35 Burst results for "African American"

Jurassic Park (MM #3830)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 d ago

Jurassic Park (MM #3830)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. I'm sure you've seen one of the Jurassic Park movies or even read the book many years ago, but it looks like a similar situation to Jurassic Park could becoming a reality, not necessarily a theme park, but there are some scientists who want to bring back woolly mammoths. Now it's not really going to be a woolly mammoth. They're going to use woolly mammoth DNA and mix it with African elephants to create kind of the chain between the two. They're the closest living specimens to a woolly mammoth that's been gone for what 3000 years, they're claiming this new woolly mammoth type creature could help reverse climate change. Is it a good thing that we want to try to take, recovered DNA and mix it with a current animal to create a new breed of animals? Yes, it could be very good thing, or it could be just like the movie Jurassic Park, a very scary thing. It's only in the talking stages right now and we're talking hundreds of millions of dollars to do that. But to bring back the woolly mammoth, something we've never seen just in museums could be happening.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Jurassic Park Nasa
Jurassic Park (MM #3830)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 d ago

Jurassic Park (MM #3830)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. I'm sure you've seen one of the Jurassic Park movies or even read the book many years ago, but it looks like a similar situation to Jurassic Park could becoming a reality, not necessarily a theme park, but there are some scientists who want to bring back woolly mammoths. Now it's not really going to be a woolly mammoth. They're going to use woolly mammoth DNA and mix it with African elephants to create kind of the chain between the two. They're the closest living specimens to a woolly mammoth that's been gone for what 3000 years, they're claiming this new woolly mammoth type creature could help reverse climate change. Is it a good thing that we want to try to take, recovered DNA and mix it with a current animal to create a new breed of animals? Yes, it could be very good thing, or it could be just like the movie Jurassic Park, a very scary thing. It's only in the talking stages right now and we're talking hundreds of millions of dollars to do that. But to bring back the woolly mammoth, something we've never seen just in museums could be happening.

Jurassic Park Kevin Mason Nasa
Fighting for Food Sovereignty in Kenya and Uganda.

Breaking Green Ceilings

01:47 min | 2 d ago

Fighting for Food Sovereignty in Kenya and Uganda.

"Thank you susan. Leonida for being on the breaking green ceilings podcast. Today we want to talk about the implications of free trade agreements. On african women specially from food sovereignty perspective. But i will start with our standard introductory question here on the podcast. Which is what role has nature played in your life and i can start with the anita or interest wondering for that first. The iba the videos descends to nature because he document shower penalties or by the social food at of a economic committee's report i'm raised from finding community and finding for so we actually directed me when we're producing Another thing i'd like to talk for example when you're relaxing use nature of that alexa eastern To league or whatever he thought we offer meaningless. Nfl but so you're connecting with a natural acid and of course that aspects appreciation mitch Your ruin susan lesser very interesting question but just to say that we alive because later is alive and if we look after it looks to us just the same and i think in the last two years we have seen exactly what nature can do when they tell you that you need one hundred million to get about for sitting as a boxy jam when mitch as playing to you realize the narrative changes as what we are we are leaving it and it's accommodating us. I don't know if we're being kind too for that's another story but

Leonida Susan Mitch Your NFL Mitch
The Port Chicago Disaster

Everything Everywhere Daily

01:51 min | 2 d ago

The Port Chicago Disaster

"One is quite sure exactly what happened but at ten eighteen pm there was a loud crash. The seminars reported as sounding like metal and timber falling down. This probably a crane or one of the booms which had collapsed then. There was the sound of an explosion and then a fire about five. To seven seconds later there was a massive explosion that destroyed the entire facility. It was one of the largest explosions in history up until that point pilots in the air at the time saw a fireball three miles into the air. The blast was felt in boulder city nevada. Four hundred thirty miles away. There was damaged onto buildings in san francisco forty eight miles away debris landed over two miles away and the plane which witnessed it said it's all white hot debris shooting past it. At an altitude of seven thousand feet. It coastguard fireboat near the pier was thrown six hundred feet or one hundred and eighty meters away where it eventually landed in the water and sank. There were three hundred and twenty men and the peer when the explosion occurred all of them died instantly. Two thirds of the dead. Were african american enlisted men who were working on the dock. In fact this explosion by itself was responsible for fifteen percent of all of the african american deaths in the second world war. I've got a previous episode on the halifax harbour explosion during world war one. The portugual explosion wasn't quite as large. But it wasn't too far away the biggest difference and the reason why the fatalities were lower. Portugal is that there were no civilians on the base. There were two hundred and fifty other injuries and of the men who were killed only fifty one wherever identified an inquiry was launched only four days after the explosion and the ruling was that it was probably the fault of one of the enlisted men. Nothing was mentioned about the poor safety conditions and the lack of training

Boulder City Nevada San Francisco Halifax Harbour Portugal
More Than a Million People in Drought-Stricken Madagascar Face Food Shortages

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 3 d ago

More Than a Million People in Drought-Stricken Madagascar Face Food Shortages

"Southern madagascar more than a million people urgently need food and thousands faced dire famine conditions. The region is normally hot and dry but multiple years of severe drought have devastated harvests of maize rice and other staple crops on the african island massive dust. Storms and locus have ravaged. What few crops remain. There's very little sign of water on this theory. Little sign of vegetation as well showy fac role as with the world food program which provides emergency food aid in the hardest hit communities. She's met people who've been forced to eat wild. Cactus leaves and tubers to survive rates of severe. Malnutrition have spiked especially among children people. Living day in day out morning tonight every day with empty stomachs as the climate warms. Southern madagascar is expected to grow even hotter with more frequent droughts. None of these people in the south have contributed to the climate crisis. They don't drive cars. They don't like hanes. yes she says. The people of southern madagascar are already suffering the impacts of climate

Southern Madagascar African Island
The Beginnings of the Philadelphia Black Mafia With Former Police Officer Sean Griffin

Gangland Wire

02:47 min | 4 d ago

The Beginnings of the Philadelphia Black Mafia With Former Police Officer Sean Griffin

"African american people have notoriously been kept squeezed out from those kinds of things. We've got all kinds of reports red line. you can't get loans. There's just a lot of ways that african americans been squeezed down and a made drugs came along and boy. These owes young geyser being squeezed out. They saw a way to make money and make big mma to do any kind of crime on organiz basis like that you got a former organization is always usually ends up with the title. Mafia hit less cabot general term. Even though it's really sessaion in nature. But what's russians russian mob russian mafia. He get the black mafia. So how did that develop their in Philadel- well is most major. Cities had a lack of remorse. Lady hurts because they didn't have offices the banking. It met that. I find mulcher series source of pines in so long numbers. One is especially atms. Rows road bags for neighbors now is all throughout the country. We had one in kansas city. Guy named peyton. He was the banker and he had the policy and he had several bars and he was active in politics and he joined with the irish organization to help get the vote out actually converted all the african americans from republican because they all rebublican before because lincoln won the war at a dow. He turned him all the democrats to go with machine. So i bet you got the same thing in this country. I mean w registering ninety nine. Buffy negro now obviously it's not it's a microcosm of what was going on about such what he called rove ice and that's the influence of those people in that neighbor in those neighborhoods and they heading rented power. Forget it was a patriot. Serves no different than the irish who police and firefighter. You trash hold jobs. This is really not complicated. But it's complicated. Because the media academics ever talked about the so no already getting back to your phillies. Black mafia it. We don't know when it started wisdom. The common theme was they started in the mid sixties. I always the foot only. Because when i started my research in the nineties about outfits i was lucky i have the benefit of twenty years of hindsight sarai. Now new flu group was supposed to look like a new bieber. Were slack ago. Records law intelligence violence and newspaper active. And what you wind up seeing where clusters of these guys being arrested together so they will each other for years. Whether that was organized crime racket the matter of honest we get to the mid sixties. There are actually calling themselves. The black

Irish Organization Buffy Negro Peyton Kansas City Rove Lincoln Phillies FLU
Sowing Seeds of Solidarity, After the Tree of Life Synagogue Killings

UN News

02:03 min | 5 d ago

Sowing Seeds of Solidarity, After the Tree of Life Synagogue Killings

"On the twenty seventh of october twenty eighteen. A gunman shouted eleven people and wounded six at the tree of life synagogue in pittsburgh in the us state of pennsylvania. The youngest victim was sixty nine. The oldest rose monning was ninety-seven all of those who died. Were members of the synagogue's congregation. This was the deadliest attack ever on the jewish community in the united states and took place the time of rising antisemitism as well as increasing levels of hate crimes against other groups including african americans and muslims in the us four days off the shootings the secretary general of the united nations antonio cherish honored the victims. At new york's park east synagogue. He denounced the mass shooting as a horrendous act. And as you just heard noted that antisemitism is the oldest form of hatred to have endured in human history. There's a big jewish population score hall. So is easy for me to stay really close to my jewish roots. I went to jewish preschool. Jewish elementary school. I spent my summer is a jewish summer camps. Why on the swim team. Kenny werner is a high school student in the squirrel hill neighborhood of pittsburgh the shooting the tree of life. Synagogue was a home away from home for her and her family. By the time. I was six or seven years old. I'd be able to run around that synagogue tree of life in just do what i wanted. We felt safe. One of katie's relatives was among those killed at the synagogue. Although she wasn't in the line of fire on the day of the shooting her mother malla says that the family has struggled to come to terms with the attacks. I think if tree of life and what happened there daily still. It's part of my everyday existence. Part of the fiber of who. I am and who my family is. My children have all been scarred to different degrees knowing people that were there knowing where certain people were standing at the time that they were likely murdered.

