35 Burst results for "African American"

Caller: Federal Aid Usually Goes to Rich People First Than Poor People

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:59 min | 1 d ago

Caller: Federal Aid Usually Goes to Rich People First Than Poor People

"Wanted to make a comment just to straighten things out because you're really misinforming people or what vice president meant when she was saying about the federal funds. So you know what she meant Dwayne? Yes. Do tell me because I'm not a racist person. I actually, I'm actually an African American that has Irish white Irish running through my blood veins, Cherokee, Indian to running through my blood banks. So I'm definitely not a racist, but I do know something about the political world because I spent a little time in it and what she was basically saying is because all across the United States, every word you go in the political world, the money the funds that are coming in from the state, it always goes to the upper class first to build the areas to do their streets. I'm not talking about it. Where's your proof of that? Where's your proof of that to win? What people told me. Now look at this. Where's your proof? Now, if you check, all you have to do is look. No, no, you're calling on the program making the accusation. Where's the proof? I'm telling you where the proof is. Everything looked at who did up the beaches and did everything those that money did not come from the rich people's pocket. It came from taxpayers pocket. And what those that are holding those positions, they want to make sure that they're building up which is no problem. They want to make sure that they're building very nice areas with those funds and a lot of the poor income areas they do not. Dwayne, did you even look at, did you even look at Fort Myers? I mean, that was the most devastated area most of the homes most of the homes there people were living in trailers.

Dwayne United States Fort Myers
White Farmers in South Africa Are Facing Land Seizures and Violence

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:52 min | 1 d ago

White Farmers in South Africa Are Facing Land Seizures and Violence

"Don't know if you've been following what's been going on in the last well now several years. In South Africa, South Africa, now black majority country, ruled by the rule really by the party that was instrumental in overthrowing apartheid, the party that fought apartheid for decades, the party of the African National Congress sometimes known as the ANC. And now South Africa has a multi party system. There are a number of parties. The ANC party is the majority party. And it controls the National Assembly. And what's been going on in South Africa really quite alarming, disturbing in many ways, two things. One is the forfeiture and confiscation of the land. Of white people, particularly white farmers. Now, some of this is unquestionably a legacy of apartheid, but nevertheless, what you have is you've got black gangs showing up at white farmhouses and the second point is not just the confiscation of land, but horrific assaults attacks and murders. There have been murders of whole families in some cases. And so the white farmers are living, well, let's just call it on the edge. And let's remember that they are also in a black majority society. Sometimes it's tempting to make a kind of easy comparison between the situation in the United States. Let's say the situation in the United States going back to the days of segregation. Because in some ways, there is an analogy between the segregationists and the segregationists here would be the Democrats in the south. And the afrikaners who are the ruling party, the African or government, in South Africa, imposing segregation on the blacks in South Africa. But of course, the key difference was that in the south, blacks were a minority. It was the white majority. Run by the Democrats who imposed segregation, whereas in South Africa, it was a white minority of Africans, the Africans originally descended from the Dutch, who migrated to South Africa going back now a couple of centuries, or a century and a half. And so when apartheid was overturned, you now had a very unstable and dangerous situation because in some ways what the black majority wanted and it's not it's understandable why this impulse would be there is revenge.

South Africa Anc Party Majority Party African National Congress ANC National Assembly African Or Government United States
David Rubenstein on How to Invest

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:34 sec | 1 d ago

David Rubenstein on How to Invest

"How to invest because it's all about financial literacy. If I can begin on page 63 with John W Rogers. First of all, would you tell people who John W Rogers is? It's a fascinating interview you did with him. But he's also got an amazing backstory. Sean W Rogers is an African American who went to Princeton, captain of the basketball team, two years after graduating from Princeton, started the first African or the what is now the largest African American investment company in the United States, Ariel capital. It's now co CEO by him and melody hobson.

John W Rogers Sean W Rogers Princeton Basketball Ariel Capital United States Hobson
Arrests Made in Fatal Shooting of Rapper PnB Rock

The Officer Tatum Show

01:40 min | 6 d ago

Arrests Made in Fatal Shooting of Rapper PnB Rock

"We got two articles that I wanted to read the rapper P and V P and B rock that was murdered. Out in LA at a rosco chicken and waffles. They found a suspect, but then I'm reading this arcade says man implicated in PnB rock murder clears his name. I haven't been able to read that article yet, but I read the first one, maybe I'll go in succession. And start with his first one said LAPD released a photo of the suspect and rapper P and B, rocks killing. Very, very unfortunate, says LAPD investigated named a gentleman named Freddie Lee, trong, and African American men as the suspect in the deadly shooting they believed that he approached the rapper, demanded his jewelry and proceeded to shoot him several times in front of the rapper's girlfriend along with terrified patrons and staff. Tron is considered to be arm and dangerous and authorities are asking anyone who sees him to call 9-1-1. This is the department also confirmed a 17 year old was arrested in a killing, but did not disclose any details. So pretty much a 17 year old was his son. And he literally robbed him for jewelry, and he says before the robbery officials said Allen's girlfriend posted a couple's location and a rapper also posted a video of him wearing expensive jewelry. LA sheriff, I think his Michael Moore said they believe that the suspects saw the rapper and his girlfriend whereabouts and tracked them down and robbed and shot him.

