11 Burst results for "African American Magazine"

"african american magazine" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"african american magazine" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"And she also Encourages other writers and provides a lot of Inspiration in and motivation and tips tricks. Whatever it is to for other writers. Which i i find inspiring just on its on its face value of you know giving back and helping people who are getting started so going to be an interesting conversation now do need to speak about my sponsors and they mentioned my low energy. Good news for me. I'm back on my vital as a while. I will be anyway tonight after fifteen days of being offered my vital. If you've watched the program listen to the program for awhile you know about my Vital it's a health supplement that makes extraordinary claims about one seventy but it also claims to Give you better more energy a better sleep and more better clarity of thought cognition and so i if you follow the program you know. I tested for six. To eight weeks at did seem to Give me very positive results. But then i laid off for fifteen days as a control. And i can tell you i've been Really feeling feeling the results. I can't wait to get back on it. Because i need more energy to get me through the springtime and when the sun is shining hearing things are looking back positive hopefully they will things will turn around but so the stuff is called my vital. It's a house formula that Health supplement to carbon molecule discovered by. Sds research back in the nineties. And it provides as i mentioned better energy More energy. I should say better sleep and as a result of sleeping better more clarity of thought and cognition so If to get started with them just go to my vital seat. Dot com slash. Mine dog to check them out. Here's the deal to use the promo code mind al-tv you're gonna say fifteen percent of your first order and if you use a subscription model rather than the one time purchase model you can save another fifteen percent and you can cancel that subscription at anytime so basically you one month supply you will get thirty percent off of use code mind al-tv and Go with the subscription model. Now once again it's a my vital seat dot com slash mind dog. I do appreciate you patronizing them The sponsor is fun wife capital. You know about fun. Mice capital lender matching platform. That gets you the best lines of credit Guaranteed can plan six pliant line and sixty seconds or less effective credit to see how much you can get used funding for anything. You need to start or grow your business. That's right. 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So i do appreciate you Patronizing them one more sponsor to get out of the way and we'll get right on with the show Mybookie dot com is one of the most popular and trusted brands in the online gambling community. Today's footballs well Get your bets in. Sportsbook offers an incredible variety sports from american staples such as football and basketball to international sports. K b o rugby and cricket it even off his wagers on entertainment and politics and simulated sports games such as madden twenty one and nba two k. Twenty one if you're looking for a line on your favorite tv show you can most certainly find it at my bookie my casino. Options are plentiful as a sportsbook. There are twenty seven different table games such as blackjack and roulette and Almost three hundred unique slash options seventy seven of which three day you can even play live table games and video poker. Get started with them again. It's mybookie dot com slash mind dog mybookie dot com slash mine dog. And here's the deal folks They will match if you use that promo code Mybookie dot com and put in the promo code mind dog you are going to get a match donation so if you wanna bet with one hundred dollars let's just say one hundred dollars to be a nice round number. They will mass that you'll get two hundred dollars of which two to play with right up to a thousand dollars so if you want to go all the way up through thousand dollars they will make that two thousand dollars. Great deal folks Check it out my bookie dot com if you're so inclined to be gambling on sports or table games or what have you And i do appreciate you sponging Patronizing all my sponsors man. Too tough day for me folks. You can tell. I'm these live e oser a little difficult for me today. But i do appreciate you Patronizing sponsors and links of course will be in the description now onto the program Author denise attorney is the writer of urban novels love over me porsche. Love has many faces. Spiral got his glory Gregory the lion hearted and long walk up She's at all so a Calmly columnist Fulltime writer who whose works have appeared in Popula- african american magazines diverse newspapers and women's periodical. She's also and i liked this That refers to it as radio. She's also a. I guess online radio host at blog talk radio. I consider that podcasting. But i i have an affinity for radio. Which is the reason. I got into podcasting. So i like the fact that she's calling it radio I i like to think of this radio program. You'd a podcast in were on online radio as well So ladies and gentlemen please open ears open your mind. The company welcoming the attorney to the mind on tv pockets and as welcome. Thank you thank you. Thank you for the out in your way to your promos best. They don't want about the item and a boost found it interesting of glad to be here on mind. Lcd and again. Thank you let me tell you about that stuff. Because i had the guy who discovered nineteen ninety one. He was on the program as guest and One of the claims it makes is that it will prolong life span by ninety percent meaning For some so. I could live to be one hundred forty or so which obviously it's going to be hard to prove until i told them i was skeptical about it so and but he said okay. I'll tell you what i'll send you a bunch of the product free. Try for six to eight weeks and have me back in and will review result so i tried it on air every day for six eight weeks twice a day two shows a day and it did give me a boost in energy and helped me sleep better but We'll see if. I do live to be a hundred and forty or so. I promise you will be invited to my own. Equates birthday party right here at that will be all that will be in the year twenty. One hundred I'm.

writer nba google facebook Popula- african attorney Author denise attorney basketball football porsche Spiral Gregory
"african american magazine" Discussed on Meet the Thriller Author: Interviews with Writers of Mystery, Thriller, and Suspense Books

Meet the Thriller Author: Interviews with Writers of Mystery, Thriller, and Suspense Books

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"african american magazine" Discussed on Meet the Thriller Author: Interviews with Writers of Mystery, Thriller, and Suspense Books

