you know the filtering and and it gets concentrated more and more and more water supply, and it has an effect on people. What affect good effect, bad effect and effect to say doesn't have an effect his day. Oh, it's negligible effect. They always say that I'm going well I, can I I don't want negligible. Want none, how about nine is it none I vote not show well-water. That was something that just Kinda dawn when they said that I start thinking I'm going yeah, a lot of the people! In the movement or that have a clear mind or just think right or contained I? Mean you know critically it's it's It's well water. And I'm going. That is a common theme. I'm wondering if there's a study on that, we're going to be talking to in this hour. Is Melody and Melody in Studio No us not her last name I thought it was on here. Melody in Studio. Let's. The studio so melody has been up here at Jays and I really haven't got the meter or say hey, I zero lot. You know. She's young attractive woman. That is where I tell you. What makes her attractive? I. Tell You this big thing. The tool belt the tool belt. You gotta walk around with the tool belt and you're going Oh. Yeah, Baby I. You know that that. I'm sorry. It's all thanks to Jay. Farm purse. Foreign purse. Icy Melody around. You know we just been busy. I Apologize I haven't had time to just just say hey. Introduced, but. Donna's been. Watching your staff and then taking pictures around the farm and everything I guess we can start to call it a farm, yeah! Yeah. He's getting. They're coming and. So she we're GONNA when we come back in the break. We're going to get her history where she's come from. Why and have an understanding of what she's been doing around here? You're kind of up here now, aren't you? I'm here, so you're living here. You got a nice camper trailer. It's pretty nice big. It's not. It's at I. Already done way less than that, yeah! So she has a history how she wound up here what she's been doing and. A big draw, they should make a poster you know, bring all. Did all the men up here? Do Manual Labor Yeah. Hey. There's women appear your Labor so. There's a lot going on here and and she's very busy and I didn't know that you were up here last time. I was here. I saw you, but you weren't staying here. You know you're kind of. It's been like two bit more than two weeks first week. I was Kinda crashing Jane. Challenge trailer that you guys are about to be in. Our. Month's case what we're GONNA do when we come back. We're GONNA hit break here a little bit i. just you know the academic. And when we come back, we'll go ahead and start. A proper introduction for melody will tell. Her life story, and she get to talk, and we'll find out What her plans are up here because this last night. I got on. It was a zoom stickle. Conference with one of. The guys? got into the lab. And he got Ellis Wayne. Going on L. Deal. From the second letter of Captain Mark, any pirate knows that commerce is communication. Markets Condense Oceans of information into a single price ovation communication are circumventing the scrutiny of the crown. This signals a change in the coin of the realm. The crown uses digital currency to surveil sensor seize and destroy wealth that will so pirate currency must protect us from this weaponized money. We need to move funds farther faster cheaper and without third party observation, basing decisions on an accelerating flow of information, so pirates require nearly instantaneous transactions with no arbitrary limits on volume or artificial influences on fees. Most importantly, a pirate currency must preclude centralization otherwise it will become another link in our chain to the crown. A superior currency will. In the obsolescence of the coin of the realm and the extinction of the crown itself trade above the grid. Join US AT PIRATESWITHOUTBORDERS DOT com. This is Michael Dean from the Freedom Teens. I've run website since one thousand, nine, hundred, ninety six and have used over a dozen web hosts in that time address hosting dot. com is the only one that hasn't broken my heart Agra's hosting up time and services, stellar and their ddos mitigation is the best I've seen. That's important. Because if you tell the truth in this world, you'll ruffled. Ruffled feathers and some people will try dirty tricks to silence your voice, no matter what the haters hit us with Agar's hosting keeps our websites online. If you have a mission, critical commercial presence or world changing activism site, you cannot tolerate Uni skulduggery so with address hosting DOT COM have a wordpress blog site, but you're not satisfied with performance up time or just want raw hosting WanNa pay with Bitcoin address hosting specializes in high performance hosting with personalized service. Good agress hosting DOT COM. Click on the button that says get hosted. That's. HOSTING DOT COM. Looking for a great real estate investment consider New Hampshire which is ground zero for the liberty, movement, your first call should be to mark worden from porcupine real estate. He's more than just a real estate agent easier. New Hampshire concierge. Where are the best places to live? Do you want farm city? The burbs or forest? Do you want do duplex multifamily buildings? So that Renter's pay your mortgage, their homes in all price ranges in new, Hampshire and mark and help with financing to invest in liberty and property mark warden can help. You find real estate dot com. Dot FM now has a dischord. Discord is a free text and voice chat platform, and we now have our own server with a bunch of channels at discord dot. L. R., N. DOT FM. You can join other listeners as they chat about various things during our live shows or anytime day or night, discord software is available cross platform, so you can have it on whatever device you want and take. Take your chats anywhere? Join our discord at discord. Dot L. R. N. DOT FM. That's discord. Dot L. R., N. DOT FM, we some good news. The indictments against Ross Auburn in the district of Maryland were dismissed with prejudice meaning. They can never be refiled. This is especially good. Because those indictments contain the only charge ever made that Ross engaged in murder-for-hire. This was a serious allegation at roles outbreak. Outbreak denies it was never prosecuted or ruled on by a jury, but was trumpeted by the federal government and the media as if it were proven fact, the Maryland Court held these indictments for almost five years, poisoning Ross's case, and leaving him under a cloud of unproven allegations as explained in Ross's appeal to the Supreme Court. The fact that the judge used these allegations to give her al-Sadr coney sentence. Sentence of Double Life Without Parole violated his sixth amendment. Right to a jury trial. Judges are required to issue sentences based on convictions decided by a jury, not unproven allegations never even charged at trial. Although this is a positive development that dropped indictment will not set Ross free now. A presidential pardon is Ross. His only hope of freedom sign the petition at free Ross. Dot Org Free Ross Dot Org. Now you can follow NFL on the decentralized mastodon social media platform at two DOT. DOT FM to DOT. Dot FM. Roads. It's the earnest handcock show where we're going their. In a row. Here in Texas Rose I. Give Him props for that because everybody else. I'm like. Yeah, whatever you know, go to taxes the. We're talking to melody and I WANNA. Give her an opportunity. Introduce yourself and tell her story because I heard a lot of these stories over the years, and eventually they find themselves. It's like I was watching the movie man recently, and I can't remember the author that senator he was quoted in there. That would know tighter wind. You know two ships will find each other in the night. You know on a calm sea, they eventually from whatever forces they kind of drift together and kind of what happens with people and ideologies. Sooner or later they just kinda ill were comfortable. It's a path least resistance. They find each other. And it seems that melody is found something from something well. Let's go ahead and you'll do some quick questions one holiday. Where we return you up here I'm sorry thirty one thirty one, so you're young. You're Thir- tile. Tile. Tiles. You WanNa get married you, WanNa, add relationship you definitely. Want to family family unit that works. That, you're looking for someone. I mean how do you be around? My Age and not be are more or less looking I. Don't put much effort into extending myself foul. I. Kind of assume like you're saying you know how things that tracked. This person will come into. My life will bump into each other doing you know what it is. We care about doing you know and and. I remember. I'm fifty nine. And I remember about thirty, two, thirty, three was the driving time for. Women. Deal at the. Time the time is here. We started early. We had all four of our children by them but so, that is. A thing, and why was that something that drove you earlier younger. You're doing something else. You made a conscious decision to go. Are you looking for a mate or you looking for a life style? Are you looking for? What you all of it? I feel like I have been kind of tracing. This. You know different homesteads and farms, and in the suburbs on fluoridated water, sitting and watching TV or riding my bike around in circles. You know wire back remember I? Wasn't playing with toys. I was playing with sticks and dirt that was in Holyoke, Massachusetts, which is like a run down old paper mill city, south of Northampton and really booming collegiate area, so it's very liberal, very progressive I don't. I don't suit what I come from. So I've I've always Ask a bunch of questions. Did you graduate high school. I did graduate high school did you right after high school? You did what you work you traveled. You went to college. I went to college. That's what I was told. I was GONNA. Do my whole life, so I went to college, I went to community college. I had a girlfriend. One of my best friends was going out to Boston College, so I just followed her went to a state school cloud. They're just kinda like live with her for a while. I mean I. I went for Ecology and earth sciences. It was like things that I did. have interest in in the sense of the way I was learning it. You know it's. School is not really my style of learning and I I'm definitely more self directed in. Two years I went almost three years, and then I dropped out I kind of like between Twenty Ten and twenty twelve. I. Feel I got kind of a taste of anarchy, and you know saw loose chain, very young but that all became Kinda really real and really present for me around twenty, ten, twenty, twelve, where I realized like this is now, and what is it that I am personally feeding into? And what am I actually doing with my life? You know I've kind of just going along with the emotions. Barrels satisfied up until then so you you decided to. Canada wasn't doing it for you and something flipped the actually picked up. Your mood is at the end of the. School It was. Early in whatever Sylvester I was in an I. Just knew I couldn't do it anymore. So I went in I didn't in our I enrolled. I actually on enrolled your. Whatever I did I don't remember now. There's some kind of process to it I got some of my semester fees back. anyhow I found a farm, a little homestead and started. And working there with them and from there. Hey. I found a homestead moved in okay, so it was through a friend of a friend, a friend of a friend. They had a homestead. They were looking for help. They needed help through the winter taking care of their animals winter wear. How many how big was it? who were the people there with our family? It was a family, okay, it was a family and it really what really did was function as like camp for kids to help expose city and suburban kids to such lifestyle, and just to help kind of infused still. Exposed totally Yeah Yup, and I wanted it to so i. that's where I had to ox. Four goats. Maybe like less than twenty sheep to feeder pigs probably thirty hands a larger. I! I don't know what the acreage was. It wasn't massive. What was cut down I'm sure they had plenty of forested land maybe like. Ten or less. How long were you there? I was only there through the winter. I WANNA say like September October to March. Massachusetts -Chusetts percents that was in mass in Ashfield great area. I I always dreamed of going back after that I love the community that I didn't ask. Now. Not, it was cold as shit ally thirteen thirteen degrees. I'm. I even had beautiful winters because they were white and crispy. I haven't had A. Penalty for coal I die down exactly Ghana's from Pennsylvania. We moved to Arizona, and she's like no nor shoveling snow. We live. It's going to be like you know not so well. From there I went out to California and opportunity when my girlfriend's been trimming and growing weed out there, so she's like. Winter you drop out of school yet, don't go to that semester at winter. Who've been your fourth year? And you're probably what twenty one or something like that as like twenty two twenty three maybe so. So then you go, you know I'm I'm not even winter socks and somebody says the California. Yes, she just you know it's. There was a lot more. She was coming from the northern part of California where where she had been spending three years. So it's actually a lot more free in northern California than it is in Massachusetts and she knew she knows me well knew what I was looking for and. I got a taste of that came back farmed more with a vegetable farmer was he and I I worked hand in hand with him onto. contract. Painted! Are you tired of governments murdering people around the world. Stop using their money. There is alternative. bitcoin is a stateless free market. non-political currency, Bitcoin cannot be inflated or controlled by any government by using their money. You are helping the state. Stop doing it. You have incredible alternative available. Now learn it. Use it spread it. Get started with Bitcoin at BITCOIN DOT COM. That's BITCOIN DOT COM. The L. R. N. Dot. FM Social media channels have. have been revamped. We've eliminated facebook and focused on other platforms like twitter and mastodon the decentralized alternative to twitter on our accounts. You'll find posts from multiple L.. N. Dot FM show hosts together in one place. Follow us on twitter at Twitter Dot L. end on FM or better yet moved to the decentralized mastodon social media platform at toot dot L. R. N. DOT FM T. O. T. Dot L. R. N. DOT FM. You'll like it. They started with Google Glass and now the engineer is behind. Google have created a new body part strapped gadgets onto. They're calling it. The flange and the new synthetic skin appendage fits between the shoulder blades into a flat surface, capable of holding a wide array of new gadgets for Google to hawk to consumers while unveiling the innovation today. Google CEO Larry Page said quote. The possibilities for the number of completely pointless gadgets to strap and stick to your body are now endless. Early adopters are already raving about the synthetic body part. It overheats burns. My skin pretty bad when I have it on, but I'm really get into like it actually thinking of getting a second one install. Critics are cautioning the tech world. 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Group zoom dozens of influencers talk show host of whatever up and we were eating dinner, and whatever so we only got in last twenty percent of it or something and. They didn't tell me there was a two minute time limit. Mistake but there at the end and they were looking for solutions and stuff anyway, so jay got on and told them all the stuff that he was doing. And I said look and the second. You guys start talking about this that the food shortage and Tyson saying you can't sell those four thousand hogs got to kill them and bury him, or you lose our contract. We go on about you know why we got a food shortage. Your son like what the Heck I go to. The guys start talking about that. And your band. Your D, Platform de monetize your. Something going. You have to get off of this grid. Some of the guys will go all we just need to. You know we'll start anew. Youtube Channel, or on those days are over man. They sucked you in I've seen this. I'm old enough to have seen this over and over. They suck you in to get your dependents and yeah, we want everybody to know why they need us well. What if you don't need them? Well. That's what's going on here. When it comes to food, you know and this is. GonNa you have when everything's really grow in here in the midsummer. Everything Brown and you shut it down in Arizona. Yeah, take a break. You're going. Make the growing season anytime blunt. July August September I just got really shade a lot of stuff, but so we're talking with melody. She's a transplant here well. She grew up in Massachusetts. She goes to school. She goes to college a little bit just not digging. decided you know she. She studied agricultural, a little bit. Tackle this and that and so I hope stead it in the winter why she chose winter I'd have no idea, but anyway, so she did it in the winter, and then she had a friend that was in northern California Tremon, marijuana, plants, or whatever going. You know it's kind of Nice up here. You should come over and give it a shot, so she did. It was picking up their melody. What happened? I California was kind of just. A lot of wandering, trying to meet like minds I guess maybe like learning myself a bit better on a personal just. Kind of way I didn't find I. Mean I I ended up having a few years living in a homestead ish situation out there with my partner and I just needed to come back home and be where I had friends and. We, were pretty well isolated up. There so I came back last winter and figured that I got to figure out how to do better out here. Isolated define isolated. Were outside of cell phone. No no phone, Internet? We'd have to drive down about twenty five minutes down into town to get enough Internet for data. or to go to the library there, which is great I read tons of gardening books, and all kinds of different like health and healing. But anyhow so I came back out here, not really sure how I was going to figure out and last August I was introduced to Chris noon. J. Means little brother. being told you know that not only was he going to help me move my camper, but they were like minds that I should really connect with. And from there ended up spending a lot of time with him I. Met Jay Shallan in September something like that, maybe whatever time and have just stayed in touch and come up here to see what's going on every so often help out with like bio char this spring and Then with all the corona virus stuff I had already through meeting. These guys and becoming aware of Free State project wanted to come up here. figured I'd take about a year to figure out how to do that. In a functional way, then corona virus, and all this insanity hits. Everyone around me in Massachusetts is totally insane in this way. Even the few people I thought were more freethinking. We're really swept up in. It wanted you know their protection their safety, okay? Why do you think what what was it? That did it you know it was. It was. Social media it was they watched too much. CNN they did while convince everyone. Yeah, what? What was there? Probably I mean most. Definitely they're all in fluoridated water. They all grew up on fluoridate water, but a few. I know at least one off the top of my head. That grew up on well water, but you know we've all been gone to public school been totally brainwashed from the moment. We're in our mothers. Bellies by our family by our community by our schooling TOLD WHO to trust. What's the truth Where does truth come from? You know it's like all these official people who say official things, so it's and while I thought you know I came out of people who was like a punk music scene. It was people were thinking alternatively wanting to do things alternatively, but as we got older. You know I kind of kept going this way. And they seemed to fall right back in line, a whole lot of and I was really blown away by. The response with this like corona thing among other things W-. It was. I believe I'm going to comply. And therefore you should hear and compliance, and not in it. You know they'd say you know. We don't really know like you can't trust what the TV says, but we don't really know and. The Way I've come to look at. It is pretty much whatever the major narrative is absolutely cannot be trusted, and there's you have to look has been the right as an and same thing with like the writing the protests right now like once something becomes that massive I. Kind of I lose trust for and I I try to see. How is it getting? Swept up to be utilized and. I. Don't know like I said I. Already liberal. Are you paying attention or you just kind of ignored it now our. Since I've come. I was really paying attention I was really cute into a lot while I, was more or less like down there with not much to do. Since I've come up here I'm really out of the loop like I just went on facebook and went through my feet two days ago and everyone's talking about riots and black lives, matter and I just again I see everyone getting swept up, and all this and I've got a friend. I met out in California. Who is a like mind to actually contact me saying you know it's happening this, is it? This is what we've been waiting for. Not since my early twenties I haven't thought like rioting was the answer you know. Know and I see how this is going to be used in Ford of what to what like for people to stand up and take action and fight against props. Fight against government. You know, but that's not what's going to happen. What is what I see is going to happen? Is I mean corvette has really hit it on the nail on the head for me. Is You know we're GONNA see more surveillance state? Be openly excuse to be there now. You all openly. No, you're being totally surveyed. We're GONNA have robocop dogs? Rip You apart if you're not like in compliance with social distancing, and this and that you know. I guess people aren't even talking about krona. Virus anymore seems like like. Yeah exactly what happened? It's. What. Does no matter who he talks to. He gets a sandwich. He's selling pig. Hurt himself. Scared. The Guy. To buy pick the other day and of course j.j tried on letting him. Note was bullshit. You just you know Jay. He's vandalizing man. He doesn't let it go, so this is came. Started visiting here at the domes. Yeah J. Challen Kinda. You know the guys up here. You know you got some of the guys. That are you know hanging? There's a lot of people come ago. They do a lot of things, but. What was the draw was it to free state project. was J I mean. Jay. Are Like I've never met. My style. Our Day Become that. Crimes of the crown by captain mark the crown cast the world in shadow, and claims to be our guiding light cowards clamor for security from boogeyman and ghost stories. Well, I say these hobgoblins are imaginary I. Say those they propped up as our liberators are now subsisting on our bondage I say there is freedom in the black, and that's exactly where we intend to go. The crown banishes its own officers for exposing its crimes and tortures dissidents to the brink of madness it dominates the globe, and swallows the wealth of generations, leaving only blood and excrement. The crown calls it piracy to explore frontiers beyond its grasp, so the time has come for us to define the conduct among pirates. I say the crown has trampled our necks long enough need decentralized solutions to centralized problems, looking for a community of like minded scoundrels or just want some swag to let the crown know what you think of it. Join the conversation at pirateswithoutborders. PIRATESWITHOUTBORDERS DOT COM. We won't be hard to find the new fourth edition of healing, our world, the compassion of Libertarianism we'll take your understanding of liberty to a deeper level, and has ever thirteen hundred updated references, new cartoons and a foreword by Dr Ron Paul with discounts for multiple book purchases the fourth edition of healing. Our world is a great gift for the Liberals, pragmatists, environmentalists and Christians in your life who think libertarianism is cold hearted. Get Yours today at healing dot, freetalklive dot, com and use Promo Code F. T. L. for a five dollar discount. You're already listening to L. R. N. DOT FM weather via our twenty four seven satellite feed, online, streaming, audio, or video feats, L. Dot FM's content is available in multiple ways, but what if all you have is your phone and no data connection, you can call our listen line at six, four, one, seven, nine, three, eight, sixty nine. 