Lapd Freddie Lee Trong LA Tron Allen Michael Moore
How Chad Jackson Got Involved With 'Uncle Tom 2'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:56 min | Last week

How Chad Jackson Got Involved With 'Uncle Tom 2'

"Back with Chad Jackson follow him right now on Twitter at Chad O Jackson. He is co producer, co writer for the amazing sequel to Larry elders, Uncle Tom, it's called Uncle Tom two. Chad, you were a kind of star, I think, very early on in the original movie. It focused on your story as a successful self made man in the entrepreneur who didn't see himself as a vector because of his skin color. How did you transition to being a co producer and co writer for the sequel? I'm curious. That's a great question. And just to kind of close out the last thought that I was making. So, Stokely Carmichael, he said, oh, sorry, no, yes, yes. So let's go back to Stokely Carmichael, NAACP. Give us that historic nugget that most people have forgotten. Yeah, so Stokely Carmichael admitted in the 90s and we have video footage of this. In fact, it's an Uncle Tom two, where he said that he was part of that agenda to impress the term African hyphen American on the black folks and what he'd had in mind is if you think you are an American, you'll fight to preserve and to conserve capitalist America. However, if you know you're not an American, you'll fight to destroy America. And he was absolutely right. I mean, look at the riots, look at the fact that a lot of these egalitarian socialist programs that are being pushed in this country, they're using black people to do it. And it's unfortunate what's happening, but it was important to showcase that in the film, to your question about how I got involved in Uncle Tom two. As you mentioned, I was running my business here in Dallas, Texas, my business is still active. We're still going. We're still taking care of our customers. But I am a natural researcher. If something interests me, I'm going to obsess over. I'm going to dig deep into it and find out everything I can about it.

Uncle Tom Stokely Carmichael Chad Jackson Chad O Jackson Larry Elders Chad Naacp Twitter America Dallas Texas
Who's Hiding Footage of Successful Black America?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:29 min | Last week

Who's Hiding Footage of Successful Black America?

"Hiding footage of black Wall Street of successful black America? Why would people hide that footage chat that you opened your movie with? Well, it's not so much that they're hiding it, is that they're ignoring it. The mainstream media, unfortunately, a mainstream historians and our public school system. It's really comes down to what do they emphasize. They emphasize struggle. They emphasize oppression when it comes to black people because they want to communicate this narrative that we are oppressed and downstream of that being bitter downstream of that being anger or angered or enraged is the demand for policy. And so they want to push policy, socialist egalitarian esque policy is really their end goal. Stalin famously said if I can take your history, I can take your country and that's exactly what they've done with this black success that our great grandfathers and great grandmothers enjoyed. They were patriots. We found hours of footage of black southerners having 4th of July parades marching down to the street with their American flags. These were people who loved their country and they loved their God, and they loved their communities. And so if we can be blinded from that as American youth as black American youth and the story that we're constantly being told is that this country hates us, it's always hated us. That's why you're in African hyphen American. Then we can begin to usher in some kind of egalitarian policy that will make life better for all people. And

America Stalin Patriots
Charlie Welcomes Salem Radio Colleague, Officer Brandon Tatum

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:13 min | Last week

Charlie Welcomes Salem Radio Colleague, Officer Brandon Tatum

"Joining us now is a great patriot and a colleague on the Salem radio network, his show is doing very, very well. You can hear all across the country as he does a fabulous show every night. It's Brandon Tatum. Brandon, welcome back to the program. Charlie, thank you for having me on. Loving the radio show, man. Listening to it, almost every night when I'm driving around and Karen and Larry elder's legacy. Tell us about the film. Uncle Tom two. The Uncle Tom too, I think is a tremendous film that tells the true history of Americans of African descent. And it digs into the nuances of how marxists individuals in our country, namely the leaders of BLM are literally taken the black community down the drain and having this anti American theology that's causing individuals who are black in this country to hate America to feel like a perpetual victim and those things are detriments and we have to change those and Uncle Tom two kind of expressed the avenue in which we can go about changing some of the things that are going on in our country and really espousing success and Victor or success and allowing us to be big tours moving forward.

Uncle Tom Brandon Tatum Larry Elder Salem Brandon Charlie Karen BLM America Victor
Breaking Down the Truth on 'The Woman King'

The Officer Tatum Show

02:14 min | Last week

Breaking Down the Truth on 'The Woman King'

"So they have this movie to project them and portray these black women, a black woman as a female king in this all black tribe of warriors who supposedly were conquering for good and going out and doing this heroic thing because they're just as good as men. Come to find out, this is supposed to be based on a true story. Of a real tribe in a real female, I say platoon in the early 1800s. And if you had to take a wild guess with your wild guess B that this movie ain't real, it ain't got nothing to do with what really happened. And it's ironic that black folks are involved in a movie portraying black folks who enslaved other black folks. And in America's white people won't go see it. You can't make this stuff up. So there's a real African kingdom called dami. I may be saying it wrong. I think it's dahomey. The homie of dahme and it was a tribe in the kingdom in the 1800s that focused on putting and then they had an all female warrior contingency called the goji, it could be a Golgi. Somebody correct me if my English is wrong, it could be a goji tribe or at least the faction of women who were female warriors. But if you look at the history of these female warriors, they were explicitly involved in enslaving other black people. They weren't this isolated group of people functioning together outside of men. They would join with men to go and conquer other tribes in some cases they beheaded them. They ripped their jawbone apart and put them away and put them out of the people's mouths. I'm assuming while they were alive, murdering other black people, and they were known for the proliferation of enslaving other black people torturing them and things like that.

