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17 Burst results for "African American School"

"african american school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:18 min | 6 months ago

"african american school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Nothing when she was very young marijuana Pepsi lived with her dad in Chicago and it almost predominantly African American school everyone knew my name teachers called me by my name no issues I did not understand that my name was unusual until like entered into the fourth grade here in Beloit Wisconsin Beloit like much of Wisconsin is overwhelmingly white and it was very clear that marijuana Pepsi was not usual it was not quite accepted and it opened the doors for a lot of T. scene and bullying and issues and not just from the students themselves I didn't have teachers who believe me but I guess the name was just so interesting they just couldn't help themselves with the questions and the opinions and the statements and dragging me to different classrooms to introduce me to other people to show who this little girl was who had this name I didn't see that as they were trying to bully me or put me down some of the questions were difficult however because they question my family the type of family that I had and what type of mother would name a child this summer teachers started calling Mary and I don't think they did it from a place of again being hurtful towards me I think they were trying to help me they saw the way that I was getting on with the students of things they were doing and they wanted to make my life a little bit easier and that worked right until I placed in the school spelling bee and they wrote Mary Jackson my certificate and I went home and my mother someone in hit the roof and came back to the school and first everybody out and do not ever call her Mary her name is marijuana do not ever write her name differently and she told me you had better never answer to anything else other than marijuana or I'm going to get you and from that day on you know I was a lot more scared of her then I wasn't them when she was younger back in Chicago school had been a joy for marijuana I was a very smart student I learned to read very early I was picked to do everything I have great relationships with the teachers and the students over night here I am at a school here and not only are the teachers looking at me funny the students are looking at me crazy they're surrounding me in the playground asking me questions why are your pants so high you know Michael Jackson in high waters and everything under the sun I felt like I didn't belong there I didn't want to be there because clearly they did want me there something must be wrong with me I you know I I've never sat on an interview or I never even shared it ever but sitting here I remember thinking about committing suicide I was night and I remember that like yesterday and I was just hoping that everything would just go away and then I sat there and said you're right for you do that they were gonna talk about you even more she says now there are a lot of reasons she was having such a hard time environmental factors family issues the relationship between the students at school relationship with teachers it was very difficult to wonder what was going to happen the next day and it was just it was a lot I won't go into too much detail you know the last thing I want to do is make it sound like I didn't have people who Love Me and who didn't take care of me I did but sometimes that's just not enough in my case he was just a little bit different between my I have a very close knit family very loving family I've got my my mom and we have we've been raised in with our grandmothers and act teas and so there's different types of things that happen in families and so you have that going on and I go for a few more years I leave home when I'm fifteen and before I left home I was a feeling student had all else maybe a D. in GM and I had never ever given any thought to what my life is going to be like after anything I was literally living day to day and I happened to be walking down the street to the store with my cousin McHale cooks and she was four years younger than me and she was bragging about how she was going to be the first person in my family to go to college and I remember stopping in my tracks because I said so what is she saying about me and the next day I went to the consul's office at the high school and I ended up going into a credit recovery program and from then on I believe I may have gotten me over three point and then from there and the other three point something a lot higher I ended up getting the most improved student award after graduation and I was awarded an academic scholarship and I like to to go to university of Wisconsin whitewater in retrospect the treatment you got over your name was that do you think kind of just the straw that broke the camel's back that led you to becoming a straight a student as a smart kid or do you think that the the tree when you got of your name was a big contributing factor to that that was one of the straws that broke the camel's back again it's that sense of belonging and in my case the lack there us worry you I get angry at your mom either for giving you the name that caused the trouble or for insisting that you continue using the name even when other people were you know offering you a sort of easy way out by calling you merry I've never been angry about my name I have never felt that there was anything wrong with my name again I didn't even know that someone even believe that until I moved here I'm looking at them like what's wrong with you why are you messing with me all I wanted to do was read my books fly under the radar go to school and go home don't mean to put emotions into your mind but it's hard for me to imagine you wouldn't be resentful at your mom for insisting that you use the name that was causing you grief though I wasn't resentful of it again it's it's like the name Stephen if someone called you Steve and your mom says not I want you to be Stephen that your name my resentful of the people bringing me the grief about it because again that's my name when I ask you what your name is you tell me it's over.

marijuana Pepsi Chicago African American school
"african american school" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:36 min | 9 months ago

"african american school" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"In the script imminent described his laughter it said it's almost painful but some argue the delicate portrayal of the mass murder will inspire real violence a lot of cinemas around the country have already banned movie goers from wearing costumes and masks at showings it's an allegation that stirred racial emotions now an African American school girl in Virginia admits she falsely accused white classmates of attacking her flowers saying like my heroes ugly it was snappy twelve year old Amari Allen had accused three of her classmates of a soul on the other hand over my mouth and one caught my eye was the Springfield Virginia six greater last week but school now says she is acknowledge that the allegations were false our families apologizing to the administrators and families of Amanda Christian school and acknowledging the national attention and support their daughter received for Joe Ramsey with that report winds designed. coming to Broadway.

murder Virginia Amari Allen Springfield Virginia Amanda Christian school Joe Ramsey African American school twelve year
"african american school" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"african american school" Discussed on KCRW

"Now an update on a story in twenty seventeen five students who sprayed racist graffiti across in historic African American school house in Virginia received an unusual punishment reading twelve books and writing about the books over the course of a year, the titles included, my angelou's autobiographical. I know why the cage bird sings TC boils, the tortilla curtain dealing with immigration and Sinophobic and L E V cells night about the horrors of the holocaust, Alex is the deputy Commonwealth attorney who came up with a sentence. And she joins me now to discuss what happened next. Thank you. My pleasure being here. Thanks for having me. We spoke when the sentence was first issued in you told me then that you wanted the teens who spray painted swastikas and lewd symbols and wrote white power on this historic African American schoolhouse to learn about race in religion. Do you think that they've learned their lesson? I sure hope so I mean, I was able to read the essay from one of the students, and what he wrote I thought was very very powerful when he talked about how even though he had been taught about Nazi symbols in school. It had never really made an impression upon him. And once he learned about it and was made to read about it. And write about it and go to the holocaust museum. It made him feel really bad and having learned about this. He was going to make sure that he would never make anybody feel this way. Again, do you think you can teach tolerance? I mean, do you think that there's a wider lesson here? Because obviously, this is a subject of great debate across America right now. I think that the only way to to teach tolerance is for people to learn about other cultures. And sometimes the only way to do that is to read about it. That was the way that I learned about those things. I mean when I first read Allen patents cry the beloved country. I knew nothing about South Africa. I didn't know anything about apartheid at the time. I remember weeping at my ignorance and at what people were going through. And so I'm hoping that that's what happened for them. Because that's what happened for me. Some people listening to this might say, that's all fine. And well having people read, but these kinds of crimes is kinds of attacks on people's identity are being treated more leniently than other types of crimes, and are these students not getting off lightly, but they weren't they were fact treated much harsher than they would have otherwise the standard disposition for a youth in our Justice system who has no prior record would be put on probation for a year like they were and to do community service and write a letter of apology and pay restitution they were not facing being put in detention into juvenile detention because this was not a crime of violence against another person. So what was imposed upon them was above and beyond? What any probation are would have had to do on a first offense charge? Like what they were facing in many ways. This was an experiment. Yes. Do you consider the experimented success in? Should it? Be replicated. I do consider it a success because they did not get in trouble. Again, the essays that they wrote at least the one that the defense attorney made available to us the student wrote that he understood so to me it worked and my hope my dream. My goal would be that. This is not an unusual disposition that causes people to write about it in the newspaper or for me to be interviewed. I would love for this to be a standard disposition all over the place. Alex Reta, the deputy Commonwealth attorney four Virginia. Thank.