"I found awfully classes from these master thriller and mystery writers to be not only motivating but the effort is some very actionable insights for example. The james patterson class offers a pdf of his outline for his bestselling novel honeymoon. Which can be downloaded. So i bought the book version of that book. And i read it a computer with the outline on split screen. So how did the outline and the book side by side. I found that to be so helpful to me figuring out my outline outline process for my own writing anyway. Go checkout three weeks dot com for slash writing. Not only will you learn from the best. But you'll help support this podcast by signing up to masterclass using that link. Okay here's my interview with danny garner. This is alan peterson with the author. And this episode of the podcast. I'm talking with danny garner who enjoyed careers as an actor director and screenwriter. His latest book is a spoon. Kun which is the second book in the tales of elliott caprice featuring disgrace chicago. Police officer elliott. Caprice will get into that and a whole bunch more with the danny. How're you doing this morning. Doing great thanks for having me on. Yeah thank you so much for a company that the podcast that to you about your work. So keep tell the listeners. A little bit about yourself. I'm originally from the great city chicago and come of age sometime in the seventies. i'm a product eh. chicago public school system. That put me arts classes all the time. So you know. I have one of those weird bios when you don't don't know what to write about yourself and he's been writing from a very young age like yeah. Actually i have 'cause like a government family of media people my my my father and my grandfather ankle were all decorated chicago firefighters. And my grandfather you know sometime around the great migration in the forties Became a firefighter. Captain which was a rare thing for african american in the city. At the time. I guess and You know it afforded him start position light so he was able to find a lot of a lot of opportunities in the growing black middle class in chicago and he did so with media distribution. Because you know it was very difficult. You are african american newspaper african american magazine to get the same kind of distribution transport and logistics that say sometimes it attributed did the herald their daily herald or the tribune would have had so my grandfather filled in the gaps between when the pullman porter stop delivering black newspapers on the on the rail and We went national. And you know life in society takes over and they rebooted the black economy so somewhere in between one and one. My grandfather was running newspapers all around down. And i guess you know. I've been surrounded by words and surrounded by newspapers and surrounded by books. You know i'm a printer's row kid so you know i've always been into. I've always been a bibliophile while he's been a chicago public library. Mole may give you. We're looking for me is found me at the library and it was always some girls at libraries. Always some books that i shouldn't be reading. You know everybody's trying to sneak into an r. rated movie nobody checks the adult sector. Let the library right. So i And then you know my influences food pretty strong man i i. I'm a eighty skate. Like most people right. So i was around with mtv broadcast for the first time. I remember when david hasselhoff was the coldest tv right. I remember when the star wars really didn't get interesting to me..

chicago danny garner elliott caprice chicago public school david hasselhoff james patterson alan peterson african american magazine Kun pullman porter officer mtv director
Frances E.W. Harper: American Author and Social Reformer

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:26 min | 2 years ago

Frances E.W. Harper: American Author and Social Reformer

"Are warrior today for Abolition Women's Rights Racial Justice Status Voting Rights and more. She was poet Teacher Public Speaker and writer. WHO's considered the mother of African American journalism. Let's Talk About Francis Harper Francis Ellen. Watkins was born in Eighteen. Twenty five in in Baltimore Maryland. She was the only child of free parents. Though at that time the state of Maryland still allowed slavery when Francis which is three years old and both of her parents died. She was then raised by her maternal aunt and Uncle Henriette and Reverend William Watkins and took their last name Francis. Uncle was minister. Teacher activists and abolitionist who had a major impact on Francis's life and work. She attended his school until she was thirteen years old. The following year Francis started working as a seamstress wasn't working. She was writing a much wasn't writing. She was reading. Francis was bright and curious and was always looking for ideas to share and stories to read in her early. Twenties Francis published articles and poems and her local local newspaper. She also wrote pieces for anti-slavery journals and completed her first book of poetry called. Forest leaves or autumn leaves then in eighteen fifty. Congress passed the fugitive slave act. The Watkins Family Left Baltimore for Ohio. There Francis was the first woman to teach at Union seminary before moving to Pennsylvania to work with the Pennsylvania Abolition Society and the American Anti Slavery Society in Eighteen fifty. Four Francis gave her first public speech part of the Abolition Movement. She did such a good job that it launched a two year lecture tour Francis beaches focused on abolition equality and women's rights in eighteen fifty four. She also published poems miscellaneous subjects. The book was was quite popular. Four years later in eighteen fifty eight hundred years before Rosa Parks would become famous for a similar action. Francis refused to give up per seat or move to the designated colored section of a trolley car in Philadelphia. The following year Francis became the first African American woman to publish the short story in the US. Her story called. The two offers appeared in Anglo African magazine. Throughout her life Francis's this is writings both fiction and nonfiction told the story of the African American experience in that era and urged social change in eighteen. Sixty Francis Married Fenton Harper and the couple had one child together. Fenton died just four years. After their naturals Francis continued her activism and writing writing after the civil war she traveled through the South during reconstruction teaching former slaves and speaking and writing about their living conditions. Her journey lead to her book. Book entitled Sketches of Southern Life. She wrote and spoke about the need for greater access to education. Women's suffrage and temperance Francis spoke at the eighteen sixty six national women's rights convention and urged the women there to fight for black women's rights. She said we are all bound up together. In one great bundle of humanity and society cannot trample on the weakest and feeblest of its members without receiving the curse and its own soul From eighteen hundred eighteen ninety. She organized for the National Woman's Christian Temperance Union and she helped create the National Association of Colored Women in eighteen ninety four alongside IDA wells Barnett and Harriet tubman among others the organization sought to advance the rights of African American women. Their campaign pain centered. On Women's suffrage Anti Lynching and Fighting Jim Crow laws. The organization still exists. Today in Nineteen Eleven Francis died of heart failure at the age of eighty six. She was buried next to her daughter. Mary who had died two years. Prior Francis Harper remains literary legend and one of the most important writers for time she was a poet and passionate activist who used her lived experiences to promote social change

Francis Harper Francis Ellen Francis Married Fenton Harper Francis Reverend William Watkins Pennsylvania Abolition Society Baltimore National Association Of Colore Anglo African Magazine Abolition Movement Maryland Teacher Public Speaker Ida Wells Barnett Watkins Family Rosa Parks Uncle Henriette Congress Jim Crow United States Christian Temperance Union
"african american magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:36 min | 2 years ago