America
Google, IBM Backtrack on Race-Conscious Fellowships

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:55 min | 2 weeks ago

Google, IBM Backtrack on Race-Conscious Fellowships

"I'm continuing my discussion of the misdoings and malfeasance of various social media platforms. And now I want to talk about Google. Now what I'm saying about Google to some degree also applies to IBM. Apparently, Google and IBM and I talked about this on the podcast, think about a week or so week or two ago. Established race based scholarship programs. And established them in coordination with many elite universities. The Google program alone was called the Google fellowship. And Google was carrying out this program with Harvard, Princeton, MIT, University of Pennsylvania, duke, NYU, UNC Chapel Hill, Johns Hopkins, I'm Carnegie Mellon. So this is a Google fellowship, and basically under the Google fellowship, if the selection process produced more than two nominees for this for this fellowship, Google required that the next two nominees quote self identify as a woman black African descent, you know, the whole, the whole gamut, trans, LatinX, or person with a disability. But it was essentially a kind of mandatory quota. You have to do this. So these colleges entered into contracts with Google as a requirement. Now, this as it turns out, flatly violates not only the well, gladly vibrate violates a civil rights law that goes all the way back to 1866, which completely bans racial discrimination and contracting. And let's notice that these are contracts between Google and these universities. And then there's also title 6 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which bans racial discrimination at federally funded schools, and all these schools, some of them, of course, private, some of them, public, but nevertheless, they all have massive contracts with the federal government and so they fall under the federally funded clause. Now, the free Beacon, the Washington free Beacon, publicized, did an article, which I talked about here on the podcast about this policy on the part of Google. And they also mentioned that IBM has a similar policy IBM had a fellowship program, and it required a mandated that half the nominees of this PhD fellowship program B quote diversity candidates. Now, Google talked, I'm sorry, the Washington free Beacon talked to a bunch of civil rights lawyers when they go, well, these programs are illegal.

Google IBM Unc Chapel Hill Carnegie Mellon NYU University Of Pennsylvania Johns Hopkins MIT Princeton Harvard Duke Federal Government Washington
'I didn't want to miss it': Royal funeral on global live TV

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 2 weeks ago

'I didn't want to miss it': Royal funeral on global live TV

"People around the world have been watching Queen Elizabeth's funeral on TV In Hong Kong British citizen Tom fell remembered being at the queen mother's funeral hand Princess Diana's So hard not to not to be there So he and others around the globe watched from a South African amphitheater She showed us courage She showed us Judy To British pubs in Paris It's a historical moment in English history and I didn't want to miss it And here in Washington Didn't feel right It is watching my own home Saw Germain Washington

Tom Fell Queen Elizabeth Princess Diana Hong Kong Judy Paris Washington Germain Washington
‘The Woman King’ takes North American box office throne

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 2 weeks ago

‘The Woman King’ takes North American box office throne

"Business remains relatively slow in theaters despite a fleet of new well reviewed releases I'm Ben Thomas Let's go to the movies We are the whole net The woman king starring Viola Davis as the leader of an all female army in the West African kingdom of dahomey in the 1800s easily led the North American box office earning an estimated $19 million in its debut The horror flick barbarian drops to second in its second weekend well off the pace with 6.3 million Newcomers pearl and see how they run follow Get off the train With bullet trains still drawing crowds at number 5 I'm Ben Thomas

The Woman King Ben Thomas Viola Davis
Biden to discuss Ukraine war with South African President Ramaphosa

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 weeks ago

Biden to discuss Ukraine war with South African President Ramaphosa

"President Biden meets today with the president of South Africa White House press secretary karine Jean Pierre says the bilateral meeting at The White House today will cover a range of issues President Biden looks forward to consulting with president ramaphosa on a range of topics including climate crisis opportunities to increase trade and investment Ramaphosa is a leader among several African nations who have maintained a neutral stance in the aftermath of Russia's invasion of Ukraine largely because of the support the Soviet Union gave to the African National Congress in a fight to end apartheid decades ago During a visit by Secretary of State Antony Blinken last month South Africa's foreign minister accused the west of focusing on the Ukraine conflict to the detriment of other crises around the globe They say the South African president is emphasizing the need for dialog to find an end to the conflict

President Biden Karine Jean Pierre President Ramaphosa Ramaphosa South Africa White House African Nations Secretary Of State Antony Blin Ukraine African National Congress Soviet Union Russia
LA Unified School District Posts Bizarre Video About Food Neutrality

The Officer Tatum Show

01:02 min | 2 weeks ago

LA Unified School District Posts Bizarre Video About Food Neutrality

"LA unified school district post a bizarre video about food, neutrality. Oh my God, these people are nuts, man. I think this is when you got life too good, you just start getting stupid. Food, neutrality, Los Angeles unified school district, allegedly promotes an eye video on social media about food, neutrality, food choices and health, market it obviously towards children. In the video, which is like something that you'll see out of a Willy Wonka movie with Johnny Depp in it, bizarre woman claiming that food choices are based on a false standard of health. A large African American woman is seen in the video saying that we are incorrectly taught from a young age that our size and therefore the food that we eat are makers are our markers of our own self worth. Now I don't think many people care about yourself worth. It just really about your health.

La Unified School District Willy Wonka Johnny Depp
Sen. James Eastland Was Joe Biden's Racist Friend & Mentor

Mark Levin

01:41 min | 2 weeks ago

Sen. James Eastland Was Joe Biden's Racist Friend & Mentor

"Any of you folks see that movie on Elvis did you see that movie mister producer On Netflix well I had to be dragged and pushed to watch it on Netflix the other night My wifey So damn good movie And there's a senator in that movie Who hates Elvis Because Elvis grew up among African Americans He learned a lot about singing style and his dancing style and so forth From blacks In Mississippi and then later Tennessee Memphis area And he often went back And he didn't have a racist bone in his body Quite the contrary But it shows this James eastland trying to shut out the sound that shows his James eastland as the racist that he was the segregationist said he was That was Joe Biden's friend That was one of Joe Biden's mentors James eastland James eastland John stennis Mississippi You know who Who I'm talking about The Democrat party The Democrats try and rewrite history and say no no no those are Republicans now They were no no they weren't That generation of Democrats died off That's true But the battle over civil rights was Democrats against Republicans and Democrats against Democrats But it was the Democrats

James Eastland Netflix Elvis Because Elvis Elvis Joe Biden Mississippi James Eastland James Eastland John Stennis Memphis Tennessee Democrat Party
Lynchings in America's Inner Cities