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It was for the adventure, and for the feeling of something important is happening here and I just wanted to come to sort of be part of that visit Shire. Society Dot Com to read and sign the Shire Society Declaration and learn the reasons. Why if you love liberty, you should immigrate to the Shire plus connect with others via the forum at Shire, Society Dot Com that's Shire Society Dot Com. You can sign up to receive the latest about the Liberty Radio Network. The our email updates at updates dot L. DOT FM that's updates dot. Dot FM. Freedom is the answer. What's the question? Want break. Listening to Ernest. Okay, we got J, two. Yo Joel. Very wrong. Go ahead Hello Ernie. Jay We'll be talking to him next. Hang out with that will know. We'll see you know, but you know until she's. You know doesn't have time gotta do something, or she gets boring, but you know it seems like she's not too boring. So you, you come here, you meet you know the guys, and so on you start going. You know this is. This is kind of was looking for. You got space here. He's clear and stuff he's got some. You'll machinery and everything just the lifestyle I wanted. I go, you'll not no pressure. You don't have to be up at some time. There's no like bells. They're not feeding you. Yeah, no, they're not babysitting, you know. Awesome to work with yeah. He James Unique. He's like she'll do what you want. Nine. No Care Kinda, you'll fix it. Come out ahead of you know it's Kinda different. You know a lot of people don't know what is definitely Jay's. JAS But. You could break it. There's a learning curve to everything so S- like when I worked on the big corporate farm that my stepfather has like three thousand acres, twenty five hundred milk cows, who had a lot of Mexican. Guys that you know the lane language bears little tough that you know work with us and. you know if you're gonNA, hire you guys. Don't speak your language and you're GonNa, put them. You know eight of them in a trailer, and they're all GonNa move in you know their wife and two kids and you're GONNA pay him. You know two thousand dollars. A month is basically what they got paid cash, two grand a month and a place to live. I don't know He. You know three times a year. He'd give them A. Butcher you know no dairy, cow or whatever they wanted and But things are GONNA get broken. That's just part part of the. Part of what's going to happen, so you're going to expect. Things are going to get breaks broke, so we introduced someone new to like equipment and whatnot. I I expect it to get broke like that'll echo. I Ha I have. Hydraulic pump porn out on. It well guess what it's not that strong means a lot less likely someone who. Some cowboys going to get on it and they're not going to be able to break it that easy, because it just isn't as strong as you know is meant to be for example but. You know it just know how. Big rocks thing right so part of the learning curve. To Machinery and power tools, so what she's good, she'll. Get right on a tractor and little practice with the clutch, and she's right there little green tractor. You're running last night. miss a nice little tractor did simple. It's easy manual transmission. And I got a another tractor actually. With, my brother's Kinda similar to that. Of course you are well Blairist tractor. Nobody wants it because it's like you know it's a difficult tractors harder to get parts for, but whatever I. You'll make pretty much. All the equipment I have is I, got A. Cheap because somebody hated it. Whenever I come up! You know my big contribution for. J. Doing a lot of work and help in Boston, for things as I go, he needs a new piece of equipment. You need this you need. Your life would be better with that. You get a new one of those we need. Why are you using this Chisel screwdriver? So, it's that kind of thing like reach it. Didn't have to walk back to toolbox. So. You know so. There's a lot of things going on, but you know. Ever, nice trailer out there you're comfortable in the winter you're going to have to. We'll see. You know but. But I was in the winter in this bus. wintered in a bus to, and it was comfortable. It's called parochial. Makes a thing but the. so we have the technology to do this. What your resources? What your income? How did you get? The trailer. How did you be able to move up and do you get money from you? Get Fed or you waiting on the Greens to grow I mean he'll tell us your financial situation. With. With the start of the whole krone virus thing I was in good a good financial circumstance. I was making good money. essentially like Nannying PCA, like for family and they were great people, and they paid me well and treated me well. I use a lot of that money plus applying for a credit card to Max out buying like garden tools, and just kitchen tools like essentially what I need to. Like the most essential tools that I need to. Move forward to growing and preparing my own food. I also had before then. Gotten alone! I'm totally a debt slave. I always swearing like when I was younger. I was never gonNA. Get into that or whatever I had already gotten into it with college, but that was. You know so now already there I have decent credit so I took out a loan ten grand on this camper. RV place I spent time trying to go around looking like craigslist and all this but I. Just I really don't have enough knowledge of what I'm looking at to whatever so this turned out to be a good thing And I've got a lot of food. Another thing I did was by a lot of dry food, so I bought of rise beans, lot of dry herbs and things like that to last me quite a while not. Right now one of the five billion vehicles, a little Toyota Camera I. Actually that's a new one replaced a few weeks ago. Just before finalising coming up here actually got into an accident totaled my previous car. This is like a one grand from my long longstanding mechanic trusts like you know junker car. Sweated it is all right. So how are you going to get out of debt? Or you're just GONNA stop. Paying is my plan like combined me. Yeah. Yeah. What are they gonNA, do they don't know where I am. I really have been feeling. Well you know and I I mean I also have been. Paying my taxes on the over the table work that I've gotten for many years, and what I most of it's been off the table, but kind of the philosophy philosophy. I've been feeling. Is there so much? Power in making you believe some and make you believe they have the power to do this or make you believe that they have the ability to come. Get you and I've kind of been testing the waters with that, and especially now with everything you know like another two trillion dollars, hyperinflation and all this craziness that's going on. It feels it just felt like the right time to. Take a bigger risk stub off more, and that's essentially what I've started doing. Is You know and now it's time to figure out how to be a lot more reliable on myself to not have to like? Go Ask for help so what? Makes you productive I. Mean you're you? You Get up in the morning and I see you. L. Farming! You're watering plants. You're doing kind of the animals. Yeah, you're you're you're fairness now to like that now? No, I mean you're you're you're always move it. That's one thing that people stand around yacking and talking and you're. You're not large, I mean you're you're what you know Fi. Yeah, you're you're. You're slow person so I. Don't know you got to buy four blocks on the pedals on the tracker or something or just sit with my the very edge of. So, this is so. But the productivity that comes out of a small woman. Compared to a lot of these guys are sitting around Yakin. I'm going. I. Don't know man if I don't see. NEL Bos. You're bend over doing something she's. Passionate. Case around here. You know it's like I really liked that because it's kind of more my pace to. Be Able to just go, you know at whatever speed is comfortable for me to do it in a good way to keep rolling in starting to speed it and I take great say take me a little breaks. Then, you get up and go again. Go! That's the thing I love to do like I truly enjoy from James while I was out there doing that field for our whole couple. Yeah, yeah, you're constantly out there in the garden doing stuff. I was waiting for a while because I was afraid you might like you did really good. Not Reversing into the garden by the way wanted to say that to you well I. I only hit one corner once, and it was just the woods steak. Yeah, but otherwise. Over and plants. Machine I was worried about the plants. I was worried about you or kids or the dogs or they're you know know you know those little. Scooter things electric Dave's going around all. Everybody. Stay away from her. You know but the but that's one thing here is rocks and boulders only awed. For me, it sounds like. Does A. Come back around bit. On. The storm. report. No, not. L.! August. The protection of life, liberty and properties with Free State Price Job about, but it's. It's an effort to move twenty thousand people who understand it's about demonstrating to the entire country. Yeah, we can have a free market a truly free market making it just a tweet. Great place to live. It's the world's largest fallen interests libertarian community, and it's only getting bigger some amazing to be able to move to plans for other. Other people flick passionately believe in being free and independent with the Free State project is managing to do though is to put their money where their mouth is physically getting up across the country and say, let's go someplace, and let's demonstrate the power of these ideas. There's a lot of kind of philosophy that surrounds liberty. There's a lot of thinking about it and talking about it, but here in new. Hampshire people are. One reasons liberty lives in new. Hampshire a documentary by Free State Project Early Movers Watch it free at one one reasons film Dot Com one reasons film Dot Com. Some of you asked, and now we've delivered L. R., n. f., M.'s live keene New Hampshire studio shows are now streamed in hd on twitch, visit our channel at twitch dot L. R. N. DOT FM and give it a follow. If you have Amazon prime, you get one free subscription on twitch if you use it on our channel, which will give L. R. Dot FM, a monthly piece of your prime subscription cost, so please watch follow share, and subscribed to twitch dot L. R. N. DOT FM. That's twitch, dot, L. R. N. DOT FM. Are you cryptocurrency advocate the crypto? crypto tip is the ideal outreach tool to help new people discover crypto currency. It's a printable business-card-sized tip that you can give to service providers preferably in addition to a good cash tip. When the Server Scandal Qr Code, it'll bring up an explanation of crypto currency how to install a wallet and allow them to claim the tip. If they don't claim the Crypto You, get your tip refunded to you after a time period you specify, plus if they do claim the tip, you get an email alert, create as many tips as you want crypto tip dot org. That's CRYPTO. You're listening to the Hotlanta newsfeed radio network at live dot hotline Newsfeed Dot Com. This stream is supported by advertisers and contributions by. Follow us on Facebook, twitter and INSTAGRAM's. Service daily newscast for June the night. Twenty twenty i Mike Clifford former officer Derek shelvin formerly charged Monday with murder in the death of George Floyd The Washington. Post reports of Chevron appear via video conference during which a judge set bail at one point, two five million dollars without conditions or million with conditions. To hearing coincided with a final public moral in Houston for Floyd, who will be buried next to his mother cemetery in Pearland Texas. Kentucky Republican Senator Rand. Paul is the sole holdout in Congress on legislation that would for the first time recognize lynching as a federal crime. His decision has sparked growing public outcry both nationally and at whole democratic state. Representative Reginald Meeks of Louisville says his community is disappointed in Paul's decision, especially amid the massive protests and national rage over the Police Killing of Louisville resident bring on a Taylor and we here in Kentucky. People have called people of conscience on are not at all. All Unfamiliar With these tactic is not uncommon for him to step out in front of the community, and claim should be on one side when his actions speaks of wise called the Emmett till Anti Lynching Act. The bill passed the US House nearly unanimously, and has the backing of all senators, except for Paul who says he opposes the legislation, because he believes it's written in a way, that potentially could allow for excessive prison sentences for minor hate crimes I'm Nadia Ramleh gone. For now. The bill remained stalled in the Senate more than forty seven hundred people across the country. Mostly, African Americans reportedly were lynched between eighteen, eighty, two and nineteen, sixty eight. What is considered to be the last public execution by hanging in the US occurred Orange Kentucky in nineteen, thirty six in Massachusetts state legislature. There may soon vote on the end of life options. Act is limited to mentally capable terminally ill people expected to die within six months. It would give them the option to get medication. That would allow them to pass away in their sleep. Dr Roger Klickler retired physician in foul muth with incurable prostate cancer and a longtime advocate for medical aid in dying. By suffering since something that those people. Do over seventy percent of the people in Massachusetts earn phasers medical raising. Klickler is referencing the most recent poll about the issue from two thousand thirteen, he says the biggest obstacle to the bill passing his opposition from some religious groups, nine states and the District of Columbia allow. Medical Aid in dying. I'm Laura. Ross brought tellem reporting this is pms. Despite the COVID, nineteen pandemic USA's happening right now advocates for people with disabilities are stressing the importance of being counted. The economic impact of the pandemic could mean sharp budget cuffs at city and federal levels, Margie Trepanier with the Center for independence of the Disabled New York or Sidney points out that census figures are used to determine how resources are distributed to states and localities, but people with disabilities. Are overlooked. The census is only done every ten years. We are locked in to a count for a decade. We can't afford to be disadvantaged that count for another ten years. Everyone should have received a census form in the mail and this year it is possible to complete the census process through the government website at Twenty Twenty Census Dot Gov I'm Andrea Sears, reporting and the pandemic. Pandemic has also made collecting signatures for ballot measures electric ear a coalition effort to convince Colorado. Voters to approve a dedicated revenue stream for schools and other public needs is launching dozens of pop up stations across the state. Scott Wasserman with the Bell Policy Center, Says Initiative to seventy one would raise taxes on Colorado's earning above two hundred and fifty thousand dollars a year. Year, but cut taxes for everyone else. Even before the pandemic we were you know and unikely funding major public priorities like schools and roads and healthcare, and it just so happens that by being the tax codes fair, we can actually fund the public priorities that every Colorado relies on in the state Wasserman, says low and middle income, Colorado's pay, a substantially larger percentage of. Of their income in taxes through income sales and property taxes than the top five percent of earners initiative to seventy, one is projected to generate up to two billion dollars each year. Proponents behind a competing initiative say cutting taxes by a fraction of a percent for all earners, regardless of income level will boost the economy by encouraging investment and job. Creation I'm Eric Gladys. Finally are Mike. Bowen tells us. Progressive Clergy are finding new people to connect with as a nation confronts a host of turbulent issues including in southern Wisconsin Reverend. Tanya said ago Pan. Leaves the Janesville United Church of Christ. which she says has a long history of activism and outreach. In the past few years. She says the Church has been more outspoken about welcoming immigrants and LGBTQ issues, the pandemic and the civil unrest, following the death of. Of George Floyd are adding to that outreach, it isn't only members of their own congregation that they're engaging with our church, for instance draws interest from the mall lineal Jellicoe young people who have young kids right now. Who who desire to make a difference in their world. This is Mike Clifford for public service. We are member. Listener supported and online at public. Do Service Dot Org. When I say, we have a difficult time ahead of. What if we are to be prepared for it? We must I shed our fearless. Here without fear because I remember. I remember that I am here not because of the path that lies before me, but because of the path that lies behind me. I remember that one hundred years. We have these machines. And after a century of Lor I remember that which matters. Let us make them remember. A. New Hampshire. We're going to be for at least probably another week while we're getting a live bus painted and so on Dhabi sent me some. You know different artwork and there. We got go over this afternoon after I. Take the bus in, and we sit down and they're going. Hey, what color do you want to go? no, no, you just start preparative and taping it up I'll let you know in a couple hours. So we're down to the wire. You know well. There are a lot of people wanted to have some input and everything, and it finally just can't wait. We just got to pull the trigger. I could have done. You know two months ago, but you know people WANNA play. Show what we're GONNA do is we're going to. Go ahead and pull the trigger on the we gotTA GOTTA base idea that design. It's just like what base colors do you want and I kinda wanted to southwestern. He kind of look. Anyway, we're just going to. Get her done and It starts today well, then. We're going to be here a farm, and while that's if I. Don't have the bus here to work on a lot of stuff. We need to get it up the Derek's in Maine, and then from there we'll go to pork. Pork fast fork fast, but it has to have at least a week for the The paint cure before we decal it now start putting graphics and stuff on it. So we're going to be doing that. Get all order. Get it done. That's what we're doing. The design for all printed and ready to go which we've done before you see a lot of the pictures, you'll see the different trailers and you know vehicles and everything. Art Work on it and so on, so we know how to put it on. It'd be a lot easier if we have repainted. Put It on, but it's got to be cured and then a good. Week of in the Sun, and then we'll put those on at port fast so pork fast fast. We're going to be putting the stuff on. That'll be a an event in it, so be borne. At port fast and fork fast, so that'd be awesome. We'll have some with it, so it's always silver lining so lining now the You Know Jay came back and he's out Neil Forman doing what Iraqi I'd do and then Melody's going to hang out for you. Call Him Donna. You all good. We. We're going to bring it the EH. Calling the paint shop say make a space. I gotTA bring it in, so we're going to do that then we gotta get a small version of everything. Well, the prepping of the soil up here I mean you've got forest everywhere. You trees, trees, fruit, trees, trees, but tree leaves, and so on it goes in kind of replenishes the soil for the. So. There's not really big dark black, you know. Fertile Earth like you get in Kentucky or a lot of other played Virginia or something like that up here and I'm familiar with this kind of soil, because it's very much the same in northern Arizona. This is a lot jack. Look you know what I'm talking about J that soil sandy soil kind of it's. It's not a lot different than here. I mean right now. It's like Jack. Lopin August up there in a rim at Boca, meadows. Meadows it's I was I thought very similar. It's just like the right I I thought when I was GONNA, go to Arizona and August for Freedom Festival and I had no air, conditioning and Mike slide and pickup truck camper I was going to be in trouble, and you're like Nah, it's like. It's like you might need a sweatshirt at night. Maybe even during the day, and there was plenty of people walking around during the day of the sweatshirt at Jackal Open August what is happening amount what eighty six hundred foot elevation, and it's in the forest, and it's beautiful, but anyway. Yeah, this is very similar, except for my trees are bigger. Trees, you can't put. Two guys can't Hook can't hold hands wrapping themselves around the big trees, but you do, and that's how you he yourself your one thing. Creative that Jay Does is he's always working a deal with somebody for a deal. GotTa deal and a lot of the clear a lot of trees? They gotta get rid of the put them somewhere. I know where you can put them, so he has all these automated devices for splitting logs. You got chainsaw cuts them. Then you've got this machine. You build a VI- Drellich pneumatic whatever. That you know Jay does of everything, and no I know that belt driven water wheel device at back in the where he make it work, you know and then. Justice last year, he got his first plasma cutter. Yeah, that's right. I'd be like do my plasma cut one of the things I? Don't know if you've got pictures of it. We've been working on this big screening of the soil knockout boulder. It's you know enormous beams, and you're not moving that thing. I tried I couldn't get by between the door and I tried to slide it or move it like not a chance in Hell I. Think is ton. There's got to be like fifteen hundred pounds right now thousand pounds. I think drift frame that we got. It's not going anywhere. So I'm like, maybe if I really really really I go. Melody moving it. It's a it's basically a A scalper is what they call it. A gravel scalper and the gravel industry is essentially what I'm building, not a power screener, but like what you say on Gold Rush. They're sorting all the rocks and sand, the grim lease the grizzlies. But yeah, so the soil here is poor, because it's just been you know pine. Trees and oak trees and maple trees just put leaves down and. Literally like an inch and a half two inches of topsoil around here when I started so I took a lot of it. And I push it up in piles. You see where I. I got Some stuff parked out back and I got these big piles of dirt with the problem is is right under the topsoil clay. So it's really hard clay, and then you dig down two feet tall sand. That's why I got these massive pine trees. You only see massive pine trees like this where there's a lot of sand because there's just as money roots underground as is tree above the ground. I believe that's true with pretty much all plants. When you dig out somebody's stumps, it's like holy cow, but he's roots. Just go for Ram Somebody's routes twenty thirty foot long like and we're ripping them up out of the ground. Inches is that a radio measurement six eight inches diameter. Somebody's routes near like they're. They're coming up for fifteen twenty feet, and then they finally break off somewhere because they go down so far can't rip them up anymore so. what I'm trying to do is I'm trying to build Tera? Terra is a region in the Amazon. Soil is extremely rich and dark, and the Amazonian did hundreds of years ago, maybe thousands of years ago, they did by slash and burn, so did it did what's called Bio Char and what they would do is right. Before it was going to rain, they would start a major forest fire. and then the rain would take all that Cole and cool it down before it burnt all the carbon out of the coal, and you're basically left over with Ash, and which is beneficial to all. The growing entered got charcoal. Vile Char- charcoal. I'm still like. Bio Char-. Charcoal are pretty sure they're really the same thing, but. Like. If you let a this is, this is how you got a whole bunch of deforestation Africa. A lot of these what they do is, they'll take any vegetation. They start a fire? They get hot and they put. In there and it starts burning, and then they cover it with dirt. And Deprived of oxygen and what happens, is it gets? It turns the charcoal. Black Lumps of whatever so it has all that energy still in it, but it's burned off a lot of the gases, and so on, and so then you take that and that charcoal carbon is conducted. It's like. It's like nanotubes or graphene her. It's very conductive when you watch the movie Avatar and they're going to look you know all the treason. Roots are communicating, and they're doing the mice helium network of the day. Blah Blah Blah Blah. That's what you're doing. You're creating not just a nutrients, because that's who will mouths hookah mount his like my Caelian breakdown would, and it's not just like sawdust chunks. Would you know you would at feeds on and absorbs the water? Not still none of that's happening in the sand. It's very you'll. You'll hardly let go of water for plants I'm sorry. Klay will hardly let go. This is. The way that. Anybody. About Anything Babol. Got Their Good. Can't put it on top leader. The overall picture in the real estate market today is one of frustration. When you take many factors into consideration, the housing market pundits would have you believe that everything is okay, but the long term trending on the real estate numbers say otherwise you're starting to see another wave of commercial and retail centre vacancies, which follows a downturn in the residential market. So when you're ready to sell your house I can help. This has done. A Hancock was silver lions realty in Phoenix. Arizona and I can take some of the guesswork out of the home selling process providing with. With market trends in your area and detailing what you can expect to before during and after the transaction being in the real estate business for almost twenty years now has afforded me knowledge of the market networking with industry specialists along the way, and that includes professionals that can help after the sale to help protect your assets, so let's get moving today. Please feel free to call her message at six, zero, two, eight, two, eight, one, eight, one nine. That's six, zero, two, eight, two, eight, one, eight, one, nine or visit my web page at Donna Hancock Dot Com. If you're looking for work. The person you are applying to maybe even more nervous than you are and the way things are now. Your references have never been more important. Here are three tips. I. Know that employers are checking. Every higher is under the microscope these days second. They won't just be checking references. You provide figure that all of your ex employers will get a call and be asked. Would you hire him or her again? Third assume you will be googled so before you apply. Remove all those party animal photos from your facebook page. Even if you're not in the job market, effective communication skills have never been more important with money and attention so scarce. For more tips for job, seekers and getting better results in all your day to day, communication hit survival speech DOT com. I'm Holland Cooke. Do you want more businesses accepting bitcoin cash and dash now with any pay you earn passive income for every purchase at those businesses, finally a financial incentive to spread bitcoin cash and Dash. You made it happen, so you get the rewards, download the any pay cash register, APP and add your crypto currency wallet addresses then install it at a real life business and tell. Tell us what you did at any INC dot. COM ANY PAY INC. DOT COM. Did you know you can listen to l.? Aranda FM the are free to air satellite channels. We have channels over nearly all of North America and much of Africa. All you need is affordable receiver and a dish smallest thirty inches. There are no monthly fees. Learn more at SAT. Dot FM plus if you are a broadcaster or want to be one, this is a good delivery method for our content. See our coverage maps and get details at sat dot. FM That Sad L. RN FM SAT dot. Dot Fm Free Talk Live. The show where anyone can call about whatever they want and we do mean anyone. The first point is it's legal, and that's important now. My question to you would be. They gasped Jews legally in Germany. Was that a good law? Well I don't know I. Don't live in Germany. Come on, you don't know you know whether it was a good idea to Gas Jews. You don't know whether it was a good idea to incarcerate japanese-americans. The point and I'm drawing a parallel, and it's a clear parallel in your dodging it. Do Good People Disobey Bad Laws Buck? No. Good people do not. Screaming Don Law. Bach to a wait a second. What if they outlawed guns in your state? Would you turn yours in buck? Oh absolutely in a minute. You wouldn't not. Sorry you're fascist like free talk live seven nights a week from seven to ten eastern live of the Liberty Radio Network at L. R. N. DOT FM. What's up next visit? The Liberty Radio Network Program Guide to find out at shows dot L. DOT FM that shows dot l.. R. N. DOT FM. To be a part of the show, call six, zero, two, two, six, four, two, thousand, eight, hundred, six, zero, two, two, six, four, twenty, eight, hundred, and now Ernest handcock, and this is where we have rejoining music from J. Nunes brother. That will try for the next break. He just gave me the disk. Play you know like your like Frank. You know thirty seconds before yeah. I need you to bring up the movie clip of the know you. Guys are killing me you. I'm sorry I gave you the disc yesterday or the day before I just when I was watching? All set up for you. Worry. We have the trump report in the next hour. Dr Franks, GonNa come on. That's always a hoot, and there's so much news and I'm just so don't care. I. I watch all the stuff. The guy now, what does it ever not been doing I mean it's always like this. Be a feared be feared. Look, Look Book. Pay attention to what we think is important of. Whatever I go, it's all manipulation. I feel the manipulation, and what's important is food. The thing always comes down. The Food and J saw this early on, and he just goes. Yeah, well, I, tell you what? I'll be literally a horse trader halls. Hey, he knows all livestock guys. He knows the auction houses. He knows GonNa and I bet you there some cheap pigs and cows and Gimme well when he know