"african american magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of the many performers our guest Bruce Telamon has photographed on stage and off a book collecting his music photos from nineteen seventy two to eighty two is titled soul R. and B. funk Telamon gotta start doing photos for the black owned Ellie newspaper soul that helped lead the way to freelancing for jet and ebony magazine's photographing musicians for record companies and becoming the photographer for Soul Train Telamon went on to shoot still photos for various movies working with people like Eddie Murphy Paul Reubens Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg Telamon cover Jesse Jackson's nineteen eighty four presidential bid where he met his wife NPR S. Karen Grigsby Bates Telamon spoke with guest contributor Centauri Clinton welcome the fresh air yeah I have to say I'm amazed at the access you've got so when you look at photos there's like there's padded bile is one my favorite photos with her feet up on a conference table were Stevie Wonder late late night at Roscoe's chicken this is something I wonder about is getting that access there's a photo of Donna Summer yes minimal make up she's got her knees are bare knees pulled up against her and she's a since we were looking down the barrel of the lands thank you at the viewer right and it is so sweet and intimate and this seems early in your career how does this photo well this was an interesting this was casa Blanca records in Filmworks her record label was promoting an album that was coming out in nineteen seventy seven and they wanted to reach this you know this black audience and they would do this sometimes to the black press they would give what were called hand outs where they have another photographer shoot it and you know some Hollywood glamour photographer would shoot it they almost even right the right the story in and quite frankly you know a lot of black newspapers in groups would not have the manpower they couldn't go to a concert they couldn't you know they couldn't be there so they would take these handouts and they would print the and and Regina said and this is the editor of soul the the edit the editor of soul said if you want to reach my audience you have to allow my photographers and my writers access and so they reluctantly said own okay you've got twenty minutes well we had set up on the day that that we were supposed to shoot Donna for the for the cover we're there three hours early well who walks in but Donna Summer and she looks at the set up and you know they had told it was going to be you know twenty minutes in and out and she looks and she says you brothers a serious she stayed for four hours sorry our maybe six months later when ebony magazine which was the big African American magazine of of record they said go do you have a photographer that you work with because they were going to defer to her and she says yes Bruce Toleman that ebony cover was my first national cover all right so you know from there a lot of things happened after that you transition that at some point to work for another Chicago legend don Cornelius the founder of some old train soul train and in the book you tell an anecdote that I I really love and it's don Cornelius and he's standing in shadow with James Brown and I love this photo not necessarily because the photos so great though because the story behind it is so great for those who don't know don Cornelia start Soul Train he runs it for over thirty years he's a music entrepreneur who was Chicago DJ and and there's just like there's this moment where James Brown who is a god of rock and roll RD and everything is standing next to don Cornelius and he surprised by all the stuff that's happening around them first of all when I when I look back at that photograph you've got James Brown and you've got don Cornelius two black men who were at the height of their their powers in their careers in nineteen seventy three they're sitting there on the set are actually standing on the set in between shots and that's one of the things sometimes it's a little subversive about being a photographer you can get close and you can listen and you can hear things you know I've always felt that that was sacred you don't tell all right now they're both gone I I think I will share it during the break James Brown was noticing you know that everybody was deferring obviously to don yeah and at one point you know he asks him who you with what do you mean James what we with who's backing you on this and it wasn't until I was putting this book together then I realized that I might have captured an important little historical footnote in black music John knew would James meant what and don you know said which it's me it's it's it's only me behind you know who's who's doing this but James Brown was asking if don was being assisted by backers who were primarily not of the colored persuasion and the answer was James it's just me that's a moment of real realization right it's like I we can not only can sing and dance we could do the whole thing we can we can as I say we can for wallet because you see what that meant was don paid for everything and then he went out and sold it and he owned his product this was not done going to A. B. C. and making a deal nobody wanted to make a deal with don back then there's a photo in the book yeah Isaac Hayes with that saxophone chain mail vest is the only thing I could call it sort of in his shaft era yes Lori Isaac Hayes you know we're getting the shaft and was singer songwriter and musician this is my first R. and B. photo that I I took and you're up in his grill I get there I was two feet away from him how do you get their stupidity not understanding that you're not supposed to be there not understanding that that to security guys could have picked me up and tossed me out but they didn't it was the end of the show I actually got up on the on the stage was crawling around these boxes the the the the road cases you know that the instruments are in and he was actually playing at that moment so there I was name and there's a there's a photo in the book of a younger Salomon standing near eyes any you are under under the piano to figure out I'm two feet away and I I just knew that was what I was supposed to do for the rest of my life we're listening to the interview our guest contributor Cynara gluten recorded with Bruce Telamon his music photos from nineteen seventy two to eighty two are collected in the book Seoul are in B. funk we'll hear more of their interview after a break this is fresh AIR this is fresh AIR let's get back to the interview our guest contributors and are a glutton recorded with Bruce Telamon his book soul R. and B. funk collects his photos of musicians from nineteen seventy two to eighty two it's clear looking through the book that you have a relationship with these artists right in if the positive side is the intimacy then you you have to develop trust what are the tradeoffs then you know to get this close to get this intimate as as someone you know as a journalist I think well are there trade us or hate groups don't take this photo Hey like what do you have to trade when I was I was never asked to put my camera down one of the things I learned early was that you not mess up the vibe and maybe don't get too close you know you can always put in a longer lens on you know pay attention it's all around you and if you're in the room the shot will come but you have to pay attention you have to be aware of everything that's going on one of the things that a couple of people told me was that they like the fact that I I didn't burst into a room and just start photographing you have to lay back just wait I've used that in it it's it's it's been good for me how do not mess up the five that you say that that's the key is like I knew not to mess up the vibe how do you not less than well you know in these are people you might think are actually cool how they are very cool they are very cool look there's a lot of folks walking around with cameras there's only a few photographers all right and you gotta you you got to learn do you know how you go about it there's a certain style to it and you know you learn from you know people like Gordon parks or you learn from you know Bob Willoughby or David Douglas Duncan these are the people that I that I looked at their work and and and and I basically just put myself to school you know and I would look and I would see how they would how they would telephoto story and how you would use your lenses and quite frankly the the the the photographer who had an impact on me was are one of the ones was Jim Marshall he of the the rock and roll yeah the macro photography took of but like my favorite photos of making Keith etcetera right in nineteen seventy two but I mean you know Janis and Jimi at at at Monterey and then later it at Woodstock and he used to like camera because a like a doesn't make that loud black you know it's a much quieter shutter that you have and and also it's unobtrusive it's it's smaller than a than a Nikon or canon and the lenses were just superb and it almost sort of disappears in your hand so there's not that red flag of always got a camera are you there in a big camera with huge carrying a camera that goes to no you don't you know you don't do that you don't fire off twenty shots in in the you know backstage in the dressing room yeah right you go you you tell a story your first national photograph actually you take a photo of of Miles Davis when you are when I was a I was a college student and and actually that wasn't really a professional job that was just Bruce wanting to go down and get a better a better a better position in a better end and a better seat I mean I was sitting at the feet of Miles Davis so you're you're you're at if you go to a concert I was in our concert in in I had bought a camera in Berlin I was on an exchange program for Whittier college and I had I had bought a I had bought a camera for a hundred and fifty dollars all my little money that I had at the time and I used up all my little for those of you don't.