Alex Reta attorney African American school African American schoolhouse holocaust museum Sinophobic Virginia South Africa America Allen
"african american school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"african american school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is Bloomberg BusinessWeek. Jason Kelly from Bloomberg radio. We're going to continue looking back at the Bloomberg equality summit was held this week at Bloomberg headquarters. Lot of buzz here in world headquarters. Great couple of days you've got up with James. He's the mayor of Kansas City, Missouri. We talked about diversity housing technology, and especially education. Here's some of that conversation. So when you first took office in twenty eleven I'm curious what were they inequalities air James that you face that bothered you the disturbed you the most. I had the great pleasure of within a month of being inaugurated little more than a month being inaugurated. I was in Baltimore or my first US conference mayors meeting, and at that meeting, I met Rao Smith of the Casey foundation a grade level reading, and he really did educate me about the absolute importance of third grade reading proficiency of what it meant to a child's academic life and to their life thereafter. So when I came back to Kansas City, we have fifteen school districts in whole or in park, Kansas City. It's a ridiculous number. And we took a data dump of what was going on with third grade reading and on average. It was thirty three point eight percent, proficient third grade readers, but in one third one third and in the in the predominantly African American school district the namesake school district. It was nineteen percent it what drove me nuts. What's that? Nobody was upset about. So I thought that if it right with my personality, I have this. Marvelous ability to upset people. So I went about going my job. I just love that. That's a bumper sticker. So we started to turn the page Casey with the goal of trying to get all children reading proficiently at third grade, regardless of zip code age color socio economics and over the years that we've been doing it now almost eight years. Is a collective impact model we work with a ton of groups we've managed to get that thirty three point eight percent up to fifty five percent. But still the predominantly African American school district is lagging far behind their suburban more suburban type peers. So now what we're pushing as early pre K because the bottom line is kids born in poverty here. Thirty million words middle middle income peers by the time, they're three years old thirty million thirty million fewer work, right? That's an enormous amount of not talking and people not socializing children not necessarily because they're mean or evil sometimes they don't know the important sometimes they're busy trying to make a living. There hierarchy of needs may be different here. Bloomberg we like to keep some data. So I wanted to just show the impact of some of the seeds that mayor James has sewn and when we have on the percentage of people living below. The poverty level in Kansas City. It's been declining since twenty fourteen doesn't feel like it doesn't feel like no, it doesn't feel like it because they're still way too many people who are living below the poverty level and must've been back because you talk so much, of course, about education. Gotta start young are our education system has failed generations of people and those people because they're they're educations have failed them don't necessarily put the same emphasis on it for their children. But the school districts haven't changed methods of teaching having changed. It's the same old same old and somehow expecting a different result. So I think that's one of the problems. I think there's also institutionalized racism that definitely has an impact. I think that there are places Kansas City, frankly is one of is a segregated city. I'm a member of the board of trustees of urban land institute, one of the people that sell found the urban land institute, he also was responsible for. Segregating the city by putting covenants in real estate contracts minorities in Watertown, another job not a new problem now and you've had eight years. What do you feel like has made the biggest impact on improving an individual an African Americans economic situation in your city, we've been very diligent and intentional about skilling people up after the recession trying to get them into new areas of work. We've been very intentional about trying to do some things in the community that would generate jobs and economic activity. We've been very intentional about putting money into the community in terms of infrastructure, which would then allow businesses to come in and operate and we've been very intentional about focusing on kids in school and in the process of doing that drawing parents into that conversation, which has helped somewhat. How did you prioritize these kinds of things safety education, affordable housing jobs? You were looking at all of this stuff. How'd you prioritize it because that's a pretty full plate? Well. Well, my agenda was a four year gender education, governmental efficiency enforcement of the laws and employment. So we for e agenda, but if evolve the things if I had to pick one thing that I would focus on I would go for education because I think that if you have education if we instill education and make it make high quality education available to everybody. I mean, really how many times do you see PHD shoot? Master's degree candidates on the street corner. You just don't I I now know what you're doing after you're out of mayor's office. You're you've got a circuit riding homage a comedy circuit. Right right education for the most education is a great equalizer. To the extent that you have equalizers. It's one of those things get you past the door. It gives you options you don't have to necessarily be engaged in risky behavior. If you have a good education, you have more options than if you don't our problem is is that we have too many people who've had failing educational outcomes, and because of that we have a higher level crime. The earlier chart that show the level of black versus non black involvement in crime. There's another overlay to that. And that is location because crime is some of our crime is disproportionately located in areas where there is poverty, which are almost per se people of color and in the thirteenth thirteen mile area in a city that is three hundred and eighteen square miles was pretty big five San Francisco, spitting Kansas City. We have about seventy percent of all the homicides in gun violence in that one area, and guess where it is in a place where there's lowest educational attainment with the lowest median income where there's the highest rate of poverty and assistance needed where there is just about every negative thing that you could say is concentrated there. And when you have people who are trapped in a hopeless cycle, then they're going to do things. They shouldn't do if they can't get their own stuff. They're going to come in. Thank yours. That's Kansas City, Missouri. Mayor sly James. And Jason what I love about these stories is so often you have conversations, and it's often at the macro level. This is somebody who's out there talking to folks at his city and just trying to tackle so many of the problems that they're facing. Yeah. It's right there there really at ground level. And there are a lot of challenges. But know, we'll see how it goes for him. Exactly. You're listening.

Kansas City Mayor sly James Bloomberg African American school distri Jason Kelly Missouri urban land institute Baltimore US Casey namesake school district Casey foundation Rao Smith Watertown San Francisco eight percent eight years eighteen square miles
"african american school" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