Caesar, craigslist says. You know what your dilemma butchers dilemma got four thousand hogs got putting in a bitch. You know who wants him me. nope, not allowed Tyson said I said farmer couldn't do it and say I want to know the. Whole Story. His lawyer told him anti-competition clause in the contract. He has an also. They have like A. Casualty Insurance for like market losses and things like this and the insurance company, said we will pay you euthanize them, but we'll. We will not pay you to to Give them away or sell them, or whatever and hogs belong tixx Tyson. This is this is the agenda, and here's the other thing what it didn't say yesterday, so I called new. Holland sales stable, which you know, my entire life up until literally like eight years ago, I was there almost every week, buying horses selling horses whatever. And I know all the guys down there and I call the guy. And, he he's the manager. He's actually a libertarian. He ran for. State representative in Pennsylvania. Down here McDermott's his name and he's involved with the Libertarian Party. So He. So when I called them, I says hey, what's going on with the hog? Situation does a bottle a day or two? After we realized we couldn't by the hogs from the guy who was doing the You know the deal right there with The the Tyson pigs because it was down Pennsylvania, also as I was GONNA. Buy 'em. He goes all last week we had. Nine Market Hawks. To what? Nine market hogs as opposed was normal. Thirty, two, hundred, twenty, two, hundred, eighteen, hundred like. The year before was I forget the number exactly, but they only had nine market hogs daily had on USDA report. It said the prices was Osama. Who bottom he goes I did. Just to keep the price up religious, because there was no buyers and somebody just brought in some amish guidance on what's going on brought to market hogs. Basically because. The Amish is. Book. So right in the Middle Amish country, so at newhall and sales stables. They have four auction barns. They have a horse stable. A Horse New Haven is where would you Paul in New Holland? Pennsylvania Lancaster County. Western no South Eastern, so it's it's like one hundred. Hundred Miles from like You Know New York City. It's odd new. Jersey's right there. It's basically like kind of set south. Big Hubs Feed Niche the largest livestock market this side of the this side of the Mississippi okay, so new England. It's it's feeding mom and pop butcher shop New England all the mom and pop operations by all kinds of stuff like New Jersey and there's a soda. They're gonNA. Go Auction, a goat and lamb barn. They got a Hog Barn. They got a cattle barn, and then they got a horse. Ox Horse Barn. Sale Barn all in this building several acres. You should just drive by there on your way home. Check out on Monday sales really awesome all the big. Hey, auction outside I love the places I learned a lot there. anyways. So like Easter right around Easter, all stuff's happening the two weeks before Easter. They'll usually have like forty two hundred goats. Twenty eight hundred sheep or lambs, and the numbers were all like literally like single digit percentage of what was coming through the auction. Because! What happened is and they shot the horse auction down for. Whatever reason nobody was showing up and and then the other livestock auctions. A bunch of the guys that. Were you know just fires weren't showing up and sellers weren't showing up to the market report now, why? were. They saying they had to be shut down. You're not allowed to drive their shelter in place. You're not allowed to buy. Why was it shutting down? So the guys at newhall were basically like We don't really care about this social distancing stuff this nonsense but what it was, which is a lot of people just weren't shown up. Another friend of mine owns a slaughterhouse in New York. State one of the biggest. mom-and-pop slaughterhouse in New, York and they do. They buy cutter. Cows cutter Kanter coal cows which are old dairy cows. Bruce milk anymore and so they. He's in new Holland twice a week by and and he couldn't even. Get his drivers. Go down here because they didn't want to go through new. York City the he's delivers boneless meat to to a a kosher hot dog manufacturer in New York City and a guy who owns a cider house has to drive his own. Meet there now. He's got better stuff to do to deliver meat. He's got dry. They just weren't going to go New York City and they and actually he's not bringing any. He can't bring anything New York City. Long Island New Jersey there's a place out in Ohio. USA Shift. WHO's not selling stuff there. Because of drivers won't even drive. he sells a stop to some other places kind of local, and he's selling a tunnel local. Meet where he is in New York, so he's like okay with selling stuff, but he's having a tough time coming up with cattle, because all the local dairy farms around here, but wiped out. He said. This guy told me his places in Whitehall News. He said within a hundred miles circle in like nineteen seventy. There was something like I duNNo. Eighty, five, hundred or eighteen thousand. I can't remember an insane amount of like. Dairies. Now, there's like two hundred within one hundred miles a him. Because all the small theories were wiped out, and everything's been centralized, and this is all because regulation. You know you have to pasteurize milk before you sell. It will a guy who's got fifty cows. CAMPATH is Milky Kfi dot equipment, so you have to sell to the crime rate Kramer. He sets the price and this why New York. is known for having a milk Mafia. Milk or dairy into New York City. You got your legs broke. you know that was a popular thing back in the eighties? I guess. So anyways. New York's really terrible when it comes any legislation, but New York has what seventy five representatives and twenty, three, million or thirty million population where like New Hampshire has four hundred thirty five re representatives. At one point three million population, so yeah, every rep in New Hampshire. What like three thousand people or so they to swing marketing and beat the Crap Yep. So, anyways, actually one of the guys that live here as a side note is running for state rep he's. He's a free stater. We're GONNA. Get Him on his show, James. So anyways. The, Getting back to this food situation is. Like a talent everybody you know, get to know your local farmer. Support your local farmer. Don't stop if you can buy it from your neighborhood. Why are you buying at the grocery? To Your neighb-. Well a lot of times. It's the neighbor willing even. Knowing how! Nick Nick! Problem Mindset in the rain me. We come back. Now. You be growing not that if it wasn't for the dog 's. The political world is a maddening cesspool of corruption and lies. Nobody tells the truth. Nobody keeps campaign promises. Nobody obeys the constitution. Nobody puts the people I. How can we ever escape this web of tyranny? Vote Ferdinando nobody. Hi, my name is nobody. I'm running for Governor of New Hampshire. Because nobody knows how to live your life better than you do, and nobody deserves that kind of power. I WanNa put you back. Control of your money. Your lifestyle your work. Work your body in your life. Nobody should rule you, but you. You Hampshire convict many people of so called crimes that should never have been prosecuted if elected. I will pardon every victimless crime in new, Hampshire history. This includes drug gambling, prostitution, gun and driving offenses. Nobody should have a criminal record when they have not harmed anybody. Wouldn't it be nice to have nobody telling you what to do? Learn more at elect, nobody dot, com elect nobody dot com. Is Spreading the message of Liberty Crypto. Currency and peace around the globe worth two dollars per month to you as you may already know in addition to our Internet, feed L. DOT FM broadcast on free to air satellite across north and Central America as well as sub. Saharan. Africa and we've been available on satellite for free twenty four seven since two, thousand, ten, the into FM Freedom Satellite. 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Derek Jay's victimless crime spree watch it for free and order the director's cut DVD at victimless crime spree dot com. Join, the DOT FM discord for live chat, twenty, four seven at discord dot dot FM. That's discord dot. Dot FM. Roads. It's the Ernest handcock show where we're going. There aren't any roads. We're back. We're back back Jay noon and we were yacking I was gonNA. Play your brothers things. We gotta get the audio rejoining. There's a lot of work to be done Derek and I. Always you know the thing was on the studio. Your problems doing the I could heck with it, man, we're just. We're getting here driving and. He had his bosh running trailer hooked family bitty. Comes into workout. Took them less than an hour and he got it. All taken care of was a plug this in here dummy. He really wanted to stay a few more days, but they. They got that that Dog Toki that was he's got some seizure issues, and they have a specialist Nicodemo only appointment they had was that Monday. And so. The majority. Get with this guy for a while, so they had to be home for. Monday tokens cool I like Toki these big dog and I remember. He had some hip problems. We're at port fast intern. LUPO that that. Massage your gun, thank you did put it on. Boom fixed them. You know and that was like five hundred dollar thing you know and. Now, they're like seventy nine dollars. You can get these things and they're awesome. Say My, but so you need a license to to do chiropractic. You need a veterinarian type license. So I, have a chiropractor friend I'M NOT GONNA. Say Dame, but he works on horses all the time, but he you can't pay him to work on the Horse, but it's okay for him to go. Just a horse did not get paid. just like it's okay for most people to raise a chicken butcher it and give it to their neighbor, but if you raise a chicken butcher, and you sell it to your neighbor selling, it's to crime, not giving out this I. Hell. It's going to be given to you, know they that's next. I'm yeah, know all this stuff is it's just everybody Kinda looks at it goes. It's just not right. You know there's something wrong. It's a plan. Yes, it is a plan. Jay is bypassing the plan well. One of the things is my plan doesn't include their plan. You know this is what would you do? campaigns. You know you're having a forum and you've got you know. The Democrat gets up and I'm going to rule you this way and better, and you gotta get all whatever I rule, you and Republican gets up. He's GonNa. Rule you're wrong I'm really you better? You can pick me for ruling, and then the libertarian gets. Gets up and goes. You Know My plan? Is You get to have your own plan? You know pace and they go little plan. You're going, wow, can you hear yourself the all these people they don't know? The purpose of government is three to have your own freaking plan. If it doesn't work well, then you got a neighbor, maybe had a better plan. It's like. If one point, one one philosophy doesn't work. Everybody goes dead. Neighbors so I have a problematic neighbor. And he come over here. And he complained about the dog and Kinda got into it a little bit with Derek the other day, because men over there to say hi, and Tokyo's just friendly. He just wants to be buddies everybody so He starts flipping out and as We started talking about how I'm diminishing the value property. I good. So I said I have friends that want to buy your house, so he's got. It's like A. Decent side it was a two bedroom. You know. I, don't know forty foot by eighty four sixty foot modular house built on a foundation, and it's twelve point eight something acres, and it's for sale, and it shares the same driveways me so If anybody's interested in BMI neighbor, he wants two hundred and fifty thousand dollars for it is what he told me which means you know I'm sure. Yes something like that and I'd like to. You know kind of get rid of him, but he he's all right. He hunts. He's he's got guns and all your every neighbor around here. That's came over here after because we do gun church, and you know I got like fifty guys down there shooting guns at the gun range. You haven't been to the gun range since you've been here. This time had a so Could man right right, right? It's like a six minute. Walk from where we are so All My. Neighbors of kind of like strolled over here to like I, heard a lot of gun shots, and they come in my driveway, and they're looking around looking around and all of them have been like. Really glad you're here. I really like what I see. And so so they come down in order to come fix. And I'd I'd say I basically like the only stuff I'm working on. is you either have to be like well? You have to be libertarian. Minded anarchist preferrably crypto currency. And a really good friend of mine, and all my neighbors with the exception of one guy have really become pretty decent, pretty good friends of mine and. A, Guy Across the street I haven't met him yet. He's on nine hundred acres. and. He's He's got a big old fifty cal up there just rattling off rounds every once in awhile while. Playing thereby I don't know if you only guy met because I think it's just like a weekend bug out place over there, but it's nine hundred acres or something. And neighbors, some property for sale and I'd like to like minded, you know. Buddy to move in there or friend. Even somebody I don't even know just they'd be listening to the show. Yeah. No, this is the thing that you get well. So, you understand the value. There's one is Jay's got five billion projects, and every time I come up here. There's like. A dozen half done whatever and I go no pick one. We're finishing that. They were finishing that. Then we're finishing hat know we'll get some stuff finished, you know. He's always taking care of all kinds of stuff. Well, what was? Just turn around. So what we'll do is I want you to tell you know you went on that rant now? You got two minutes to tell them about the hogs. Replenishing the soil up there, what we I tried to save all your plaque dirt. So what I did is also. Doesn't really smell bad like hogs around here so basically doesn't how many square foot area I had. Maybe I don't know in eighty by one hundred roughly. We'll say that. I went and I bought twenty, five, thirty, two hundred and fifty pound market hog market hog is a hog just to go to slaughter because I had Okay so it was. Six Thousand Square feet. Six Thousand Square Feet Wet, but twenty five hogs and I gave him a bunch of hey. We gave them We finished. Hey peanuts. Yup, they're lying about everything Ernie. Hawke cow pig hey. They lie about everything member told us that pigs don't know how to eat. Hey, they eat. Hey, just fine everything. But. They love and they go nibbled a little mushrooms out of it like. If you throw in a chunk of like hate us, go like mushrooms growing out of it, they'll just nibble up those little mushrooms. They love the mushrooms in the hey, and so anyways and their pooping all over the place, because they the eaten poof and we're feeding them yogurt. We're feeding them peanuts and some organic cotton corn, OATMEAL and. Some chocolate chips only a few of them like to chocolate chips funny. A lot of was it why all just just stuff? You had laying around free. Why were there? Loads for free I don't know why it's for free overruns. It's GonNa. Be Spoiled. It's added date. It's whatever and. I didn't my my buddy. Neil Got Bardo farm. He just brings it. He's been doing I've went there like a decade ago. Man They're. They're always at some Scott. Some supermarket or something throwing away Guinea pigs like thank you, so it's important. Activate Bio Char. So what I did is one of my barrels out there one of my peters for the hogs fed up with filled up a bio char. Over there eating a bio char all the time, so the eating a bio charge like eating charcoal, and you go to Mexico and you get to Teresa's. Know and you're feeling a little sick. You go to the pharmacy and they just give you a charcoal. You just take it and it'll absorbs whatever or alcohol poisoning charcoal is really good I mean people take charcoal baths? So hogs reading the charcoal, and then it's their pooping out now I got. Hot Pig compost with activated bio in it and it doesn't stink. Because bio char is a buffer. It absorbs all the nutrients now if you take unactivated biotech, and you mix it all on Your Garden Gardens Not GonNa grow well the first year because the bio charged essentially absorbing, the nutrients kinda holding onto. You can actually have an oil spill and put like bio char all around near, and let's just drive over it was. Rake it up like days later throat and a wood boiler woodstove. and. It sucks up all the all the bio. Char. We put The the vital truck sucks up all the oil I put a bio char in with chickens. My brother puts it in with horses. How you do it! He takes a bunch of would put in a barrel. Get Lit and then covers. That or you put it in your boiler in a buck. Fifty different ways, and what's the? Easiest thing for me is. I got just five hundred thousand. You would boiler. is four foot sixty three foot wide I. mean you could literally stack like eight bodies in there. It's huge and. I'VE WE FILL IT UP? It would, and then there's a bunch of hot coals. Hours later. Scoop the hardcore. into. All this lack. Of. Activated all four. From the third letter of Captain Mark. The crowns observation conditions us to be dishonest with ourselves. Therefore, constant surveillance produces a society of constant deception. Honest communication is the seed of civilized conduct to deny us. The seed is to deny us. It's fruits, but the crowns primary objective is to stifle free thought itself to make it subjects and capable of dissent. Season Pirates have always encrypted messages and codes and ciphers to intercept transmissions were incomprehensible but today the crown possesses a band tools of pattern recognition that document profile and predict our every move. Today piracy requires hailing frequencies completely invisible to the crown. We are tired of poltergeist in the static, looking for a community of like minded scoundrels or just want some swag to let the crown know what you think of it. Join the conversation at PIRATESWITHOUTBORDERS DOT com. On. Free Talk Live. We're bringing people to the ideas of liberty every day from wrestling superstars like Glenn Jacobs you guys really are having an impact I believe like I, said a lot of where I am now. Do Listening to free talk. Live you change my mind on some very important issues. Years ago, two random people tuning in on the radio I was stuck in the left right paradigm by her and your show by chance on Saturday night from there I went on during the Free State. State project in become an angle flyer so I mean that's really the reason why I am is because I know that. If it wasn't for you, guys being on issues your. I never would have found the idea of liberty. Your amp will directly change more lives by getting free talk. Live in front of people looking for. Talk Radio Online and on the air. When you amp free, talk, live, you get perks like access to the only facebook group and amp podcast visit amp, dot, freetalklive dot com. bitcoin dot. COM has launched a trading platform at local dot, bitcoin dot com, allowing you to buy or sell bitcoin cash via dozens of payment methods like pay pal, then Mo, bank deposit, remittances or meeting in person with cash. There are no idea requirements to sign up for and use the site, and all communications between buyers and sellers are encrypted finally a global trading platform that respects your privacy visit local bitcoin dot com to get started trading bitcoin cash local dot bitcoin dot com L. DOT FM now has a. A dischord discord is a free text and voice chat platform, and we now have our own server with a bunch of channels at discord, L. R. N. DOT FM you can join other listeners as they chat about various things during our live shows or anytime day or night, discord softwares available cross platform, so you can have it on whatever device you want, and take your chats anywhere. Join our discord at discord dot l., R. N. Dot. FM that's discord dot L. R. N. DOT FM the Free State Project has. Has Reached its goal of twenty thousand Liberty Lovers who pledged to move to New Hampshire and get active to achieve liberty in our lifetime? Perhaps you're trying to figure out what part of New Hampshire should be your destination. If so consider keen, you'll find more than one hundred and fifty reasons to move too keen at move dot free keen. Dot Com keen is famous for its historic publicity, generating activism as well as being the liberty media capital of the world. It's home to freaking Dot com New Hampshire destination for. For Liberty Activism News and opinion for years. We've been compiling over one hundred fifty reasons to move too keen at move. Dot Free Keen. Dot Com where you'll learn about some of what's happening here and what makes keen a great place to live. If you love liberty, you'll probably enjoy anywhere. You end up in the Shire, but do your due diligence I. Please visit, Move Dot, freaking dot com for the full list of over one hundred fifty reasons to move to keene. That's move. Dot Free, keen DOT COM. Live video of our key. New Hampshire based shows a screamed on D. Live. Please follow share, D- live dot, L. DOT FM. That's D. Live Dot L. R. N. Dot, FM. It's time for declare your independence with Ernest handcock. And Melody Angie and And me. All right what we're talking about is You know just. Universal, basic income, or or are we taking it? Are we doing it? You know I got. Out How much it was, we got, and we Donna just signed it and sent a Dire S. Now. Here's your money back. You put it on our account if you want but. So I don't know what happened. I don't know if they credited. Do you know if they credited towards her counter? Not having checked whatever don't care, but the I. Don't think he's having account the irs. That's the problem right there. Count I. You know the thing is. Is that people that support US and so on? They write it off. You know they do then. Where did you give it well? They got it. It's really for them I. Don't give me crap. You know it's to make sure that these guys are legit and their. Whatever I don't care, but the Bio Char wanted WANNA finish up on that soil building you get. Well what I did. I remember Terron Lupu that lives up here now. Chiropractor that's written. He's an author. He does law farming, stuff and everything. When he was in Savannah Georgia before he moved up here, he tried six inches thick of wood, chips chips, and that's a big thing. woodchips well. I had irrigated to Acre horse property. Kind of thing and Phoenix were where we were, so we had chickens, and we go in Turkey meal. NOCCO panics and those other stuff, so we had to go in on well, Don had like six chickens i. mean you know so i? I Miss Chicken. Now. We're about out of eggs or jobs here. Go grab any eggs you want from ours. I think we also go. Great eggs. I don't know man I'm not good exotic. I had duck eggs and they're not to say but know. It's so anyway, so we. Took a lot of the trees that we because. It floods, it's like six inches deep my whole property twice a month. So I have seventy foot trees, big giant pint kicked crap out of this stuff. It's enormous, but that creates a lot of biomass, so we gotta Chipper and we started doing, and I had an area where I put that chips on there and just let them sit and the next year. Man I got worms I got. You'll like chickens going through it I got black dirt. I've heard of people building gardens on top of pavement with wood chips. Just, make! Hey is what I had access to indefinitely. What J. has tons of access to and in recent years through reading and following different Gardeners Hayes? Ruth Sal is yes, she is. Like sixty seventy. With that you know with square foot golf because we use the straw straw, you know to for the chickens. Like every couple of weeks, yeah, then we take all that output. Put another bail or two in there, and then we take that and that's got Kickapoo. Paul in it and everything, and then we just till it in with the soil, so we're building great soil so. Hay or Straw, tell me the difference between the two. So what you know, it's us, so hey is essentially grasses or lagoon so like clover Alfalfa? ALFALFA's lagoon. They have long roots. They can survive on little water They can actually get drowned out if you give him too much water so in southern Arizona. There was a farm that. I had. Studied a little bit because we do some similar equipment in Colorado, but they were in Alfalfa ten times ten cuttings a year, and they were very close to the Mexican border, and it was all on this sugar sand and the only time they didn't cut. It was like in December, and February to let it grow, but alfalfa loves heat so alfalfa grasses, whatever hayes a combination of edible grasses. I it. It's usually harvested and putting the bales and the next fed as a dry or wet You can wrap it in fermented. You know the marshmallow bales. They calm bills at a wrapped up. Too hort to cows, horses go to then Straw is. Is the byproduct harvesting grain? So you got wheat? OAT Rye. you know even like she is seeds bombasle. When when when the combine goes through and combines a week it it. It it. Takes the seeds out. Separates the seeds and all the shaft, so like take a piece of weeks drawn. Break it off nizing. Look right through. It's like a strong you could probably. Suck moderate couple with it. There's. There's no seeds and Straw in what's called clean. Straw, so the some guys don't like us. Hey, because there's seeds in the hey. Well. I really like the biodynamic farming. There's this place called living web farm. If you Google Living Web farm, they talk all about this biodynamic farming they do. They do basically a very similar Joe Salton type operation. And so these guys talk about building the soil, so they go into places like Mel was talking about. They take a parking lot. If can acre parking lot, and they put you know. I don't know several hundred yards chips on it, and then they put cover it all and hay and Straw, and they see it with a cover crop, and then they grow all kinds of vegetables in there, and they got a massive garden, so living web farms will tell you dat. You know I think you're right. That grow everything everything grows. You shouldn't shouldn't even plug anything from the guard. Just let whatever grow, unless it's like a nasty. We'd invasive. We don't want just pluck them, so we cover crops all the gardens here. Everything's covered in. Hey, and then we. We did a cover crop of wheat rye. and he's pollinator flower while expecting a blow in the compost around the plants. Then we got chipmunks eating all the wheat and rice seeds In the beach. So we got we got one cat killing about one chipmunk day that we got here so like you know. I, WANNA. I'd need to do something good for that Carolina three sisters. You're supposed to plant a seed I think like for the animals for the earth. Okay well the animal getting there, I got a pellet gun I haven't gotten a chipmunk yet. To see a bunch chipmunks, man. No, you're afraid of you. Buy Your my way Mazzy whiz around through your I I carry nine millimeter my side and I. Could you know take chipmunk out several times? Twenty feet from the House and I don't WanNa scare to baby or two way or I don't have like. In Ring my ears, but And so anyways too busy to slide in a scope on the pellet gun. So. By building the microbes in the soil is so important. The the Hejaz keeps on breaking down a hey keeps breaking down you go pull