Bruce Telamon ebony magazine Ellie twenty minutes two feet fifty dollars thirty years three hours four hours six months
"african american magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

16:08 min | 2 years ago

"african american magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh AIR Aretha Franklin Marvin Gaye Al Green earth wind and fire parliament Funkadelic Diana Ross Donna Summer Barry white Bob Marley Patti LaBelle are just some of the many performers are against Bruce Telamon has photographed on stage and off a book collecting his music photos from nineteen seventy two to eighty two is titled soul R. and B. funk Telamon gotta start doing photos for the black owned Ellie newspaper soul that helped lead the way to freelancing for jet and ebony magazine's photographing musicians for record companies and becoming the photographer for Soul Train Telamon went on to shoot still photos for various movies working with people like Eddie Murphy Paul Reubens Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg Telamon cover Jesse Jackson's nineteen eighty four presidential bid where he met his wife NPR's Karen Grigsby Bates Telamon spoke with guest contributor Centauri Clinton welcome the fresh air you know I have to say I'm amazed at the access you you've got so when you look at photos there's like there's Patty bile this one my favorite photos with her feet up on a conference table were Stevie Wonder late late night at Roscoe's chicken this is something I wonder about is getting that access there's a photo of Donna Summer yes minimal make up she's got her knees are bare knees pulled up against her and she's essentially looking down the barrel of the lands thank you at the viewer right and it is so sweet and intimate and this seems early in your career how does this photo well this is an interesting this was casa Blanka records in film works her record label was promoting an album that was coming out in nineteen seventy seven and they wanted to reach this you know this black audience and they would do this sometimes to the black press they would give what we're called hand outs where they have another photographer shoot it and you know some Hollywood glamour photographer would shoot it they almost even right the right the story in and quite frankly you know a lot of black newspapers in groups would not have the manpower they couldn't go to a concert they couldn't you know they couldn't be there so they would take these handouts and they would print the and and Regina said and this is the editor of sold me the edit the editor of soul said if you want to reach my audience you have to allow my photographers and my writers access and so they reluctantly said Ono okay you've got twenty minutes well we had set up on the day that that we were supposed to shoot Donna for the for the cover we're there three hours early well who walks in but Donna Summer and she looks at the set up and you know they had told it was going to be you know twenty minutes in and out and she looks and she says you brothers a serious she stayed for four hours sorry our maybe six months later when ebony magazine which was the big African American magazine of of record they said do you have a photographer that you work with because they were going to defer to her and she says yes Bruce Toleman that ebony cover was my first national cover all right so you know from there a lot of things happened after that you transition that at some point to work for another Chicago legend don Cornelius the founder of some old train soul train and in the book you tell an anecdote that I I really love and it's of don Cornelius and he's standing in shadow with James Brown and I love this photo not necessarily because the photo so great because the story behind it is so great for those who don't know don Cornelia starts soul training he runs it for over thirty years is the music entrepreneur who was Chicago DJ and and there's just like there's this moment where James Brown who is a god of rock and roll RB and everything is standing next to don Cornelius and he surprised by all the stuff that's happening around first of all when I when I look back at that photograph you've got James Brown and you've got don Cornelius two black men who were at the height of their their powers in their careers in nineteen seventy three they're sitting there all the set are actually standing on the set in between shots and that's one of the things sometimes it's a little subversive about being a photographer you can get close and you can listen and you can hear things you know I've always felt that that was sacred you don't tell all right now they're both gone I I think I will share it during the break James Brown was noticing you know that everybody was deferring obviously to don yeah and at one point you know he asks him who you with what do you mean James what we with who's backing you won this and it wasn't until I was putting this book together then I realized that I might have captured an important little historical footnote in black music a new with James meant what and John you know said which it's me it's it's it's only me behind you know who's who's doing this but James Brown was asking if don was being assisted by backers who were primarily not of the colored persuasion and the answer was James it's just me that's a moment of real realization right it's like we can I don't even think of them as we can do the whole thing we can we can as I say we can for wallet because you see what that meant was don paid for everything and then he went out and sold it and he owned his product this was not done going to A. B. C. and making a deal nobody wanted to make a deal with don back then there's a photo in the book yeah I see case with that saxophone chain mail vest is the only thing I could call it sort of in his shaft era yes Lori Isaac Hayes you know we're the thing the shaft and was singer songwriter and musician this is my first R. and B. photo that I I took and you're up in his grill out there I was two feet away from him how do you get their stupidity not understanding that you're not supposed to be there not understanding that that to security guys could have picked me up and tossed me out but they didn't it was the end of the show I actually got up on the on the stage was crawling around these boxes the the the the road cases you know that the instrument and he was actually playing at that moment so there I was and then there's a there's a photo in the book of a younger Salomon standing near eyes I mean if you are under under the piano two six zero I'm two feet away and I I just knew that was what I was supposed to do for the rest of my life we're listening to the interview our guest contributor Cynara gluten recorded with Bruce Telamon his music photos from nineteen seventy two to eighty two are collected in the book Seoul are in B. funk we'll hear more of their interview after a break this is fresh AIR this is fresh AIR let's get back to the interview our guest contributors and are a glutton recorded with Bruce Telamon his book soul R. and B. funk collects his photos of musicians from nineteen seventy to eighty two it's clear looking through the book that you have a relationship with these artists right in if the positive side is the intimacy then you you have to develop trust what are the tradeoffs then you know to get this close to get this intimate as as someone you know as a journalist I think well are there trade us or hate groups don't take this photo Hey like what do you have to trade what did I was I was never asked to put my camera down of the things I learned early was that you not mess up the vibe in maybe don't get too close you know you can always put in a longer lens on you know pay attention it's all around you and if you're in the room the shot will come but you have to pay attention you have to be aware of everything that's going on one of the things that a couple of people told me was that they like the fact that I I didn't burst into a room and just start photographing you have to lay back just wait I've used that in it it's it's it's been good for me how do not mess up the vibe that you say that that's the key is like I knew not to mess up the vibe how do you not less well you know in these are people you might think are actually cool how they are very cool they are very cool look there's a lot of folks walking around with cameras there's only a few photographers all right and you gotta you you got to learn do you know how you go about it there's a certain style to it and you know you learn from you know people like Gordon parks or you learn from you know Bob will be or David Douglas Duncan these are the people that I that I looked at their work and and and and I basically put myself to school you know and I would look and I would see how they would how they would tell a photo story and how you would use your lenses and quite frankly the the the the photographer who had an impact on me was are one of the ones was Jim Marshall he of the rock and roll yeah the record photography took of but like my favorite photos of making Keith etcetera right in nineteen seventy two but I mean you know Janis and Jimi at at at Monterey and then later it at Woodstock and he used to like camera because a like a doesn't make that loud clack you know it's a much quieter shudder that you have and and also it's unobtrusive it's it's smaller than a than a Nikon or canon and the lenses were just superb and it almost sort of disappears in your hand so there's not that red flag of always got a camera are you there in a big camera with a camera that goes to no you don't you know you don't do that you don't fire off twenty shots in in the you know backstage in the dressing room yeah right you go you you tell a story your first national photograph actually you take a photo of of Miles Davis when you are when I was a I was a college student and and actually that wasn't really of a professional job that was just Bruce wanting to go down and get a better a better a better position in a better end and a better seat I mean I was sitting at the feet of Miles Davis so you're you're you're at a queue you go to a concert I was in my log in in I had bought a camera in Berlin I was on an exchange program for Whittier college and I had I had bought a I had bought a camera for a hundred and fifty dollars all my little money that I had at the time and I use of all my little for those of you don't remember it American Express travelers checks but I had my little American Express travelers checks and I wrote it all out but the camera we were at the university of Copenhagen miles was coming to to play it Tivoli gardens which is a big venue in in in Copenhagen and the brothers wanted to go of go see miles so we go and we were in the cheap seats because we didn't have any money and I decided to go down to the front well I walked down to the front and usher stopped me and he says you have to go back to your seat nice it will actually I'm from jet magazine American publication look the man straight in the face and lied I'm sorry mom but he said okay and then allowed me to proceed down and during the concert I photographed miles of us I don't know two to three feet away from him and he's in the front are you know front part of the stage and there came a moment when the when the photographer the the Danish newspaper photographer took miles was doing this solo he had the mute on the solo it was intimate it was quiet it was subtle and the photographer fires off with them Nikon motor drive right in the middle of of the soul that said that that would be like click click click click click okay miles didn't say a word he just did a spit valve on the guy and that is that is that rose that's pretty that's pretty that's pretty gross but then he turns and he looks at me and he says you can stay oh baby I was done okay I was like floating on air be clear I want to say when I say that is gross the spit valve is when you're when you're when you're a performer like this it collects right exactly the trump and so in a lot of it can collect and you can see musicians when you're emptying them on the side of the stage and their places form so to do that is possibly one of I mean can you I'm I mean I just love the point was that he the artist was insulted and also the guy he could have gotten you know you didn't need to do that okay as a chronicle or or as a a recorder of of this moment I learned you know us stay out of the way and don't don't mess up the five and so you know there we were and that's something that I've always I mean it's taken me are too many places Bruce Solomon thank you so much you are welcome thank you Bruce Telemann's book is called soul R. and B. funk photographs nineteen seventy two to eighty two he spoke with our guest contributors and are England tomorrow on fresh air we'll talk about the banking a conspiracy theory our guest will be investigative journalist Michael is a cough who uncovered what he describes as the previously unreported role of Russian intelligence in creating and fostering one of the most insidious conspiracy theories that arose out of the twenty sixteen election a conspiracy theory that was.