The Officer Tatum Show

02:29 min | 3 weeks ago

Lynchings in America's Inner Cities

"We'll get back to the topic of this violence that occurs in the inner city. And I don't understand why our country presidents and we're not having an outcry. As much as COVID, you know how many people in the inner city per CAPiTA are getting killed. How many young men are trapped in a gun and gang violence? And we just, if for decades, I'm going to give you a statistic and this was fact checked. People today cry about racism, slavery, and the plight of the white man against the black man. Now, during slavery, I don't believe we have any record of how many slaves were killed. I would argue that more slaves were killed once they were released than were killed in slavery. Why do you say that, mister Tatum won because I went to college and I learned about African studies and then you put two and two together with logic and you say that they had to purchase black people as slaves. And so if you kill them, you're really throwing away your money that can not be recoverable. So many times they used to work them beat them, abused them, but they did not kill them because they needed them to work. After slavery was abolished, they had no use for some of these black people, so sometimes, in some cases, they would be killed indiscriminately. If you look at the legacy of lynching in America, there's about 3400 black lynchings in the 68 year recorded history of lynching in this country. And could there be more? Yes, there could be more that wasn't recorded. Could the number be off, it could possibly be off. I would extend to you, we should double that number. We could say that it only is half of all the lynchings in the 68 year of lynching. Let's round it up to 6000 lynchings. And we'll run with that. The entire 68 year legacy of lynching in this country, let's say that there was 6000 lynchings of black men. And that's me doubling it up. You look at the violence that occur in America today, mostly in the inner cities, you're talking maybe between 6, 7000 black men murdered by other black men in one year. And one year,

Mister Tatum America
A Montage of Joe Biden's Recent Blunders & Lies

Mark Levin

01:17 min | 3 weeks ago

A Montage of Joe Biden's Recent Blunders & Lies

"But we don't need to go to ancient history We can go to more recent history Just in the last ten years or so Cut 22 ago And it happens to be as Barack says a three letter word jobs JOBS John Where do you got the first sort of mainstream African American Yes Who is articulate and bright and clean Nice looking guy I mean that's a storybook man We hold these truths to be self evident All men and women created by go you know you know the thing You can not go to a 7 11 or a Dunkin Donuts Unless you have a slight Indian accent to fully I'm not joking And you don't know my state My state was a slave state My state is a border state My state is the 8th largest black population in the country My state is anything from a northeast liberal state I'm not going to be immune I got something to do I got to go do it Chuck Graham state senators here Chuck Stand up chuck let them see you Oh God love you What am I talking about I tell you what you're making everybody else stand up though pal Thank you very very much

Jobs Jobs John Barack Chuck Graham Chuck Stand Chuck
Left Wing Sheep, Have You Any Wool

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:44 min | 3 weeks ago

Left Wing Sheep, Have You Any Wool

"So she says this and I want you to hear how the sheep, the left wing sheep, which is redundant. All leftists are sheep, not all liberals, liberals are weak, but they're not necessarily sheep. But all the left wing sheep on the media. This is how they reported with zero evidence. Zero evidence. This is how they reported the claim by the duke girl. Hey duke volleyball player is speaking out after she and other black teammates. And threatened during a match against Brigham young university on Friday. A volleyball match between CNN university turned ugly after one duke player was heckled with racist slurs, racist slurs, hurled at a dude. During a match at Brigham young. It's not just the absolute racist attacks that Rachel Richardson and her fellow African American volleyball players endured. The richness it was not only called the Indian women. She served during a game against BYU. She was threatened and she said she was made to feel unsafe in a crowded gym. So here's my question. I used to be on Don lemon somewhat frequently. And I would like to ask DOM when you said that. If we were to put you on a lie detector, would you have passed the test if the question that you had to answer was, do you believe what she said to be true?

Volleyball Brigham Young University Rachel Richardson Brigham Young CNN Don Lemon
The Moral Lessons of Slavery

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:19 min | 3 weeks ago

The Moral Lessons of Slavery

"There are good people who support bad things. And I gave the example describing slavery as vicious see, among other reasons that you could save it. Not every slave owner was an evil human being. Even though slavery was evil. Was, first of all, and most important, it was universal slavery. So the people engaged in a universal practice that they didn't even know as bizarre as it sounds to us. Like the ancient Greeks, from whom we theoretically derived but certainly the word democracy comes from Greek word. They assume that slavery was the natural order of life. That is what was assumed by Africans, by Muslims, by Chinese. Slavery was assumed to be a given. And where it was wiped out, it was wiped out by our civilization, the western civilization. Slowly, too slowly, but it was.

"african american" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:37 min | Last month

"african american" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"In light of the newest federal holiday, Juneteenth, the curriculum features a primer on June 19th, 1865, when the enslaved and Galveston Texas learned that they were free, and while students have the option to do research on the history of the reparations movement and Black Lives Matter activism, they won't be required to know these topics for the AP exam. While many of the issues surrounding how African American history is taught, are at the center of the ongoing culture war, this course is more than a decade in the making. The college board, a nonprofit that administers college entrance assessments like the SAT, says high schools had frequently been asking for an AP African American studies class. But when it asked colleges and universities a decade ago, if they would accept college credit for such a class, the answer was no. When college board leaders posed the question to universities again recently, they got a resounding yes, says Trevor packer, head of the college board's AP program. The events surrounding George Floyd and the increased awareness and attention paid towards issues of inequity and unfairness and brutality directed towards African Americans caused me to wonder. Would colleges be more receptive to an AP course in this discipline than they were ten years ago. The college board also hopes AP African American studies, while draw students who are usually underrepresented in AP classes. A 2021 report by the center for American progress found that black students are less likely to enroll in AP classes than their white and Asian peers, and are more likely to attend schools without AP classes. Many of my students report back to me while they're in college, and they say it would have been so good to have this particular course, says nelva Q Williamson, who is teaching the course in Houston and says she plans to include classroom discussion of local examples of redlining. Part of the reason the AP African American studies course is a revelation for many teachers is that there is no standardized K through 12 curriculum for the subject nationally. As Sharon Courtney, a teacher and peekskill New York, who was participating in the pilot, put it, everyone's doing their own thing in different parts of the country, and I'm really happy about the college board's ability to standardize the curriculum and put it out there for everyone at a time when the country needed an organized approach to combat the firestorm of opposition to critical race theory and teaching anything that revolves around African Americans in this country. In fact, while it may not be on the exam, that's one topic that teachers say is sure to come up in class. Students are wise to the controversy and are ready to talk about it.