out, look, round bills and just pull out some of the wet spots. It's like beautiful comp. Lal's Party. We had the other day. One of my one of my good friends, actually girls who stood up these pants for me. She's a free stater in keene. She's a seamstress. She! Packed a bunch of grain bags with a whole bunch of life. For her little garden at home in the city and and. She sent me a text she goes. Hey you WANNA sell some bags of this I got. Friends. Don't want to buy this this this this. Hey, compost stuff. And I ain't really got time to do that and. That's one thing is you're as I've been traveling across the country? You'll see to where the new. Used to be bales of Hay that were rectangles correct. Area now they have these big round bales. You know wave, two billion pounds and a lot of times. They used to be They were just open, didn't they? Started having they wrap them and they kind of waterproof them a little bit. They're not waterproof from what they're doing is they're wrapping 'em information. So they're, they want it. The ideal is to bailed at what they call high high moisture. Hey, or hey, Lidge! or They'll call it bale. Bale Hay Ledge put it into a bagger into a big silo or pit. But they want basically thirty two percent moisture is perfect for bail age, and then at ferment, so it's almost like cabbage. So this hey, I got so we were really for minute. That's better for the animal to eat way better than. I. Thought I thought they were freaking out if it got wet and it was so. Sad for dry freak out if you're GonNa, tell on your Mike. You don't want the dry hair to get wet, but what they do is they wrap it and no oxygen gets in there, and it's a fermentation process so now like these four by four bales, four foot by four foot bales at our dryer, like four hundred five hundred pounds by the high moisture Bale, or the bail edge there like eight, hundred, two nine hundred pounds and a feed value. Tremendous better, but you really can't feed it to horses. Unless you give the horses botulism vaccine the botulism vaccine. Then you could see the horses, but cows goats pigs. Handle it really well, but cows do really good on high moisture village. Really I thought it. Was You know well? I guess for horses. They were saying. Don't feed them. Or Right? Yeah, you don't WanNa feed. Horses wet. Hey, they're pretty sensitive. Another huge thing I want to say about using hey for the garden is we're GonNa hit the a time limit here, but we'll go into on the streaming. GO TO PHOENIX DOT COM and left to live streamed air, and then on the other life St Louis are. Just a lot more go to have. Four Former. Bring every hour I'll be. No. I'm sorry Whitman. Model. Out there. Alley? Wondering. Guard. This is Michael Dean from the Freedom Teens I've run websites since nineteen, ninety six and have used over a dozen web hosts in that time address hosting dot. com is the only one that hasn't broken my heart address. Hosting up time in service is stellar and their dos. Mitigation is the Best I've seen. That's important, because if you tell the truth in this world, you'll ruffle feathers, and some people will try dirty tricks to silence your voice, no matter. Matter what the haters with avarice hosting keeps our websites online. If you have a mission, critical, commercial presence or world changing activism site, you cannot tolerate any skulduggery, so go with agress hosting DOT COM. Have a wordpress or blogger site, but you're not satisfied with performance up time or just ron hosting WANNA pay with Bitcoin eggers hosting specializes in high performance hosting with personalized service. Go to address hosting DOT COM. Click on the button that says get hosted. That's address hosting DOT COM. The L. R. N. DOT FM Social Media Channels have been revamped. We've eliminated facebook and focused on other platforms like twitter and mastodon the decentralized alternative to twitter on our accounts. You'll find posts from. L. R. DOT FM show hosts together in one place. Follow us on twitter at twitter dot, l., our end on FM or better yet moved to the decentralized mastodon social media platform at toot, dot, l., R. N. Dot. FM T O ot, dot. Fm I think you'll like it. I'm a little obsessed with my magic mud several years ago, I met Jessica Armand the founder and CEO of my magic bud, and I even know my teeth were coffee stained a week's worth of use. Convinced me and now I. Use it every three or four days. It's clinically proven to whiten teeth and I think it cleans better to my magic months available at most local health food stores, sprouts, natural grocers CVs Walmart's natural beauty all, but I can get it for you for twenty percent off with Coupon Code ftl twenty at my magic mud dot com twenty. You're listening to the heartland news. Feed Radio Network Broadcasting Live twenty percent our news. Stream is supported by advertisers and contributions by. Follow us on facebook, twitter and instagram. Public? Service, daily newscast June the night twenty twenty I'm Mike Clifford former officer Derek, shelvin formerly charged Monday with murder in the death of George. Floyd The Washington Post reports Chevron appear via video conference during which a judge set bail at one point, two five million dollars without conditions or million with conditions. The hearing coincided with a final public moral in Houston for Floyd who will be buried next was mother in a cemetery in Pearland Texas. Kentucky Republican Senator Rand. Paul is the sole holdout in Congress on legislation that would for the first time recognized lynching as a federal crime. His decision has sparked growing public outcry both nationally and at home democratic state. Representative Reginald Meeks of Louisville says his community is disappointed in Paul's decision, especially amid the massive protests and national rage over the Police Killing of Louisville resident bring on a Taylor we here in Kentucky people of Color. People of conscience are are not at all unfamiliar with these tactic is not uncommon for him to step out in front of the community and claim to be on one side when his actions speak of. Called the Emmett till Anti Lynching Act the bill passed the US House nearly unanimously, and has the backing of all senators, except for Paul who says he opposes the legislation, because he believes it's written in a way, that potentially could allow for excessive prison sentences for minor hate crimes I'm Nadia Ramlogan for the bill remained stalled in the Senate more than forty seven hundred people across the country, mostly African Americans, reportedly were lynched between eighteen, eighty, two and nineteen, sixty eight. What is considered to be the last public execution by hanging? US occurred in Owensboro Kentucky in nineteen thirty six. Massachusetts the state legislature there may soon vote on the end of life. Options Act damped is limited to mentally capable terminally ill people expected die within six months. It would give them the option to get medication that would allow them to pass away in their sleep Dr Roger Klickler is retired physician in foul mouth with incurable prostate cancer and a longtime advocate for medical aid in dying. To die with suffering is something that most people want to? Open suddenly. Percent of the people in Massachusetts are in. Medical Guy. Klickler is referencing the most recent poll about the issue from twenty thirteen. He says the biggest obstacle to the bill. Passing is opposition from some religious groups, nine states, and the District of Columbia Medical Aid in dying, I'm Laura Rats Hellum reporting. This is PMS. Despite the COVID nineteen pandemic, the US census happening right now advocates for people with disabilities are stressing the importance of being counted. The economic impact of the pandemic could mean sharp but cuts at state city and federal levels. Margie Trepanier with the Center for independence of disabled New York, or Sidney points out that census figures are used to determine how resources of distributed to states and localities, but people with disabilities. Are overlooked, and the census is only done every ten years. We are locked in to a count for a decade. We can't afford to be disadvantaged in that count for another ten years, everyone should have received a census form in the mail and this year it is possible to complete the census process through the government website at twenty twenty census dot. Gov I'm Andrea Sears reporting and the pandemic has also. Also made collecting signatures for ballot measures, electric trickier, a coalition effort to convince. Colorado voters to approve a dedicated revenue stream for schools and other public needs is launching dozens of pop stations across the State Scott. Wasserman with the Bell Policy Center says initiative to seventy one would raise taxes on Colorado's earning above two hundred fifty thousand dollars a year, but cut taxes for everyone else even before the pandemic. Numerically funding major public priorities like schools and roads and healthcare, and it just so happens that by taking the tax code fairer, we can actually fund the public priorities that every. Colorado relies on in the state Wasserman. Says low and middle income Colorado's pay. A substantially larger percentage of their income in taxes through income sales and property taxes than the top five percent of earners initiative to seventy one is projected to generate up to two billion dollars each year. Proponents behind a competing initiative say cutting taxes by a fraction of a percent for all earners. Income level will boost the economy by encouraging investment and job creation. I'm Eric Gladys. Finally are Mike. Bowen tells us, progressive clergy are finding new people to connect with as a nation confronts host of turbulent issues, including in southern Wisconsin Reverend, Tanya said a Gopalan leads the Janesville United, Church of Christ, which she says has a long history of activism and outreach in the past few years. She says the Church has been more outspoken about welcoming immigrants and LGBTQ issues, the pandemic and the civil unrest, following the death of George Floyd are adding to that outreach. Outreach and it isn't only members of their own congregation that they're engaging with our church, for instance draws interest from the millennial evangelical delicate young people who have young kids right now. Who who desire to make a difference in their world. This is Mike Clifford for public service. We are member. Listener supported and online at public new services dot org remember that I'm here not because of the path that lies before me, but because of the path that lies behind me. I remember that one hundred years. We have these machines. And after a century of I remember that which. We still. Make them remember. We. There's Frank God. Manny ways till the last. Minute every time you're killing me. This Ajay's like. Go in talking got can't wait on prank. What what the hell you're. You're killing. A doctor Dr late or you are their yards zoom wasn't connected there there you go well. Try doing it thirty seconds earlier. Seriously can I tell you it wasn't connecting? So our? This is well. It's been like a week behind. This is a few things to talk about this time. I don't even know where to start so much impact on all of this from from the trump report perspective Are you guys safe? Has Been Talking last couple hours every. He's good on your end. Yeah, we're fine. We're taking the The bus in to be painted this afternoon. You know so, that's like a you know thing. We got to get a smaller version of our small version of our stuff and So that'll take a week and we're probably going to get the jeep in this one done. Get all matching. BE PURDY! and. Then while I'm here at Jay's, I'm I'm know manual labor. BRECON tractor, doing pulling Farman, whatever and. Then we get it back will probably go up to Derek's and do some more studio work. We gotta do some audio balancing, so everybody quit yelling at me and then some other stuff, and then we'll go to pork fast fast, and it needs a week for the painted cure, and they will decal it and everything while we're up there. That'd be like an event at pork passport past that'd be fun and and you know doing interviews and traveling the country and here J.. He got like of hogs. You know they got cattle. There have been opening their own creating their own slaughterhouse and their refrigeration truck of hanging. The doing and people will not be a starving up here and they're getting all their meat cheap because Tyson says you gotTa Kill Him Oh, and you supposed to sell either I mean it's amazing what's going on? But but the suit, but the solution is is. Not Paying attention, and just just doing. Getting meet cheap, we're having a hard time. Finding steers in pay him big money for them. We got piglets pretty. Pretty right and and market hogs, but yet well, and yet it's steers were selling hanging You're selling. Tell for five dollars, a pound plus They paid a butcher. And we go all the half and half half. Cows sold that we can possibly find so this is. A know this is what I'm looking at. This is what I'm seeing. You know is the people that are. We knew was going to happen. We've been talking about it a lot of the guys here you know Jay Derek. We were stocked up BOB's out on this we're we're fine because we knew what was coming. Why well now you know as I, look over the last week. I was just driving of course I you know over the headline news since stuff to be posted. A lot of stuff, then you send me some videos and look at some stuff for you. You Watch a little TV here. Tucker Carlson goes on about whatever, but it has been. There is a fear generator going on trying to scare the living, crap and everybody. Are you feared? Are you worried what's up? Oh I'm not fear. Again with most of our group, we've been preparing for this for a long time, and we've been seeing the manipulations of this country through the media through all Titians for quite a while. And I think. It's sort of a sense of I. Don't know Schadenfreude I guess of on the world and for many of our friends and neighbors were starting to understand this in all fairness to them. I have found is from Alaska. Week town I mean countless. Here's the cash account. Probably want my my two heads, but it's still very close as people to me. You know I won't mention names. The how many of them are buying their first gun. People like if you've had no. Never in a million hears about about about about purposely a gun I have. People are Democrats who've never voted Republican. who were saying look I'm not sitting there dead now with trump, but I'll tell you what this. I don't know what is going on with the average person who has not been paying attention all the time. Who Sat in there did that kind of like an armchair, a an armchair. Armchair American just basic as essential. Once in a while, maybe watches the the presidential debates. Every four years considers themselves. You know MTV rock. The vote also what to do, and they think that their Egede educated. You know as far as what's happening there. The first ones to argue most of our our our listeners right now around Thanksgiving dinner telling us about how crazy are those are the people? Those are the people who figured this whole thing are starting to wake up with. There's something off and wrong, and they're seeing it in the end. The obvious division of what the media's doing used to get away with this. It was okay, no way we re. I thought this was all happening to benefit the Democrats taking over and win in the House and Senate, and every mayor's office of this for them. No, it's not working that way. Is it Blowback Day? Anticipate this absolutely. Absolutely I know. We have a couple of minutes till the end of the break I want some of your listeners and granted. Maybe many of your listeners figure this out by now. This is something that I sold the first two days after that tape. I started doing research on that tape. Explain explain more when we come back, but if you haven't figured it out yet. Pain, what are you talking about that tape? The video video George Floyd within the. Framework! Off Officer unfriendly. I'm sitting there. Watching that immediately and something came to my mind, just watching it and one of the things that the tagged it was that does that. Was that number couple of frames you could see? One of the officers, the officers helping. Shot was an Shabas Shabas I'm GONNA goes name. Either helping him hold down Floyd and the couple frayn's in that video. Like like the modern mcgruder film very right with the GRUETER film. That's the modern version of, but but that couple friends. He looked like he was a minority I thought he was black, and I kept trying to figure out the race of the other top and Chris Christie. They kept trying to say that this thing was racist, and I'm thinking. Wait a minute. How racial first off and that's my whole family throughout I'm dying. Prove, you cannot prove anyone out there to this point that this has anything and the thing to do with race and yet they spun this. Early and they decided to pull everyone by the leash and I'm amazed. I hiked with with a well-known freedom. Seats person just just a couple of days ago, we went. We kinda just hung out in. This person didn't even think about it and he's like. I never thought that that far back. Just assume everyone's assuming this is racial, and that's an issue. Well, you know all lives matter. The Sanad lock lives. Matter now turned into a political party which I think Tucker. Carlson made a great point on that one of the one of the few times. I've listened to Fox, but when you pull this back, it has nothing to do with race. From the very beginning, they spun this immediately and the one time that Americans came together on this immediately. Libertarians conservatives whether you had rush limbaugh where you had trump people and black lives matter all green that this is a wall enforcement issue. What this is, this is a long force issue and that's A. Whole other discussion okay, but but the minute people were unified on this. They had to stop that immediately and separates the minute. The coon by US started the people in charge. The only thing they have is division south of. The South. Division and they saw this unification before this election. They so white black people getting together. They already knew that the black boat was was dumping the Democrats for trump. Then, of course you know just a few weeks ago, of course we had. We had the vice president dementia. Sit there and talk about what eating say that that that's about if you don't vote for people for trump, and you're not black enough. I mean he just made that comment. He was losing hemorrhaging the black vote and the Nisa curves, and now the have. The. Right? From. Plunging anyway I wouldn't point. Ever. discuss. This. Gordon bring back quite, back talk. Frank! But. More next time and then I got a lot of questions. From the six letter of Captain Mark. A pirate's life is characterized by voluntary interactions. Unfortunately, the crown presses everyone into involuntary servitude, landlubbers believe slavery was abolished years ago, but the crown still claims to own us when it comes into service against our will. Given sufficient ambition, it would gladly draft thousands of hapless victims to kill or be killed it simply slavery by another name. landlubbers are routinely commanded to serve the so-called justice system in jury duty, but before you swell with civic pride, consider that how you feel is irrelevant to the crown you will appear is ordered or face punitive measures. The crown insists that you participate in your own oppression. Jury. Summons. Provide pirates with a unique opportunity to obstruct injustices, a jerk and vote. Not Guilty units proven the law was violated. Ager quit for any reason at all, and not even a judge can reverse that verdict. Receiving jury summons is basically winning the sedition lottery. But if you reveal that you know this during jury selection, you'll probably be dismissed if the crown foolishly crimson pirate into jury duty, it behooves the pirate to conceal their intention to nullify unjust laws. If he master takes one hundred percent of your labor. It's called slavery, but if they only take fifty percent, they call it taxation, a difference of degree, not kind whether the crown claims a fortune percent is irrelevant, most of all a slave owner desires, contented slaves, meaning thoughtless ones and accept their bondage, these house slaves see no contradiction being drafted in a war in slavery or some into a jury to prosecute tax, evasion and ideal slave knows no higher call, then the masters will. The crowns, highest ambition is that it's slaves revere the authority that's subjugates them, but the crown does not own me. I will not surrender my time and treasure to the crowns. Ambitions join the conversation at PIRATESWITHOUTBORDERS DOT com. There are basically two types of advertising, direct response and branding radios great for direct response with its low cost listener ratio, but audio can't be beat for branding, which is a longer term endeavor. You want to be the first thing that someone thinks that when they think about your product or service. If you have a local business that you want kept top of mind in your community, call the station. If you need national reach, Free Talk Live got around two hundred radio stations. Millions of monthly listening sessions can suit all budgets, and if we don't think we're right. Right for you, we'll tell you email me market freetalklive dot com, there are lots of ways to listen to free talk. Live or podcast has been around since podcast began, and now the F. T. L. feed is loaded with content besides our full show archives. Did you know that we make it easy for you to customize your podcast subscriptions we have different feeds one that includes only our full shows, one with just the daily digest and our main feed that includes everything you decide what you listen to. It's quick and easy to customize your feeds at feeds dot. Dot freetalklive dot com that's feeds DOT FREETALKLIVE DOT COM. We have some news the indictments against Russell Brixton, the district of Maryland were dismissed with prejudice meaning. They can never be refiled. This is especially good because those indictments contain the only charge ever made that. Ross engaged in murder-for-hire. This was a serious allegation at Rolls. Outbreak denies it was never prosecuted or roll on by a jury Putt was trumpeted by the federal government and the media as if it were proven fact, the Maryland Court held these indictments for almost five years poisoning Ross's case and leaving him under. Under a cloud of unproven allegations as explained in Ross's appeal to the Supreme Court the fact that the judge us these allegations to give her all say coney sentence of Double Life Without Parole violated his sixth amendment. Right to a jury trial. Judges are required to issue sentences based on convictions decided by a jury, not unproven allegations never even charged at trial. Although this is a positive development that dropped indictment will not set rolls free now a presidential pardon is Ross is only hope of freedom signed the petition at free Ross, dot org free raw dot org. You're listening to the best liberty oriented audio streamed around the clock on the air and online. This is the Liberty Radio Network at L.. Red Dot FM. To be a part of the show, call six, zero, two, two, six, four, two, thousand, eight, hundred, six, Oh, two, two, six, four, twenty, eight, hundred, and now Ernest handcock. Dr Franken Berry on the true report. You know. Talk trump anymore like here. You know I never really. Anyway you know, but. It's just another guy wants to rule me. What do you think is really going on? Is You're paying attention to the media and you're looking at from your perspective of whatever? A lot of people are. What do you think the attitude is? They're more likely to vote for trump and he better be doing a meal in rip off or what? Oh, absolutely, I look. We're really of course. This is typical Ernie. We're skipping to the end to the part that. But I'll tell you what this is. Not An issue whether trump's going to win, the question really is trump. GonNa Take California with that's. That's a whole nother discussing. This this is this is going to be the landslide been talking about you guys for a long time. This whole election has nothing and I've argue with you for a while and I. Think you know you and I are? We've seen I'd more on it, not that you you know you at least respect, my opinion on this I think many people have agreed with. This is not about house in stalled this years ago. Ago You know the reason that I went from Ron Paul since nineteen, eighty eight. I may add libertarian audience of this show kind of knows for a long time I understood about the federal. Reserve and the issue of this and that you know Petro Dollar, all of this stuff and I've been fighting for these policy issues all this time, but seeing how Ron Paul was railroaded. How deeply established? The establishment is no pun. Pun intended seeing just how they culture was getting torn apart as someone who's traveled and lived overseas in Japan and Asia and and business savvy Sylvia Russia. It's I. was there actually a few years? After the Soviet Union fell, so there was still these overtones when I was there. Anyway long story short is that when truly traveled you? You understand what American culture is and yet Americans. Don't think we have a culture. Culture there's also a whole fight about western Western civilization. This is such a larger issue. When I saw when I started to see how the establishing squash people like like Ron Paul White would it. Did the Ralph Nader with that famous video like what they did with Ross Perot and threatened with the whites of his daughter. Remember that you know what they did with other people in the past, not to mention Bernie Sanders. Whether you love or hate his policies. You can see what they tried to do to him. And why people are so angry that the people who support Bernie Sanders has been railroaded twice by establishment then tests under house arrest for the pandemic in these Democrats strongholds, and then all of a sudden, just loose with this fell false narrative that the man is out to get you if you happen to be black, and and and if you're a minority and just completely let this thing explode all of this feeding into trump, but anyway I guess the trump election, and this argue some Libertarians. Past the concept now of the point of whether or not the Federal Reserve should be banned or not, which of course should or or about all the troops back on day one and eliminated petrodollar bought I get all that I didn't lose my libertarian Craig, the despite from people, but this we've passed that Rubicon and I think whether you agree one hundred percent or not. You understand my point. That's what this election is, and I've never spoken like Sean Hannity that. Election is the most important of all. Kinds like walking papers for those guys. This is I think the average American is starting to understand that this is. This is not about abortion. This is not about fly burning. This is about the the just the core, the core of this country, and it's about to be taken over by Colt. Are these. It's not just the black lives matter these our coldest. This is a group that has lost her mind. Their battered literally bowing down, and taking a knee before people out of fear subjugation, I mean we're. We're watching this live within a few days. Within a weekend we went from. You know it's like a police reform, so all of sudden disbanding, the police taken another