Bob Marley Patti LaBelle Bruce Telamon ebony magazine Aretha Franklin Marvin Gaye Funkadelic Diana Ross Donna Su Ellie twenty minutes two feet fifty dollars thirty years three hours four hours six months three feet
"african american magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:47 min | 2 years ago

"african american magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"AIR Aretha Franklin Marvin Gaye Al Green earth wind and fire parliament Funkadelic Diana Ross Donna Summer very white Bob Marley Patti LaBelle are just some of the many performers are against Bruce Telamon has photographed on stage and off a book collecting his music photos from nineteen seventy two to eighty two is titled soul R. and B. funk Telamon gotta start doing photos for the black owned Ellie newspaper soul that helped lead the way to freelancing for jet and ebony magazine's photographing musicians for record companies and becoming the photographer for Soul Train Telamon went on to shoot still photos for various movies working with people like Eddie Murphy Paul Reubens Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg Telamon cover Jesse Jackson's nineteen eighty four presidential bid where he met his wife NPR's Karen Grigsby Bates Telamon spoke with guest contributor Centauri Clinton welcome the fresh air you know I have to say I'm amazed at the access you got so when you look at photos there's like there's padded bile is one my favorite photos with her feet up on a conference table were Stevie Wonder late late night at Roscoe's chicken this is something I wonder about is getting that access there's a photo of Donna Summer yes minimal make up she's got her knees are bare knees pulled up against her and she's a since we were looking down the barrel of the lands thank you at the viewer right and it is so sweet and intimate and this seems early in your career how does this photo well this was an interesting this was casa Blanca records in film works her record label was promoting an album that was coming out in nineteen seventy seven and they wanted to reach this you know this black audience and they would do this sometimes to the black press they would give what we're called hand outs where they have another photographer shoot it and you know some Hollywood glamour photographer would shoot it they almost even right the right the story in and quite frankly you know a lot of black newspapers in groups would not have the manpower they couldn't go to a concert they couldn't do you know they couldn't be there so they would take these handouts and they would print the and and Regina said and this is the editor of soul the the edit the editor of soul said if you want to reach my audience you have to allow my photographers and my writers access and so they reluctantly said Ono okay you've got twenty minutes well we had set up on the day that that we were supposed to shoot Donna for the for the cover we're there three hours early well who walks in but Donna Summer and she looks at the set up and you know they had told it was going to be you know twenty minutes in and out and she looks and she says you brothers a serious she stayed for four hours sorry our maybe six months later when ebony magazine which was the big African American magazine of of record they said do you have a photographer that you work with because they were going to defer to her and she says yes Bruce Toleman that ebony cover was my first national cover all right so you know from there a lot of things happened after that you transition that at some point to work for another Chicago legend don Cornelius the founder of some old train Soul Train and in the book you tell an anecdote that I I really love and it's don Cornelius and he's standing in shadow with James Brown and I love this photo not necessarily because the photo so great though because the story behind it is so great for those who don't know don Cornelia starts soul train he runs it for over thirty years is a music entrepreneur who was Chicago DJ and and there's just like there's this moment where James Brown who is a god of rock and roll RB and everything is standing next to Duncan alias and he surprised by all the stuff that's happening around first of all when I when I look back at that photograph you've got James Brown and you've got don Cornelius two black men who were at the height of their their powers in their careers in nineteen seventy three they're sitting there all the setter actually standing on the set in between shots and that's one of the things sometimes it's a little subversive about being a photographer you can get close and you can listen and you can hear things you know I've always felt that was sacred you don't tell all right now they're both gone I I think I will share it during the break James Brown was noticing you know that everybody was deferring obviously to don yeah and at one point you know he asks him who you with what do you mean James what we with who's backing you on this and it wasn't until I was putting this book together then I realized that I might have captured an important little historical footnote in black music Donna knew would James meant and don you know said which it's me it's it's it's only me behind you know who's who's doing this but James Brown was asking if don was being assisted by backers who were primarily not of the colored persuasion and the answer was James it's just me that's a moment of real realization right it's like a we can not only can sing and dance we could do the whole thing we can we can as they say we can for wallet because you see what that meant was don paid for everything and then he went out and sold it and he owned his product this was not done going to A. B. C. and making a deal nobody wanted to make a deal with don back then there's a photo in the book yeah Isaac Hayes with a saxophone chain mail vest is the only thing I could call it sort of in his shaft era yes Lori Isaac Hayes you know we're getting the shaft and was singer songwriter and musician this is my first R. and B. photo that I I took and you're up in his grill I get there I was two feet away from him how do you get their stupidity not understanding that you're not supposed to be there not understanding that that two security guys could have picked me up and tossed me out but they didn't it was the end of the show I actually got up on the on the stage was crawling around these boxes the the the the road cases you know that the instruments are in and he was actually playing at that moment so there I was on and and there's there's a photo in the book of a younger Salomon standing near eyes any you are under under the piano to figure out I'm two feet away and I I just knew that was what I was supposed to do for the rest of my life we're listening to the interview our guest contributor Cynara gluten recorded with Bruce Telamon his music photos from nineteen seventy two to eighty two are collected in the book Seoul are and be funk we'll hear more of their interview after a break this is fresh air support for.