Park East Synagogue Pittsburgh Jewish Elementary School United States Kenny Werner Pennsylvania United Nations New York Malla Katie
200 Headless Goats Found in Georgia River, Cops Suspect 'Santeria Practice'

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:39 min | 6 d ago

200 Headless Goats Found in Georgia River, Cops Suspect 'Santeria Practice'

"Hundred headless goats found in georgia river. Cops suspect santeria practice. Okay i wanted to know where you get. Two hundred goats from headless goat has goats the heads in the heads. I okay so. I want to know where you get to wear. Get two hundred goats is these are carcass headless goat hill carcasses whose heads have been removed and found floating down the judge river. Maybe it was aliens according to this headline anyway. So bonnie. How did you even stumble upon this. Well my friend who lives in georgia posted like the headline on her instagram story. So i was like islamic real. And i googled. It seems real in. It's just crazy to me that the cops are even saying. Oh we think this is santa maria. You know it's not like they're like there's a logical explanation and we're going to get to the bottom of this. They're like it's witchcraft. Yes you actually looked up the definition at santeria nut santeria or is it. Is that how you pronounce it. Santeria just heard it santeria. Not sublime song. Oh yeah that's right okay. Could you look that up. And can you tell our listeners. What santeria is yes. It's a religion or maybe like a spiritual path of african origin that spread through cuba and the other south american countries down there and some people apparently still practice it to this day in one of the things that they believe connects them to like the you know god or the. Dvd's they want to connect to. You is

Georgia River Bonnie Santa Maria Georgia Cuba
COVID Pandemic Claims Black Morticians, Leaving Holes in Communities

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 6 d ago

COVID Pandemic Claims Black Morticians, Leaving Holes in Communities

"The corona virus pandemic has had a big impact on the black community and on those who provide funeral services second generation mortician Shawn Troy in South Carolina lost his father to the virus this level of vision loss of looking at my father's name plate to go on a William Penn Troy senior died in August of last year that would go to do this so very close with the national funeral directors and morticians association says the funeral director is the most prominent individual in the African American community no disrespect to my colleagues across the country we're we're more I should say more because culture plates John Troy says he still gets inspiration from his father's side you can do is catches you with a train you for this all your life you've been ready to do it is not your time since the start of the pandemic about one hundred thirty black morticians have died from the corona virus I met Donahue

Shawn Troy William Penn Troy National Funeral Directors And South Carolina John Troy Donahue
The Racial Double Standard of the Democratic Party

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:11 min | Last week

The Racial Double Standard of the Democratic Party

"Know any criticism of the black democrat and we conservatives are denounced as racist if you dare to criticize a brock obama for eight years. You're racist you're not allowed to criticize anyone who's african american in the political arena but you see a white woman wearing a literal monkey mask throwing it at a black gubernatorial candidate like larry. Come on mike. She just happened to find a monkey mask. That doesn't mean she's racist. This is the left. They don't recognize how bigoted they are. They don't care about black conservatives their hatred for a black conservative like larry elder or their disdain and indifference to black americans who believe in voter. Id laws and i think they're both important because it it it's very telling about the left. Dow black people are just a little dumber than we are. They can't get a photo. Id come on. There's no reason you got to produce an idea to vote.

Brock Obama Larry Elder Larry Mike
A Big Tell From Circle-Back Psaki on Biden's 6-Pronged Plan

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:31 min | Last week

A Big Tell From Circle-Back Psaki on Biden's 6-Pronged Plan

"And get ready today. Because poor joe biden. Who barely knows where he is at any given day on any given day. He's going to have a big announcement today about a six pronged kovin plan. I can't wait to see what these six prongs are going to be like circle back. Jen was asked about it yesterday at the white house. Also been very firm and maintaining independence between the federal government and what schools and the private sector does. So tomorrow she. We anticipate the president to say much is with us already said to urge those entities to take action or war new actionable. There will be new steps. The president announces tomorrow absolutely new steps. The americans jay z. Light should we expect any new kitchen recommendations as an example vaccination or not it depends on if you're vaccinated or not will there. There's a big tell from circle back asaki depends on whether you're vaccinated because if you're not vaccinated your dirt if you're not vaccinated you can get fired. You can be discriminated against and ps. that's going to apply to a lot of african

Joe Biden JEN White House Federal Government Jay Z
Putsch Back: Africas Latest Coup in Guinea

The Economist: The Intelligence

02:04 min | Last week

Putsch Back: Africas Latest Coup in Guinea

"Guinea has just been kicked out of egos. The economic community of west african states after military leaders staged a coup over the weekend. Speaking after an emergency eco summit burkina-faso's foreign minister alpha berry insisted that all those arrested during the coup be kept safe on exeter lengthy physical dependent alpha. Took on. now you be immediate to alpha conde. It took the like assam and that president alpha conde be released immediately. Soldiers had detained him after storming a government. Building in concrete guineas. Capital video showed the eighty three year. Old mr conde surrounded and looking stunned mama dida mboya. The head of guinea special forces and the apparent coup leader took to national television declaring the constitution and the government dissolved was about to do to let gorsuch show on monday. He said a government of national unity would be formed within weeks whether that will mean better governance for a country in desperate need of it is an open question as is just how long africa's renewed trend of such coups we'll continue cruiser was surprising to some degree but sitting to some and people watching guinea. This was not such a shock. Kenley salmon isn't africa correspondent for the economist that because these causes of becoming for awhile prison conde who's been ousted was elected but had changed the constitution to allow himself to run potentially for two more terms that was met with protests in the streets soldiers. Pretty forces responded to this violence. He'd been won the subsequent election at least according to official results but again was heavily disputed and there were protests. So there's been background sense of frustration. Which i think at the very least gave soldiers

Burkina Alpha Berry Guinea Alpha Conde Mr Conde Mama Dida Mboya Gorsuch Government Of National Unity Kenley Salmon Africa Conde
This Is Why African Countries Have the Lowest COVID Rates in the World

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:31 min | Last week

This Is Why African Countries Have the Lowest COVID Rates in the World

"If you look at what country has embraced the vaccine the most and the lockdowns the most and the masks the most israel would be the top of the list yet. Their rates for cases are worse than almost any other country on the entire planet per capita. Why do you remember for a short period of time when everyone was freaking out about india india with the massive kovic search. What happened well if you go. Look at the indian government's own website you do know that they say in their treatment portfolio. Just go take some ivermectin and hydroxy klaren india's. Kobe rates have plummeted. What's the lowest cove rates in the entire. World is in america. not even close. Is that mexico. No the lowest as of a couple of months ago and it's probably changed as uganda. Why is it that african countries that take antivirals with their breakfast food literally because malaria is so widespread. I don't mean that as a pejorative. it's just you take anti antivirals all the time you get bit by a wrong insect in africa just injured life. Do constantly drinking tonic water constantly. Taking anti-malarials why is that. Why is that. Why is there not been a massive coverted death surge beyond anything that we would have expected in the poorest countries with the worst healthcare systems like africa.

India Indian Government Israel Kobe Uganda Mexico Malaria America Africa
Raducanu, 18, 1st Qualifier in US Open Semis; Sakkari Next

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last week

Raducanu, 18, 1st Qualifier in US Open Semis; Sakkari Next

"Well number one that a joke of it just kept alive his hopes of a grand slam raging in US open final four showdown with the fourth seed Alexander Zverev but once again the soap was forced to work early before advancing coming back from a set down to beat the sixth seeded Italian Matteo Berenstain eight six three in the fourth so there is a box with a straight sets win over the south African Lloyd Harris the surprises continued in the women's draw with British qualify him to write a kind of straight setting eleven seed Belinda benches that to meet various factory the Greek up setting the full state Carolina Pliskova nine Graham like us

Alexander Zverev Matteo Berenstain Lloyd Harris United States Belinda Carolina Graham
Virginia Removes Robert E. Lee Statue From Capital

All In with Chris Hayes

02:06 min | Last week

Virginia Removes Robert E. Lee Statue From Capital

"All learn the story of the warren school at least the basics of it slavery and the rights and status of enslaved people through america into a civil war from eighteen sixty one eight hundred sixty five north. The union eventually won the south confederate states. That had seceded were vanquished and president abraham lincoln was assassinated. But we are not taught. Hardly ever i certainly was taught this only a little bit. We know less about is what came after after the union's victory which is a successful effort by those same confederate forces to win back white supremacy in the south and to win back. The story of their own nobility and those victories are marked with monuments to the confederacy to the losing side to the traders. Like this one. A robert ugly erected in the former capital of the confederacy in richmond virginia in one ninety twenty five years after lee's surrender napa mathematics and after the thirteenth and fourteenth and fifteen commitments which made slavery illegal and unconstitutional enshrined due process in our constitution and gave men of any color of the right to vote and full citizenship and after the union victory there was a hope born for people like frederick douglass and thaddeus stevens and harriet tubman of a true multiracial. Democracy enshrined in those civil war amendments of equal citizens under law with dignity and respect and freedom and the beginnings of that the period the period of reconstruction the south with federal troops deployed to keep the peace confederacy reduced to shameful abject defeat. Black people were voting. They were registering to vote and they were going to school. Becoming becoming local office. Holders and mayors town councilman and members of congress. Like senator hiram revels of mississippi. I bet you've probably never heard that name. Maybe some of you know it. We don't learn his name. The first african american to serve in the upper chamber these were the actual beginnings of a true genuine multiracial democracy in the south and in america that were then destroyed