09:05 min | 1 year ago

"african american school" Discussed on KGO 810

"From California. Uniformly welcomed by the Democratic Party. Which has a very high bar held by the progressives. The soft cell of Camelot harasses underway. Here in these coast, the New Yorker, profiling her three hundred page autobiography very carefully presented a very wedding story. A child born to educate a couple. Father from Trinidad mother from the subcontinent. India? A divorce follows early in communist live mother moves to Oakland and road. I take not a good upscale neighborhood of Oakland. This is many years ago. Carmela goes through a largely African American school, which is a product of segregation so much has house. Zip code is used to be difficult with people who are educated but cannot afford rent in any event is a winning story. It's a tree grows in Brooklyn story. It's roic and the New Yorker lays it out beautifully. This tells me that Kabul Harris is the one right now. There are other candidates. However, I turned her policy because with her very clear and articulate presentation, she is with the progressive left. There are some twists with two particular matters highlighted by professor Lee or hanging who's at the Hoover Institution. The Democrats have presented policies that are right now. Demonstrably ineffective. Professor a very good evening to you. Carla Harris is a good speaker. She's she's. Mm successfully followed. The speaking Hayden says not a Barack Obama more Michelle Obama. She's very good. And the presentation made it Oakland before twenty thousand people was greatly effective. It's a it's a measure of everybody else that they have to have a rollout. Like that. However, you have identified two of our policies that require explication. But at the same time show weakness at her thinking about what is to be done when she's in the Oval Office. I the minimum wage what is her position? And what do we know about minimum wage and jobs? Good evening to you, professor time. Good evening. Yes. Kamala Harris supports. The democratic view of a fifteen dollars an hour. Minimum wage the Democratic Party consistently try out a line that we can raise the minimum wage, and it won't affect jobs when Barack Obama's president. He stated that in a state in a state of the union address. He said there is no convincing evidence that raising the minimum wage will reduce jobs, and and that's just flat out wrong almost every well executed study shows that increase in minimum wage will reduce jobs, and it's sometimes it's a little bit hard to see because the impact of an increase the minimum wage can be a hundred times larger ones businesses have had had a chance to adjust and this includes automating jobs moving jobs offshore. Moving businesses from high minimum, which states to low minimum wage states. And ironically, this policy really really damages the lives of people whom the Democratic Party often points to have says these are people it's a policy. That's completely contrary to the interests of those people there are minimum wage cities. Now, do we have studies from those cities showing? A retreat and the number of a startup tops. Yes. Seattle is a city with a minimum wage city. And yes, there are job losses in Seattle. What's interesting is that there are some old minimum wage studies that have been proven more recently to just be demonstrably wrong. They have glaring data errors and all players. And what's unfortunate is that the Democratic Party continues to cite those studies as evidence that the minimum wage doesn't doesn't reduce jobs? Essentially is as an economist. We like to say you raise the price of something and people buy less of it. And there's no reason why that law economics doesn't apply to lower skill labor. It really really impacts heavily very young people who don't have a lot of work experience just in the process of gaining skills and immigrants who have yet to assimilate and who may not have a good command of the English language in terms of communication. These are people him the Democratic Party says these these are these are voters these are the laws and policies the word those people say professor commonsensical. So what we have here is something that really cannot be debated. The Democrats are saying the sky's falling unless there's from minimum wage, and you're demonstrating that the sky does not fall when when when the minimum wage reflects the marketplace and that when you raise it begins to fall on the league. I the most the least among us. That's you know, it's really not a debate. I can enter into professor I mean, you're you're demonstrate that the that the list of markets are damaged you can show that their damaged and yet the Democrats continue the spotlessly. No. That's exactly right. People today often talk about political elite, and there's a group within the Democratic Party. The governor of my state, California, Gavin Newsom being one of them, incredibly wealthy people. Who think they're helping workers by saying, hey, we'll raise the minimum wage to fifteen dollars an hour. Twenty dollars an hour, and they often mask in terms of being a living wage, well only about zero not even zero point four percent of fulltime workers are minimum wage earners. And for many of those workers their wages rise for very quickly. I mean, what's really disappointing to me as a communist is within the Democratic Party there. Cyst a declining base who believe that a free market place is is a way for everybody to have opportunities and succeed, and that view that I think this country was founded on and and succeeded on for for hundreds of years is one that's really dying within the Democratic Party. And it's really very very sad that we have a couple of minutes, and this requires more attention, but you highlighted in your defining ideas pace at the Hoover Vergara versus California. The case was school children who had standing brought a lawsuit against the state saying that the the number of ineffective. Teachers were depriving them of a decent education dicamba Harris as attorney general take a position in this case. She certainly did she worked with. Teacher labor union to fight that lawsuit. And when the judge when the trial judge in the case ruled for the school children who brought a constitutional equal protection argument to the to the view that they were receiving poor education because there are thousands of what the drought just call grossly ineffective. Teachers in schools in the poorest neighborhoods today after that the trial judge ruled in favor of school children on every count camel Harris filed an appeal literally day after that the trial judge announced his opinion. We're just had a settlement in Los Angeles United school district where it is very clear that the children are not being well served. You can't miss it. She's a junior Senator from California. I don't know if she's taking that position. I did not know the Laras had had filed an appeal against schoolchildren. It's surprising the twists and turns of. This. Yes. Yes. She I mean, I think she was really working in concert with the Democratic Party and the Democratic Party receives enormous contributions from politically very powerful teacher union, the American federation of teachers writing why gardens outfit. Absolutely, absolutely. And I don't know. I think I would love to see a democratic politician. Take a stand against the teacher's union. I have not seen it. I would love to hear from one who who did at. And it's not really about the school. Teachers, many of whom are just remarkable. It's really about the unions represent those teachers, right and camera Harris.

Democratic Party California Oakland Professor Kamala Harris Kabul Harris Barack Obama India Seattle Trinidad Brooklyn Hoover Institution professor Lee American federation of teacher camel Harris dicamba Harris Oval Office Carmela African American school
"african american school" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"african american school" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Gone, and I'm definitely gonna rebuild it in two thousand nineteen you absolutely right. Whole lot of funny stuff going on in Seattle. Oh my God. Lot of stuff you need to be addressed. Because they pay a lot of hustling up here. Don't you know, the city? This was like like three three billion dollars budget. That's more than a lot of space this this this this county. So it's a lot of hush money floating around here. And the question was what are they doing in our parts of Seattle would that three billion dollars doing random out of the CD when a historic what black people being in justified that came go back to the neighbors? They live. They go down African American school goes down to camp building. With a wreck houses found do chopped up found in the sixties. It's bad enough that they kick the black sadder. Would it? Call Chinatown lasted district back in the day. We were HR Jones youth A O J took all those store. Bill Ella Fitzgerald album used to be down here. Story motel. Historic landmarks. They took it from the back and gave to the Asian call the Chinatown so back in the fifties and stuff so in another took the CD in the south. They kicked us all to the county. They got the money here. You got three out of five richest men in the world of in. This county are nowadays that they. Trying to come east Google and Amazon just opened in New York. And we're about to put their feet to the fire on what are they doing? In terms of. Brags? And not hiring. And they're not doing contracts and would they had none of our businesses. They're dealing with you you right on point. I agree with you, Brian totally. Thank you for your call, Tiffany. Where are we with the first step Bill? What's the latest on that? That's the for those that don't know the criminal Justice reform Bill, right? There is a bipartisan effort that was Hata clear path that was supposed to have corn on both sides of the aisle, and it's a quagmire now because two very conservative Republican Senator Tom cotton, Arkansas, John Kennedy from Louisiana have introduced amendment that could threaten to derail the entire thing. It passed the procedural hurdle on Monday. But now with these amendments people who have supported it may not and what the amendments include is basically allows more people to to be tracked. Once they once once a people could conduct arrested and their release it allows them to be more of them to be tracked. So basically they serve their time. They're out of prison, but people can still trapped them it would also bar some of the people with. Conviction from participating in earn time credit, which basically requires the bureau of prison notify victims went up prisoners, we so again like you served your time, but you're still comparable to parole, but more intense, these are some of the things that people try to work through. And so now if he's very extremely conservative center monkey wrench in it. This is something that was a federated by path. And now it may be delayed until next year. Let's take a break. We'll be right back Tiffany cross out shopping keeping it real be right back. Sharpton is on news talk thirteen eighty w what if every time you went out you could cash.

Bill Ella Fitzgerald Seattle John Kennedy bureau of prison Tiffany African American school Senator Tom cotton Jones Sharpton Google New York Brian Hata Amazon Arkansas Louisiana three three billion dollars three billion dollars thirteen eighty w
"african american school" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"african american school" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Debate about personalities instead of about issues about addressing what is in front of our country, it became partisan politics party first country second mentality, and it's time to elect people are willing to reach across the island get to work with the country. His Republican opponent is. Is a southern California fixture. Fifteen term congressman Dana Rohrabacher this time. It seems to be a tougher race than you've had before. Well, this is a very tough race because we have a really a change in the basic electorate and the basic political flow in our country. Donald Trump has done what he said he was gonna do. He's going to shake things up, and when you shake things up, it means that all the old political ways of doing things and the political coalitions new coalitions are formed, and so sometimes it's to the good of Republicans. And sometimes it's not in your particular situation. Have there been some negative affects to your bid for reelection? Well, the negative impacts of my on my real action have everything to do with the fact that Mr. Trump. Personality is different people. You know, they were upset when they differentiated Ronald Reagan that it seemed that Mr. Trump. Our president didn't have the same sense of propriety. But you have to sometimes seem a little abrasive to get things done. And Trump is willing to do that the forty eighth district used to be solidly Republican. But the district is evolving, it's more diversified. There are more minorities and more Democrats, and rude is going after many of his opponents position against Dana Rohrabacher who's been there for thirty years and hasn't passed a single piece of legislation and fourteen years who has some of the most outlandish ideas, including training and arming children to protect our schools to not believing in climate change to sane that homeowner shouldn't have to sell their homes to LGBTQ individuals in the list goes on and on and on. He simply does not represent the values of the forty eighth district of California. And for that matter anybody in America in two thousand sixteen Hillary Clinton carried the forty eighth district by just under two points. That has given the Democrats hope but Rohrabacher points out he. I also won the district in two thousand sixteen by more than sixteen point Hillary may have one down here. But that's because there are a lot of women who wanted there'd be a woman. President Obama didn't win down here at all. And my my opponent is more like Obama that he is Hillary right now the race for the forty eighth district is viewed by most as a tossup Steve Futterman, CBS news Costa, Mesa, California. Meanwhile, Tuesday's elections could make history for women, especially if voters and the first female Muslims to congress that includes Michigan democrat Rashida to Leib who correspondent Rena nine and met the first thing I think about when somebody says you're going to be the first Muslim is celebrate this moment, we changed. The course of history at a time. We thought it was impossible. And that if you just believe believe in the possibility of someone like me. Well, many have focused on her faith receded to leave says this moment is so much more for it to happen at a moment where we really have felt this moment of darkness at a moment. Where Islamic phobia is such a high rate like you don't have to read the Koran to love me love the actions. Love the things that I do look at those and that will help people get beyond whatever fear or restoring typical thing that they might be thinking about I will uplift you in so many ways not to leave one democratic primary in August and is running in Michigan's thirteenth congressional district. If she wins, she'll be one of the first Muslim women in congress. What was the moment? Word hit. You hit me yet? I think people don't realize just how much of a roller coaster. It is. And it's it's happy chaos right now. It's what I describe it. As do you believe that a Muslim wave is coming to congress? I know I'm all for not ways, I'm all for only notion not Muslims. Women to lead joins the hundreds of women running for office this year, and like many of these candidates. She's also a mom. Don't. Tallied was born in the mid seventies in Detroit to Palestinian immigrant. Parents. Her mom thought, the Ma says, she always believed her daughter would live the American dream. How does it feel to have your daughter be the next? You know, she thinks God. Thank god. I'm the girl from south west. He trade that didn't speak English when I started school. I was my mother's translator entirely poverty. Twelve years old. And I remember how people looked at her. I remember the different things that were happening to my family as as we were getting, you know, situated and buying her first home in southwest Detroit. Watching my mother learned how to drive for the first time all of those experiences come with me and the cause closest to her heart immigration reform, your eyes well up when you talk about immigration. Yes. Why? So I went to a predominantly African American school. I didn't even understand like our immigration system. I knew my parents immigrated here, I think growing up in a community where your neighbors are impacted directly this hard and talking about walls and separation and detaining children. I think the immigration system, we have demonized it do you feel that the Democratic Party is transforming into something different. I think it is a new time. A new era of the civil rights movement. It's time for a change Rena nine reporting. And there's a new effort underway to get people to vote..