Funkadelic Diana Ross Donna Su Bob Marley Patti LaBelle Bruce Telamon Aretha Franklin Marvin Gaye twenty minutes two feet thirty years three hours four hours six months
"african american magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"african american magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Terms of who was responsible for the state of affairs and then another demonstration this one in southern california a trans woman named sir lady java who was a performer was terminated from her job as an entertainer at the red fox club and in october of nineteen sixty sixty seven she organized a demonstration with a couple of dozen activists and representatives of the to pick it the red fox club it was actually covered in jet magazine the african american magazine and she she lost the battle but i would say she won the war she was not reemployed but a little more than a year later los angeles rescinded rule number nine which was the the local statute used against quote unquote gender impersonation in entertainment howdy mahogany of big smile when mark minton sir lady java what did you mean to you well you know she was just she was legendary i mean she was a transplant ear at a time where trans people weren't able to get jobs let alone own their own businesses run their own shows and so she was not only gorgeous she was smart she was in powered and you know she really lead the way and provided inspiration for a lot of people in the trans community especially for trans women of color with all of these incredible events why is it that stonewall became the event that we commemorate that has led maybe it's been mythologised to some extent as the start of the gay rights movement or the key rights movement hi why that event wasn't there nine yeah i think there are a few reasons the event itself was significant it lasted for a week diminish this less than a week where most of these other demonstrations were shorter lived it was more violent more aggressive more militant and there were police arrests there were injuries i think it's also important that took place in new york and of course new york city loves attention it's the media capital of the country and things that happened in new york tend to get tend to assume national significance importance but but even more important i think all of those factors it's just the fact that a few months after stonewall decision was made that the stonewall riots would be commemorated every year in june and july and that actually was a decision to replace annual demonstrations that had been taking place since nineteen sixty five in philadelphia on july fourth on independence day those annual reminders they were called to place from sixty five to sixty nine and the last of those actually took place right after stonewall but the decision was made in the fall of sixty nine that instead of continuing the annual reminders philadelphia there would be annual commemorations of stonewall in the first year that took place in new york city los angeles chicago and then starting in seventy one it really began to spread around the country and around the world so every year we were reminded as a community and the larger public about the significance and importance of stonewall understanding is san francisco did not come at it right away why not well i think in part because there was a sense that the developments in san francisco preceded stonewall developments were important and i would also say that news in san francisco focused more on these police killings and even more generally in california the l._g._b._t. press for months was focused on what turned out to be three police killings there was a third one in oakland california and so i think of californians interpreted stone will through the prism of local developments which really meant police violence and state repression and then there was a small commemoration in san francisco in nineteen seventy from what we can tell only about twenty or thirty people marched and then more people participated in a gay in golden gate park but that gay and it turns out was raided and number of people were arrested us los angeles had a much bigger commemoration and zan francisco had a somewhat larger one then in nineteen seventy one that it was the start of a march to secretario to advocate for state sex law reform but it was really then in nineteen seventy-two that's just organized its first large commemoration of stonewall listening to you talk about the history it gives me a better understanding of the frustration that bubbles up.

"african american magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:57 min | 2 years ago