Warren School Robert Ugly President Abraham Lincoln Thaddeus Stevens America Frederick Douglass Harriet Tubman Richmond Virginia LEE Senator Hiram Revels Mississippi Congress
NFL Cancels National Anthem Performance After Singer Refuses to Vaccinate

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:51 min | Last week

NFL Cancels National Anthem Performance After Singer Refuses to Vaccinate

"A big football game the big big day tomorrow night. tampa bay is going to host. The dallas cowboys. There's a story associated with the game that has barely been mentioned but there was an article in the epoch times. The told the story of victory boyd. Victory boyd is a twenty seven year old singer songwriter. She's a grammy award. She was a member of the team that produced kanye west's grammy award winning. Jesus is king twenty twenty top contemporary christian album and she was slated to sing the star spangled banner before the tampa bay dallas cowboys game. She asked for religious exemption to not have to take the vaccine well. Nfl said you're fired if you're not vaccinated as you stand in the middle of a football field in a stadium full of sixty five thousand largely unvaccinated people than you can't sing the national anthem before the tampa bay buccaneers dallas cowboys game. Covert insanity is at a fevered pitch. Let that sink in in a stadium. Full an open air stadium of sixty five thousand people many if not most of whom will be unvaccinated twenty-seven-year-old tamp victory. Boyd will not be allowed to sing now. I haven't seen a picture of her yet. But i'm gonna make an assumption. I could be wrong. But i'm gonna make assumption that this is a young black woman and in fact. Yuri are great. Video manager has already found a picture of her. And if you're watching the show on our livestream. Mike online dot com there. She is beautiful young african american woman. You're going to be hard pressed to find much coverage of this controversy and one would think you would be a pretty big story. Don't you think this big story. The woman who was going to sing the star spangled banner before the tampa bay. Dallas game is fired because she won't be vaccinated after seeking a religious exemption from the nfl. Why it's not a big story. You know why you're going to only find it in places like the epoch times evidently because she's a young black woman

Grammy Award Victory Boyd Dallas Cowboys Tampa Bay Dallas Cowboys Football Tampa Bay Boyd Tampa Bay Buccaneers NFL Yuri Mike Dallas
White Supremacist Liberals Are Trying to Stop Larry Elder From Becoming California Governor

Mark Levin

01:31 min | Last week

White Supremacist Liberals Are Trying to Stop Larry Elder From Becoming California Governor

"The way to underscore this white supremacy point Look how all the white supremacists on the left. Galvanized to try and destroy an African American name. Larry Elder. Ladies and gentlemen. We have got to learn to use their language and their narrative against them. White supremacists in California. Our gang up. On an African American. It's so bad that they're accusing the African American who is clearly black of being white. And the Democrat Party in the media in Hollywood. The entire American Marxist movement. American Marxist movement is in on it. You see, you can never win. Even if you're black. If you don't throw in with them. You're not really black. Wait a minute. Look at me. No, no. Your mind has been warped. You're part of the white supremacist movement. And what did they say? He was in black face or something? Something so grotesque. So great But they can get away. But they say whatever they want the party of slavery and the party is segregation. The party Jim Crow. The party of Joe Biden, one time segregationist. Oh, yeah. The party Robert Byrd, Klansman. I mean, think about this stuff. Say whatever they want.

Larry Elder Democrat Party California Hollywood Jim Crow Joe Biden Klansman Robert Byrd
The Case for the American Dream and Exceptionalism

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:31 min | Last week

The Case for the American Dream and Exceptionalism

"I was asked yesterday to give a speech coming up in about a week in fact less than a week. It's next this coming sunday. The event is not the important thing here. But i was asking speech and the topic of the speech that i've been asked to give us the three or four greatest issues or challenges facing our country and i said done i said i could name for them right now without even doing any research and writing the speech she said what are they i sent him. I can tell you off to find out like everybody else does speech. One of them was not patriotism but it could be just to just to kind of buttress. The point that i made. I believe a lack of national pride a lack of national. I'm looking for the another word for pride here. And i'm struggling a little bit here. But a belief in american exceptionalism that used to kind of you know be found. I think in the in the hearts and under the chess of of of most americans almost all americans particularly at times of crisis and in times of when our nation has been attacked. Bit just generally speaking. We know what we have as americans that nobody else has quite frankly. That's the biggest part of this. I mean i've said this before. I think i've said this to dennis's audience so maybe you've heard me talk about this before. When is the last time you heard anybody on a national or international news cast in an interview a story and essay a book talk about trying to achieve the french dream. The answers probably never and that's no knock specifically on france but you don't hear about the german dream you don't hear about the russian dream you don't hear about the chilean dream you don't hear about the venezuelan dream. You don't hear about the south. African dreamer the australian dream the dream that people all over the world have is the american dream the ability to come to america. Raise a family here get a job. Learn a trade learn a skill open a business. Buy a house have a family. The american dream what everybody talks about and by and large. I think that's something that has driven america to its heights over the course of the last several decades

Chess Dennis France America
"african american" Discussed on We The People

We The People

10:09 min | 7 months ago

"african american" Discussed on We The People

"This were by coming public as he did in revealing himself as a former slave he obviously wrist being captured back into slavery until the time when his saving was purchased by a group of supporters in england and he could be turned two nights after trip to england as a free person but call you before that he risked his liberty really by coming out revealing himself as former slave and revealing the name of his former slave master who then had licensed under the. She's just lay back to common. We return them to slavery but in terms of of courage. Harriet tubman someone who escaped slave for herself and rather than being content with her new phone. Freedom freedom quotation marks because the fleet them. That was the reality of for black folks back then is not what we would call today free. By any means given the sphere the intimidation the tomb crow regime the domestic terrorism. That was all the land and in many places she went back into the south back below the mason dixon line and helped hundreds of slaves escape back into freedom by bringing them to the north with the passage of the fetal fears fugitive slave. Act schmidt the anonymously to the north she then Engaged us often helping them go further north into canada and she did all this Obviously under coke of darkness in secret is one story that i read recently of her steeling herself sneaking into a slave auction in baltimore maryland and when the auction near took a break she went to the slaves were being held and took them from the ten and got him to enter. When the auction came back to oxford off the slaves he realized dance laser gone. But one thing. I do want to read to you. And it's a letter of this was a letter a statement that february. Douglas lead to hurry. Tubman recognizing her courage ticket Seconds to read this. The difference between us is very march. Most that i have done in suffered in the service of our cause. Who's been in public. I have received much encouragement. Every step of the way you on the other hand of labored any private way. I have wrought in the day hugh in the night the night sky in the silent stars have been the witnesses of your devotion to freedom and of your heroism accepting john brown of sacred memory. I know of no one who has willingly encounter more pearls hardships. Conserve arm slaved people. The you have. And i think that says a than that i possibly could and she did meet no at least once every think twice there had been met with john brown. I believe she met with him a few months before he embarked upon his military mission. It that harpers ferry. And i'm not sure to what extent she was involved in the planning of that. I know she did me matted. Douglas and dallas actually burn. John brown tried to recruit for douglas into that mission at harpers furry Frederick douglass thought that browns ambition was a bit twin vicious he he think he that Was underestimating the ease with which he could raise a slave army to take up arms against save masters and he. He basically was john brown well but one have nothing to do with it and thereafter. After i believe he actually took a triple champion pre planned to europe because he was afraid that he would be accused of big co-conspirator. Have if it were to become known that he had met with john brown and discussed this beta at operas. Furry and one. Quick thing in terms of i two to shows us how how important the first amendment was Her incredibly courageous reporting of lynchings. That was not covered by the way for us at all Brought to bear in late. The kind of terrorism that footed the lives of so many people in various parts of this country by documenting lynchings. Sooner if they happened to making people aware of it it could not be secret. anymore and her courage also tremendous her House was burned to the ground. I believe at one point her Wishy published in newspapers. He's wonderful newspapers. She probably several of them also burned to the ground and of course relied was constantly under threat. Thank you so much for that for reading that. Incredibly moving passage professor shaw any final thoughts on frederick douglass and those great women and the reconstruction period and then i want to move forward to the period known as redemption the backlash against reconstruction which led to the disarray of the promise of the reconstruction amendments and the rise of such great figures as w e b two boys a founder of the any a cpi and great scholar and author as well as some less known but equally heroic figures like monroe trotter. Who thought that the boys and others didn't go far enough in advocating for equal rights. Tell us about them. Here's what i wanted to just quickly Underscore that harriet tubman. A woman actually fought in the civil war and had a commission But i also wanted to share that powerful quote attributed to her keep going if he was scared. Keep going if you are hungry. Keep going if you wanna taste feed him keep going. This is what he what she said rather to those. She bought out of slavery when they will flagging in whether they could Successfully a Escape So i wanted to mention that Wbz the boys of one of the great american's it's really a shame that All americans don't know who he was. He was born In the year that the fourteenth amendment was ratified. If i remember correctly in eighteen sixty eight and he died literally on the eve of the great march on washington He died as a An ex patriot In ghana And over the span of his life his policies Grew and developed and change He was a great historian. A great sociologist say a a an integration as you mentioned the founder of the n. double acp But he also at various points Was somebody who Adopted a communist ideology when communism wasn't what it became a later on And he was a pan africanist So this was one of the great intellectual thinkers in american history and and one of the great writers. He wrote a black reconstruction in america as well. As the souls of black folks could go on and mentioned doc water Many of his great works And he was also famously known for his Intellectual battles with the booker t washington Who in his time Was if not the most famous one of the most famous african americans and so we could say a great deal about w e b boys and He didn't grow up in the south He grew up in massachusetts In great barrington. Massachusetts didn't come from that slavery Tradition of but was one of the great leader's of african americans in this country judge. Mickey you told me that you were setting out to reread the souls of black folks. An inspired me to Do the same and you also wanted to talk in addition to destroy us about monroe trotter. Who is less well-known but also very important hero of the time. Tell us about the boys and trotter. Many ways the. The relationship between the tension between the boys and trotter respects relationship intention. That is more familiar to most folks. malcolm x and martin luther king trotter with someone from from delivered. Apparently he was not only someone who was very very progressive militant adversarial river adjectives. You wanna put but it appears as though he wasn't not the most tactful person in the world he was known to engender conflict not only amongst his intactness but also with people who are allied with him Interesting nine hundred and twelve. He actually supported against Deploying w boys he supported woodrow wilson for president which is ironic because wilson became one of the great segregationist present segregated. The workforce in washington. Dc after he became president but Wilson met with trotter before the election and made what was described. Some vague gestures toward equality for for black folks in trotter. Believe that He's he felt that that was better than was getting from the other side. When wilson then I guess you could use the term with open ten win south and was convinced by democrat in the solid theory. He wilson had to become much more in tune in visual matters ended up..