Donald Trump Dana Rohrabacher California congress Hillary Clinton Obama Detroit Rena nine president Michigan Democratic Party congressman Ronald Reagan African American school CBS America Steve Futterman
"african american school" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"african american school" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"That and the two thousand sixteen election in general where it became a debate about personalities instead of about issues about addressing what is in front of our country, it became partisan politics party first country second mentality, and it's time to elect people are willing to reach across the island get to work with the country. His Republican opponent is a southern California fixture. Fifteen term congressman Dana Rohrabacher this time. It seems to be a tougher race than you've had before. Well, this is a very tough race because we have a really a change in the basic electorate and the basic political flow in our country. Donald Trump has done what he said he was gonna do. He's gonna shake things up, and when you shake things up, it means that all of the old political ways of doing things and the political coalitions new coalitions are formed, and so sometimes it's to the good of Republicans. And sometimes it's not in your particular situation. Have there been some negative effects to your bid for reelection? Well, the negative impacts on my on my real action. Have everything to do with the fact that Mr. Trump's personality is different people. You know, they were upset when they does different. Ronald Reagan that it seemed that Mr. Trump that our president didn't have the same sense of propriety, but you have to sometimes seem a little abrasive to get things done. And Trump is willing to do that the forty eighth district used to be solidly Republican. But the district is evolving, it's more diversified. There are more minorities and more Democrats, and rude is going after many of his opponents position I'm going against Dana Rohrabacher who's been there for thirty years and hasn't passed a single piece of legislation and fourteen years who has some of the most outlandish ideas, including training and arming children to protect our schools to not believing in climate change to sane homeowners shouldn't have to sell their homes to LGBTQ individuals in the list goes on and on and on. He simply does not represent the values of the forty eighth district of California for that matter. Anybody in America in twenty sixteen Hillary Clinton carried the forty eighth district by just under two points. That has given the Democrats hope but Rohrbacker points out. He also won the district in two thousand sixteen by more than sixteen point Hillary may have one down here. But that's because there are a lot of women who wanted there'd be a woman. President Obama didn't went down here at all. And my my opponent is more like Obama Hillary right now the race for the forty eighth district is viewed by most as a tossup Steve Futterman, CBS news Costa, Mesa, California. Meanwhile, Tuesday's elections could make history for women, especially voters and the first female Muslims to congress that includes Michigan democrat Rashida to leave who correspondent Rena nine in the first thing, I think about when somebody says you're going to be the first Muslim is celebrate this moment, we changed. The course of his. History at a time. We thought it was impossible. And that if you just believe believe in the possibility of someone like me. Well, many have focused on her faith Rashida to leave says this moment is so much more for it to happen at a moment where we really have felt this moment of darkness at a moment where Islamaphobia is such a high rate, but you don't have to read the Koran pool of me love the actions. Love the things that I do look at those and that will help people get beyond whatever fear Syria typical thing that they might be thinking about I will uplift you in so many ways not to leave wonder democratic primary in August and is running in Michigan's thirteenth congressional district. If she wins, she'll be one of the first Muslim women in congress. What was the moment where it hits you hit me yet? I think people don't realize just how much of a roller coaster. It is. And it's it's happy chaos right now. It's what I describe it. As do you believe that a Muslim wave is coming to congress? An offer not ways I'm all for owning the ocean, not Muslims, but women. Joins the hundreds of women running for office this year, and like many of these candidates. She's also a mom. Lead was born in the mid seventies in Detroit to Palestinian immigrant. Parents. Her mom thought, the Ma says, she always believed her daughter would live the American dream. How does it feel to have your daughter be the next woman? She thanks God. Yeah. I'm the girl from southwest Detroit that didn't speak English when I started school. I was my mother's translator entirely poverty. Twelve years old. And I remember how people looked at her. I remember the different things that were happening to my family as as we were getting, you know, situated and her first home in south west he trade watching. My mother learned how to dry for the first time all of those experiences come with me and the cause closest to her heart immigration reform is well up when you talk about immigration. Yes. Why? So I went to a predominantly African American school. I didn't even understand like our immigration system. I knew my parents immigrated here, I think growing up in a community where your neighbors are impacted directly. It's hard and talking about walls and separation and detaining children. I think the immigration system, we have demonized it do you feel that the Democratic Party is transforming into something different. I think it is a new time. It's a new era of the civil rights movement. It's time for a change Reno nine reporting, and there's a new effort underway to get people to vote..