"african american magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Terms of who was responsible for the state of affairs and then another demonstration this one in southern california a trans woman named sir lady java who is a performer was terminated from her job as an entertainer at the red fox club and in october of nineteen sixty sixty seven she organized a demonstration with a couple of dozen activists and representatives of the to pick it the red fox club it was actually covered in jet magazine the african american magazine and she she lost the battle but i would say she won the war she was not reemployed but a little more than a year later los angeles rescinded rule number nine which was the the local statute used against quote unquote gender impersonation in entertainment howdy mahogany vic smile when mark monster lady java what did she mean to you well you know she was just she was legendary i mean she was a transplant ear at a time where trans people weren't able to get jobs let alone own their own businesses or run their own shows and so she was not only gorgeous she was smart she was in powered and you know she really lead the way and provided inspiration for a lot of people in the trans community especially for trans women of color with all of these incredible events why is it that stonewall became the event that we commemorate that has led maybe it's been mythologised to some extent is the start of the gay rights movement or the tiki rights movement hi why that event there yeah i think there are a few reasons the event itself was significant it lasted for a week certainly diminish this less than a week where most of these other demonstrations were shorter lived it was more violent more aggressive more militant and there were police arrests there were injuries i think it's also important that took place in new york and of course new york city loves attention it's the media capital of the country and things that happened in new york tend to get tend to assume national significance and importance but but even more important i think all of those factors it's just the fact that a few months after stonewall decision was made that the stonewall riots would be commemorated every year in june and july and that actually was a decision to replace annual demonstrations that had been taking place since nineteen sixty five in philadelphia on july fourth on independence day those annual reminders they were called took place from sixty five to sixty nine and the last of those actually took place right after stonewall but the decision was made in the fall of sixty nine that instead of continuing the annual reminders philadelphia there would be annual commemorations of stonewall in the first year that took place in new york city los angeles and chicago and then Starting in seventy one it really began to spread around the country and around the world. So every year we were reminded as a community and the larger public about the significance and importance of stonewall, but my understanding is San Francisco did not commemorate it right away. Why not? well i think in part because there was a sense that the developments in san francisco preceded stonewall developments were important and i would also say that news in san francisco focused more on these police killings and even more generally in california the l._g._b._t. press for months was focused on what turned out to be three police killings there was a third one in oakland california and so i think californians interpreted stone will through the prism of local developments which really meant police violence and state repression and then there was a small commemoration in san francisco in nineteen seventy from what we can tell only about twenty or thirty people marched and then more people participated in a gay in golden gate park but that gay and it turns out was rated and a number of people were arrested us los angeles had a much bigger commemoration and san francisco had a somewhat larger one then in nineteen seventy one that it was the start of a march to sacramento to advocate for state sex law reform but it was really then in nineteen seventy two that's cisco organized its first large commemoration of stonewall listening to you talk about the history it gives me a better understanding of the frustration that bubbles up around the police presence at pride because the issues that they were fighting against and trying to be visible against was police brutality essentially and so how much of that defeat still lingers honey mahogany what is what do you think about police presence at pride these days at the parade well i think my understanding of what it takes to put on a parade and keep everyone safe has changed since i started working for the city so i will acknowledge that before this a little bit more i was allowed to be a little more anti police because i think that's the job of the communities to push government and including the police to do better to be better but what i will say is that you know it's many people have said time and again that is a protest definitely started as a protest today it's a little bit more of a celebration and i think that's well earned that we've done a lot and cheese a lot in the past few decades in terms of l._g._b._t. q. equality that doesn't mean that the fight is over trans people especially are constantly under attack by our commander in chief who lost the popular vote but i am so it's important to remember that they're still mortified for and i think that where the police are involved that there needs to be a certain level of humility on their part and acknowledgement that you know these bad actions these misdeeds did happen in the past and to some extent continue into today into the president i mean we even in the bay area we are still seeing police abuse happen on more regular basis than any one of us would like and so i think there needs to be an acknowledgement of that you know in new york and wipe n._y._p._d. officially apologized for the stonewall rights we haven't had the same thing happen here in san francisco and i think it's about time that you know we can apology mark what's your take on on police presence at pride in irony that's their about them being part of the prayed when it really wasn't many ways of protest driven by police actions yes absolutely i think there's long been bitter about the police role at pride but also the role of elected officials the role of the military military recruiting has now taken place that pride parades and giving military exclusion to this day the trans ban in the military so you know so it's really an issue and it's really a problem but i would also add that the civil rights also represented exploitation by business because it was a local bar and it was mafia owned and the mafia was in collusion with the police there was a payoff system at the stonewall and the early pride marches impre also debated the role of businesses at the time it was bars now that has morphed really i would say since the nineties about the role of corporations at pride and do we want corporations to have such a powerful role when they can fire l._g._b._t. people they do fire l._g._b._t. people what is it mean that they're marketing and selling themselves to l._g._b._t. people without following through on substantial contributions to l._g._b._t. community organizations history projects museums right so so there's that ambivalence as well as for the apology i really agree and to start would be the l._a. berkeley and oakland police apologizing for those police killings in nineteen sixty nine but it really is just the first step city government state governments could be doing a whole lot more to promote research on l._g._b._t. history promote l._g._b._t. street education promote projects like cultural districts and so their policies i think a good first step but it's only just that i that honey mahogany i'd love to hear your thoughts on the corporatization of pride the capitalizing on pride that we're seeing i feel like i'm hearing more and more frustration around it now and you've described that as a double edged sword what did you mean well i think to a certain extent you know the involvement of corporations and pride shows that we have become more accepted that we are more welcome but it also means that our images more sellable and it's being used to sell products into to appeal to people and it's really all about the money so and that in itself is also double edged sword right because a lot of l._g._b._t. people especially performers really bank on things like pride to help pay their rent inexpensive places like san francisco where they're constantly being pushed out so from an equity standpoint i you know i don't want to prevent anyone from being able to earn a living but at the same time these corporations really have to earn their place here pride we're looking at the fiftieth anniversary of the stonewall riots through a san francisco bay area lens with honey mahogany and mark stein and we'll have you our listeners joined the conversation after the break on meena kim this is forum here's what's coming up tomorrow on forum the golden state warriors andre dollar joins us just weeks after a hard fought n._b._a. finals to talk about his life on and off the.

San Francisco
"african american magazine" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"african american magazine" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The number of giraffes killed by poachers in Africa. Every day that's one every couple of hours. How can you help? Join the San Diego zoo global wildlife conservancy and be a part of the team that a fighting to enter off extinction by supporting how conservation efforts you can affect change including Gerard rehabilitation. Anti-poaching patrols and rerelease of often and injured your ops. Conservation happens one animal and one person at a time. Join us now at end extinction dot org. Gender harassment occurs. When a person is harassed based on their gender or gender identity and does not have to be sexual in nature. Degrading comments about men or women and displaying materials that are offensive to a particular gender are both of gender harassment. And it's never okay. If you or someone you know is facing this type of behavior contact Illinois sexual harassment and discrimination helpline at one eight seven seven two three six seven seven zero three. It's finally, April and Venus your style guide for fashion and swimwear is getting you ready for longer days and warmer nights. During the celebrate spring event, the new Venus, spring fashion collection has arrived. And it's a perfect time to get mazing deal on the styles that have made Venus famous all year round kickoff. Spring by getting a forty dollar Easter typically for everyone hundred dollars you spend that can be used on your next purchase. Just go to Venus dot com or download the Venus app and use the promo code warm to celebrate. Spring with Venus. Coming up after the news. We are in a catch up with skipped comparisons got a great event to tell you about in Joliet. Coming up this Friday night. It's time now for a news. Sponsored by audio expo North America. Here's Andrea darlas federal agents have broken up a billion dollar Medicare scan that pedaled unneeded orthopedic braces to hundreds of thousands of seniors two dozen people were charged including doctors accused of writing bogus prescriptions. Chicago's historic Johnson publishing company has filed for bankruptcy today. The company published them in the most the country's most recognizable African American magazines, including ebony and jet and the twenty three year old man charged with lying to the feds about being Timothy pits in the missing Aurora boy will continue to be held without bond. Judge considers Brian Rini a flight risk. He was charged last week after DNA testing proved he was not pits in traffic and weather all next on WGN. If you have a red face or bumps and pimples as an adult you could.