John brown Wilson england canada america ghana Tubman Frederick douglass harriet tubman frederick douglass europe wilson two nights douglas february john brown Mickey Douglas washington malcolm x
"african american" Discussed on We The People

We The People

12:34 min | 7 months ago

"african american" Discussed on We The People

"I'm jeffrey rosen. President and ceo of the national constitution center and welcome to we the people a weekly show of constitutional debate. The national constitution center is a nonpartisan nonprofit chartered by congress to increase awareness and understanding the constitution among the american people. Today's episode highlights african american constitutional visionaries will explore their lives legacies and constitutional values from the fight for abolition to the civil rights movement. And i'm joined by two of america's leading constitutional visionaries and great friends in the national constitution center. Professor shaw is julius. L chambers distinguished professor of law and director of the u. n. c. center for civil rights. He is the author of many works including the introduction to the ferguson report of the united states department of justice civil rights division. He worked for the naacp legal defense fund for over twenty years and was its fifth director council. Preser- shaw. It is wonderful to have you back on the show. Wonderful to be with you. Jeffrey and judge ted. Mickey has been a judge on the. Us court of appeals for the third circuit since one thousand nine hundred four. He served as chief judge from two thousand. Ten two thousand sixteen. His previous service includes work as a state trial judge chair of the pennsylvania. Sentencing commission and an assistant. Us attorney and. i'm thrilled that. He has just joined the national constitution center. Board of trustees judge mcgee. It is such an honor to have you with us thank you. It's an honor to be here. Well we are going to discuss great constitutional visionaries throughout history. And i want to begin. With frederick douglass Professor shaw what was douglas's constitutional significance. And what should we. The people listeners know about his constitutional legacy such a. Douglas of course was one of the most famous americans of the nineteenth century And he was an escaped slave He was an abolitionist And during the civil war He pressed president lincoln even before the civil war. But certainly doing a civil war Both respect to allowing african americans to fight in the civil war But also i think he helped move president lincoln from his original position In which he thought post freedom. How black american should be we reestablished in africa He was someone who engaged with the constitution. If you read his writings if you read his speeches if you read the newspaper that he established and ran for years as an abolitionist he engaged with the constitution itself He believed the constitution belonged. Not only to those who Were the original You know creatives of the constitution. Those who were the founding fathers but he believed that a belong to all americans and that included african americans Most notably i think Frederick douglass made arguments about what should happen after freedom with respect to the constitution. He believed in franchise men of black americans and he believe in equality so He was in a sense A in a real sense out one of the second founders of our nation and he advocated for trumpeting. The constitution In a way that a bent toward it freedom. Thank you so much for those inspiring words. Frederick douglass celebrated his birthday on february fourteenth. So we can offer those thoughts in honor of his birthday. And you're so right to stress that he thought all americans were included in the constitution. Emphasize what came after in our civil war exhibit on reconstruction. We have a passage. Where when douglas red madison's notes saying that the constitution was not meant to recognize property and man it changed the way he thought of himself as a person and as a citizen and convinced the slavery was not that the constitution was not a pro slavery document. I should have said that. He also believed in equality for women. That's a crucial part of his legacy. And i will ask you about that when we talk about. Some of the great women visionaries as well. judge mckee. Heard a professor. Shaw's introduction to frederick douglass. Why do you think frederick. Douglass is constitutionally significant. He was very instrumental in the Debate surrounding particularly the thirteenth amendment he engaged with elizabeth candy Staying who was a women's rights of pacino. Communal proponent for the women's right to vote there was tension there in terms of how the thirteenth amendment would be drafted should include download. Only the right of former enslaved people to vote but should also include the right of women. Suffrage stanton at a number of suffragette thought that it was absolutely necessary for the thirteenth amendment to include the right of women the outlawing slavery lincoln day. I'm sorry douglas disagreed with that. As a matter of strategy he thought look if we include. Both were barely have enough support here to get former slaves men former male slaves the right to vote if we put on top of that language was include extending the right to vote to women. Were going to lose. The whole thing was a matter of strategy. He advocated that the right to vote which was enshrined in the civil war. Amendments be limited to free. Slaves ma'am free slaves. Obviously but not because he believed that women should be excluded from the right to vote but simply as a matter of of A strategy engaged with lincoln as press was has mentioned in terms of wells. Views of of black folks he Douglas realized that lincoln believed that. Lincoln did not see blacks as the social equal rights because of the lincoln support for the american causation society. Which is press was looted. You wanted to see free blacks. We removed from the united states. But lincoln thought that he could never time keep kids using the two names douglas. Nevertheless far was important to to work with With douglas run lincoln around this issue in fact He made the statement when he was criticised with working. Not only with linkin but with Former slave owners. Douglas response was well. Look i will work with anyone to achieve the common good and i work with no one. Insofar as the defenses the comedy for the common bed so in that sense may see echoes of contemporary politics. Here he ran. Much advocated working at common purpose. Which you've come and go even if it meant working with united with people who are otherwise you have very fundamental game at one thing to this. The emancipation memorial in washington. Dc where it received some variety lately which keep fixes the statue depicting a naked in the statute a black slave rosalyn from his knees but he's kneeling at the the knee abraham lincoln. Douglas gave a speech in eighteen. Seventy six when that memorial was dedicated. What you said there was that. He expressed his dissatisfaction focus gesture he said the negro here the rising is still on his knees and nude he wrote what i wanna see before i die as a monument representing the negro not concerned on his knees like four footed animal but he under his feet like a man. He was just an eloquent spokesman for the allio of black folks only of women as well for for all people and for fighting for that concept to be ingrained within the civil war. amendments both of you have mentioned the connection between the douglas's fight for rights for african american men to vote and women's suffrage and the next pair that i want to introduce is harriet tubman and ib wells. Both were heroes who fought against the stain of slavery as well as fighting for the enfranchisement of women professor. Shaw what can you tell our listeners. About harriet tubman and i to be well. Harriet tubman of course was someone who fought against slavery was one of the leading voices again. Slavery Harriet tubman Long with so john tooth With two women who played one of the most and some of the most important roles in the struggle to end slavery abby wells and her time journalist someone who was a very active against lynching and violence against african americans These were great. Americans I i should say to go back to frederick douglass for a moment and His work on behalf of women's rights of women felt that The fourteenth amendment was a great betrayal. the suffragettes is they will call the women's rights activists they were abolitionists. Add been abolitionist But when the fourteenth amendment was adopted it had language in section tweeter the fourteenth amendment for the first time mentioned mail the words male gender sex and they thought that was a tremendous betrayal And the fact that the fourteenth amendment did not wasn't interpreted as Applying to women in the same way that it did to african americans and certainly a the fifteenth amendment Betrayed women's rights So you think about sojourner truth You think about her famous speech You know our woman to You think about Ida b wells She was a very powerful advocate of for women's rights as well as the rights of african americans When you think about these women from that era they will before times in many respects And these were some of the great of black americans but some of the great americans period I think when we think about them we should also think about The second founding on another founding as the country move toward a more perfect union. You've used the phrase second founding several times and thank you for reminding us that like frederick douglass these great women. Harriet tubman sojourner truth and ida b wells were second founders as well judge mckee. What can you tell us about. Harriet tubman ida. B wells and sojourner truth one thing that is the all of these people were talking about. The incredible courage That they had. But i think of the word courage as courageous as people. Like frederick..

Frederick douglass harriet tubman Harriet tubman Jeffrey jeffrey rosen frederick douglass february fourteenth two thousand washington Mickey ida b wells Douglas africa Lincoln douglas nineteenth century frederick Today one thousand shaw
"african american" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

Moore Hair Galore Podcast

01:55 min | 9 months ago

"african american" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

"Ancestors being over in africa to agree to endure and the detriment of what are here. Had to endure as being enslaved in america. You know it's still an issue our our hair we're the only race thus wear. Our hair is a controversy for some. You know why. Why are here. You don't have to be in question you know. It's part of our identity. It's part of who we are. Hit me up. I loved here. be bad. Comments questions.