Donald Trump congress California Hillary Clinton Dana Rohrabacher Detroit president Rashida Michigan Obama Democratic Party congressman Ronald Reagan African American school Rohrbacker CBS America Syria
"african american school" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"african american school" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"A debate about personnel. Instead of about issues about addressing what is in front of our country, it became partisan politics party first country second mentality. And it's time to elect people are willing to reach across the island get to work with the country. His Republican opponent is a southern California fixture. Fifteen term congressman Dana Rohrabacher this time. It seems to be a tougher race than you've had before. Well, this is a very tough race because we have a really a change in the basic electorate and the basic political flow in our country. Donald Trump has done what he said he was gonna do. He's gonna shake things up, and when you shake things up, it means that all of the old political ways of doing things and the political coalitions new coalitions are formed and sometimes it's to the good of Republicans. And sometimes it's not in your particular situation. Have there been? Some negative effects to your bid for reelection. Well, the negative impacts of my on my real action have everything to do with the fact that mister Trump's personality is different people. You know, they were upset when they differentiated Ronald Reagan that it seemed that Mr. Trump, our president didn't have the same sense of propriety, but you have to sometimes seem a little abrasive to get things done. And Trump is willing to do that the forty eighth district used to be solidly Republican. But the district is evolving, it's more diversified. There are more minorities and more Democrats, and rude is going after many of his opponents position against Dana Rohrabacher who's been there for thirty years and hasn't passed a single piece of legislation and fourteen years who has some of the most outlandish ideas, including training and arming children to protect our schools to not believing in climate change to sane that homeowners shouldn't have to sell their homes to. LGBTQ individuals in the list goes on and on and on. He simply does not represent the values of the forty eighth district of California. And for that matter anybody in America in twenty sixteen Hillary Clinton carried the forty eighth district by just under two points. That has given the Democrats hope but Rohrabacher points out. He also won the district in two thousand sixteen by more than sixteen point Hillary may have one down here. But that's because there are a lot of women who wanted there'd be a woman. President Obama didn't win down here at all. And my my opponent is more like Obama that is Hillary right now the race for the forty eighth district is viewed by most as a tossup Steve Futterman, CBS news Costa, Mesa, California. Meanwhile, Tuesday's elections could make history for women, especially if voters and the first female Muslims to congress that includes Michigan democrat Rashida to Leib who correspondent Rena nine in Matt left. First thing I think about when somebody says you're going to be the first Muslim. Mm-hmm. As celebrate this moment, we change the course of history at a time. We thought it was impossible. And that if you just believe believe in the possibility of someone like me. Well, many have focused on her faith Rashida to leave says this moment is so much more for it to happen in a moment where we really have felt this moment of darkness at a moment. Where Islamaphobia is such a high rate like you don't have to read the Koran to love me love the actions. Love the things that I do look at those and that will help people get beyond whatever fear or restoring typical thing that they might be thinking about I will uplift you in so many ways not to lead wondered democratic primary August and is running in Michigan's thirteenth congressional district. If she wins, she'll be one of the first Muslim women in congress. What was the moment where it hits you hit me yet? I think people don't realize just how much of a roller coaster. It is. And it's it's happy chaos right now. That's what I describe it. As do you believe that a Muslim wave is coming to congress? I don't know. I'm all for not ways. I'm all for owning the ocean, not Muslims. But women. Delete joins the hundreds of women running for office this year, and like many of these candidates. She's also a mom Hamadan. Don't. Tallied was born in the mid seventies in Detroit to Palestinian immigrant. Parents. Her mom thought, the Ma says, she always believed her daughter would live the American dream. How does it feel to have your daughter be the next woman? God. She thinks God. I'm the girl from southwest Detroit that didn't speak English when I started school. You know, I was my mother's translator entire was probably twelve years old. And I remember how people looked at her. I remember the different things that were happening to my family as as we were getting, you know, situated and buying her first home in southwest, you trade watching my mother learn how to drive for the first time all of those experiences come with me and the cause closest to her heart immigration reform, your eyes well up when you talk about immigration. Yes. Why? So I went to a predominantly African American school. I didn't even understand like our immigration system. I knew my parents immigrated here, I think growing up in the community where your neighbors are impacted directly tarred and talking about walls and separation and detaining children. I think the immigration system, we have demonized it do you feel that the Democratic Party is transforming into something different. I think it is a new. Time. It's a new era of the civil rights movement. It's time for a change Reno nine reporting, and there's a new effort underway to get people to vote.

Donald Trump Dana Rohrabacher California congress Hillary Clinton Obama Detroit president Rashida Michigan Democratic Party congressman Ronald Reagan CBS African American school America Islamaphobia Reno
"african american school" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"african american school" Discussed on KCBS All News

"About personalities instead. Of about issues about addressing what is in front of our country, it became partisan politics party first country second mentality. And it's time to elect people are willing to reach across you get to work with the country. His Republican opponent is a southern California fixture. Fifteen term congressman Dana Rohrabacher this time. It seems to be a tougher race than you've had before. Well, this is a very tough race because we have a really a change in the basic electorate and the basic political flow in our country. Donald Trump has done what he said he was gonna do. He's gonna shake things up, and when you shake things up, it means that all of the old political ways of doing things and the political coalitions new coalitions are formed, and so sometimes it's to the good of Republicans. And sometimes it's not in your particular situation. Have there been some? Negative affects to your bid for reelection. Well, the negative impacts of my on my real action have everything to do with the fact that. Mr. Trump's personality is different people. You know, they were upset when they differentiated Ronald Reagan that it seemed that Mr. Trump that our president didn't have the same sense of propriety, but you have to sometimes seem a little abrasive to get things done. And Trump is willing to do that the forty eighth district used to be solidly Republican. But the district is evolving, it's more diversified. There are more minorities and more Democrats, and rude is going after many of his opponents position I'm going against Dana Rohrabacher who's been there for thirty years and hasn't passed a single piece of legislation and fourteen years who has some of the most outlandish ideas, including training and arming children to protect our schools to not believing and climate change to sane that homeowners shouldn't have to sell their homes to LGBTQ individuals in the list goes on and on and on. He simply does not represent the values of the forty eighth district of California. And for that matter anybody. In America in twenty sixteen. Hillary Clinton carried the forty eighth district by just under two points. That has given the Democrats hope but rollback or points out. He also won the district in two thousand sixteen by more than sixteen point Hillary may have one down here. But that's because there are a lot of women who wanted there'd be a woman. President Obama didn't win down here at all. And my my opponent is more like Obama Hillary right now the race for the forty eighth district is viewed by most as a tossup Steve Futterman, CBS news Costa, Mesa, California. Meanwhile, Tuesday's elections could make history for women, especially voters and the first female Muslims to congress that includes Michigan democrat Rashida to leave who correspondent Reno nine and met the first thing I think about when somebody says you're going to be the first Muslim as celebrate this moment, the change the course of history at a time we thought it was impossible. And that if you just believe. Believe in the possibility of someone like me. This is a well many have focused on her faith receded to leave says this moment is so much more for it to happen at a moment where we really have felt this moment of darkness at a moment. Where Islamaphobia is such a high rate like you don't have to read the Koran to love me love the actions. Love the things that I do look at those and that will help people get beyond whatever fear or restoring typical thing that they might be thinking about I will uplift you in so many ways not to leave wonder democratic primary in August and is running in Michigan's thirteenth congressional district. If she wins, she'll be one of the first Muslim women in congress. What was the moment? Word hit. You hit me yet? I think people don't realize just how much of a roller coaster. It is. And it's it's happy chaos right now. It's what I describe it as do you believe that a Muslim wave is coming to congress. I don't know. I'm all for not ways. I'm all for owning the ocean, not Muslims. But women. Joins the hundreds of women running for office this year, and like many of these candidates. She's also a mom. Lead was born in the mid seventies in Detroit to Palestinian immigrant. Parents. Have her mom thought, the Ma says, she always believed her daughter would live the American dream. How does it feel to have your daughter be the next? She thinks God. Thank god. I'm the girl from south west. He trade that didn't speak English when I started school. I was my mother's translator entire was probably twelve years old. And I remember how people looked at her. I remember the different things that were happening to my family as as we were getting, you know, situated and Byner first home in south west trade watching my mother learned how to drive for the first time all of those experiences come with me and the cause closest to her heart immigration reform, your eyes well up when you talk about immigration. Yes. Why? So I went to a predominantly African American school. I didn't even understand like our immigration system. I knew my parents immigrated here, I think growing up in a community where your neighbors are impacted directly hard and talking about walls and separation and detaining children. I think the immigration system, we have demonized it do you feel that the Democratic Party is transforming into something different. I think it is a new time. It's a new era of the civil rights movement. It's time for a change Rena nine reporting. And there's a new effort underway to get people to vote..