guns away and getting rid, and now putting the now putting just like black lives matter people in charge of guns I mean my God I mean the Libertarians in private military. For a long time so laughed, but now it's like the other people so now. We've got a world where where we're law-abiding. Citizens are not supposed to have guns and other police are not supposed to have guns. So what would have what we call we're, don't we jump the whole criminal system having guns? What do you think that does for trump? I mean this. This just keeps piling on. I WANNA. Get back to in a second. Though about why does not racial the deeper issues here but? It's such A. It's such a loaded point, but yeah, this is the trump report and it does play into him and one last is this to me is round. Three of the of the of the screening means as my mom would say remember those those s j w women that used to see if the paintcare screaming when trump one. Think about this. This is round three. The night that trump won you had you had the first one right that when he won. You had the riots of the people screaming outside. Like this, it was just like there's like a bunch of petulant showed journeys. GET THEIR WAY, and they exploded the scene after election night. Then round two was the so called women's March had nothing to do with women and I was there I marched with Dr Easter. The two of US marched with all of our trump's slag. Amongst almost what close to a million or whatever of women with their little pink pussy hats, they called them. And they stopped, and they called it a women's March he wasn't, he was nothing but a an excuse to just cry out and scream. You know we didn't get our way right, and so now we have a third one. That's what this is. This is another event at dressing up as it's about police, brutality and Racism and always companies like Amazon and every company, including my natural product profession that had put out a statement from the from the National Association that. We condemn racism and everyone's taking a knee and. Wait a minute if they had to put out the doctor. So, what? What do you mean? They had why why I'm just saying? If you're watching seriousness. All these companies are all bending the knee. Just like you're seeing politicians and cops bending the literally on television surrounded by people watching them like Dodson Superman to you. Make it superman bowel before him. Screw that, and that's what these people are forcing to do. In these corporations doing the same thing. It's extortion money every company now. I don't know like I don't know if it's officemax oldest. Throw them as an example, but every company out there earning now is making statements putting on their websites throwing everything out saying we care about black lives, and it's almost like we're in. In in black district. Okay, let me let me go ahead. I wanted to share perspective on this. I've been through this before ready and it's extortion Let me. Turn this just one thing that I i. WanNa share is that during the Nineties Day, I did the same thing with guns. It was you had all these people come Inada Claude, you get trained or lawyers, accountants or being counting their insurance adjusters liability. Evaluators Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah and they would convince the boards or aborted directors, or you know the say same day than those of the it's all a plan, and they get the people in and they go. This is the narrative that we're going to do. When narrative is! A cost, US money and it costs US customers, and it costs us if we allow guns or have guns, or they got guns where they talk about God's guns, so they all say we. We don't like guns. You're not allowed to have gone. Then you find out that liability goes up then you start having more dining destruction. Then you start having you know people. It's a gun free zone. It's Osha for criminals they get to go in. The schools. Get to go into the cafeteria and they get to go in ages. Lay waste everybody go on military bases, and they're not allowed to have guns available. And they and they killed there. So this has been A. it's like it's a plan. When these guys abandoning sale! And, he started to give the size. What are they doing? There is a plan be. Something else going on. On the people. I think they are, but what the debate? Are the politics. I will talk about looking for a great real estate investment consider New Hampshire. which is ground. Zero for the liberty, movement, your first call should be to mark worden from porcupine realestate. He's more than just a real estate agent easier New Hampshire concierge. Where are the best places to live? Do you want farms city? The burbs forest. Do you WanNa? Do Plex multifamily buildings so that Renter's pay your mortgage? Their homes in all price ranges in new. Hampshire and mark and help with financing to invest in liberty and property Mark Gordon can help. Give on real. ESTATE DOT COM. You're already listening to L. R.. N. Dot FM weather via our twenty four seven satellite feed, online, streaming, audio or video feats. Dot FM content is available in multiple ways, but what if all you have is your phone and no data connection? You can call our listen line at six, four, one, seven, nine, three, eight, hundred, sixty nine. That's a long distance number, so you may incur charges if not listen as long as you want. Six, four, one, seven, nine, three, eighty, eight, sixty nine. Researchers were able to successfully teach a father how to communicate his emotions with rudimentary hand gestures. The stunning development happened after Stanford. Researchers spent nine months trying to train forty two year old Pittsburgh for Ron. Meyers to express simple sentiments like pride and love in a way few thought possible to conduct the study researchers used large simplistic diagrams, depicting hand gestures. Dad might use to show emotion in a way Ron could easily comprehend. We would often leave band of brothers or thirty for thirty reruns on. On to help them stay comfortable. When Ron was able to successfully identify emotion, he was given rewards to reinforce good behavior, including buffalo wings, or a moment to read a page of a Tom clancy novel. Despite Ron's breakthrough, researchers say he still has a way to go before achieving full emotional maturity as after several months of work with Ron. He still retreats to the corner of the lab to look up dry walling techniques on the internet whenever his real family drops by to see him. Is the onion news network. Are you tired of governments murdering people around the world? Stop using their money. There is an alternative bitcoin is a stateless free-market. non-political Currency Bitcoin cannot be inflated or controlled by any government by using their money. You're helping the state. Stop doing it. You have incredible alternative available. Now learn it. Use it spread it. Get started with Bitcoin at BITCOIN DOT COM. That's bitcoin Dot Com imagine someone in your community getting in their car, turning on the radio and hearing the liberty. Liberty Radio Network, you can make that vision a reality with your own micro radio station visit broadcast, L. R.. N. DOT FM to learn how you can put our programs on the air in your area, you can have eller in dot FM running around the clock, and you can even add in your own local shows building a radio station simple, but programming isn't. That were Ilar. End On FM comes in learn more at broadcast dot, l., dot FM that's broadcast dot L. R. N. DOT FM. Congressman recently revealed that legislation, totaling twenty nine hundred pages, and involving more than one trillion dollars was available to members of Congress for less than forty eight hours to study and consider. That's over sixty pages of legislation per hour. Do you think anyone read the entire bill I'm? Jim Bob Dole with downsize DC DOT ORG consider a proposal buried in a thirty two hundred page, three hundred and eighty eight billion dollar bill, which would have empowered committee, chairman or their agianst to examine. Examine Americans tax returns when this will provisions came to light, no one claiming know how it got into the bill. One Congress question said I didn't write it. I didn't approve it. I wasn't even consulted. If your attorney represented you this way, he might be disbarred, but this is how Congress represents you every day. That's why downsize DC DOT. Org has created the read the Bills Act you can force congress to read their bills before they pass them at downsize DC DOT org. Do you love to make sure you favorite Dale end on FM. So you can receive our tweets at twitter DOT DOT FM. That's twitter dot L. R.. N. Dot FM. Freedoms the answer. What's the question? You're listening to Ernest handcock? Playing through I. Get back. We're back with frank bree I I can play it, but you can't hear it, so it's I. Mean if you can hear it, but frank can't so Carl Sagan. Carl Sagan on superstition observation. Nothing conclusion dinosaurs all right, so you're big Carl Sagan Fan we wait, wait wait, wait, wait. Wait wait wait before he played I. Just wanted to explain so obvious. Pretty Random Pearl taken after that whole rain about. Apart so basically This is from COSMO's Satan. Guys. You're young. You're great sides. Seconds Science. Why blocks minute and twenty seconds? Anyway, the thing is this is exactly just just hold us when we talk about the planet. Listened to about logic and what we're seeing, what's going on with George Floyd and this racist issue, and how the cowboys, how the system is has completely turned on its head about logic, and trying to convince you of something that doesn't exist is exactly what happened to astronomers with Venus, so just go ahead and play. It makes the point all right. The first person to look through a telescope Galileo sixteen nine. But only could see a future listeners. And optical telescopes got bigger. That's all anybody could see. A disc with no details fails on it at all. Venus evidently was covered with an opaque layer, thick clouds and sealing surface for centuries. The composition of the clouds of Venus was unknown. I mean you could go outside. Look up, see Venus with the naked eye observed sunlight reflected from the clouds of Venus. What were you looking at? What were the clothes made of? But he knew. As a result. Imagination ran riot. The absence of anything you could see on Venus. Led some scientists and others to deduce. That the surface was a swamp. The arguments if we can dignified such a freeze. When something like this? I can't see a thing on the surface of Venus why not because it's covered with a dense layer of clouds? Well, what are clouds made of? Water of course, therefore Venus must have an awful lot of water on it. Therefore, the surface must be wet. The surfaces wet. That's probably a swamp. If there's a swamp this ferns, if earns. Maybe. There's even dinosaurs. Observation, you couldn't see a thing conclusion. Dinosaurs. That's that. Did it if you couldn't see anything, there must be dinosaurs. Yeah exactly. That's the punchline and that's what we have here. Why have is what we have at Wong forcement? That apparently I'm GONNA use apparently not to legal. You know I think we've all see from the video. The Guy Killed Floyd, but until it's proven record walk, but essentially we have a wall law officer. Right who killed an American citizen right? That was a suspect. That's all we know that's it. That's all we know clouds on Venus, and somehow it's turned into my God. It's it's it's racist or bending these and don't understand that the deep seated racism since comes Jefferson owned slaves, and on and on and on and I mean this whole thing's exploded and people can't remember this week or so ago, using their own is using on brain. There was nothing racial about this okay. Okay. Somehow we got the dinosaurs, so start to go through this thing you let's go. Let's go through all the evidence or lack of at this point. Right I ve off you've got you've got houses. Guy Racist by definition racist believe that the white race in this case would be superior rats. What racism is that? You believe that your race superior to all others. It's not because you say that you don't like rap music. That's not race you WanNa, take prejudice or discriminatory. Use other words expand your lexicon yesterday ws, but thought diluting the term racism. You don't understand what the damn thing meetings turned into a catchall in order for people to self flagellate report with our education system, or to try to shame neuter, and and just just silence everyone else. Okay, but that's not what the word means and second will. How can this Guy Racist when I always married to an Asian woman? So why would be diluting the superior white? Race Gene Pool by doing that right? That's the first thing, so he's married to an Asian person. His partners Asian. Who's looks apparently early name sounds me our arm. Sorry, a Vietnamese what? What it sounds like a mattress firm, and then the other two officers, one of those officers black, not enough half black, whatever I don't care, but the point is these these these these inner city cop, a police officers by almost by rule they have to be interracial. I mean just to avoid the the the the appearance of being racist. So that's why I started investigating this immediately. Because you don't have just simply white cops around together in Philly Chicago doesn't happen. And of course, that's what you have you ever. White Cop buddied up with I'm not looking at the racing. I I hate spend so time that it's just. It's it's cops. Elite and tally of we rule. You didn't like my Buddha respect, my authoritarian, the professional lizama protecting rights is not even it's it's. There's the goon squad you know, and so I'm not I. Don't I. Don't like this. I do like talking about it because it's not. It's that's not it. That's not what's going on. It's they don does and you know. The power comes from the barrel of a badge. And I am when this stuff happens I don't see you know I have to see it. You know other than the neon somebody's throat. What color I'm going? It was blue versus. It was A. Thin Blue Line. Wrap them around my throat. It was a left Jack. Right Jack Bu The jackboot on your throw party. Did this is this is what I see. And I think a lot of people are starting to see this. They're starting to default to where it is government it is this power so when they start talking about defunding the police. What are they? Replace it with nothing which suits crap out of me because it doesn't matter because their pensions are going to crap anyway. They gotTA keep them. Pay You I tell you people knew I wanNA make this prediction. Here's Ernie prediction you know on the morning of six nine, twenty twenty. You know this is Tuesday January night. My prediction is is that you're going to see the COPS? The police, the fire military. They're gonNA. Go through the same phase that the Soviet Union did when they. They're told to bring the tanks in the go up against the people. Go why they're not paying me. They took my pension. You know I'm not getting the real support and the profits from whatever hell I'm with them show. That will start to happen, and almost like they expect it to, but what was would then mean. You know if you're if you got the with them? It's not the people and they got an media saying that the people in the streets and them is Antifa if it's. Black lives matter, which is not even usually. You're trying to combine the two. They're not the same. You know so I now I start seeing all of these. s already had two. Volume loud I'm. Going at it, you know the what I'm seeing the to and I have ANTIFA getting training. I talk about the. Money those money going into do and Clinton. Foundation of China of the the philosophy of them, those of whatever coming in America No. I'm going Oh my God what you know. How do you not see what's happening? This is not normal. Earning, there's another I. Mean you want to get to that part of it and we'll. Bring it up. Now will only get back to the second, but I'll tell you what you're asking. What the game is built. Of Attorney General Bar just talked about that. If we're trying to spend the police, the other option is in order to some people are scared. What happens? We don't have the cops God. Forbid or pre privatized can't have that so therefore I guess the other solution is to go the other way and to federal is the police. He's now talking about that. Maybe all the police should younger one unified system so therefore there's there's standards that are net from police departments that to me I. Think is where the end game is with us. I. WanNa game. There's an endgame. What do you mean in game? I'm just say as far as law enforcement. They always they scare. You Really Fart one side that we're going to have all disband the police and roving gangs and posses which you know, heck I I don't have problem with that. Especially Sheriff Joe's Posse out here. That's the story, so we're GONNA have a software of private police. Of course then the issue is who controls the private police. And when people say realize how crazy that seems the most equal then they're gonNA. Say when we have to do something we have to do something. and. Well. Catered? For like. Kim. HERE WE GO I. Log On my. Back. At work. Got Hey. We have been here before. So you've signed the. Shire Society Declaration and are planning your move to New Hampshire to be around more liberty oriented people next sign up for the Shire Society Forum at Forum Dot Shire Society Dot Com there are a bunch of people there who are already in the Shire and they want to meet you. If you're already in the Shire physically, you should also come by the forums. Remember not everyone uses facebook. 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Great place to live, it's the world's largest fallen tourists libertarian community and it's only getting. Some amazing to be able to move to other people I passionately believe in being free and independent with the Free State project is managing to do though is to put their money where their mouth physically getting up across the country and saying, let's go someplace, and let's demonstrate the power of these ideas. There's a lot of kind of philosophy that surrounds liberty. There's a lot of thinking about it talking about it, but here in new, Hampshire people are doing it one hundred one reasons liberty lips in. New Hampshire a documentary by Free State Project early movers. Watch it free at one reasons. Film Dot Com one. Oh, one reasons film DOT Com. You can put the Liberty Radio Network on the air in your area visit broadcast dot l., DOT FM to learn how broadcast dot L. R. N. Dot, FM. There are those that just want to be left alone. And those that just won't leave them alone. Which one are you? The Ernest, handcock show and semi trump report with Dr Frank, Chambery, you know is this. A trump thing know I'm getting. It always seems to come back trump, and I'm wondering you know is that. Is that what the goal is? All this is democratic. Socialism takes over the world, or they starve us. What? What's the in game here, you think. Well I mean. We cover on the show through the years here? This is not about trump. The people keep thinking it is who haven't been paying attention. Especially people in molest who as we've said statistically get less than five percent of their news and cultural influence from conservatives or libertarians or anyone else, but the bubble in which they're end, where, at least they don't think that the rents conservatives get. Get thirty five percent on average of their news and culture from the other side. Often they don't even to when you're stuck in some airport and got to watch CNN. Which I know those days are changing, but nevertheless it's it's a non stop that you're forced to hear both sides and you under you, you understand, and as you said all the time the more that you understand the opponent's. Opponent's moves then you'll probably win. It's when people don't understand and can't think from the other perspective is how you tend to lose the argument, and maybe the overall battle. That's that's ultimately what's happening. Why many of us can see this and more and more people are being read pilled, or how or whatever you WANNA use at. Let's say they're they're being. They're starting. Understand their own party this. This is not about you know what went achievements Democrats have dumped the last fifty years or one hundred years. This is a deeper issue of that party's been co opted by a cult by by by people who do not represent what they believe in, and a lot of these moderates are homeless. They don't know where to go, and they're starting to be forced to look around. I'll give you. One example just one I have some examples in my own family and friends of people were talking to me finally after all these years. I stopped talking to them. I had a friend. Is someone actually spent two hours? He finally wanted to learn about the petrodollars and about how we got in this mess. I have a two hour. Talk with someone very very. Very close miserable special conversation. I've person WHO's of artist. Savard is a family and friends whose constantly just know I can't believe you believe you've anything. Trump lies a few times a day some help. He just wound up telling Tongues Savar to just a couple of days ago that he was on, he was watching the news or somewhere video and Sold Donald Donald Trump give that speech that he gave at NASA talking about you know. The first half was about George Floyd help halt. He was and how you know talking about his views, and just whatever it was a great speech. You know there's nothing in there. That really was in any way. Controversial was a wonderful one of his speech given right and this person. Person solve the speeches, said wow. I didn't realize never really saw trump's speech before, and yeah can't disagree with anything. And then he just happened to switch over to CNN or one of those channels, and was solid, completely different things you were spending and cutting and editing everything, and for the first time for this audience like you know what else is new. WHO's listening to freedoms, PHOENIX, but to have average regular people being able to see just black and white now. They're not even hiding it anymore. Just the absolute lies and these are places like. The New York Times of supposedly had you know just reputation and the giants? Just one thing that I wanna make sure will understand that I that I'm starting to see. They don't I. Say this a lot now. People start to see what I'm talking about. One was You know they don't need to convince you. They just need to convince you that your. Your neighbors are confused convinced or crazy now it's your neighbors that voted for your neighbors. Everybody else. You're the one the only one that thinks this way. Every bail thinks this way on social media or the media. Lame Stream media media so last century do that and that everybody thinks this. You're the only one that thinks what you're thinking. And when you start to find out now not and you go on alternative media, you start to see people, you respect and the credibility of him now call bs on it boom. You're centered your band. You're not allowed. And I'm going win. You start to see this once. You see this you can't unsee. And I and I. Think what's happened. Is People are they want to confuse you into thinking? And we gotta do mail in voting because Cova of the Democrats won so say at the computer, and at some point it's not you're still voting I you know it's not GonNa make any difference what I'm talking about. And whenever for over the years I would go, look, it's not going to happen all at once. You're going to see all this stuff and pieces being positioned to move it around. Around, but it will happen overnight well. I'm sitting here going. Hello, it Monday. I'm going. This is the overnight. Everybody's going what happened I go. They were moving their chest pieces. They were getting everything else said they were having all these people in positions of accounting in insurance in a large corporations and board of directors in the media in politics, and all money that they would spend in the foundation of the Philanthropic, whatever the hell of I got a bunch and I love humanity was. Getting! Elected Mayor City Council of Atlanta. I, have a guy who lives in Atlanta goes. What's your proof that you know Soros? Money in Atlanta I'm going. I didn't even had the effort to even freaking. Just Google Soros Money Atlanta. I. Already know what's going to happen. You know I don't care. Or early this this is the great that is. Put this on your show. This is exactly what we saw revenge of the SIP. Initiate Orders Sixty six right I mean things. Higher series was getting everything set up. The emperor got everything all the pieces in place, and then finally boom. We're now the empire, and Bam or order sixty six, and all of the clothes every thought were their friends turn, and just happened overnight, and all of a sudden went from one side to the other and people's heads were spinning that what we're going through? Okay, this is what I just did. I just did because I. I I was thinking about it. I put Soros Money Atlanta one million dollar. Soros give gives Georgia Democrats money advantage, right wing conspiracy I mean. I saw George Soros Foundation pledged one hundred and thirty million to go, you know. See The foundation is contributing twelve million to relief in Atlanta. Atlanta Chicago Yeah. Blah Blah Blah. I knew I had to do is just type it in you know and it's everywhere. This whole thing is a plan. It's a scam. It's an excuse to do. There was an evitable financial crash in search of an excuse, and they needed to be able to control people to stop it. You know to censor. You're not saying it right. You're not doing it right. You need to vote this for this person and not that person. And if you say something different, you're not allowed. You're ostracized from all the platforms. Yada Yada and that's like I'm saying. They're private platform. Do the hell they want, but they're public space battle. Give a crap if they can they are. Last night. Temperature invite me just to do me a solid. We were busy and eating dinner in there. I didn't get into the first you know. Four fifths of it three hour plus thing they had dozens of influences. You know talk, show host, and so on, so it's like you know Ben Swann and lucrative house-key in Burma's and and a bunch of the other. Is You know you recognize a bunch of? We've had him on premiums. PHOENIX, and so on on the show and their videos, and so it represented millions of subscribers well I came in, and they should have told me there was a two minute limit. But anyway, so I go in and a Tim introduced me, and you know who I was what I was doing, so I went through, and then had jacomb on, and say the solution and you'll. It's food I go. This is thing is going to be about food. We saw what was coming last October. We got ready for all you guys. Start talking about this stuff. The solutions at people have they're going to ban for. For that. They're going to go no hell. No, we're lower than what people out there taking care of themselves. We don't want people having solutions. We don't want people being able to survive this thing. We don't want people to be able to outlast us. We wanted to know why they need our central command of universal basic income and I'm going. This whole thing is about a consolidation. They had to kill America's middle class that. Has Been in their side forever owned by the way they got guns so now they're I think they saw the desperation of decentralization and technology that people