Trevor packer George Floyd Galveston college board nelva Q Williamson AP AP African American studies co Texas center for American progress Sharon Courtney peekskill Houston New York
"african american" Discussed on Chop On It Radio Network System

Chop On It Radio Network System

02:15 min | 3 months ago

"african american" Discussed on Chop On It Radio Network System

"Varied. But it was a time of good news and a bad news for black radio fans. A lot of things changed, but we're giving you some of the breakdown of some of the history on African Americans and radio, one of the things that we pointed out mean that you can jot down, you can go check out is who was the first black person to own a black radio station, right? And that was professors, Jesse, B Bible, seen. Told you about that. And we'll get into him as well on some of the things that he did, you know what I mean, animated. And also a lot of people question and they ask will. Radio station stored, you know what I mean? Featuring an Australian program for black audiences. You know what I mean? So for us, what race for African Americans started in the mid 20th century. And that's what radio was the most popular medium of mass communications. So programs target it specifically to black audiences, brought together their language, music, and politics and culture, creating new sense of community. Right. So there's a lot of them call it the golden age of radio to golden age of black radio. You know what I mean? So these are the types of, but it also the first radio station. We talked about that too in a breakdown in the information. The ERD was the first radio station owned and program by African American that station was established again in Atlanta, October 3rd, 1949. It was broadcasted on 8 68 ill. So that's right there. That's a big piece of information and a lot of people never even knew, you know what I mean? A lot of history when it relates to African Americans. And radio. And we ain't done. We got a whole lot more to go. We'd be right back though. We gonna die of the truth, baby. Let's go, let's check in with the more lovely. Y'all know the motile platinum group. DRS, right? And gangster lean. So there's a little more building. He's

Jesse ERD Atlanta
"african american" Discussed on The Social Work Routes Podcast

The Social Work Routes Podcast

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"african american" Discussed on The Social Work Routes Podcast

"So that's why. I created jima and it seems to fit in with the story that you told about your us growing up in a community that a lot of mutual End as you described with gentle caged in the breakup of different moon is it. Do you think it made it harder for for young people that than maybe twenty thirty or forty years ago. Oh yes for sure you not right. Now i'll tell people is that i would when i grew up like i said i can walk around every neighborhood and everyone knew who i was right in her cursing girl. You know you had like that the the community built around you. That's that's what the village you had the village around you That kind of you know from the churches to you. Know the the crazy lady on the corner right you know. I had the neighborhood. Police miss johnson. Who if you you weren't at school. She know your grandmother is at work she gonna tell on you So a lot of those kind of things You know are are gone And then you know like i said. The war on drugs really fraction the particularly african american communities it really impacted our community. So hard you know. It took a lot of took a lot of women but it took a lot of men on our communities and so And left that left a big gap And so so when we talk about you don't particularly with some of our african american Young men not really having a you know that support like now And you know and when your support system becomes your social worker your peel in You know all these people who are off at five and we have problems.

twenty thirty five forty years ago johnson african american jima
"african american" Discussed on The Social Work Routes Podcast

The Social Work Routes Podcast

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"african american" Discussed on The Social Work Routes Podcast

"There are visual differences in just resources word. You know a lot different so so in speaking about that. The separation you re to certain historical on the african american community. And could you talk a little bit. About how the african american community developed in northern california in the bay area. How did you come to be an african american community. And you referred also to the panthers who might not be familiar again into an internal sure. I growing up like i. I tell people a lot of times. I didn't know i was poor. I went to college. I knew that there was differences. Just because you know. When you. When i got to high school students visiting people you visiting people outside of my neighborhood. I know that there was a set differences. But i you know. My neighborhood was prior to the war on drugs. It was just rich with culture. We had the the muslims ahead their area. We had we you know. My grandmother was a part of a co-op we had grocery coop. We had all the stores. You stores liquor stores bars pool halls. All those things were owned by african americans. Brian and so So it's so. I spent the. I don't know there was a lot of freedom tonight. Yeah there was a there was a lot of crime. But i. I had no fear walking around the neighborhood Until like i said to toll the war on drugs started happening And so the the panthers heavy in our neighborhood in east palo to the period but in east palo alto with a lot of the food programs. They were always programs. Like i said. The co-op was a big gathering area. So they were always there was always always like a programming going on regards to uplifting the community uplifting african-americans particularly a lot of it geared towards kids young young people And so So so i just have a fond memories of that. Part of angela davis coming in and speaking at home but there afro at the co-op and epa is what we call follow and so along with a lot of the blight in crime. And all that. I also have that that piece. That was kind. The started shifting away. Like i said towards the late seventies to the early eighties when you discuss the panthers. So they were that started in in oakland sixties a which had programs that really kind of from mutual aid within within the african american.