"african american" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

Moore Hair Galore Podcast

05:31 min | 9 months ago

"african american" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

"You had like ear do again. in lauren hill. We had a finger waves. The french rose to the straight waves inspired by lia in destiny's child many african americans were accepting their hair while some others still conforming to european standards of beauty around twenty ten. There was a surge in the number of women of color wearing their natural hair. This was called the natural hair movement. The movement was made in still may possibly by the availability of numerous resources on the internet and in real revived to help. African american women care for their hair while the main route reasons for this movement grew was because a lot of people discover the cancerous effects. Oh relaxers in other streaming chemicals. At this time this was a period of vocalists and we became woke. I remember hearing something about what relaxers actually do it that relaxed that lives seeps. Through your head. Continue your brain. I forgot where Heard that i saw that on something so kind of documentary. Something in you know. After knowing that i'm like while you know frying my hair like that. Just keep getting straight so. That's when a lot of us as women we decided to you know. Put those chemical down into started. We are here natural turns transition. Now's that's the hardest part of transitioning from Your hair relaxed to your natural state of hair on so a lot of us did the big shot where we just chopped.

lauren hill lia African american african americans european french around twenty ten
"african american" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

Moore Hair Galore Podcast

02:14 min | 9 months ago

"african american" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

"Started wearing our hair out. The civil rights movement popularized the acceptance of african american hair. Many african americans wanted to show their support in pride of their heritage so they start emulating afro style that created the the movement of blackest beautiful and black pride and black panthers all-black the back in the sixties the true black panthers you know all of had him and that's the popular afro comb was handled his shaped like this to remember the black power salute. He who were born in that era members. I haven't that tick with the black power does throughout the seventy s into the late seventies and early eighties from afro. It evolve the it. The soul. Blow jerry curl the jerry kerr was like a soft gloucestershire loose permanent curls and it was made popular by entertainers like michael jackson. And lionel richie. You know we all had our. I know i had the daring curl had the carefree curl. And did it made your hair. It did grew your hero bass because you had to keep your hair moisturised. So wearing know of awareness. Stupid curl bank on. You had to keep spraying carefree curl moisturizer activator. My hair was like way past my shoulders. So i thought i was stuff. So you know after curl it from the eighty s and then going into the nineties. I'm african americans mostly adopted hairstyles. That.

michael jackson lionel richie sixties seventy s gloucestershire eighty s late seventies african american early eighties afro african americans black nineties
"african american" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

Moore Hair Galore Podcast

02:19 min | 9 months ago

"african american" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

"So there has to be some some sort of Like him in in the product north for it to make the hair you know straight s some form might not be as much as I used to get onto the affirm. I've tried it all. I'm telling you up. I had the farm. Relax sir i had. What was it oil of k. I've had oh. I can't even designer touch. I've had it all up had it all when Slavery was abolished in eighteen sixty five. Racism was still prevalent black people with left black features in more white trace for granted more opportunities. Most african american women were wearing straight hair impressing curl hair styles as we were talking about housekeeping. Jobs were more lucrative in what higher only be called. Moloto was back in the day. They were light. Skinned women were calling models Which was basically a mix mixture of white and black heritage. Most of the blessed could only brooklyn in the plantations In the.

eighteen sixty five brooklyn Moloto african american
"african american" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

Moore Hair Galore Podcast

05:21 min | 9 months ago

"african american" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

"Mean when you look at yourself in the mirror. Can you imagine looking at yourself being american. You know you're already stripped of your identity. Your stripped of your hair and you look at yourself in the mirror and you know imagine you see you know that beautiful hair that you groaned and nourished you know be taken away from you are people felt like they have lost. The most important part of this whole process was skies by the slave traders as sanitation purposes. That's what they said they said. This was to keep you know art. The slave ships or whatever sanitize which. I can't see how that happened because if you know african history and how slaves were transported. Here they were packed like sardines so sanitation was not an issue. Apparently but that's what they that's what traders use as the excuse. As to cut in raised in shape off african tears the shave was amused of trying to alienate them from their heritage. That they've been a part of author life. Like i said before here was never just about hair. Hair was never just as the center by entity the slave in columbia who grew their hair for bit rated it in a map patterns as signal to us for escape and to stay messages to other slave. That was interesting. i'm imagining a scenario. Where maybe five raids meant. Okay go east or timber as may say you go due north or braids. That are on top of your head. Every which way maybe translated as sloppy mountains. Okay i'm i'm kidding but i'm just saying you know it was clever burying genius of caffeine a map you know on top of your head by by way of a certain way embracing. This is why i say that. We are so ingenious in so creative of how you know things we we do. You know we do it in in such a way that no one would ever know. No one from alpha wherever realized in louisiana in seventeen eighty nine law was passed that required black women to cover their hair in public. I made up heard of religious reasons why this happens but the reason for this one. Particulary was to distract the men from working. Because it was a distraction. I guess from men who were working as usual black women became creative with the way they tied their hair and use beautiful fabric to cover their hair with style. I've seen oh pitchers of african hair and the and the care ramps and everything is just beautiful so a law that was created stifled their beauty. Ironically drew more attention to it as the years passed. Saving excuse me. Slavery grew to be accepted. And what's the new normal the whites for the new generation of slaves an eighteenth century. It became okay for them to grow their hair. But the major issue how to maintain and care for the here was you know came in question before they were enslave that that is while they were still in africa. What they used to take care of their hero was wouldn't picks which is like a comb with three pigskins butter oils in a she be powder but in this new continent. None of that was available. So i'm sure a lot of you listeners. Know that black hair isn't the easiest to take care of. Even at these people weren't slaves number allowed to use white people's.

columbia africa eighteenth century five raids louisiana american african seventeen nine law three pigskins eighty
"african american" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

Moore Hair Galore Podcast

02:07 min | 9 months ago

"african american" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

"Do spend some money on hair. Products here is something that a lot of african americans cherish and rightfully so. I might even go as far as saying that. We have a love affair with our here. I know i have a love. Hate relationship with my hair all right but.

"african american" Discussed on The Rural Health Voice

The Rural Health Voice

05:39 min | 11 months ago

"african american" Discussed on The Rural Health Voice

"Strikes me is that in modern medical experiments you always have a test group and a control group in the test group gets the drug and the control group gets jealous Cibo and then the researchers see if and how much the people in the test group improve over those who have the placebo, you know, but as you stated treating syphilis, not the goal documenting the process was the goal which brings me to the next question in the book you use the phrase devalue black bodies. Tell me what that means, Sure. So really what I mean by that when we think about devaluing black bodies is that we know that the first slaves were brought over and sixteen nineteen and since then what many people don't know is that African American slaves especially were used during the time of slavery for a lot of testing they were not seen at home. Time as people. They were seen as Beast of Burden. They certainly were less then at one point they counted as three-fifths of people and so testing on them simply made since the same way we test on Lab Rats now and so one of the most shocking I think examples of this is really a lot of modern Gynecology off. So many people have probably heard of Henrietta Lacks at this point where her cells were used without her consent, but what people don't know is that a lot of the medical procedures in modern Gynecology office were tested on African American female slaves without anesthesia. Additionally. We saw a lot of sterilization of African-Americans for various reasons again, without their consent. And so there's been this continuous devaluation of the bodies of black people and it didn't stop at slave. What we can link it to now and I know that you just did a podcast about maternal health is actually that so one of the things that we know is that we don't know why African American women are dying at a higher rate in childbirth because nobody has studied them and honestly, it's because there wasn't a lot of value placed on studying them. There wasn't a lot of funding Place specifically on looking at maternal health and maternal outcomes for people of color. And so again, and that is devaluing that body that is devaluing the access to adequate Healthcare the access to Real and True health care that communities of color are facing every day. And with that at the beginning of the pandemic, we were told to stay home work from home. Stay away from those not in our immediate family unit as much as possible wife. Is it harder for minorities? Sure. What we find is that it is harder mainly for people of color to abide by those rules because of I'm going to talk on two main issues. The first is employment. So often times what you see is that individuals of.

Cibo syphilis Henrietta
"african american" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"african american" Discussed on Science Talk

"Swami this conversation with myself began sixteen years ago started production, river, keeper, and the Guy delivered packages to the office. It might have been ups or something like. Like that, so what in the world you guys do? I told him you know. We protect a river, and we sue polluters, and we run advocacy movements. And he said wow thought about that I could see the wheels turning in his head. He was a person of color, and he said I didn't think that black people could do this successfully wore. The white communities would accept doing this. So I realized that there was perspective out there a set of expectations about what any of us are likely to be able to do, and that we had to challenge those expectations all of us as the only African American river keeper in the US Tuchman acts as a bridge between a white, dominated conservation, establishment and communities of color alongside the river. He protects you find challenges being a person of color in working in this field. Sure I feel challenges and their intricate ones because I don't want to. To be identified as the river keeper for the Black Folks. That's kind of futile right I. I feel like I'm representing a movement that wants to protect a watershed that requires as much participation across many boundaries and I do find time to the messing us in black and brown communities necessarily needs to be different, because the problems are different, because the perspective is different, environmental consultant to Chemo Price adds that perspective may be at odds with the perspectives of mainstream environmental groups had to talk to people who. Bring bring trees to neighborhoods. It hadn't even considered the history of African. Americans in trees. People may not be jumping up and down. Going here on trees, you know older people, maybe like you know what reasonable represent safety for me who knows, but it's just being open and honest about an invalidating the fact that not everybody is a tree hugger in it's okay, and while many people consider untrammelled park lands peaceful escapes from the stresses of the city. People of color may view them differently. There's a lot of people that you know of justifiably are afraid of certain parks because that's where people go maybe to. To Do to dump bodies where people go to do things that they don't want other people to see them doing, and she says that people may simply feel unwelcome especially in federal parks. This like that room in your house that has the plastic on the couch gymnastics to.