don't need them anymore, so they had to pull the trigger and. You're. Never done their pensions are done. You've got you. Hey, commanders of. Soviet Union in Moscow last. Screw it I'm with them so now when they're doing the take the knee crap. What the Hell is that? Even mean. Please let us keep our pensions. I don't even know what that means. Here with a financial crisis. You're right. They know it's on the horizon and the thing is. They had everything in charge that they were going to be in charge when it collapsed. Clinch down. At the. Donald Trump of the. Week. For breakfast. Your. Twain. Don't have a crap about black. graphically have. Out For you. The way. I. I. I. Really don't. Break going. Out To. Now? Four. Are. You about to meet the media. If you're about to be interviewed, do their homework for them. Know this about the person who will interview. He or she is busy, so expect minimal if any preparation. He or she doesn't know as much about your topic as you do. He or she is an as concerned as you are about getting your message out, so you need to take responsibility, provide a biography and factsheet. Factsheet photographs or other materials that tell your story reporters won't be put off if few supply frequently asked questions remember public speaking one. Oh one at the end of the speech. What's the one thing you want them to remember? You can download the document I supply to reporters who interview a and squirm through video that demonstrates how not to conduct your media interview at www dot, survival speech dot com. I'm Holland Cooke. Now that you've found liberty. Radio Network at L. DOT FM. You may want to help expose others to our great programs to assist you in doing so you'll find resources at promote dot L. DOT FM including details on how to get a free bumper sticker quarter page flyers you can print out and distribute manner for your website as well as files will allow you to make your own custom banners and Graphics Visit Promote Dot Dot FM and helping new listeners to the Liberty Radio Network. That's promote dot. Dot FM sell four one one is a free APP for Android and IOS that replaces government control nine one one. Four one one allows you to presort a group of friends or private organizations to show up any emergency sell for one is a nightmare for the state, because it proves their so-called services are needed sell four one one thousands of installs, and of course it's covered by the pitcock. Nobody license sell four one one because your friends won't shoot Shuji when you're in trouble without the government would build the emergency services you and sell for one one. Get it today and get sell for one. Where the rubber always meets. And actually I'm not even sure what that means. Speed Radio Network Live at heart. Dot Com. This stream is supported by advertisers and contributions by. Follow us on facebook twitter and INSTAGRAM's. Service daily newscast June the twenty twenty. I'm Mike Clifford former officer Derek. Show shelvin formerly charged Monday with murder in the death of George Floyd. The Washington Post. Reports of children appear via video conference during which judge set bail at one point, two five million dollars without conditions or million with conditions. The hearing coincided with a final public moral in Houston for Floyd, who will be buried next was mother cemetery in Pearland Texas. Kentucky Republican Senator Rand. Paul is the sole holdout in Congress on legislation that would for the first time recognize lynching as a federal crime. His decision has sparked growing public outcry both nationally and at home democratic state representative. Reginald Meeks of Louisville says his community is disappointed in Paul's decision, especially amid the massive protests and national rage over the Police Killing of Louisville resident. Bring Taylor and we here in Kentucky. People, of color, people of conscience are are not at all unfamiliar with these tactics is not uncommon for him to step out in front of the community and claim to be on one. One side when his actions speak otherwise called the Emmett till Anti Lynching Act. Bill passed the US House nearly unanimously, and has the backing of all senators except for Paul who says he opposes the legislation, because he believes it's written in a way, that potentially could allow for excessive prison sentences for minor hate crimes I'm Nadia Ramleh Ramlogan for now? The bill remained stalled in the Senate. More than forty seven hundred people across the country mostly african-americans reportedly were lynched between eighteen, eighty, two and nineteen, sixty eight. What is considered to be the last public execution by hanging the US occurred Orange Borough In nineteen thirty six in Massachusetts state legislature, there may soon vote on the end of life options act. Damp is limited to mentally capable terminally ill people expected die within six months. It would give them the option to get medication that would allow them to pass away in their sleep Dr Roger Klingler retired physician in foul mouth with incurable prostate cancer and a longtime kit for medical aid in dying. Gye suffering is something that most people don't want to do open suddenly presented in Massachusetts, are in phase of medical reason going. Is referencing the most recent poll about the issue from twenty thirteen, he says the biggest obstacle to the bill passing his opposition from some religious groups, nine states and the District of Columbia Allow Medical Aid in dying I'm Laura. Ross sprouts Hellum reporting. This is PMS. Despite the covid nineteen, pandemic, the US census happening right now advocates for people with disabilities are stressing the importance of being counted. The economic impact of the pandemic could mean sharp budget cuts at state city and federal levels Margie Trapani with the Center for independence of the Disabled New York or Sidney points out that census figures are used to determine how resources are distributed to states and localities, but people with disabilities often are overlooked in the census, only done every ten years we. We are locked in to a count for a decade. We can't afford to be disadvantaged in that count for another ten years, everyone should have received a census form in the mail and this year. It is possible to complete the census process through the government website at twenty twenty census dot. Gov I'm Andrea Sears. Reporting and the pandemic has also made collecting signatures for ballot measures a lot trickier, a coalition effort to convince cholera auto voters to approve dedicated revenue stream for schools. Schools and other public needs is logic. Dozens of pop-up stations across the state Scott Wasserman with the bell policy. Center says initiative to seventy. One would raise taxes on Colorado's earning above two hundred fifty thousand dollars a year, but cut taxes for everyone else even before pandemic. We were you know. In Ne-, Mickley funding major public priorities like schools and roads and healthcare, and it just so happens that by taking the tax code fair. We can actually fund the public priorities that every. Every Colorado relies on in the state. Wasserman says low and middle income Colorado's pay a substantially larger percentage of their income in taxes through income sales and property taxes, then the top five percent of earners initiative to seventy one is projected to generate up to two billion dollars each year. Proponents behind a competing initiative say cutting taxes by a fraction of a percent for all earners, regardless of income level will boost the economy by encouraging investment and job. Creation I'm Eric Gladys. Finally Are Mike Bowen tells US progressive clergy are finding new people to connect with as nation confronts a host of turbulent issues including in southern Wisconsin Reverend. Tanya said a Gopalan leads the JANESVILLE united. Church of Christ which she says has a long history of activism and outreach in the past few years. She says the Church has been more outspoken about welcoming immigrants and LGBTQ issues, the pandemic and the civil. Civil unrest, following the death of George Floyd are adding to that outreach, and it isn't only members of their own congregation that they're engaging with our church, for instance, draws interest from the millennial evangelical young people who have young kids right now. Who who desire to make a difference in their world. This is my Clifford for public service. We are member Lissa supported and online at public service DOT ORG. Much and welcome to to letting sports with Eric. It'll get me on a two for Tuesday. They'll shots Judas. Priest's and Van Halen. Shoutout to your boyfriend, your girlfriend, you WanNa call in and do a dedication. What's that oh? This is sports. Talk Never Mind, football, basketball, baseball, hockey, soccer, golf, tennis auto racing boxing eleven is going to throw them out. Just checkers every cricket. Coming to you from my house on the east side Sushi? What you got and bringing you sports talk to the nation, and the nation's not just of USA but Mexico and Canada wherever else you might be listening and other ways of catching US number one. First and foremost always is the American forces radio network, and if you're in the military, you're doing a great job. I'm on your side. I'll always be on. Thank you for everything that you sacrificed. In order to keep us safe, sorry. No off Mike on the gaming headset. Thing I'm gagging. Eight vitamin GUMMY. Eat those things elderberry with the vitamin C. and zinc. So let an old man thing I hope not. But anyway let me know when we start. Can I get a Mulligan? The tune in APP iheartradio stitcher APP stitch it up, girl, also twitter is. If you WANNA get in that way. sports violent DOT COM, the website and go there. Click listen live to hear. The show's not around me an email. Rick sports violent dot com got a really nice email last night from Robert and Michigan. Who says he's a new listener? And this show fits him just right so. I appreciate that robber and anyone who's a new listener love to hear from you as well. Rick Out Sports, violent DOT COM, the shows pretty open, except for Tuesdays, we always are joined by Carlisle himself sports talk com that'll be about a half hour and Bruce. Marshall and Vegas with the gold sheet will check in and talk a little NHL hockey other than that one eight, hundred eight seven eight play number to call one, eight, hundred, eight, seven, eight, seven, five, two not. Come on. Let's say you just bought a house. 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Tickets book a flight today to London, Paris, Madrid or anywhere else you wanNA. Go and pay a lot less guaranteed call the international travel department right now at low cost airlines, eight, hundred, seven, five, four, four, five, three, one, eight, hundred, seven, five, four, four, five, three, one, eight, hundred, seven, five, four, four, five, three, one. That's eight, hundred, seven, five, four, forty, five, thirty one. From faulty breakers to broken windows to leaky pipes, roofs, and water, heaters, homes, and businesses around the country can't work until the pros do. That's why Lowe's created credit programs that work for pros with everyday five percents savings on eligible purchases cluster October thirty first sixty days promotional financing on your Lowe's business account or extended terms on eligible account receivables learn more in store or online and lows. Pros Dot com putting money back in your pocket. Just one more reason lows is the new home for Prince subject to credit approval US only. Supports with Rick tittle Rick. tittle is genius the best show ever. He's so wonderful genius. Ever, he's so wonderful. Chick-fil-a sports with Rick tittle. Key so handsome Jesus genius. Much and welcome back to the show Rick Tuttle with you coast to coast, and around the world on American Forces Radio Network. You'd like to get in. It's one eight, hundred, eight, seven a play. A couple of weeks ago, I was talking about how. The AM NBA had never had a kneeling incident. Spotted be predominantly African American. MLB had won by the Oakland A.'s Bruce Maxwell who's out of baseball. And of course the NFL. Cap Nick and Eric read in a couple more. Marshawn Lynch didn't Neil, but he's sat. When he was with the raiders on the bench during the national anthem. But. I said. When these sports resume. Get ready I mean even in hockey. Get Ready. Everyone's GonNa you know. That's something that we know we'll get to that in a second, but let's go to Viet California mamand vents is up dude. Yeah. How's it going there? I'm keep my subjects on sports for a while but so I wanNA. Talk about the NBA. I know we're GONNA start up the playoffs and you know I think it's exciting I'm going to watch him, you know my team is nowhere to be found because they're the warriors, and and obviously you don't deserve to be mentioned for that, but here's. Here's here's a question I. Know I'm jumping way ahead to talk about this, and it's not the track. It's when the Olympics. If we assume everything's going to be on schedule now at the Olympic start next summer. The NBA playoffs are going to be actually actually. I think the season's will be in the summer. It won't even be in the playoffs yet when Olympic start. What's the NBA GonNa? Do are they going to allow the G. players to the go? They going allow like they got smile at you. On the warriors, he would probably represented his country. Are they going? Allow these players to leave the middle of the NBA season or I mean if they even thought about that because it seems Kinda mean that we're gonNA. Have Olympics in the NBA has its season during Olympics either they should do a pause. Allow the players to go become the owners that one or You know we're just going to have a bunch of college. Kids I guess going, but even that's another question when the college draft. Is over to season, and they have all these seniors. Are they going to be able to join his team in mid season and join me because we never had the you know the situation NBA was. You know pretty much playoffs, and just a few teams left. College was over. So that's another question. That kind of my mind by the college is going. Allow the players to to. Join in midseason to that's like to question Olympics into college. Well yeah the I mean. We remember the NHL would take a break. I don't think the NBA would I think. It'd be a situation where they would just say. Screw it and probably San I mean guys like smile gates. We get the represent. Slovenia. But the main stars I don't think are going to go, but I would imagine the draft will get pushed back to the off season whenever the off season and I don't think they're going to hold a draft in the middle of the season I. Just don't think so. So that makes another situation. If you do all season, Doernen at the second year basketball season, I don't know if it's going to be a player and say Heck I'll play a second nother year. I mean you could draft me, but I wanna stay eligible and played a college another basketball season I mean. Crazy with the NBA got themselves into now with the scheduling I mean it's like. Really help I mean they can't really help of and everything got. Nine knocking I'm not I believe me. There's no criticism coming from me. These are just questions I have. I'm not throwing garden anybody I'm just I'm just thinking out loud and I'm going okay. If. They do that then should they allow the players to play the the second year? Because they they probably be better off playing another year in college season, and then they could join the team when they could drop them. Let's say you're now a member. Let's say the Indiana Pacers. No College Joe Going to Michigan and that player would maybe ever his college season, and then joined Indiana papers. Pacers Mila season I think it might be better off of the players. You think that would allow that, or would you say no? You can't play now I. Don't think they would do that and I. Even to them I think the. Want. Allow that to someone to get drafted and go back. It does happen in hockey and listen MLB. Does their draft obviously right in the middle of their year they do June. That's coming up tomorrow by the way at least the first round so. It's I think you know traditionally with with football and basketball doing their off-season hockey there in the off season I think for one year they'd probably push it back. It would be a nightmare for college freshmen who thought they were one in done? Because probably most of them are flunking out and won't even have an extra year of eligibility because they didn't go to class, so those guys better start going to class. But the thing is the. Thing that really bothers me and and I wish the NBA. NCA with work on this. I really upsets me is because these agents whisper sweet nothings, so he's ears of the NBA players, and there's about twenty players who go for one and done and only full small handful of traffic, and they lose their college eligibility I. Just think they should have a rule in place of an agent promises They're going to get draft and they don't get draft at the agent has to pay for college and allow them to continue to college. There's no scholarship and he could play in college, but he agent is now responsible for paying a kid's college. Because that would make agents think twice about promising. These kids really have. Have a chance because I. I think that or they allow them to go back, but they don't get drafted i. it just really unfair. I might feeling I want especially live kids are poor. WanNa see every kid get a chance to produce a college degree to can You know if they're not going to get traffic, because let's face it most kids an NCAA. Probably that top players all think headed for the NBA and most of 'em honored so the the the number one goal to be getting your college degree, so they can make a living when winner playing career is over I mean that's the most important thing in my book you know. I care about the players. That's all I care about I care about the families, and and I just think the NCAA cold-blooded. To not allow the players to go back if they don't get draft because that's most of them, I mean I it's if you look at. Tiffany sat about two hundred declare themselves eligible for the draft, and only a small percentage actually get drafted. It's it's really horrible, and it's you know like I said it's I don't know I I just care about the kids for the while these kids are from poor families have no chance of paying for the school. You know in instead of going around thinking that they're getting drafted. They should be in the mindset that you're not getting drafted. Drafted that gotta be busting your button classes because that's GonNa. Save you out of poverty. That's it's not coming NBA. Great. If you make it, but you don't even have to be the NBA, I mean. If you're a decent player, you could go to Europe and make some good money, even G. League. It's not bad money, but if you have your college, excrete behind, you could actually make good money at the G. League. You know doing whatever you do. I mean I just I just think about the kids. That's my important thing and I heard a look at the other baseball throughout. All these players looking at it is supposed to be gone like twelfth fourteenth. I mean I. Don't I'm not sure if he as a really, you know. Set out single who they're going to be drafted because it seems like all the players are saying they're interested. Expect to be gone before the twentieth pick, and they're like twenty six or twenty seven. I think so. Have you heard anything? I mean probably not because you can't talk to anybody, but have you heard anything about? The as might be interested in tomorrow's draft. Well. We don't know they could go for. They usually try to go high upside. Guys like Tyler Murray and Austin Beck and Logan Davidson last three number one picks, but. You know they let college players. Usually you would think, but then again a couple of years ago. They had three first round picks. They spend them all on high school hitters with the Russell Robertson and and Olsen but There's no way that I don't even think Jim, Callus could figure out who the twenty six overall pick in the June attract is going to be. We basically know it's probably going to be Special Torkelsson. Number one to Detroit he went to cast grandy, high up, and pedal them, and played at Arizona State, and then after that it's probably this kid Martin the infielder, and then a high school pitcher to the Marlins, and we'll see about that anyway events. Thanks for the call man and I'll talk to you soon. Take. All Right? That's Vince in Lafayette I'm Rick Tuttle. We'll take a quick break in the lines are open at eight, hundred, eight, seven eight play. Come back. Attention to anyone that's written a book. A wants to write a book. The process is not that complicated. Take a first step. Even if you write a page a day, you build momentum and your book will become a reality. 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It's great advice, plus when you make this free call now we have debt. Destroyer experts ready to help. They can show you how to destroy your debt and get your life back on track debt. Problems don't have to be overwhelming. You could live stress-free and debt. Free credit cards medical. Medical Bills IRS tax problems, even student loan debt learn about free programs offered by the credit card, companies, hospitals, and even the government that can help slash your debt. Call the debt destroyer now for free information call now eight, seven, seven, three, six, zero, zero, four, zero, two, eight, seven, seven, three, six, zero, four, zero, two, eight, seven, seven, three, six, zero, four, zero, two. That's Eight, seven, seven, three, six, zero, four, zero two. So. I just need you to listen to me I. Know that a lot of times, MOM! It might not seem like I'm listening to you, but I am I. Hear You. And what you save really doesn't matter to me I. Mean Let's be honest. No Kid likes rules, but I get why we have them I, hear you and I know it's because you care all the talks we've had over the years including what you've told me about not using alcohol and other drugs, they stick with me and believe it or not. They really do make a difference especially at times that matter mumps. Drink nothing some good, so thank you. For talking and preparing me for what's ahead, thanks. For never giving up and always being my biggest fan, thank you for letting me know what you expect so I can try to meet your expectations. For more information about talking with your kids about the juice of alcohol and other drugs visit underage drinking dot samsa dot. Gov. Where did you get those clothes at the toilet store? Shot. Clock. John. Public. I'm so disgusted by Rick. tittle that I find him very intoxicating. Thank you for that? I guess and welcome back to the show rectal with you. One, eight, hundred, eight, seven, a play. That's what will get you in and. Get you heard girl. That's right. Get channing gets you heard. And coming up in the next segment we'll bring in Karen Lyle sales port. Talk Dot Com. and. Our guests will be Marie Rogers. The Commodore. The Los Angeles Yacht Club. Also known as the Jacek Club. If? He can't pronounce. Things aren't as I was saying A! The whole thing about Yeah, you know kneeling kind of A. Thing for Kevin Nealon and for the NFL really do notice sports. It's going to happen everywhere now. And I'm. I have no problem with it I'm sure that will urge some people. But what you will see. As. You'll see people kneeling on mass. And by the way it is on mass, not an mass just like it's not en vogue. It is on vogue because I'm a pretentious Frenchman. But. That's what we know what we will do. They'll be. One hundred players on the field. Hundred six to be exact. And players will neal. And that's just what's going to happen. And I will be surprised. If, no one does Neil. Because you basically say. Now. Here's the thing before you would kneel and people say oh, you hate America. You hate the flag. You Spit on those who died at d day and in the rice patties of Vietnam and on the Shores of Mountains Zuma. What sorts of Tripoli? That's what people thought. That's what you're doing now. If you don't Neil, you're pro. Racist police brutality. And that's just the way it is. And you might say that's. Not What it is. But that's what it's going to be. In Sports. And all you gotTA. Do is look at Roger, goodell. WHO said Sorry we were wrong. Sorry I said Oh Neil. And remember. Goodell said that. The, League was quote wrong for not listening to NFL players earlier and then encouraging quote all to speak out and peacefully protest. There's. Look This was a eighty one second video that cadel put out and. Some officials on Park Avenue said that the NFL is just out of the business of sanctioning or Also, discouraging any player to take in the. And Eric Reed and Kenny stills and a couple others did it. Without any penalty, now remember Colin. Kaepernick as a three year banishment from the League. Some people think that. He should come back after all this. But when Gadiel. Goodell says I personally protest with you. And I want to be. Part of the much needed change in this country. That is a change and this is what made trump mad. Because trump is still playing up to his fan base, which is. You know, love it or leave it if you kneel for the American flag, as he said fire, the sons of bees. So. I think that you will see the commissioner. When he goes to a game, he will neal now during the national anthem. And, these are some uncertain times when it comes to that but. I think we can all agree that there is a racial oppression. When, it comes to these types of things. You can talk about economic injustice and. You can talk about an equitable criminal justice system and things like that. But first and foremost. It's GonNa. Be Hard to get people money overnight. IF PEOPLE COMMIT CRIMES? They go to jail regardless of what their heritage is right. Now you might say well. It's still skewed, one way or the other. These are all problems in the country, but the number one thing is people being mistreated. For. Being Black and as we all know. This is. We're going to have some changes in this country. And the voices of athletes are going to be heard. That's not going to quell. A lot of the The riots and things like that. It's mostly peaceful protests right now. If anything. Kapernick years later. The Movement is filing picking up steam for the wrong reasons. Someone had yet another. person had to be murdered in cold blood on video. And you know we don't know where the country's going. We don't know what the impact of Covid nineteen is going to be whether it's GonNa come back strong again I. Know a lot of states more than twenty states is a big spike as you can imagine from people on the streets, breeding and spitting on each other. But we do know the NFL is GonNa do whatever it can to play as many games as it can. And when they look at the NBA and the NHL and the arguments in MLB right now. They. Don't want to be that. They WANNA. Be The only sport. That plays a full season because this all happened basically right after the super bowl. So, they've had the whole off-season to try to deal with it. So the social issues. Are Going to be at the forefront and it's GonNa. Be Of course part of our national conversation I hope. We are having a conversation I hope people. Will listen. And I do think it's important. To. Look inside sometimes, because it's very easy for us to say well I'm I'm not racist. I would never do anything like that and then just really go through your whole head. You know you're not. You're one hundred