Donald Trump California congress Hillary Clinton Dana Rohrabacher president Michigan Obama Democratic Party congressman Ronald Reagan America African American school CBS Rena Islamaphobia Detroit Steve Futterman
"african american school" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"african american school" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"A woman President Obama. Didn't win down here at all. And my my opponent is more like Obama that is Hillary right now the race for the forty eighth district is viewed by most as a tossup Steve Futterman, CBS news Costa, Mesa, California. Meanwhile, Tuesday's elections could make history for women, especially if voters and the first female Muslims to congress that includes Michigan democrat Rashida to leave who correspondent Reno nine and met the first thing I think about when somebody says you're going to be the first Muslim is celebrate this moment, we changed. The course of history at a time. We thought it was impossible. And that if you just believe believe in the possibility of someone like me. Well, many have focused on her faith Rashida to leave says this moment is so much more for it to happen at a moment where we really have felt this moment of darkness at a moment. Where Islamic phobia is such a high rate. The key to have to read the Koran to love me love the actions. Love the things that I do look at those and that will help people get beyond whatever fear or stereotypical thing that they might be thinking about I will uplift you in so many ways not to leave wonder democratic primary in August and is running in Michigan's thirteenth congressional district. If she wins, she'll be one of the first Muslim women in congress. What was the moment where it hit? You hit me yet? I think people don't realize just how much of a roller coaster. It is. And it's it's happy chaos right now. That's what I describe it. As do you believe that a Muslim wave is coming to congress? I I'm all for not ways, I'm all for owning the ocean, not Muslims, but women. Joins the hundreds of women running for office this year, and like many of these candidates. She's also a mom don't talk. Lead was born in the mid seventies in Detroit to Palestinian immigrant. Parents. Her mom thought, the Ma says, she always believed her daughter would live the American dream. How does it feel to have your daughter be the next woman the know? She thinks God. I'm the girl from south west. He trade that didn't speak English when I started school. I was my mother's translator entire was probably twelve years old. And I remember how people looked at her. I remember the different things that were happening to my family as as we were getting, you know, situated and Byner first home in southwest. He trade watching my mother learned how to drive for the first time all of those experiences come with me and the cause closest to her heart immigration reform, your eyes well up when you talk about immigration. Yes. Why? So I went to a predominantly African American school. I didn't even understand like our immigration system. I knew my parents immigrated here, I think growing up in the community where your neighbors are impacted directly. It's hard and talking about walls and separation and detaining children. I think the immigration system, we have dehumanized. It. Do you feel that the Democratic Party is transforming into something different? I think it is a new time. It's a new era of the civil rights movement. It's time for a change arena nine reporting. And there's a new effort underway to get people to.

congress President Obama Rashida Michigan Democratic Party Steve Futterman CBS Costa California Reno Detroit Hillary African American school Mesa Byner Lead twelve years
"african american school" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"african american school" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Debate about personalities instead of about issues about addressing what is in front of our country, it became partisan politics party first country second mentality. And it's time to elect people are willing to reach cross you island get to work with the country, his Republican. Opponent is a southern California fixture. Fifteen term congressman Dana Rohrabacher this time. It seems to be a tougher race than you've had before. Well, this is a very tough race because we have a really a change in the basic electorate in the basic political flow in our country. Donald Trump has done what he said he was gonna do. He's gonna shake things up, and when you shake things up, but means that all of the old political ways of doing things and the political coalitions new coalitions are formed, and so sometimes it's to the good of Republicans. And sometimes it's not in your particular situation. Have there been some negative affects to your bid for reelection? Well, the negative impacts of my on my reelection have everything to do with the fact that. Mr. Trump's personality is different people. You know, they were upset when they differentiated Ronald Reagan that it seemed that Mr. Trump, our president didn't have the same sense of propriety, but you have to sometimes seem a little abrasive to get things done. And Trump is willing to do that the forty eighth district used to be solidly Republican. But the district is evolving, it's more diversified. There are more minorities and more Democrats, and rude is going after many of his opponents position I'm going against Dana Rohrabacher who's been there for thirty years and hasn't passed a single piece of legislation and fourteen years who has some of the most outlandish ideas, including training and arming children to protect our schools to not believing in climate change to sane that homeowners shouldn't have to sell their homes to LGBTQ individuals in the list goes on and on and on. He simply does not represent the values of the forty eighth district of California. And for that matter anybody in. America in twenty sixteen Hillary Clinton carried the forty eighth district by just under two points. That has given the Democrats hope but Rohrabacher points out. He also won the district in two thousand sixteen by more than sixteen point Hillary may have one down here. But that's because a lot of women who wanted there'd be a woman. President Obama didn't win down here at all. And my my opponent is more like Obama that is Hillary right now the race for the forty eighth district is viewed by most as a tossup Steve Futterman, CBS news Costa, Mesa, California. Meanwhile, Tuesday's elections could make history for women, especially voters and the first female Muslims to congress that includes Michigan democrat Rashida to leave who correspondent Rena nine in Matt the first thing I think about when somebody says you're going to be the first Muslim is celebrate this moment, we changed. The course of history at a time. We thought it was impossible. And that if you just believe. I believe in the possibility of someone like me. Well, many have focused on her faith receded to leave says this moment is so much more for it to happen at a moment where we really have felt this moment of darkness at a moment. Where Islamaphobia is such a high rate like you don't have to read the Koran to love me love the actions. Love the things that I do look at those and that will help people get beyond whatever fear or restoring typical thing that they might be thinking about I will uplift you in so many ways not to leave wondered democratic primary in August and his running in Michigan's thirteenth congressional district. If she wins, she'll be one of the first Muslim women in congress. What was the moment where it hits you think it's hit me yet? I think people don't realize just how much of a roller coaster it is. And it's hip. It's happy chaos right now. It's what I describe it as do you believe that a Muslim wave is coming to congress. I know I'm all for not ways, I'm all for owning the ocean, not Muslims. But. Women. Joins the hundreds of women running for office this year, and like many of these candidates. She's also a mom. Don't. Toledo was born in the mid seventies in Detroit to Palestinian immigrant. Parents. Her mom thought, the Ma says, she always believed her daughter would live the American dream. How does it feel to have your daughter be the next woman? She thinks God. Thank you. I'm the girl from southwest Detroit that didn't speak English when I started school. You know, I was my mother's translator entirely. Probably twelve years old. And I remember how people looked at her. I remember the different things that were happening to my family as as we were getting, you know, situated and Byner first home in south west he trade watching. My mother learned how to drive for the first time all of those experiences come with me and the cause closest to her heart immigration reform, your eyes well up when you talk about immigration. Yes. Why? So I went to a predominantly African American school. I didn't even understand like our immigration system. I knew my parents immigrated here, I think growing up in a community where your neighbors are impacted directly tart and talking about walls and separation and detaining children. I think the immigration system, we have demonized it do you feel that the Democratic Party is transforming into something different. I think it is a new time. It's a new era of the civil rights movement. It's time for a change Reno nine reporting, and there's a new effort underway to get people to vote..