Black Folks African American river Tuchman Swami gymnastics Chemo Price US consultant
"african american" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"african american" Discussed on Science Talk

"Road wanting. This is so exciting. Fred Tuchman is the river keeper for the Pawtuxet River in Maryland and a winner of the Audubon. Naturalist Society Twenty Twenty Environmental Champions Award River keepers are part of the national nonprofit group dedicated to protecting waterways. Swami this conversation with myself began sixteen years ago started production, river, keeper, and the Guy delivered packages to the office. It might have been ups or something like. Like that, so what in the world you guys do? I told him you know. We protect a river, and we sue polluters, and we run advocacy movements. And he said wow thought about that I could see the wheels turning in his head. He was a person of color, and he said I didn't think that black people could do this successfully wore. The white communities would accept doing this. So I realized that there was perspective out there a set of expectations about what any of us are likely to be able to do, and that we had to challenge those expectations all of us as the only African American river keeper in the US Tuchman acts as a bridge between a white, dominated conservation, establishment and communities of color alongside the river. He protects you find challenges being a person of color in working in this field. Sure I feel challenges and their intricate ones because I don't want to. To be identified as the river keeper for the Black Folks. That's kind of futile right I. I feel like I'm representing a movement that wants to protect a watershed that requires as much participation across many boundaries and I do find time to the messing us in black and brown communities necessarily needs to be different, because the problems are different, because the perspective is different, environmental consultant to Chemo Price adds that perspective may be at odds with the perspectives of mainstream environmental groups had to talk to people who. Bring bring trees to neighborhoods. It hadn't even considered the history of African. Americans in trees. People may not be jumping up and down. Going here on trees, you know older people, maybe like you know what reasonable represent safety for me who knows, but it's just being open and honest about an invalidating the fact that not everybody is a tree hugger in it's okay, and while many people consider untrammelled park lands peaceful escapes from the stresses of the city. People of color may view them differently. There's a lot of people that you know of justifiably are afraid of certain parks because that's where people go maybe to. To Do to dump bodies where people go to do things that they don't want other people to see them doing, and she says that people may simply feel unwelcome especially in federal parks. This like that room in your house that has the plastic on the couch gymnastics to go into, but looks really nice, but you can't go use it so sometimes I think people perceive that is just any unaccessible space to them that distance people may feel regarding these spaces comes partly from their not having been included in the process of creating them, maisy us is a landscape architect and arborist and says that city. City planners pay much more attention to the needs and desires of upscale neighborhoods than those of low income communities. I've gone to so many different community admitting and can tell you from firsthand experience. How much more deference communities that are rich white? Get in the in the planning process how they get to Co. create their communities as part of that because they have power that they can leverage in that process. She's found that many people don't fully understand the process one in which city planners create land, use maps and decide the fate of each community everywhere there is. There are people who decide what type. Type of land use goes where rate so if you have like a power plant in your neighborhood, somebody decided that your neighborhood is a good location for that power plant. If you have other types of pollutants in your neighborhood, a lot of times it has to do with industrial land uses or commercial land uses those are decisions that an urban planner would make, and so if you noticed stat, communities of color tend to have these adjacent cities with pollution. That's because somebody approved that land use, but people don't know that land use maps drive like these kinds of decisions and a lot of times people. Are not part of the process when they're creating the land use maps in a lot of times, people are part of the process. Get Nord in the process of creating this,

Black Folks African American river Tuchman Swami gymnastics Chemo Price US consultant
"african american" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"african american" Discussed on Science Talk

"Road wanting. This is so exciting. Fred Tuchman is the river keeper for the Pawtuxet River in Maryland and a winner of the Audubon. Naturalist Society Twenty Twenty Environmental Champions Award River keepers are part of the national nonprofit group dedicated to protecting waterways. Swami this conversation with myself began sixteen years ago started production, river, keeper, and the Guy delivered packages to the office. It might have been ups or something like. Like that, so what in the world you guys do? I told him you know. We protect a river, and we sue polluters, and we run advocacy movements. And he said wow thought about that I could see the wheels turning in his head. He was a person of color, and he said I didn't think that black people could do this successfully wore. The white communities would accept doing this. So I realized that there was perspective out there a set of expectations about what any of us are likely to be able to do, and that we had to challenge those expectations all of us as the only African American river keeper in the US Tuchman acts as a bridge between a white, dominated conservation, establishment and communities of color alongside the river. He protects you find challenges being a person of color in working in this field. Sure I feel challenges and their intricate ones because I don't want to. To be identified as the river keeper for the Black Folks. That's kind of futile right I. I feel like I'm representing a movement that wants to protect a watershed that requires as much participation across many boundaries and I do find time to the messing us in black and brown communities necessarily needs to be different, because the problems are different, because the perspective is different, environmental consultant to Chemo Price adds that perspective may be at odds with the perspectives of mainstream environmental groups had to talk to people who. Bring bring trees to neighborhoods. It hadn't even considered the history of African. Americans in trees. People may not be jumping up and down. Going here on trees, you know older people, maybe like you know what reasonable represent safety for me who knows, but it's just being open and honest about an invalidating the fact that not everybody is a tree hugger in it's okay, and while many people consider untrammelled park lands peaceful escapes from the stresses of the city. People of color may view them differently. There's a lot of people that you know of justifiably are afraid of certain parks because that's where people go maybe to. To Do to dump bodies where people go to do things that they don't want other people to see them doing, and she says that people may simply feel unwelcome especially in federal parks. This like that room in your house that has the plastic on the couch gymnastics to go into, but looks really nice, but you can't go use it so sometimes I think people perceive that is just any unaccessible space to them that distance people may feel regarding these spaces comes partly from their not having been included in the process of creating them, maisy us is a landscape architect and arborist and says that city. City planners pay much more attention to the needs and desires of upscale neighborhoods than those of low income communities. I've gone to so many different community admitting and can tell you from firsthand experience. How much more deference communities that are rich white? Get in the in the planning process how they get to Co. create their communities as part of that because they have power that they can leverage in that process. She's found that many people don't fully understand the process one in which city planners create land, use maps and decide the fate of each community everywhere there is. There are people who decide what type. Type of land use goes where rate so if you have like a power plant in your neighborhood, somebody decided that your neighborhood is a good location for that power plant. If you have other types of pollutants in your neighborhood, a lot of times it has to do with industrial land uses or commercial land uses those are decisions that an urban planner would make, and so if you noticed stat, communities of color tend to have these adjacent cities with pollution. That's because somebody approved that land use, but people don't know that land use maps drive like these kinds of decisions and a lot of times people. Are not part of the process when they're creating the land use maps in a lot of times, people are part of the process. Get Nord in the process of creating this,