percent not racist at all. It's like well. I would never say this word. I would never treat people poorly, and it's like okay just to you know we can't take things for granted. You really have to look hard sometimes. It's like you don't think preconceived notions that. If you see this type of person, you're like Oh. We're going to get this or if you see that type of person now now I'm going to get that. It's it's things decade engrained and remember. If you go to any kindergarten in America, you will see every kid playing together and they. Absolutely could not care less what color or gender anybody is. These things have to be taught. And so. Conversation. that. The NFL's going to have with the the players goes all the way up to the top now with the commissioner. And New York City so it'd be naive to think that is going to change overnight because it's not. And I think that you know league-wide initiatives to help attempt to pain and anger in our streets right now. have been taken up by just about every Inc. you know they. There's not one corporation right now. That's going to say now that I think about it I'm not really into B.. L. M.. And that's the thing you could say. You know it's like You know commercials right now if you do a commercial for any product. You cannot have a white couple or white family has to be. Purse persons of color has to be mixed. If you watch it. Ninety percent of commercials most now have mixed same sex, or it's just you can't be all look. It's just this old white. Corporation these are just. It's just a fact whether you agree with them or not. This is how you sell things now. This is what the bottom line is. And you say they don't really care about if you have a commercial for an alarm. And you have a criminal. WHO's not a white guy? You are going to face backlash. And that's the thing we have a mob mentality. In the world today through social media that. You know may not be literally as bad, but I'd say figuratively bad as any mob in the history of the world, people will just instantly point you give you at scarlet letter, pigeonhole you, and then that's it and your career is over. At Grant Napier all lives matter. That's a racist thing to say it is. You're fired I said I I. Don't know grant like he's not. I don't have it cell phone number, but I've talked to him enough over the years that. You know I respect his work. I don't know if he's racist or not. I'm white. He's never treated reportedly or anything, so I can't say whether he's racist or not and I guess you know it's do as saying the other day. It's the straw that broke the camel's back. It wasn't just this one thing, but you know I the saying this week as well, Ellen Degeneres said we must have justice people of color. How dare you say that and she's like? What did I say? It's black. Lives matter not POC lives matter hoops. So. It's fair to assume that. Many players who ignored or rebuked this movement will no longer do so the no longer be able to do so. I think it's also fair to complicate. which players are not locked arms? Remember when I was working TV for the giants, and they had until. There's a cure day. For AIDS and AIDS Awareness Day this one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, four I believe. And they had a big pre-game. deleo and there was one pitcher. And Dame his name but I forgot it. He was just a bullpen arm, and he said no I I believe in the Bible I'm Christian and I don't think that being gay is right like this isn't anti gay it. This isn't pro gay. It's just you know anti-aids and he's like no. No I'm not into that whole thing. So. Let's see the guy who has his arms crossed, and he's like I will never kneel with you. And it could get ugly all right I'm. Rick will come back onto the said we'll talk a little see. Takes me away. The. Through. I wanted to. Be. This is Karen. Lyle Sell Sports Talk. Today I wish to say, thank you to all of the African American men and women in my life who have mentored me and welcomed me into leadership in the boating and sailing communities. Thank you till the Nora Clark Staff Commodore of the Pacific interclub. Yacht Association, who greeted me as a new delegate from Berkeley Art Club years ago and only makes me feel welcome every time I see her, but worked with me to organize the USPS building bridges of peace, special postal cancellation that acknowledged the ninety eighth anniversary of the WII. Lenora has been involved in leadership and voting advocacy at the state and national level for years. Thank you to current. PIC Commodore Robert Willis. Who is also a member of the Ebony Boat Club, founded in nineteen, Eighty, seven and active African American Vote Club in northern California that has members from ages twenty two seventy years old. This morning I was thinking about the collegiate sailing team at Hampton. University in Virginia Hampton University is a traditional African American school that grew from its first teacher Mary peak in eighteen sixty one. It has a proud tradition of education that started with some courageous people with vision and dedication, and became a well established accredited university, whose alumni are proud part of our American history i. also wish to warm late. Knowledge Marie Rogers. Who accepted my idea to create sales for talk as the first continuous programming for sailing in international twenty four seven sports talk broadcasting. Marie introduced me to keep people who continue to stay to be support to our programming. She and I have had marvelous ongoing conversations about current events. Past history and on the subject of community sailing. Thanks to Kevin, Battle Commissioner of the US rugby. Division One a WHO has been a guest on our show and a sailing enthusiasts with an impressive history of leadership in US rugby. Thanks to. Abraham Cooper another guest on our show, whom I've worked with on a number of occasions in his roles as postmaster of San Francisco. He is now in leadership at USPS. In Washington DC. I am the grateful recipient of knowledge introductions and mentorship of these wonderful men and women. And I just want to say. Thank you for your leadership, your warmth and friendship. At this time in our history, I wanted to give acknowledgement to these people without him. I could not have done what I do today. This is caroline of salesforce dot. com? All right. Thank for that Criss Cross. Welcome back to the show Tila with you coast to coast around the world on American forces. It's Tuesday's. That's Tuesday at nine forty. And this is when we're joined by our co host for this sales. Sports Talk Dot Com segment. Karen Lyle who's also in her home in the East Bay. How are you my friend? My Friend Carrie you I'm doing well and speaking of friends we welcome back Marie. Rogers to the show. She was on last summer. She's the Commodore of Los Angeles Yacht Club and that's one thing Karen that sometimes I think people like me think yachting is just for the rich and people born with silver spoons in their mouth, but that's not the case. I Know Murray. That you have been very active in having a program. Called community sailing, which is bringing in a lot of diverse people and giving them an opportunity to get their hands on that helmet other things, don't you? Yeah. It's really been my focus for really the last. Ten years. getting more people on water I'm. Fortunate to be able to go sailing just about any days, not working my real job. and. It's been really joy introducing people to the water and I have to. Remind you that I was commoner last year. I'm junior staff Commodore of the club out, so I'm like the outgoing has been, but I get to keep my title for life. As Well yes, just did I mean every admiral is an admiral. Every president is the president, so you are the commodore just like Lionel Richie. Thank you. Remember when I first came to the Los Angeles Yacht Club several years ago I walked in to the front desk and the manager dairies was there and I think there was a a meme burning margie who told me all about this community sailing program that they had and They embraced it as a proud part of the tradition for Los. Angeles, Yacht Club at the time I didn't know that it hadn't existed forever and I had no idea that you were the founder and I had met you at that time. Can you tell us how that started in your idea was for that. Yeah it was really interesting it was near the end of the recession. And I was basically out of work. I work for the entertainment industry. You know about everything down. And I had the opportunity to buy a vote on Ebay for very little money, and if you remember back in those days, people are selling everything you all are. These are getting horses, boats and whatnot so I got this week Dale. And it was the platform for me. to teach people how to sail. I went out and got a teaching certificate for sailing and set up a sailing, the club and and the members scratch their heads like why you Dane us and I'm like well I'm kind of overhaul welding on water. But I have a lot of friends. You don't get the sale and part of this yacht club and I'm on the board, so why not? This is an experiment. Let's just see how it goes. And I really for a long time I've been thinking what how great it would be to to have a sailing school, any thoughts and Yacht clubs are kind of a you know vestige of the past like rix Introduction on the treaty money and Your family had to be well known and all that. You know! Back in the old days to get outside, and that's no longer true, but still the old. Model doesn't really work All, the time and was like modern society. And traditionally has had not been a diver. Gathering people so so I say. So? I thought wow, I could hit so many different you know check marks at this can bring in my people. And all all different kinds of people have more women at the helm or people of Color as to how you didn't really matter I, just like I wanNA rainbow coalition coming in here and just sort of frightening. APP is wonderful part. And so it really took off was very successful the whole idea didn't pass the for the first time I I presented the idea of having these people actually members of the club at a reduced rate, but soon was shown that it actually brought in a lot of revenue to the club. So these taper playing patriots lesson sending lessons, they're paying for the Jews, and they're coming in and enjoying food and beverage. You know we needed to borrow after clinics and just became like a wonderful gathering. So it's really gone from just sailing school to full blown like a club within a club and I'm dairy powder. Murray, I think for a Lotta people, sailing can rather intimidating. It's one thing to have an inboard outboard motor, and you're basically driving like a car, but when you think about all the different sales in the names form of boom swinging over, and then the boats sometimes looks like it's going sideways and you gotTa Run side of the boat. What are some of those things that you have to tell the neophytes don't be afraid. I'm going to teach you how to do this. I can't well I started my professional career as educator like I started I'm high school far language teacher. Education Basement Foundation of my life like I knew I was going to be a teacher. Some kind of teacher you know for the rest of my life. So we started with education I, mean I show. I have a model of a mono haul I kill vote. It's basically a small model of like. You know forty foot like normal sailboat like you say in. San Francisco or new quarter anyplace I explained like this thing is not ship over. It works I explain the physics of it. He talked about the parts of the vote. And all their functions, and then even talk about the actions of the vote like you know how you package it. You know how you Keep your self safe from a guy like the boom. Sing around all that stuff. We talked about beforehand actually videos. And this is for the people are not in sailing school. They just sort of coming out for clinic will. We will let anybody come at a click as I've never been on a boat before I just teaming up with people who who have had the experience. They don't have to be an instructor. And so by the time you get on our. They've really exciting when stuff starts happening. They know they know what to do and they know that I'm GonNa make sure that they're safe and The huge component of our lessons that we talked about weather. And we talked about on the forces Iran and water, and a third of the water on the boat, and so that went votes. Start telling me going up when. It's it's thrilling. You know it's Kinda ticket, but this is fun like we're not endangering. Somehow they really trust me. They my husband, who coach and the other people that I've trained. So by the time around and water, and and the winds really starts coming up. They're having a good time. I've never had a person through up and never had a prison freak out. You know maybe a little bit in the beginning, but then they really get into it because it's IT'S A. It's a family environment like you just don't get all tight. They and scare people you know which happens unfortunately on a lot of votes. So they're pretty much nurtured along and And they keep coming back. So That's. That's what makes me feel really. One of the things I've noticed in yacht clubs that I've been throughout the world. Is that the skill of sailing and the passion for boats voting of whether it's power or sailing is is like a common denominator that just brings everyone together, no matter what their background How how does that play out in your community? Sailing program especially because those. Those let's have to be maintained as well. You have four I think that are belong to club right? Yes, yeah. So the type of people that come well, you know I designed the program or I should say. My husband designed a program so that people who had never been. Invited into onto a boat until you off of environmental have that opportunity if for one day, but hopefully they would continue, but what happened with very little outrageous that we started getting people who were of means. You know professionals I'm talking about like cardiologists and attorneys and you know these were not you know families having a hard time seeing her children? which is you know what the? What the? Thoughtless if it was going to be, you know perhaps and instead it's real cross section of society. I mean there's all different types of people also gender. Of changes identification you name it. It's comes to this program. but the Cutler's. You say the common denominator really is that. On out like it doesn't matter your political outlive. It doesn't really matter what your upbringing band. It's just that we're all on this. On this device basically, and we're harnessing the power of nature to make it. And being out in the sunshine being out with all the negative ions this day and the environment For people seeing for the first time like if she lying. Are, when we actually can sail like right next to whale. Because sometimes the whales are actually an harbored where we sail. And it's amazing, you know. Everybody really changes any sort of armor that they were wearing. The beginning or trepidation completely melts away on the Camaraderie. It's really a type of a metaphor for I. Believe how our society. If we all KINDA had a common goal, not a common outlook, coming kind of experience and I. Know this sounds Kinda Lou. But. That really is what this means for me for all of us getting together having a good time enjoying nature respecting nature. Like life, pulling trash water, and you know having these conversations about wanting to get back on the water, wanting to protect us live wanting to clean up. You know the situation, no industry. No next to the water. You know what there's a Lotta waterfront industry. A lot of pollution from you know when I was a small child. That's being cleaned up and so. You know? In a way. We're all kind of aware that, but until you see all that tracks when you know artery he. Brings it home I just? This is a real thing like I. Really don't want. He's last week anymore. All those issues is just kind of has his one. Sport is when activity has like all these tendrils. Hits People's hearts. There, she is. It is Marie Rogers Commodore Los Angeles. Yacht Club. Thank you so much for your time and your insights again. We really we really appreciate it. We look forward to having you on again soon. ME. Right And for those of you who didn't get the ticket reference a USB at Disneyland I gave you a book of tickets and the rides where the good ones like the matterhorn to remember that Karen. It was great, so you're you're you're Disneyland Aficionado? Not, really you know what I was just thinking about. She was talking I. Don't think I've ever been on a sailboat in my life. You know Well you know I have one and you don't live when we when we get away from when we get to be passed the cove in nineteen thing and we can see each other again. You should come. Just sit on the boat. You might even like to go out. I've sat on Wa I duNNo I. Don't I don't think I have a lot of interesting going, because I think it'll suck me out the Golden Gate and we'll crash into the FARALLONES, not with skilled people at the helm taken. Don't let me be the captain. Karen Lyles sales sport. Talk Dot Com check it out Karen. Thanks for your time and we'll catch up with the next week. Okay sounds great. We'll take a quick break. Come Back Down Force Brown. Attention to any one that's written a book. A wants to write a book. The process is not that complicated. Take a first step. Even if you write a page a day, you build momentum and your book will become a reality. The hard part is getting it published. That's when you need to call page publishing. They've got hundreds and hundreds of thank yous from new authors. Just like you. They make the process of publishing your new book and getting it sold online a simple process. You can learn how. 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CARDS BILLS IRS tax problems, even student loan debt learn about free programs offered by the credit card companies, hospitals, and even the government that can help slash your dad call deck destroyer now for free information call now eight, seven, seven, three, six, zero, four, zero, two, eight, seven, seven, three, six, zero, four, zero, true, eight, seven, seven, three, six, zero, zero, four, zero, two. That's Eight, seven, seven, three, six, zero, four, zero two. Okay, I just need you to listen to me I. Know that a lot of times, mom. It might not what I'm listening to you, but I am I. Hear You. Say really doesn't matter to me I. Mean Let's be honest. No Kid likes rules, but I get why we have them. I hear you and I know it's because you care all the talks we've had over the years including what you've told me about not using alcohol and other drugs, they stick with me and believe it or not. They really do make a difference especially at times matter mumps. Drink no thanks. I'm good. Thank you! For talking and preparing me for what's ahead, thanks, mom, never giving up and always being my biggest fan. Thank you for letting me know what you expect so I can try to meet your expectations. For more information about talking with your kids about underage use of alcohol and other drugs visit underage drinking dot, samsa Dot Gov. Come now. Don't be ashamed. We will have idiosyncrasies. Jaw. down. I wish you would try and slap Rick Kittles Mama's face. He would clown you. Thank you for that and welcome back to this show and it's funny. Sometimes just as an observer like what I was just talking about like in the old days, every ad had to be white people like Oh. We don't WANNA put non white people. Old People won't buy a product now. It's the exact opposite. And assist. Corporations to do they take the temperature of the country. What's everybody into right now? And I was just talking about the way you do ads right in this little pop, Mike on my computer for rocket mortgage by quicken loans. There's two pictures. One is a a couple at their kid. It's a black guy like Asian woman and the other couple is a lesbian couple. have been like. Zing, poison, and the you know even in the nineties, right? And, you just wonder, do people really care? I guess the bottom line is if if people are changing. You you don't want to question why and obviously I think for a lot of these CEOS and their castles. You know not saying they're all bad people but they. Don't WanNA. Make anybody mad and they WANNA. Make cash I get it. But then so you can question the motives sometimes. Are you really being progressive? Do you really care about you know and then the bottom line is the bottom line, and that is like look were in the business of making cash and given out loans, and we don't care who you are. We just want to give out alone then I guess that's true right. So at the ends justify the means the means justify the ends whatever, but I guess I shouldn't call into question the morals or motives of corporations right now if they're doing it like the NFL you think they really care about kneeling now. I think Roger Goodell has changed in his mind, because that is how the country fills right now. And people demonstrating on the streets, and it's like what our kids do, and now let's do that. And so. I know some of it can be very cynical but I. Guess it's better than them. Stang STOIC right. I will never change. I guess that would be worse so I. Guess I shouldn't question their motives. Iraq Italy got another two hours together and come on back at one, eight, hundred, eight seven eight play. You're listening to. The heartland newsfeed radio network. Lie. HARTLAND NEWSFEED DOT COM. This dream is supported by advertisers and contributions by. Follow us on Facebook, twitter and INSTAGRAM's. Service daily newscast for June the night twenty twenty I'm Mike Clifford former officer, Derek chauvinist formerly charged Monday with murder in the death of George. Floyd The Washington Post reports of children appear via video conference during which a judge set bail at one point, two five million dollars without conditions or million with conditions. Hearing coincided with a final public moral in Houston, for Floyd, who will be buried next was mother in a cemetery in Pearland, Texas. Kentucky Republican Senator Rand Paul is the sole holdout in Congress on legislation that would for the first time recognize lynching as a federal crime. His decision has sparked growing public outcry both nationally and at Home Democratic State Representative Reginald Meeks of Louisville says his community is disappointed in Paul's decision, especially amid the massive protests and national rage over the Police Killing of Louisville resident. Bring on a Taylor we here in Kentucky people of Color. Of Conscience are are not at all unfamiliar with these tactic is not uncommon for him to step out in front of the community, and claim should be on one side when his actions speak of. Called the Emmett till Anti Lynching Act the bill passed the US House nearly unanimously, and has the backing of all senators except for Paul who says he opposes the legislation, because he believes it's written in a way, that potentially could allow for excessive prison sentences for minor hate crimes. I'm Nadia Ramlogan Ford Out. The bill remained stalled in the Senate more than forty seven hundred people across the country. Mostly African Americans reportedly were lynched between eighteen, eighty, two and nineteen, sixty eight. What is considered to be the last public execution by hanging in the US occurred in Orange Borough Kentucky in nineteen, thirty six. Message the state legislature. There may soon vote on the end of Life Options Act. The act is limited to mentally capable terminally ill people expected die within six months. It would give them the option to get medication. That would allow them to pass away in their sleep. Dr Roger Klickler is retired physician in foul mouth with incurable prostate cancer, a longtime advocate for medical aid in dying. Guy Suffering since something that most people don't WanNa be over seventy percent of the people in Massachusetts are take. cler is referencing the most recent poll about the issue from two thousand thirteen. He says the biggest obstacle to the bill. Passing is opposition from some religious groups, nine states and the District of Columbia allow medical aid in dying. I'm Laura tell him reporting. This is P. MS. Despite the COVID nineteen pandemic, the US census happening right now advocates for people with disabilities, stressing the importance of being counted, the economic impact of the pandemic could mean sharp budget cuts at state city and federal levels Margie Trapani with the Center for independence to the disabled new. York or Sidney points out that census figures are used to determine how resources are distributed to states and localities, but people with disabilities often are overlooked, and the census is only done every ten years we. We are locked in to a count for a decade. We can't afford to be disadvantaged. Count for another ten years. Everyone suit of receives a census form in the mail and this year it is possible to complete the census process through the government website at twenty twenty census dot. Gov I'm Andrea. Sears reporting and the pandemic has also made collecting signatures for ballot measures a lot trickier, a coalition effort to convince Colorado voters to approve a dedicated revenue stream for schools and other. Other public needs is launching dozens of pop up stations across the state Scott Wasserman with the bell policy. Center, says initiative to seventy one would raise taxes on Colorado's earning above two hundred and fifty thousand dollars a year, but cut taxes for everyone else. Even before the pandemic we were you know in unikely funding, major public priorities like schools and roads and healthcare, and it just so happens that by making the task codes fair. We can actually fund the public priorities that every. Every Colorado and relies on the state, Wasserman says low and middle income Colorado, pay a substantially larger percentage of their income in taxes through income sales and property taxes, then the top five percent of earners initiative to seventy one is projected to generate up to two billion dollars each year. Proponents behind a competing initiative say cutting taxes by a fraction of a percent for all earners, regardless of income level will boost the economy by encouraging investment and job creation I'm Eric Gladys. Finally are Mike. Bowen tells. US, progressive clergy are finding new people to connect with as a nation confronts a host of turbulent issues, including in southern Wisconsin Reverend Tanya, said go, pan leads the Janesville United Church of Christ, which she says has a long history of activism and outreach. In the past few years. She says the Church has been more outspoken about welcoming immigrants and LGBTQ issues, the pandemic and the civil unrest following the death of George. Floyd are adding to that outreach. It isn't only members of their own congregation that they're engaging with our church for instance draws interest from the millennial evangelical. People who have young kids right now. Who who desire to make a difference in their world, this is Mike, Clifford for public service. We are member. Listener supported and online at public news service DOT ORG. Back live with you, re tittle coming to you from my house, commend as the captain of the controls back on the Board at Sports Byline USA. Corporate Headquarters Downtown San. Francisco just blocks from the Bay and North Beach. Where are you what's going on? What's going on in your Your sporting world, I'm here to open the lines to. One, eight, hundred, eight, seven eight play. Let's discuss it who get fired. Who should get hired? Who should get drafted? That's important because we will have the first round of the draft tomorrow. All GonNa be of course, webcams and Skype, and all that, and then we'll have rounds two through five. Some teams have extra compensatory picks, and other giants have a few from Madison, Bumgarner and will, Smith and others have eight picks instead of the normal five. Of course, the Houston Astros don't have first or second round pick. And the what the Red Sox lost second round pick. It's just if you can tell me. The difference between the Astros and the red sox and weather punishment was different I love say really know the reason why behind the because the red sox didn't do. All right sounds good. One, eight, hundred, eight, seven eight play will get you in. We'll talk about the MLB draft if you want as I, said these guys outside of. You know the top three. And I had heard the name Spencer Ferguson before, because when the giants drafted Bishop last year in the first round tenth overall. Everybody, said on my Gosh, the other guy on that team. Torkelsson the kid from Petaluma a he. Could be the number one overall pick. He hit eleven. Home runs the whole time. He was in high school while he was kid grew. He was gonna be the all time home. RUN leader Arizona State. History more than Barry Bonds More than Bob Corner! He was too short when the corona virus hit. Fifty four home runs in two years. That's an incredible amount of home runs for a college baseball player. So I don't think the trait is going to pass on him at number one overall, but we will see mine Yana big shoutout to the military listening on A. F. N. F. A. N. of used. They save come home soon. Proud of you! Keep up the good work. I'm Rick Fiddle. Come on back for our two. 