Brian angela davis northern california early eighties late seventies oakland east palo alto tonight east palo african african american african americans americans sixties muslims afro
"african american" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"african american" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"You're in is stressful time. So be kind to yourself and take care. I recently wrote in forbes about how kamala harris may be able to heal the wounds between black women and white women but i defer to our terrific yesterday on these issues. I'd like you to meet dr. Marcia chatelaine a provost distinguished associate professor of history and african american studies at georgetown university here in washington dc. She's a scholar of american life and culture previously. She was an assistant professor of honors in african american studies at the university of oklahoma in norman. She earned her. Phd at brown university and her undergraduate studies at the university of missouri columbia in journalism and religious studies fellow aspiring journalists. They go. Marsha was a terrific expert featured in the recent pbs series. The vote on how women fought for and won the right to vote over an eighty year struggle or more welcomed green connections radio. Marcia thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. Oh you're welcome. You're welcome so our start in the heart of this issue. As i said in my introduction i've understood the black and white women had a kind of love hate relationship if you will during the suffrage battles as i understand it. Black women wanted white women to include abolition in their struggle. But the white women leaders believe the combining the two would keep the legislation from. What is your take on it. Tell us the truth. Because you're the historian so the issue at hand between abolition and suffrage are deeply tied. And that's because a number of figures in the suffrage movement were first activists in the fight against slavery and i think the poignancy of the battle for women's suffrage was the fact that many of the white women who were at the lead of the suffrage movement were anti-slavery and they had supported. Abolitionist may have believed that there was a moral reason to end the system of slavery but when it came to suffrage they were divided over the issue of universal suffrage Some do not believe that black women white men should equally have the vote. Some did not believe that black men and black women should have the vote. So i think that the suffrage movement really exposes the limitations of racial solidarity even among people who were on the right side of history one issue were not able to transfer that sense of grace to the issue of suffrage. And that's where you see the fault lines. In the suffrage movement really emerged from it was the fact that they did not want include african american women visibly or prominently or ideologically in their fight for the right to vote because they believed that it would degrade the quality of the vote of degrade the preciousness of the right and a number of these women again. Even though they were morally opposed to slavery they would not immune from white supremacist ideas. Okay so there's so much to unpack in there. You said something really interesting you said and i paraphrase of course but the the the divisions over the vote represented larger divisions in the racial schisms. If you will Racial solidarity behind the vote. Yes so one of the things that i think..

Marcia Marsha one issue norman dr. Marcia chatelaine yesterday washington dc two georgetown university african american eighty year one university of oklahoma first activists university of missouri columbi kamala harris american black things
"african american" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

Moore Hair Galore Podcast

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"african american" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

"Ancestors being over in africa to agree to endure and the detriment of what are here. Had to endure as being enslaved in america. You know it's still an issue our our hair we're the only race thus wear. Our hair is a controversy for some. You know why. Why are here. You don't have to be in question you know. It's part of our identity. It's part of who we are. Hit me up. I loved here. be bad. Comments questions.

"african american" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

Moore Hair Galore Podcast

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"african american" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

"So there has to be some some sort of Like him in in the product north for it to make the hair you know straight s some form might not be as much as I used to get onto the affirm. I've tried it all. I'm telling you up. I had the farm. Relax sir i had. What was it oil of k. I've had oh. I can't even designer touch. I've had it all up had it all when Slavery was abolished in eighteen sixty five. Racism was still prevalent black people with left black features in more white trace for granted more opportunities. Most african american women were wearing straight hair impressing curl hair styles as we were talking about housekeeping. Jobs were more lucrative in what higher only be called. Moloto was back in the day. They were light. Skinned women were calling models Which was basically a mix mixture of white and black heritage. Most of the blessed could only brooklyn in the plantations In the.

eighteen sixty five brooklyn Moloto african american
"african american" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

Moore Hair Galore Podcast

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"african american" Discussed on Moore Hair Galore Podcast

"Different ethnicities in africa had different hair textures. Patterns and styles vary from dreadlocks in ancient egypt. And niamh be up but before. I continue to pockets. I went to state that there is nothing dreadful about rox hint dreadlocks. Nothing or about that. I simply use that work with the purpose for you. Guys who may not know the hairstyle. I'm referring to all right back to the puck ass. Kiki twists of the mendicant tribes red hair isles in congo and ghana. Looser curls of the sean breed from the blue lonnie tried senegal had their hair curled up and linked in them pow up on the top of their heads in the shape up. Appointee hat all the hairstyles of ancient africans in various regions different there was a common understanding in recognition that their hair held a number of significance ranging from social significance aesthetic value spiritual importance but most importantly law their hair gave them a sense of identity so each tribe had their own sense of style. And you can pretty much recognize what tribe you came from by the style of their hair with that way someone who wore their hair. You know the person's age group marital status gay ethnicity family background. The gen wealth and their rank in society. Here wasn't just to our people. It was highly symbolic people with long full hair. Were known to be rich because they had access to expensive oils in price needed for maintaining their strands. The bigger the person's natural hair the healthier once big hair signified wealth in age group to older women who wore their hair in up dues while the young girls in the wall culture of cynical. Were not ready to get married. Partially saved their hair to look less appealing. That's interesting those with Short drek lots in front of their faces in the niambi. Try were young girls on through puberty while those dreadlocks tied back their hero who were interested in marriage. People of royal backgrounds wore hats or hair pieces in dorner hair with elaborate beads as a simple their prestige. You can wrigley figure out a person by what hairstyle they hit and then in the fifteenth century the trans atlantic slave trade happen countless number of africans from various necessities were forced in even worse when our read it were sold by their fellow africans in two slave ships that took them to europe. I know a lot of people. Don't realize that you know. Europeans weren't only slave traders. There were also other africans who were slave traders. They captured their own basically or other tribes and sell them to the europeans into slavery from europe. They were sold to other countries including america. It was not worth the. Among the europeans that the hairstyles of african stand slave very elaborate braids or twists locked but with shells beezus. Some has strips of cloth material woven in threaded into their walks. This was something to note. Because these africans have very little in the way of clothing while their hairstyles were very elaborate out. Their their clothing and comparison was pretty much basic pieces so we can conclude from this that their hair was clearly more important to them and it was like the major highlight of their appearance..