Black Folks African American river Tuchman Swami gymnastics Chemo Price US consultant
"african american" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"african american" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"Into the Horn and the style switch. The vibrations into wax, and that's how the Yuccas were made. Wayne Westinghouse. Electric develops the modern microphone adventure, allow those record labels to actually go out in the field with microphones and actually beat a record folks on site. So there are some sermons from almost popular Patriots, Day Reverend James Gates. Who is recorded in his church? In Atlanta Georgia, they have the microphone set up. This also allows than to bring other people other voices so that you can actually hear someone saying a man or Hallelujah or preach, or that's right. You can hear them in the record label was able to adjust the volume in their pitch of those voices as opposed to the acoustic days or the best way that they could make adjustments of this way was just basically move a person further away from torn from the from the from the horn personal, it's too. Yeah. Those must be really different. Feeling records you to the one done in the studio with the preachers standing there, very close to the device versus being in the church at must be interesting as a researcher to hear how how that changed. It is very interesting because it doesn't feel good. But ones with the microphones and call and response, it does feel more does transport you more. If you are there, there's one newspaper article I've found when a preacher in new. Jersey is adjusting to this phenomenon. He says that one of his church members. Is Not coming to church anymore. But instead it staying home and listening to records by Reverend James Gates, and he says, you know I can't understand how someone who was preaching a sermon. Thousand. Miles, away is causing my church number to have religious experience. You know five hundred miles away. So the is in the twenties, is a real phenomenon that people can finally ear. Very very expressive style and never have to leave their home. This is a real nominal folks. So your asset, your about the period when radio is beginning as well. So tell us why radio wasn't an outlet because that that could have been opportunity to hear a sermon live thousand miles away with a powerful am transmitter. So. Why was that less likely? For this group of preachers who was a couple of reasons I would say I is. Part of this. Aspect of Racial Discrimination African American preachers have a difficult time in the twenties getting on the radio As you know, a lot of radio in the early days is sponsored by corporations, and so there are many corporations who are concerned, what if they're sponsoring the? The X Corporation radio. Isla, there's some concern on corporate executives about having their products, their corporation too closely aligned with African, their kids. So there's some concern about having african-americans links to corporate radio. The other is just the way in which radio Spike and radio. Ownership across the country, African Americans lag behind white Americans in having radio sets in their homes. Part of that is due to electrcity the African American population during the twentieth is going through a major migration leaving rule America. Particularly, the world will south and moving to urban America where they'll have more access to. Electricity for radio, but that's a very, very staggered experience. Another reason is also because of the way that mainline churches in America for the most part dominate with radio in America, and by mainline on me established Presbyterian established Baptist Episcopalian organizations are excuse me denominations of this nature. What evangelical white preachers who are not connected to these established denominations. If they want to get onto radio, they have to pay to get on or as established preachers such as Henry Emerson Foster who was at Riverside, church famous Riverside Church in New York. He get free time to be on radio because he's. STABLEST were Mrs Denomination? And is, is that what you're satellite preacher or as was that also He's a white and palm early, the main line denominations aided in rotate a lot of they didn't have a sort of a circle of folks who were approved to get on religious radio. It was stopped. They came together came up with the terms. There would be no controversial subjects, but since radio was sort of a public utility that it should be used up north local communities. So they were inspirational messages that nothing controversial nothing about the theological distinctiveness of these organizations, but even jellicoe creatures by the name like slim likes of Amy Simple McPherson without in California at the Foursquare Gospel Church. Angelus Temple folks of that nature. They actually had to pay to get on the radio pay commercial time still part of what happens early on as they approaching or radio, but they're also asking for donations so they can stay on radio. So. What African Americans up with all this of set in front of them It's difficult for African American preachers to get on radio on the phone graph side. It's a wonderful opportunity on a phonograph side because the phonograph trade industry begins losing money to to radio, people are a by radio sets and photograph companies are not are losing losing sales. they, looked to African Americans to bolster. Their their bottom line and bad began in nineteen twenty with the advent of modern booze being recorded on the radio with a like serve Mamie Smith and others that was the first Black Blues Record recorded in nineteen twenty, and then from there, this phonograph industry relive begins to focus and concentrate on a new aspect of the market, and that's the African American community. Community, that's the voice. Yeah. That's Jennifer. That's the voice of Laurent Martin. Associate. Professor at Washington University in St Louis, and we're talking today on radio survivor about his book preaching on Wax from New York. University press. Two Thousand Fourteen, which is about the phonograph and the shaping of modern African American religion and their own Martin. You just described this idea that. Radio in the twenties was was taking away revenue from the phonograph industry. So they turned to the African American audience, which was being denied access to the radio. So the phonograph industry starts to try to sell more records to African Americans which to. which does is that why American music is what American music is.

America James Gates New York African American community Wayne Westinghouse Atlanta Laurent Martin Patriots Jersey Riverside Church Hallelujah Miles University press Angelus Temple Georgia researcher Mamie Smith X Corporation Isla
"african american" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"african american" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Groups of people who are often neglected. I believe it. This is gonNA sound like a really awful. All question you ever watch the TV show new Amsterdam. I just started watching. You know because I used to watch. This is us, but now it comes on the same time as black ish in makes a mix this which we're like both shows and stuff like that, so but the moment that black ish goes off. I always turn to Amsterdam. Because I remember I was looking for something because it's not ready to go to bed, I want something to watch TV or whatever and turn on a new Amsterdam in. They were working with These African Americans in the Barbara shop now it's. Getting that and is so funny, because I can't think of I got a Frat Bro. Memory kept off aside, but he's a matter of fact. He's from Oakland but he lives in Los Angeles and his. Event is called trapped medicine, and eventually they go to different barbershops around south, central Los Angeles and I think either. They get free haircuts and promote. Cardiovascular disease and awareness in her take care of herself. Menam can't think of his name bread. His organizations called trap medicine. He went to Morehouse. University, So, that's going to bother me. By I I. Encourage you guys to deafened. Look at the medicine because ever listened to this and. Is because he's doing some positive things. Djamil Lacy Djamil Lacey. Lacey yeah, told him out. The reason I brought that up was because. The white doctor was sitting in the black barbershops, wanting to promote cardiovascular health like blood pressure testing all that stuff, and he wasn't part of their community, so they were ignoring him, and so he gets the bright idea to teach. The Barber's how to do the testing now they're not medically trained. And of course, the board of the hospital has a tizzy fit, and I guess somebody goes, and and they see the barber is doing you know the test? I think they might have been do. Blood sugar testing to I watched Kinda late at night, and I watched for entertainment, and then just kind of it's brain doesn't doesn't i. don't need the details to remain. Should I just remember cover time I talk to you? I think about that episode. How you know he was trying the white director of medicine doctor was trying to help communities. Help themselves there's. An I think I think that's important it is. There's so much until Barbara Shop. It is a member because content about last time. We were hosting amateurs of called the power three in one of the places that really help promote was the barbershop and things from people. See that you're from a community and they blew what you're doing stuff like I. can only go to Barbara. Starr slower than other things to do, but those bombers are cutting hair all day in they kind of promote and they talked. talked to different groups of people about what you're doing components of it because you gave them the blueprint what to do, that's like additional promotion, and it was like a badge of honor, because my yards from the suburbs of Indianapolis in give him a haircut in West Chicago when I was taking classes when Dr Program and they thought so highly. Let me hang the poster. To light with all the other things that they promoted community like like like you know a badge of honor, and it's just one of from. We'll see because. When people see what you do, system to slow unique has aware northwestern. Psychology, switcher? And what happens like you could be in the most obscure area. And we'll say on team. Uncle, my Granddad, my grandma, my whomever. They have some Alzheimer's. They had a stroke they how all this stuff in? We didn't know what to do, but when we see you, let us pass you. Pester you with these questions because you're resource that we don't normally have, and that's why like that's so committed to like this whole idea of community, neuro, psychology and cognitive agent health disparity because I believe that this utility and I think like we're just at the tip of the. And so much more to do with it. I agree. Well? That's a wrap for this week. If you enjoyed this episode, you know the routine ratings reviews. Share this episode with friends family strangers. Follow me on social media, so you get to see all the other fun things that are going on in my caregiving life, and as always over in your ears again next Tuesday..

Amsterdam Djamil Lacy Djamil Lacey Barber Barbara Shop Menam Los Angeles Alzheimer Barbara Oakland Morehouse director Indianapolis Chicago Starr Dr Program
"african american" Discussed on Black History in Two Minutes

Black History in Two Minutes

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"african american" Discussed on Black History in Two Minutes

"Dry-cleaning gas masks and traffic signals are some of the many innovations that we owed to the ingenuity of early African American inventors. In eighteen twenty one. Thomas Jennings became the first African American to be granted a patent. Jennings been the process of dry scouring. A forerunner to dry cleaning, it is surprising that Jennings was able to patent his process of dry scouring, even though he was free, because there are still a great deal of resistance on part of lawyers to take African, Americans says clients and patent their ideas and inventions. Regardless of how the lawyers being a felt. Jennings had staked claim for blackened vendors. And once slavery was abolished. A steady flow of African Americans was able to patent their inventions. Among them was judy read? The first African woman to receive a pet. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty four read patented a machine for needing enrolling dough. Ms Reed signed the application with an X. Indicating that while she was a brilliant inventor. She had never been taught to read or write. Two of the most influential early black inventions came from the mind of one inventor. Garrett mortgage. Garrett, Morgan, invented breathing device, which is a equivalent to what we would call gasmask. There's a story that in nineteen sixteen, there was a natural gas explosion in the Midwest and Morgan was able to demonstrate that his gas mask actually save people's lives, and so his invention got a great deal of notoriety. Years later after witnessing the traffic, Accident Morgan devised another invention. This time to make driving safer. Morgan ended up patenting a new kind of traffic light that would allow people to have a little bit more time to stop, which was the forerunner to the yellow lights recognizing how hard it had been to get his gas mask except it around the country, he sold it to General Electric. He knew that because he was African American he did have the access to the kind of markets that would help those inventions sell. Later black innovators stood on the shoulders of Jennings read Morgan and other patent. Pioneers such as Jan Matt, Zellweger Creator of shoemaking machine and Sarah good inventor of a folding bed. Their inventions not only improve daily life. But they also established black people's role in fostering America's long tradition of trail, blazing.