harassment Brian Rini Africa San Diego Andrea darlas Joliet WGN Illinois Gerard Timothy Johnson publishing North America Chicago Aurora Medicare twenty three year billion dollar forty dollar
"african american magazine" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"african american magazine" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Giving you the headlines three you nine hundred seventy two hundred. But we're asking talk basketball as the breaking news that Magic Johnson is out as the president of operations. I can't think of a better guess to have in studio to talk basketball. Brandon Robinson is here. He will join us right after the news, which just remarkable timing. Yes. Hey, Chicago, remarkable timing. All these thoughtful big cerebral questions about basketball and Magic Johnson's out. So it's perfect. We'll just talk about Magic Johnson. That's all good. Yeah. So never though moment with the Lakers this season. It's it's surprising. I guess as their season over or are they just made this announcement game before. So basically, the Magic Johnson who was the president of basketball Angeles. Lakers did not want to tell Jeanie Buss that he wanted to step down as president of baseball operations and had a over forty minute presser before game. And so I was at the United Center came over here and kind of been checking in with some folks, my league sources and basically boils down to head coach Luke Walton who has a very good relationship with the bus family Jeanie Buss former Laker was drafted actually ever leave in two thousand three the same draft. Lebron James was drafted it. And there's just this disparity of what's next and coaching process the pressure. You know, Magic Johnson said that he would step down. I think after year two of this project. If it didn't go down the way, he thought it would and a little premature. We'll get all of that. And we'll talk more about that coming up right after the headlines which are sponsored by Kars for Kids. Here's Andrea darlas. Chicago's historic. Johnson publishing company has filed for bankruptcy this afternoon. The company published some of the country's most recognizable African American magazine, including ebony and jet magazines, both were sold in twenty sixteen. A congressional hearing on online hate turned into a vivid? Demonstration of the problem when a YouTube livestream, the proceedings was bombarded with racist and antisemitic comments YouTube disabled, the live chat section of the streaming video about thirty minutes into the hearing and the year old man charged with lying to the feds about being Timothy pits. Missing Aurora boy will continue to be held without by a US magistrate considers it Brian Rini is a flight risk charge last week after DNA tests proved that he was not Pinson, traffic, sports and weather next on WGN. Link and they're going to find out who they are without us over more. Recent we come to West Virginia,.

Magic Johnson basketball Lakers Johnson publishing company Jeanie Buss Chicago president of operations Brandon Robinson YouTube Lebron James president Brian Rini West Virginia Andrea darlas Timothy pits Luke Walton Kars for Kids US WGN United Center
"african american magazine" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"african american magazine" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Kim, Gordon has got the WGN news right now, mostly cloudy, sixty three at O'Hare Chicago's historic. Johnson publishing company has filed for bankruptcy this afternoon. The company published some of the country's most recognizable African American magazines, including ebony and jet. Both magazines were sold in two thousand sixteen legislation was introduced in Springfield today to change the constitution and allow voters to decide on governor Pritzker fare tax plan. The governor says he's open to debate from both parties. But if it's a no go schools, universities community, colleges, social service agencies and public safety by fifteen percent or raise taxes on everyone. From those making thirty thousand dollars to those making a million dollars by twenty percent. The plan would raise taxes on the state's wealthiest not the middle class. Speaking of taxes. Are you getting a smaller than expected tax refund at house budget hearing on Capitol Hill today? Illinois, congressman Mike Quigley effing IRAs. Commissioner Charles reading refunds or down six billion dollars compared to last year as of March twenty nine we have issue two hundred six billion dollars in refunds associated with seventy one million separate refunds, and you know, we're more or less on par with where we were last year tax day is Monday, April fifteenth Israelis voted to maintain the status quo that from senior Palestinian leaders is suppose revealed no clear winner in the general election. Both prime minister Netanyahu's right-wing Likud party and the rival centers blue and white party claim victory today a congressional hearing on online, hey turned into a vivid demonstration of the problem. When YouTube livestream of the proceedings was bombarded with racist, and antisemitic comments YouTube disabled, the live chat section of the streaming video about thirty minutes into the hearing the twenty three year old man charged with lying to federal agents about being Timothy. Fits in the missing Aurora boy will continue to be held without bond a US magistrate considers Brian Rini flight risk. He was charged last week after DNA tests proved he was not pit sin drivers need to slow down. Stay off their phones. Obey the signs and be alert for workers that message from the Illinois department of transportation during work zone awareness week. I dot spokesperson guide trivial says speeders face big fines. And if you hit a worker, you could spend fourteen years in jail. Concerned about though crashes and work ten to be more severe four out of five crashes of Potala involves somebody driving for work. Each year in Illinois. There are more than fifty three hundred crashes in works owns and now WGN sports. Here's Kevin Powell. Thank you, Kim White Sox trailing the temporaries ten to five in the bottom of the ninth on the south side cubs after their opening day win the host the pirates tomorrow night. John Lester could miss an upcoming star team expected to place the lefty on the inter- list after he left yesterday's game with left hamstring tightness around baseball. Pittsburgh pitcher, Chris Archer has been suspended for five games Cincinnati outfielder yelp week for two and reds manager. David bell for one game for their roles in a bench clearing scuffle last week. And it's the home finale tonight lows the Knicks Virginia celebrating its first national title after they held off Texas Tech in overtime last night. The Cavaliers host a championship parade this weekend preseason schedule has been released. Carolina to start things off at the giants at the colts. They wrap up preseason play at Soldier Field. When they host the titans the exact dates to be determined. Masters. We continue in Augusta tee-times announced today. Tiger Woods off at ten. Four on Thursday morning. Roy macaroni and Ricky Fowler are.

Kim White Illinois Johnson publishing company WGN colts Springfield YouTube Illinois department of transpo Tiger Woods Chicago Likud party Kevin Powell Augusta Commissioner Charles Aurora David bell US Cavaliers