europe africa america ghana fifteenth century congo two slave ships each tribe african africans niamh senegal trans ancient europeans lonnie Europeans atlantic
"african american" Discussed on The Rural Health Voice

The Rural Health Voice

05:39 min | 2 years ago

"african american" Discussed on The Rural Health Voice

"Strikes me is that in modern medical experiments you always have a test group and a control group in the test group gets the drug and the control group gets jealous Cibo and then the researchers see if and how much the people in the test group improve over those who have the placebo, you know, but as you stated treating syphilis, not the goal documenting the process was the goal which brings me to the next question in the book you use the phrase devalue black bodies. Tell me what that means, Sure. So really what I mean by that when we think about devaluing black bodies is that we know that the first slaves were brought over and sixteen nineteen and since then what many people don't know is that African American slaves especially were used during the time of slavery for a lot of testing they were not seen at home. Time as people. They were seen as Beast of Burden. They certainly were less then at one point they counted as three-fifths of people and so testing on them simply made since the same way we test on Lab Rats now and so one of the most shocking I think examples of this is really a lot of modern Gynecology off. So many people have probably heard of Henrietta Lacks at this point where her cells were used without her consent, but what people don't know is that a lot of the medical procedures in modern Gynecology office were tested on African American female slaves without anesthesia. Additionally. We saw a lot of sterilization of African-Americans for various reasons again, without their consent. And so there's been this continuous devaluation of the bodies of black people and it didn't stop at slave. What we can link it to now and I know that you just did a podcast about maternal health is actually that so one of the things that we know is that we don't know why African American women are dying at a higher rate in childbirth because nobody has studied them and honestly, it's because there wasn't a lot of value placed on studying them. There wasn't a lot of funding Place specifically on looking at maternal health and maternal outcomes for people of color. And so again, and that is devaluing that body that is devaluing the access to adequate Healthcare the access to Real and True health care that communities of color are facing every day. And with that at the beginning of the pandemic, we were told to stay home work from home. Stay away from those not in our immediate family unit as much as possible wife. Is it harder for minorities? Sure. What we find is that it is harder mainly for people of color to abide by those rules because of I'm going to talk on two main issues. The first is employment. So often times what you see is that individuals of.

Cibo syphilis Henrietta
"african american" Discussed on Science Talk

Science Talk

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"african american" Discussed on Science Talk

"Road wanting. This is so exciting. Fred Tuchman is the river keeper for the Pawtuxet River in Maryland and a winner of the Audubon. Naturalist Society Twenty Twenty Environmental Champions Award River keepers are part of the national nonprofit group dedicated to protecting waterways. Swami this conversation with myself began sixteen years ago started production, river, keeper, and the Guy delivered packages to the office. It might have been ups or something like. Like that, so what in the world you guys do? I told him you know. We protect a river, and we sue polluters, and we run advocacy movements. And he said wow thought about that I could see the wheels turning in his head. He was a person of color, and he said I didn't think that black people could do this successfully wore. The white communities would accept doing this. So I realized that there was perspective out there a set of expectations about what any of us are likely to be able to do, and that we had to challenge those expectations all of us as the only African American river keeper in the US Tuchman acts as a bridge between a white, dominated conservation, establishment and communities of color alongside the river. He protects you find challenges being a person of color in working in this field. Sure I feel challenges and their intricate ones because I don't want to. To be identified as the river keeper for the Black Folks. That's kind of futile right I. I feel like I'm representing a movement that wants to protect a watershed that requires as much participation across many boundaries and I do find time to the messing us in black and brown communities necessarily needs to be different, because the problems are different, because the perspective is different, environmental consultant to Chemo Price adds that perspective may be at odds with the perspectives of mainstream environmental groups had to talk to people who. Bring bring trees to neighborhoods. It hadn't even considered the history of African. Americans in trees. People may not be jumping up and down. Going here on trees, you know older people, maybe like you know what reasonable represent safety for me who knows, but it's just being open and honest about an invalidating the fact that not everybody is a tree hugger in it's okay, and while many people consider untrammelled park lands peaceful escapes from the stresses of the city. People of color may view them differently. There's a lot of people that you know of justifiably are afraid of certain parks because that's where people go maybe to. To Do to dump bodies where people go to do things that they don't want other people to see them doing, and she says that people may simply feel unwelcome especially in federal parks. This like that room in your house that has the plastic on the couch gymnastics to go into, but looks really nice, but you can't go use it so sometimes I think people perceive that is just any unaccessible space to them that distance people may feel regarding these spaces comes partly from their not having been included in the process of creating them, maisy us is a landscape architect and arborist and says that city. City planners pay much more attention to the needs and desires of upscale neighborhoods than those of low income communities. I've gone to so many different community admitting and can tell you from firsthand experience. How much more deference communities that are rich white? Get in the in the planning process how they get to Co. create their communities as part of that because they have power that they can leverage in that process. She's found that many people don't fully understand the process one in which city planners create land, use maps and decide the fate of each community everywhere there is. There are people who decide what type. Type of land use goes where rate so if you have like a power plant in your neighborhood, somebody decided that your neighborhood is a good location for that power plant. If you have other types of pollutants in your neighborhood, a lot of times it has to do with industrial land uses or commercial land uses those are decisions that an urban planner would make, and so if you noticed stat, communities of color tend to have these adjacent cities with pollution. That's because somebody approved that land use, but people don't know that land use maps drive like these kinds of decisions and a lot of times people. Are not part of the process when they're creating the land use maps in a lot of times, people are part of the process. Get Nord in the process of creating this,

Black Folks African American river Tuchman Swami gymnastics Chemo Price US consultant
"african american" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