Thomas Jennings Morgan Garrett Zellweger Creator Ms Reed Jan Matt judy Midwest America General Electric Sarah
"african american" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

09:06 min | 1 year ago

"african american" Discussed on Short Wave

"How long was Robert on the transplant? Waiting List before he got offered that like initial face. Oh very very quickly that offer came. I think about a month after after he got on the list which is pretty unheard of and then after that it was a very long wait for a second one in my understanding is that he turned down. The first face that he was offered heard was that said the way it works is they try to find a donor who is close in complexion match as possible. Just because it makes you know the surgery easier ear the cosmetic result is better and it also helps ease the recovery mentally. I think just because your identity changes as little as possible And this donor honor that they found was much much lighter in complexion than Robert They use a one eighteen scale to kind of talk about the the color of the donors that they're looking at Roberts about a fifteen or sixteen and this donor I think was a one No darker than a three and Robert just decided that that was not going to work for him and that he wasn't quite ready to take on a change that drastic. You know one thing that he said that I thought was kind of interesting. That he wasn't really didn't really feel like he was in a rush all he wanted was to be able to use his face To each normally closes mouth drink through a straw to kiss his daughter on the cheek so to him. You know it. It was not the kind of thing that he was thinking about all day every day it was sort of when we find the right one. It will happen but he was not impatient at all. So eventually Robert. Burt did get a face. Bat matched his complexion enough that he accepted it. Tell me a little bit about the actual surgery. So the surgery was insane it takes about sixteen hours including including all of the phases. It was led by an amazing surgeon at Brigham and women's Hospital. His name is Dr Bohdan. POMAHAC this was his ninth face transplant. Which is incredible to me He started out by flying to the site where the donor had died And he and his recovery team started by detaching his face in tissue shoe so that they could be reattached Roberts so they put it in this cooler and then they fly back to Boston. Where team is prepping Robert buyers starting to Detach some of his nerves and vessels So they start with the neck and make sure that all of that goes smoothly and then once there are signs that the transplant it will be successful than they remove his skin And start reattaching. All of the vessels and nerves with extremely painstaking work like tiny. Amy Tiny stitches that they have to do under a microscope. Wow that's a lot and like scientifically pretty cool. Oh it's amazing. So Robert was the first African American American to receive a full face transplant. Tell me a little bit about why. That's such a big deal you know. There's a long history of African Americans being mistreated by The US medical system going back to you know times of slavery when slaves were often recruited to be unwilling participants in medical experiments And something I really uncovered in my reporting and talking to people medical historians and people who study the space is that the legacy of mistreatment treatment through things like again experimentation on slaves and the Tuskegee experiment in which. US researchers denied black men with syphilis treatment for decades. And you know all of these horrible examples have really culminated in a feeling of mistrust in the medical system among black Americans. So they're much more hesitant president to do things like organ donation because they don't inherently trust that a doctor is going to do what they say they're going to do with the organ. The study that you were talking about is kind of infamous infamous Syphilis experiment their apologies and people came out and talked about how unethical it was and out never should have gone forward. In the way that it did headbutt men died and men pass onto their partners into their children. And it's it's very hard to make that go away. I don't think that you can you. Ram and that study lasted decades. It was a very long study. And it's it's frankly incredible to me that something like this was going on during Robert Chelsea lifetime. I'm GonNa play you take proper. He actually talked a little bit about that. There's very little donor ships. Our community carousing resulted the history particularly ending African American culture. The scripture schism is is very blue. It's not just skepticism. But we will history. This is not a law for Austin throughout confident System and that legacy has unfortunately followed the African American community for centuries in decades since then. Yeah I mean let's talk a little bit about that because I think in your piece. It said that only seventeen percent of black patients awaiting an organ transplant got one in Twenty fifteen compared with about thirty eighty percent of white patients right. So there's a definite disparity there correct so there's a few different factors that contribute to that one being that rates of disease or just much higher among black Americans and part of it which I found fascinating is that black Americans are far less likely to ask their family members and loved ones to donate for them so oh having a really visible example like Robert Chelsea could make an enormous impact on encouraging people to to register as organ donors to see it as a good thing and to sort of literally. See the face of what this can do work. Arkansas save equals is. I'm GONNA narrow transplant. Illuminate A- cursing of sickle cell disease and argued a chance to not only a lot of this glut out of the coot. Now we'll talk in humanity are I would not have heard this condo focuses Horton interest To this degree if I had gone through this experience so yes there is a great deal of responsibility. How shoulders are feeling well heart? Yeah that sounds like the Robert that I know yeah and I was. I liked it because I asked him about and he was was like well. Let me tell you some things. Let me sit down and let me tell you about organ donation you know what I mean. It was just like boom boom boom. These are the things you can do. This is why it's important and I thought that was pretty awesome. He is far from done now that the surgery is done. I think this is something. He's going to be working on for years in the future. Right so Let's talk about how Roberts doing now. You've checked in with him a little bit about his recovery. Yeah I mean from the very beginning. His doctors were blown away by how well he's doing. He had very very few complications locations after the surgery His face looked great right away. He was up and walking and talking days after the surgery needed. Very few painkillers His vision was a little off. He had some swelling around his eyes and some extra skin on his eyelids so he couldn't see all that clearly and people kept telling him how great his face as looked and he really couldn't see at that well and that was just really striking to me. That people are so impressed by the surgery but Robert's just China China Z.. Trying to recover you know since then he has just done amazingly well and you can even here in the tape that you've played for me. His voice is so much clearer than it was is when he was discharged his recovery has really been remarkable to watch with garbage. Grace of God. Maddie do this are are not had any pain. Wow you you you heard ago valley skin is not to talk to Lily's rally how. How would you like to gear with a little along? The lillies valley. I I like your attitude. That's this gummy okay. Ascension are optimistic causative thinking who has released the Dalai you got to get done in order to excursion excursion. So Robert Wood. You see more than anything. Your faith has has helped you through this experience. Grog Kerr's me. Who is a curfew? Genoa Woah. You're I was smiling. The whole time listening to that clip because he has said almost verbatim all of those things to me and it's it's been very very affirming. I think to see their response to the story. I've gotten numerous emails from readers. Who thanked Robert for sharing his a story and a few have even told me that they've decided to become organ donors since reading it which is just incredible and I think a real testament to the story that Robert is telling both Robert Chelsea Jamie disarm for talking with us today? Today's episode was produced by Brett Hansen and edited by Vietnam. I mattie suffiad yeah thanks. For listening to shortwave N._P._R...

Robert Robert Chelsea Roberts Brigham and women's Hospital Robert Wood US Robert Chelsea Jamie Genoa Woah Amy Tiny Dr Bohdan Burt president Boston Grog Kerr Bat Arkansas painkillers Ram
"african american" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:45 min | 3 years ago

"african american" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Houston, We have a podcast welcome to the official podcast of the NASA Johnson Space Center episode 32 African American History Month. I'm Gary Jordan. I'll be your co host today along with Kawhi Harris. The lead budget analyst for propulsion and power engineering division, and the chair of the African American employees Resource Group KYW thanks for coming on, Hey, Gary. Glad to be here. So we have these groups here at the center called employee resource groups, and KYW here is the chair of the African American employees Resource Group. So we teamed up to do a special episode for African American History Month where will be bringing in four guests that specialize in different areas across the center to do four unique segments. That's right. We're very proud of our employees Resource Group, and we have folks with the riot range of skills today. We have guest involved in life support systems and a flight controller, robotics, engineering, and human health and performance. Awesome. I'm excited that we can bring everyone together for this episode. So this is pretty cool because you'll see all in one episode how many. Things are going on at the same time, So with no further delay, Let's go light speed and jump right ahead to talk with our guests from across the Center for African American History Month. Enjoy. Declining vibe market County. Marc Chagall deserve we have on now. All right KYW Thanks for a helping me open up this episode. But uh, before we go to our first guest, kinda wanted to set some context about Yorke's these, these employee resource groups. So if you can kind of start off by talking about what is an employee Resource Group here at the Johnson Space Center and then about yours. The African American employees Resource Group said the mission of the a ERG is to serve gear. See as a catalyst to strengthen JSE recruitment on an retention engagement and development of African Americans at J. Thus contributing to the maximum inclusion, an innovation of the juicy workforce, and a Hanson success of the NASA mission. Envision. We do a lot of outreach events through to community. We feel it's important to have a focus on community. Let them know that there are people out here at AFC who looked like them who work here. How can give them hope that they can also work here. We also promotes Stam a lot. We bring in speakers And we focus a lateral, develop an armed. Louise, We have several training sessions throughout the year. We have speakers come in and is all about helping to make J C A and even better place to work Hossam are I want excited to kind of kick this off. So All right, Chi, who is going to be our first guest today. First, his anti a chambers She's to Thermopylae humidity control, subsystem manager of the EIA SIS and the life-support systems branch. She started here is a coop has worked on a lot of different projects in our time here. All right. Well producer, Alex, let's play the warm whole sound effect in get right into that. Talk. Okay, So so you start a your journey here as a cooperate I did. I started Basically, I got into So I went in the University of Texas at Austin Okocha were, I does pursued a degree and uh, in aerospace engineering and um, but prior to that, when I was in high school, I participated in the Texas aerospace scholars program. Um, I believe they've updated it, uh, since then the name of it as a and cost. Now it's a national community colleges that they bring they bring Community College students from all over the nation. I think now yet how That's awesome. Now they, um, I remember, uh, it was advertised in my high school. Um, hey, were analysis looking for high school students to come to a NASA and have mentor ness engineer mentors. And I was I hopt right on it. And uh, I went to NASA for about a week. I we had like a series of assignments up until that point. And uh, spent a week at NASA and I learned about the Co-op program, and Alan was like one of the primary hiring grounds first for students or for full-time employees. And I was sold. So when I uh, the ferry very, very first career fare at University of Texas, I was a freshman and the NASA booth was the booth that I went to first hand in my resume, end that following year, they were actually hiring sophomore level. Since uh, I interviewed in, uh, was offered a coop uh, at NASA cells really excited. Nod Aniko off is, uh, it's a rotational programme, right? So you go multiple times. Yeah,

NASA African American History Month employee Resource Group Resource Group NASA Johnson Space Center KYW University of Texas Gary Jordan Marc Chagall Houston engineering division Kawhi Harris Johnson Space Center analyst Nod Aniko official Yorke Stam