Donald Trump Dana Rohrabacher California congress Hillary Clinton Detroit president Michigan Obama Democratic Party congressman Ronald Reagan CBS African American school America Toledo Islamaphobia Reno
"african american school" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"african american school" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Our country, it became partisan politics party first country second mentality, and it's time to elect people are willing to reach cross and get to work with the country. His Republican opponent is a southern California fixture. Fifteen term congressman. Dana Rohrabacher this time, it seems to be a tougher race than you've had before. Well, this is a very tough race because we have a really a change in the basic electorate and the basic political flow in our country. Donald Trump has done what he said he was gonna do. He's going to shake things up, and when you shake things up, it means that all of the old political ways of doing things and the political coalitions new coalitions are formed, and so sometimes it's to the good of Republicans. Sometimes it's not in your particular situation. Have there been some negative effects to your bid for reelection? Well, the negative impacts of my on my real action have everything to do with the fact that mister Trump's personality is different people. You know, they were upset when they differentiated Ronald Reagan that it seemed that Mr. Trump, our president didn't have the same sense of propriety, but you have to sometimes seem a little abrasive to get things done. And Trump is willing to do that the forty eighth district used to be solidly Republican. But the district is evolving, it's more diversified. There are more minorities and more Democrats and Rudas going after many of his opponents position against Dana Rohrabacher who's been there for thirty years and hasn't passed a single piece of legislation and fourteen years who has some of the most outlandish ideas, including training and arming children to protect our schools to not believing in climate change to sane that homeowners shouldn't have to sell their homes to. LGBTQ individuals in the list goes on and on and on. He simply does not represent the values of the forty eighth district of California. And for that matter anybody in America in twenty sixteen Hillary Clinton carried the forty eighth district by just under two points. That has given the Democrats hope but Rohrabacher points out. He also won the district in two thousand sixteen by more than sixteen point Hillary may have one down here. But that's because a lot of women who wanted there'd be a woman. President Obama didn't win down here at all. And my my opponent is more like Obama Hillary right now the race for the forty eighth district is viewed by most as a tossup Steve Futterman, CBS news Costa, Mesa, California. Meanwhile, Tuesday's elections could make history for women, especially if voters and the first female Muslims to congress that includes Michigan democrat Rashida to Leib who correspondent Rena nine and met the first thing I think about when somebody says you're going to be the first Muslim. Slim as celebrate this moment, we changed. The course of history at a time we thought it was impossible. And that if you just believe believe in the possibility of someone like me. This isn't well, many have focused on her faith Rashida to leave says this moment is so much more for it to happen at a moment where we really have felt this moment of darkness at a moment. Where Islamaphobia is such a high rate. You have to read the Koran to love me love the actions. Love the things that I do look at those and that will help people get beyond whatever fear or restoring typical thing that they might be thinking about I will uplift you in so many ways not to leave wonder democratic primary in August and is running in Michigan's thirteenth congressional district. If she wins, she'll be one of the first Muslim women in congress. What was the moment where it hit? You hit me yet? I think people don't realize just how much of a roller coaster. It is. And it's it's happy chaos right now. It's what I describe it as do you believe that a Muslim wave is coming to congress. I'm all for not ways, I'm all for owning the ocean, not Muslims. Women. Joins the hundreds of women running for office this year, and like many of these candidates. She's also a mom don't. Tallied was born in the mid seventies in Detroit to Palestinian immigrant. Parents have allowed her mom thought. The Ma says she always believed her daughter would live the American dream. How does it feel to have your daughter be the next? God. She thinks God. Thank god. I'm the girl from south west. He trade that didn't speak English when I started school. I was my mother's translator entirely was probably twelve years old. And I remember how people looked at her. I remember the different things that were happening to my family as as we were getting, you know, situated and buying her first home in southwest. He trade watching my mother learned how to drive for the first time all of those experiences come with me and the cause closest to her heart immigration reform, your eyes well up when you talk about immigration. Yes. Why? So I went to a predominantly African American school. I didn't even understand like our immigration system. I knew my parents immigrated here, I think growing up in the community where your neighbors are impacted directly this hard and talking about walls and separation and detaining children. I think the immigration system, we have demonized it do you feel that the Democratic Party is transforming into something different. I think it is a new time. It's a new era of the civil rights movement. It's time for a change Reno nine reporting, and there's a new effort underway to get people to vote..

Donald Trump Dana Rohrabacher California congress Hillary Clinton president Rashida Michigan Obama Democratic Party congressman Ronald Reagan Detroit CBS African American school America Islamaphobia Reno
"african american school" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"african american school" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"His Republican opponent is a southern California fixture. Fifteen term congressman Dana Rohrabacher this time. It seems to be a tougher race than you've had before. Well, this is a very tough race because we have a really a change in the basic electorate and the basic political flow in our country. Donald Trump has done what he said he was gonna do. He's going to shake things up, and when you shake things up, it means that all of the old political ways of doing things and the political coalitions new coalitions are formed and sometimes it's to the good of Republicans. And sometimes it's not in your particular situation. Have there been some negative effects to your bid for reelection? Well, the negative impacts in my on my real action have everything to do with the fact that mister Trump's personality is different people. You know, they were upset when they differentiated Ronald Reagan that it seemed to Mr. Trump, our president didn't have the same sense of propriety, but you have to sometimes seem a little abrasive to get things done. And Trump is willing to do that the forty eighth district used to be solidly Republican. But the district is evolving, it's more diversified. There are more minorities and more Democrats, and rude is going after many of his opponents position I'm going against Dana Rohrabacher who's been there for thirty years and hasn't passed a single piece of legislation and fourteen years who has some of the most outlandish ideas, including training and arming children to protect our schools to not believing in climate change to sane that homeowner shouldn't have to sell their homes to. LGBTQ individuals in the list goes on and on and on. He simply does not represent the values of the forty eighth district of California. And for that matter anybody in America in twenty sixteen Hillary Clinton carried the forty eighth district by just under two points. That has given the Democrats hope but Rohrabacher points out. He also won the district in two thousand sixteen by more than sixteen point Hillary may have one down here. But that's because a lot of women who wanted there'd be a woman. President Obama didn't win down here at all. And my my opponent is more like Obama that he is Hillary right now the race for the forty eighth district is viewed by most as a tossup Steve Futterman, CBS news Costa, Mesa, California. Meanwhile, Tuesday's elections could make history for women, especially if voters and the first female Muslims to congress that includes Michigan democrat Rashida to leave who correspondent Reno nine in met the first thing I think about when somebody says you're going to be the first. Slim is celebrate this moment, we change the course of history at a time. We thought it was impossible. And that if you just believe believe in the possibility of someone like me. Well, many have focused on her faith receded to leave says this moment is so much more for it to happen at a moment where we really have felt this moment of darkness at a moment. Where Islamic phobia is such a high rate. You don't have to read the Koran to love me love the actions. Love the things that I do look at those and that will help people get beyond whatever fear restoring typical thing that they might be thinking about I will uplift you in so many ways not to leave wonder democratic primary in August and is running in Michigan's thirteenth congressional district. If she wins, she'll be one of the first Muslim women in congress. What was the moment where it hits you hit me yet? I think people don't realize just how much of a roller coaster it is. And it's it's happy chaos right now. It's what I describe it. As do you believe that a Muslim wave is coming to congress? I'm all for not waves. I'm offer only notion not Muslims. But. Women. Joins the hundreds of women running for office this year, and like many of these candidates. She's also a mom. She was born in the mid seventies in Detroit to Palestinian immigrant. Parents. Her mom thought, the Ma says, she always believed her daughter would live the American dream. How does it feel to have your daughter be the next one? God. She thinks God. Thank god. I'm the girl from southwest Detroit that didn't speak English when I started school. I was my mother's translator entirely. Probably twelve years old. And remember how people looked at her? I remember the different things that were happening to my family as as we were getting, you know, situated and Byner first home in south west to trade watching. My mother learned how to drive for the first time all of those experiences come with me and the cause closest to her heart immigration reform, your eyes well up when you talk about immigration. Yes. Why? So I went to a predominantly African American school. I didn't even understand like our immigration system. I knew my parents immigrated here, I think growing up in a community where your neighbors are impacted directly. It's hard and talking about walls and separation and detaining children. I think the immigration system, we have demonized it do you feel that the Democratic Party is transforming into something different. I think it is a new time new era of the civil rights movement. It's time for a change Rena.