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Good news is it easy to bundle home and auto through progressive and save on your car insurance gag behind the lasagna is very old, progressive casualty, insurance, company affiliates and other insurers discount not available in all states your situations. Our two of letting sports. You thought it couldn't get any better, but it's potter. Rick tittle back. He's so great. I can't believe how awesome he is more sports talk. Yes, didn't get any better spotter. Rich analysts back. He's so great. I can't believe how awesome he is more sports talk yes. Our two of simulating sports. Down to Check me out welcome back to the show with you coast to coast around the world on. Radio Network. It's our pleasure to welcome to the show out Wexler. He is the CEO of cries picks now. If you ever wanted to play fantasy sports online, you know there've been a couple of companies that have been inundating us with. Advertising and promotion it all seems honestly a little bit confusing a little bit of a pain and here's where prize picks comes in 'cause you get in, and you get out in less than two minutes. Is that kind of the gist of it Adam? I even say we want you in and out of less than a minute. We want it to be the most simplified version of daily fantasy ever. And that's the other thing, too. Is that I mean you can pick MLB and NFL, but you guys do Cornhole, and then e sports I mean sports. Look at all the other you know like the warriors of bought an overwatch team. I mean everybody knows that. This is really coming on huge, isn't it? Absolutely especially with with with in nineteen you know a number of sports leaks had had a chance to shine. So you know in our case, League of legends with actually are number one most top to the market in April and then followed by counterstrike was actually our most popular market in the back. How do you go about? You know prognosticating East Sports. You obviously are going to need experts. I mean and a lot of those times. Those experts could be fourteen years old. How do you go about that? It's good question. I'm not the the line maker Free Sports I. Can't lie there, but no, we've got a great. We've got a great team. You know we've got a dedicated lines makers to each individual sport. Some of them are obviously versatile across different sports, but yeah, these guys are a little better at math than I. What would you say I mean? You've started a lot of companies? It's just I. is it in your bones that you start one, and then you think about what can I do next I mean? How does that work for you in your process? Sure so I've been you know technology entrepreneur for fifteen years now. Fantasy sports for five, plus and this is actually a third product within the fantasy sports world so. I like the dream that by night themes come to fruition by day, and and you gotTa keep iterating. You gotTa keep pivoting obviously very roller coaster very much. A roller coaster ride over the last five plus years fantasy sports. You know I'd I'd say. Late Twenty fifteen, where where ironically a little worse for our business than the last couple of months even though we did get hit with a freight train when all of our revenue sources of revenue stream. Went Away. No doubt about it now. Let's talk about how you can get in and get out and one of those things I like. If you're picking a sport, maybe just pick like three players instead of doing the entire lineup worrying about transactions and trades and I. Know that is part of the fun fantasy, but that's also extremely time consuming so this is one of the ways you've cut the corners right. On a season long fantasy player. That's where I fit into the landscape as a consumer, we basically. Aimed to create a daily fantasy games of the season long that was the original intent of this I was never once gravitate towards the Fan draftkings format very very much. Resembling Poker. where you have to worry about all the different players that are available. You gotTA worry about everybody. You're playing against in this case, it's just you against the projections to two three or four players predict if they're gonNA go over under their projections Senate in your now entertainment tonight. Come questions for Adam Wexler CEO and Co founder, a prize picks when you think about the pain of fantasy. What are some of what some of the feedback you get from? People who say I can't deal with it? It's too much of a pain. Yeah well. Once again. We would like to think this is literally going to be the easiest. Most simplified version of daily fantasy sports is a pretty broad concept that has become synonymous with one format, or at least it did letting this past decade but there's a number of different Dan daily fantasy sports for match, and and we. We just have a good Get belief that over the next decade this we call single player fantasy, and these over under predictions is going to become the most prevalent. When you think about the fact that even Adam Silver Commissioner of the NBA couple of years ago, saying look betting is coming, and we know it state by state, not just Nevada New Jersey now California and others have opened up to maybe having A. Gambling with an APP. How does this affect your businesses? A fantasy sports guide is this health. Does it just drum up interest or does it take away from you what what happens with all that? You know I think it's great. Obviously, the Supreme Court decision from. A couple years ago, I think it was a little little over two years ago now. Definitely brought a lot of awareness throughout the country but take a state. Take a state like. California. You guys because you know the tribes interests. You guys are probably not. GonNa be getting legal mogul sports spending anytime soon, and so for that reason, a game like ties picks where it's reminiscent of playing against the house. in the form of a fantasy game. It's the next best thing. It's the closest legal alternatives, so we'd like to think that we can carve out a nice niche throughout throughout much of the country, especially as we all await the legalisation to permeate through the rest of the country. So. How do you go about it website and APP? How does it get done? Absolutely we're. We're both asked doors just price fixed strongly encourage everybody to read the reviews. They could see what our customers have to say for themselves. and then also online. Dot Com everybody that signs up gets a free to pick entry to win twenty five bucks out of the gate. No catch there and then, and then it's a twenty five percent deposit match right away. You always are these stories about the guy who goes to the track and puts two dollars on a pick six and gets three hundred thousand dollars. Have you taken it in the shorts at all like that as a company? Yeah now it's fair question, Um! Yeah, when we when we were initially scaling up the product. trying to figure out of what we wanted to You know it's a game at the end of the day, and then you know for example, we actually tried out the notion of five picks in an entry. with bigger pay-outs but both from a risk management standpoint as well as from a customer retention standpoint. We didn't think that it was in our best interest to allow people to play the lottery of sorts. We thought it was much better if we just kind of. Him The option to just come in like I, said before pick to three or four and we've got two different varieties. You know there's there's the all or nothing play which we call the power play, and then there's the flex play which affords you the luxury of living one and still winning money. And then finally you know it's sort of like. With smoking if people get sick smoking. It's almost like they don't get the blame. They blame the cigarette company, and this is why you see a lot of gambling places that always tell you look only gamble that you can lose, and then they have gambling addiction hotlines. It's almost like they hold you responsible. If they gambled too much, have you seen patterns of people may be going a little crazy, and you had to warn them or cut them off. Yeah I. Think every operator needs to be be cognizant of that. Are More obligation being in this industry to be responsible in that in that sense, and in our case you know we would put certain precautionary measures in place such as the most, you can currently win on anyone entry a thousand Bucks so we want you did it. More than anything kind of spread out your action, you get your your wins and losses in across the board, but over time but. You don't come price to to try to lose a million dollars overnight You know we we we want. We wanted to become a part of your. Daily behavior patterns. You know as your as your turn on the TV to wash your favorite sports, you know, pull up your phone. pull up stakes, and and you know. Basically. Get in the game through through a new concept of daily fantasy. Out Your action, get a piece of the action. Check it out on the APP stores, both Google and on I o s it is prize picks. We've been speaking with the man behind the whole Operation Adam Wexler. Adam thanks for your time. Congratulations on it and let's talk down the road man. Sounds good. Thanks for having me. I'm rectal lines are open, one, eight, hundred, eight, seven a play. Attention to anyone that's written a book. A wants to write a book. The process is not that complicated. Take a first step. 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He would clown you. girl don't act like I did when I did it because I said that coming up next by the way. Bruce Marshall and we'll have a little talk. got the. I can't do the French. You look up to to. Do by. we talked about. I went through the little NFL news real quick. Concerning some vets veteran players. The cowboys are going to be making. Dak Prescott, their highest paid player in franchise history. They've been all in on signing him to a lucrative deal. There's no doubt. It's going to happen. Don't worry fans. It's going to happen, but how about this Michael Irvin. Who by the way when he was on my show. He. Wanted me to know how I did. My Open word says he's handsome. He Genius and I. Told knows an APP with my own voice, but anyway he liked the open. He thinks that the cowboys. Need to. Pay Back back for what he's done. Saying Quote Dak has done everything and he has one. He has won a lot of football games in his first four years, so to say he doesn't deserve. The money isn't totally correct. He does deserve. The money back has not been great. But perfect, not necessarily in wins and losses of course, but I'm talking about the person that he's been the kind of investment. You want to make the kind of guy you say. Yeah. We hit it with this guy. We got him in the fourth round. You stole, for years. So whatever he gets, he deserves because you owe him back pay. Him. You stole for years now. What does he mean by that? Well obviously he means that Zach was underpaid for how he performed. But. This is what happened when you are a fourth round pick. The third choice for Jerry Jones Jerry Jones desperately wanted Paxton Lynch. He wouldn't fork over an extra pick that Denver would. Paxton Lynch cried at the Coliseum and I think he's out of football. Then Reggie. McKenzie decided he wanted Connor Cook a Michigan State who stunk and is out of football, too. And so then Jerry Jones like a member. Jerry Jones wanted. Johnny football and his son Steven. Zack, Martin, he's like Zack. Martin, who's been the best garden football since he's been drafted? All pro. He's been in the League and one of the reasons that Zeke and Zach Mazi man have been doing too well. Actually. It's not Zach. It's Daqing Nevermind Lettuce Zach C conduct. So. Multiple reports say at the cowboys already offered Prescott the contract that would make him the highest paid quarterback in the NFL. But Irving suggestion. Is that They should give them more. The twenty twenty franchise tag was put down the table. Dak has not signed yet, but if he does, that will pay him more. Than thirty one million dollars. But because he was a fourth round pick without a fifth year option or a high ranking salary. So far. In those four years, he's made two point seven million dollars now any other job where you get almost three million dollars in four years. You have an amazing job. But when Michael Irvin sees that he throws up when I see it, are you see it? Our eyebrows get raised. You're like wow. You got four years of Dak Prescott two point seven two. and. He kind of understand what Michael's talk about here. He says it's business. Dak wants every penny and Jerry wants to try to save every penny, but usually those kinds of deals I always tell people will get done as soon as the slipper falls off. Cinderella twelve o one something will get done. It'll come in and back will be. For, a moment, the highest paid quarterback. Before mahomes gets his. and. He's absolutely right about that. Then speaking of quarterbacks. Janus Winston who? I think a lot of people were surprised by the fact that the saints brought him in. I know I was they weren't gonna be able to hold onto bridgewater and they also. Talked, about how tastes some hill could be drew brees replacement. drew brees who came under fire for just speaking his mind. Saying. I don't like anybody dishonoring the American flag. But if you speak your mind like that right now, you're gonNA. Face a tremendous backlash. And then he said sorry. I didn't mean anything by it I'm on your side well. Jameis Winston is now at the saints. Any signed a one point one million dollar contract to be a backup. And he has a chance to learn from me Huger. Hall of Famer and he will not be starting quarterback this year if breezes healthy. Even, though he led the NFL and passing. Five thousand, one hundred and nine yards, but also interceptions of course with thirty two thirty three touchdowns. Now if you think that's a now, I remember. Jeff George led the NFL in passing with the raiders and he didn't go to the pro bowl because everybody hated him. So. He's embracing his new role in New Orleans, but here's the thing Winston is twenty six years old. That's amazing and he has not resigned. To say I'm a backup forever. In fact he believes in himself to the point where he said. Quote. I know what I'm worth. And I know day in and day out with publicly coming in and saying it that historically, I'm one of the best quarterbacks to play the game. And quote wow. And if you throw for over fifty one hundred yards, you should be confident. About taking care of the ball. Apparently. He's dropped a twenty pounds. He's Vegan now. He's also been working with trainers on his habits in the pocket. during his five seasons in Tampa Bay, he threw eight. Interceptions. which is an obscene amount of number? But he said sometimes your biggest strength can be your bigness weakness I'm an attacker and I try to attack consistently. Trying to attack every time I play. A want you to feel my presence. Every I'm in the game, but at the same time I'm the quarterback I have the ball. I'm the one who says this goes here and that goes there. I am the answer so learning how to manage that attack mode and how to manage that not attack mode is the balance I'm trying to find that perfect balance. Now you can be cynical and say coming come on. The guy's already shown what he's had. Winston did say that his last ten picks came when he had a broken thumb. And you know he was trying to play through it. But, you know I think he probably thought he was going to stick around until the Tampa Bay buccaneers got a guy named. What is it? Oh? Yeah, Tom Brady. So right after that you know, there's always somebody who likes you if you've got talent like that at least one guy. And that guy was Sean Payton. John. Peyton did not hide his desire to get him down the crescent city and got his wish. You got that deal a little over a month after he got cut by the bucks, and now he has a chance to. Work with Winston, but it's really more of a chance for Winston, because the saints don't need Winston as much as he needs them. As I. Say you have a quarterback Guru and offense of one of the most outstanding offensive mines and football. This side of Andy Reid Guy who's one of ring, and then you have drew brees who seems like a great teammate despite the fact that? Some people in the locker room. We'll probably have to have conversations with him. What things of me but Winston said? It's different when you have someone who's a hall of fame quarterback that you can ask and he can say. Hey, Bro, don't watch. Stop just watch me come work with me. Let's work together. Let's do this again. Let's watch film together now. He has no choice because I'm going to be sitting in the room. I'm going to be with him every day. There's people talking about me like I'm an old washed-up quarterback like I'm forty years old, I've got so much life. I've got so much energy man. This is not over for me. And yes, when you're twenty six forty sounds old. Definitely sounds hell old. And it's not. Look at the guy who was drafted two overall right after him by Tennessee as the kid Outta Oregon again Marcus Mariota, and whereas he right now he's in Las. Vegas and he'll be back up Derek Carr. And I can tell you as a raider fan. It's been a long time since we had a backup. We could trust maybe rich Gannon until he became the starter. We'll come back on sports violent. Off. Hey travelers. Do you want to save money on your next flight? Then pick up the phone and call. That's right call because the best prices are not online, they're with smartfares. See smartfares has special deals with the airlines when they have. Seats, they use smartfares to fill them, so you get airline tickets at ridiculously low prices. Our prices are to load of publish online with the extra money you'll save. You can book another trip for treat yourself to dinner or shopping, so stop searching all of those travel sites to find the lowest price on your next flight. 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I league I should say to come back with an official post virus. Plan, but it looks like you know neutral venue probably in August, and that's going to be teams that were hot like the Bruins and your nights and the flyers will say Oh, we've lost our momentum, but other teams who were kind of petering out like the stars and Islanders and the the jackets will feel rejuvinated, and you'd say well, you know. BOSTON, Loss home-ice, because now it's in a neutral venue, but right now I don't think anybody really cares or has a lot of sympathy for some of these teams. We we, we just want the the sport back. What do you think? Yeah exactly rick and I think when it comes back. This is GonNa be intriguing I'm not sure how this stuff You know everything. I if we look at it sort of the new season. Though the players are going to be. The same as last. March? Their time office. It's like. Actually, it's not a little bit by the time they get back on. And we always felt the early portions of the season. I mean our About addictive morning as people. Having things kind of basic couple of years ago, the twenty nine hundred unless she's only had. I mean from the start teasing through Thanksgiving you about the buffalo sabres would have been. Fine with me ended up in the playoffs altogether, so there could be. For. Doing, bad mess for the NHL you could really see some surprises. Something's come out. Why isn't here on? There's other factors walk could impact. The bottom line is before form charts before the lockout. After be out. You know a lot of great players never played in the playoffs, obviously Ernie banks, but you think about a guy like Felix Hernandez never played in a playoff game. My trout's only played in three. He's lost all three, and I think about comic Dave and when he came in, and had such a great run the beginning, but the last three years oilers have been out, and you can argue that mcdavid is the best hockey player in the world, and so I think for the League to get at ten back into the playoffs is I think it's good for the League, don't you? And I think it's good. David and. Dry. Seidel and it comes time for that to be able to. Move in creation. Stayed there and they don't. They don't do this. You know you're. Going to be sitting. They don't go to a big market. I would hope that they would stay there, but it would help for evidence thinking. To make them. More competitive data. They've had some coaching changes last couple of years they. made it made run there three years ago the last round at that. Rick I thought. Was the next. After in the spring of twenty seventeen sharks in the playoffs, the Baxter seven. But that seems like forever ago, but they did. Turn it around something they'll be you. Watch I think. Again and I'm hoping that gave it and try subtle. Sticking out there. You when I look at Toronto. It's amazing when you think of a an original sixteen like them with all the money they spend on even coach like Babcock. They have not won a playoff series in sixteen years. They've been out in one the last three years and they. kind of like my shark. They have a lot of money tied up in the stars. They have forty million dollars tied up into Virus Matthews Monir. And Knee Lander right now so I'm kind of wondering I. Don't think they're going to blow it up if it doesn't work I mean they were still fighting for their playoff lives when the league went into shutdown, but do you think they could get to the point? Where like screw it I know a lot of people want to blow my sharks. When they lost to the kings after being up three one I didn't think it was wise. They should get rid of you know. Polski in hurdle and big Joe and and Marlow and I, thought. Why would you get rid of your best players? But do you think this is kind of them? Make or break thing for Toronto with all the money they spend. FEERICK the I sort of Equate Toronto here it's could be like the Washington nationals the NHL version of the national brands the. just never could get over that hurdle. been all that talent. They have there and then finally last year. Different things happen just. Click. For Toronto. You're wondering if the same thing. I think they've got to win a playoff series now the fact that they're not going to have to run into the bruins right off the bat coming back and Boston has been roadblocks for Toronto recent years. Served as the catalyst for the have been. There for way that wild chart wing for the APPS over the brewers last year, one thing that all of a sudden accident one curious. Battleground states and so they. They not a lot of this out, but that one game. Works if they used to buy? Your car. They get. Some backs, it might have the same. So Things that I would really watch here. Because of that and I can get some benefits some confidence and I think sometimes it's been between the ears believes in recent years in the playoffs and maybe just. Avoiding. By nothing thirteen. Closed. Back. Got More questions for Bruce Marshall in Vegas with the gold sheet. if the season had continued, it looked like Chicago was gonNA miss the playoffs for the third straight year. You probably think GM Stan Bowman. was going to get fired I. Say that because the team President John. McDonough already got fired earlier this year. They will be taken on the for mention. Eminent Edmonton oilers in their plans series, but the Blackhawks at a twenty four playoff teams there, the twenty third seed I don't think anybody's giving them a chance against the oilers. Do. You think they're gonNA. Clean, house and maybe bauman would go as well. It just seems like a place like ago three years outside of the playoffs too much. Rick I that the hawks or in route to. Finish the? Hidden disrupt the seek March. that. We got A. Class action against. The check but so this? Despite changed a little bit. Having Especially want. So I, don't know I thought he was on his way. makes. More check if you got the brings up another question. Whenever this playoff spot and they said that I could. Kind of thirty, August, one. There's GonNa. Be a very compressed time period between the end of the season the start of the next one. More than usual it a lot of office stuff changing. short period of. Time, Remake of losses so I think actually stab over might be one. Of the. The lockout. The blackhawks may just stick right, so look. Going to be watching anything shorter compressed off. So I think it's the same. People! Do something to talk about. Another interesting thing when you look at the Rangers Bruce, they have a plan against the canes. And there's been some discussion about. Who they want to go with between the pipes, obviously, Henrik quiz is the face of the franchise, and if you look in playoff history, he's been in eleven times he's. Top fifteen all time for playoff goal he's he's got a nine twenty two save percentage, but. He's had a bad year. His backup Alexander Georgiev has played better than they got this kid their goalie, the future, a Russian name, eager disturbing, who played in twelve games and was amazing, so there are ranger fans who say we gotta go at the Rock. He's proved himself in the playoffs, so rise the occasion somebody will say no is backups better, and then the ones say screw both of them. Let's go with the kid, so they have a choice between three guys. What would you do? I go at the kid. I get off at the end of the regular season. That might be the way I would go what I saw the Rangers back member. It was nurture been there but. Christopher chocolate and You know I think this. Kid Hard to say I I think I might be the least likely option. I think he's all past and sell by date here and certainly looks like. It's not. Seven eight years ago. He turns around by himself. I think it's probably one of the other two. And then finally.

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