Donald Trump Dana Rohrabacher California congress Hillary Clinton Detroit president Michigan Obama congressman Democratic Party Ronald Reagan CBS African American school America Steve Futterman Costa
"african american school" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"african american school" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"WBZ news time one forty one Detroit city council president Brenda Jones has started a write in campaign in hopes of winning the thirteenth congressional district seat held once by John Conyers, the person who won the primary for the two year term is former state lawmaker Rashida to leave. She talked with CBS ends arena nine in the first thing. I think about when somebody says you're going to be the first Muslim is celebrate this moment, we changed. The course of history at a time. We thought it was impossible. And that if you just believe believe in the possibility of someone like me. Well, many have focused on her faith receded to leave says this moment is so much more for it to happen at a moment where we really have felt this moment of darkness at a moment. Where Islamaphobia is such a high rate. You have to read the Koran to love me love the actions. Love the things that I do look at those and that will help people get beyond whatever fear or stereotypical thing that they might be thinking about I will uplift you in so many ways not to leave one or democratic primary in August and is running in Michigan's thirteenth congressional district. If she wins next week, she'll be one of the first Muslim women in congress. What was the moment? Word hit. You hit me yet? I think people don't realize just how much of a roller coaster. It is. And it's it's happy chaos right now. That's what I describe it. As do you believe that a Muslim wave is coming to congress? I don't know. I'm all for not ways. I'm all for only notion not Muslims, but women. Joins the hundreds of women running for office this year, and like many of these candidates. She's also a mom. Lead was born in the mid seventies in Detroit to Palestinian immigrant. Parents. We followed her mom thought. The Ma says she always believed her daughter would live the American dream. How does it feel to have your daughter be the next? God. She thinks God. Thank god. I'm the girl from south west. He trade that didn't speak English when I started school. I was my mother's translator entirely was probably twelve years old. And I remember how people looked at her. I remember the different things that were happening to my family as as we were getting, you know, situated and buying their first home in south west to trade watching. My mother learned how to drive for the first time all of those experiences come with me and the cause closest to her heart immigration reform, your eyes well up when you talk about immigration. Yes. Why? So I went to a predominantly African American school. I didn't even understand like our immigration system. I knew my parents immigrated here, I think growing up in the community where your neighbors are impacted directly. It's hard and talking about walls and separation and detaining children. I think the immigration system, we have dehumanized it. Do you feel that the Democratic Party is transforming into something different? I think everybody transforms right organically. I think it is a new time. It's a new era of the civil rights movement. It's time for a change to leave one Michigan's thirteenth district primaries, roughly sixty percent African American. He says it's all about issues, and she hopes to secure fifteen dollars minimum wage plans to push for equal pay and health care for all. And of course, he's hoping to overturn the travel ban which impact several Muslim countries about CBS ends Reno. Nine in reporting, Google employees walking out of the company's New York City offices yesterday. Protests the tech giant's treatment of executive accused of sexual misconduct. This after the company acknowledged that a former executive received a ninety million dollar exit payout despite a sexual assault allegation to new Gupta is a Google employee..

Islamaphobia Detroit CBS Michigan Rashida congress Google executive Brenda Jones John Conyers Democratic Party New York City African American school president Lead assault Reno
"african american school" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"african american school" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Our Thursday Newswatch continues next week's midterm election could be historic for women seeking office voters could San the first female Muslims to congress that includes Rashida to leave the democrat running in Michigan's thirteenth district house race CBS news correspondent Rena Nina with our streaming network CBS N, Matt. With to Lebed discuss what it means for her and Muslim Americans nationwide. We're seeing a Toledo is now facing a last minute ride and challenge from the woman that she defeated in August. But the momentum is still with her campaign. She's an attorney a former state legislator, the oldest of fourteen and also the daughter of Palestinian immigrants, and she tells me she's looking to change history at a time. Most people think just is impossible. The first thing I think about when somebody says you're going to be the first Muslim is celebrate this moment, we changed. The course of history at a time. We thought it was impossible. And that if you just believe believe in the possibility of someone like me. Well, many have focused on her faith receded to leave says this moment is so much more for it to happen at a moment where we really have felt this moment of darkness at a moment. Where Islamic phobia is such a high rate. But you don't have to read the Koran to love me love the actions. Love the things that I do look at those and that will help people get beyond whatever fear or restoring typical thing that they might be thinking about I will uplift you in so many ways not to leave wonder democratic primary in August and is running in Michigan's thirteenth congressional district. If she wins next week, she'll be one of the first Muslim women in congress. What was the moment? Word hit. You hit me yet? I think people don't realize just how much of a roller coaster. It is. And it's it's happy chaos right now. It's what I describe it as do you believe that a Muslim wave is coming to congress. I don't know. I'm all for not ways. I'm all for owning the ocean, not Muslims, but women. To leave joins the hundreds of women running for office this year, and like many of these candidates. She's also a mom don't talk. Lead was born in the mid seventies in Detroit to Palestinian immigrant. Parents. Her mom thought, the Ma says, she always believed her daughter would live the American dream. How does it feel to have your daughter be the next woman the gods? She thinks God. I'm the girl from south west. He trait that didn't speak English when I started school. I was my mother's translator entirely poverty. Twelve years old. And I remember people looked at her. I remember the different things that were happening to my family as as we were getting, you know, situated and Byner first home in south west to trade watching. My mother learned how to drive for the first time all of those experiences come with me and the cause closest to her heart immigration reform, your eyes well up when you talk about immigration. Yes. Why? So I went to a predominantly African American school. I didn't even understand like our immigration system. I knew my parents immigrated here, I think growing up in the community where your neighbors are impacted directly. It's hard and talking about walls and separation and detaining children. I think the immigration system, we have dehumanized it. Do you feel that the Democratic Party is transforming into something different? I think everybody transforms right organically. I think it is a new time to new era of the civil rights movement. It's time for a change to leave one Michigan's thirteenth district primaries, roughly sixty percent African American. He says it's all about issues, and she hopes to secure fifteen dollars minimum wage plans to push for equal pay and health care for all. And of course, he's hoping to overturn the travel ban which impact several Muslim countries. Let's CBS news. Correspondent Rena Naina..

Michigan congress attorney CBS Rena Nina Toledo Rena Naina Lebed Democratic Party San Rashida Matt African American school Detroit Byner Lead
"african american school" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"african american school" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"Who worked at twenty two Kirova street in Moscow for Russian military intelligence for the GRE from his cubicle in Moscow. We learned in that indictment that that Russian military officer personally targeted election infrastructure in Florida in Iowa and in Georgia and Georgia is the state where the secretary of state alone among all other states in the country, he alone refused any help. When it came to shoring up the security of estates elections, even after he was directly warned by homeland security and subsequently by the FBI. Georgia is the state or the secretary of state said these warnings were ridiculous. Ridiculous warnings. There's no chance Russia, whatever target his state or you kidding turns out his state is one of the states that Russia targeted on October twenty eighth two thousand sixteen, and we can name the guy who did it and the office he was sitting in when he did it. Once those Russian military officers started were targeting Georgia's election system starting on October twenty eight th two thousand sixteen I wonder what they did with Georgia's voter systems. We don't know because under that secretary of state rather than let anybody investigate if anything untoward might have happened instead, they wiped the servers, fair race, the servers, so nothing can ever be checked. That's secretary of state and Georgia is now the Republican candidate for governor of Georgia. He's presumably running for governor on the basis of his performance as secretary of state, which honestly is a performance for which anybody might rightfully expect to be famous. Well, before the disaster of Georgia election security and the two thousand sixteen election in his first full year, a secretary of state in two thousand ten. He sent armed agents door to door in black neighborhoods in Brooks County, Georgia. This is after a big, get out the vote effort there among black residents that big, get out. The vote effort led to the first ever majority African American school board in their town. Local residents said they'd been motivated that year by teacher layoffs in their school district teacher layoffs that were really unpopular. And according to one local leader of the voter, registration effort. Quote, we've been bit by the Obama bug since two thousand ten. We've been bit by the Obama bug and we knew it was time for a change in Brooks county as well. They brought criminal charges against twelve local black residents who helped get out the vote effort. They brought charges against those twelve residents for things like bringing on voluptuous containing completed absentee ballots to a mailbox. They criminally charged this group of local residents with more than one hundred election law violations, including dozens of felonies. They put them on trial to face more than a thousand combined years in prison. And you know what? Not a single one of those charges held up on every single one of those charges. Local resident was either acquitted or the charge had to be dropped by the prosecutors. Not only were there no convictions. There weren't even any plea deals. Acquitted dropped in every single one. And the attorney general of the state subsequently had to issue a statement clarifying that. Actually, none of the actions. Those African American local residents in Brooks county had been charged with none of the things they were charged with. We're actually illegal mailing in absentee. Ballots is not a crime registering. Your neighbors to vote is not a crime, but tell that to the people who Brian Kemp sent his armed agents door to door after in two thousand ten. That's Brian Kemp, Georgia secretary of state. He also instituted what's called an exact match program designed, honestly to kill voter, registration applications. If there's even one single digital character difference between your voter registration application and any other record the state has on file for you. So if like there's an extra space added by the registrar when she types in your name or your address, literally an extra space, or if you live on something something road and the registrar types in our deep period to abbreviate road instead of our d which is the way it's abbreviated without the period and some other database than forget it..

Georgia Brooks County Moscow Brian Kemp officer FBI Obama Russia African American school Florida Iowa attorney