06:46 min | 2 years ago

"african american" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"Because of this focus on on that audience? I think so I mean, we do see, you know jazz, which you know most music historian say is sort of the original music on the American experience that was invented here in the US. Right next quarter around the world and blues as well. I do think that is part of the beginning of American popular music being primarily associated with the African American of. Cultural African American cultural expression, I. Do think that is the beginnings of that because now we could arguably say. America's music that we know exported around the world could argue is hip hop. I'm the Daddy Salah using bad. No matter where you are. Watching television show the other day was One of those competition shows was a dance competition and there were so many hip hop groups pop dance groups competing, but they were from all over the world and it was fascinating to see from Taiwan, the Philippines Japan to Amsterdam, all these different hip hop, dance groups, all of them. You know, they look like you never know from style dance that they're not from the US since. So it's it's quite a phenomenon. The Way that African American music coaching expressions going around the globe. As you mentioned, hip-hop I've also heard that you know these early. Preacher records that were talking about. That that you can show linkages between that and and rap and hip hop culture to. You know as long as we're on that topic, maybe you could talk about that a little bit. Sure I think that there is A. Connection. Between. Talk about the African, American. Sermon by that meaning with could sermon. The sermon is preached to a rhythm rhythm and cadence. It involves a call and response that had experience as deep connection deep roots to cultural expression in West. Africa, which is brought over by enslaved Africans and continues within the US and as adapted to the US new and then We see the connection wish even with with with hip hop in with rappers who are. are able to tell us tell you a story about whether their life or fable or story that is has a a a meaning to it in. All is done to the pace in the rhythm of ace drums, and there's often a call and response whether it's a group or whether it's the audience, you get a sort of a talking back and forth, and that is all very muscle connected onto the African American chance. Yeah. It's amazing to get this history and also sort of back to the economics, tying it back to radio that the economics of of radio had an impact. The radio had impact on the record industry the. So you talked about how some of these records from from these African American preachers ended up out selling a lot of other types of records did that in turn lead to? airplay on the radio I'm curious. You know that's a great question We do start getting African, American preachers buying up time especially in urban enclaves like Chicago beginning in the thirty. On their approach preachers. Elder Lucy. Sniff has a popular radio show in. CHICAGO. And she ended up buying time in typically because of the setup, a radio commercial time with actually prime time that could be bought. So Outer Lucie Smith will be preaching or her broadcasting, her services from Chicago daring a prime time moment where audiences could hear it the free time or the sustaining time of radio that was given away was often at a time when no one else was listening by the time, the radio station new would have low low low viewership, maybe and they would give it to away to a preacher typically a white American preaching on for Free Time. So we do get African American preachers in places like Chicago. getting on the radio in. DETROIT But I I don't have any. Evidence in the book of phonograph preachers getting their son moments played on the radio. The only evidence I've found was a young man wrote into newspaper saying that he had heard Reverend James Gates, the popular phonograph preacher. Preaching on the phonograph and on the radio. Now was the only thing he wrote in saying how much he enjoyed enjoyed it. So I don't have. I. Don't know if that means having gates was at a radio show I. Don't think he did. So I am led to believe that Nathan perhaps there was some local radio stations that are playing these salmon's even if it's something that's paid for, by Columbia Records Columbia records, nate, go to a local radio DJ and say, Hey, play this record, and then say you know if you WANNA. Hear more at Dow. Down to Steve's. Record shop where you can buy more, and of course, we summons will also. May. Be Mailing catalogs. So Columbia, in paramount would also distribute. In also, newspapers, there'd be these order forms or you could say, you know I wanna I WANNA buy this summer in this sermon in this sermon, and that was the day. Of course, upon a CIO de cash on delivery, you'd would pay the mail. You would bring your records to your house, and so the are newspapers that are littered with these advertisements. Would you can order sermons by mail order? So all that to say I think it is a possibility that Columbia paramount would have reached out to local radio stations and said, Hey, point record. So we can have, and of course, these records they're not just they're not just words a Lotta Times. I. Mean you're you referenced Reverend, J M Gates and and these are songs. These sermons on records, sound to me like Gospel Music. So it makes sense that they'd be played on the radio because they're extremely lyrical and have a melody. Yes. A level, a number of do in that we're dealing with seventy eight. So we're talking about three and a half minutes on each side of the. So we're talking about a record at only has about seven minutes until.

US Chicago James Gates Columbia Records Columbia Salah America A. Connection Africa DETROIT Taiwan Elder Lucy CIO Columbia Amsterdam Lucie Smith Chicago. Steve Nathan Philippines Japan
"african american" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

07:56 min | 2 years ago

"african american" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"The love of Radio and sound. My name is Eric Klein with me today his Jennifer weights, and before we jump into the interview today with the author of the book preaching on Wax The phonograph and the shaping of modern African American religion by Lebron Martin. I WANNA share with you a piece of sound from an old phonograph. So it's scratchy old. It's from the twenty s I believe and it's a reverend James Gates preaching. To his audience on the recording on preaching on wax about the evils of shopping corporate. Off The change though is the top. and. Then why they think I want you to listen. Then I want to put it into Out. Obvious gene stole the time has come as I've said to you before. Offer you the pattern is you're marching. In the town where you live. and to the country people. Out Yonder, when you come to town spend your money with people who are will give you credit spend money with the people who are give you age off. I'm telling you this for your book and I bought I. Won't you sing tonight as never? Gentlemen me you be. Violent. Time. To read. Then Again that is the B side of a seventy, eight record that. According to today's guest on radio survivor was never released. Possible because it was. deemed. Noncommercial not not ready to be. Sold in stores. Criticizing the emergence of the national chains during what was. Basically, the eve of the Great Depression in the United States today's episode and interview was produced by Jennifer. Today we're speaking with Laurent Martin the associate professor in religion and politics at the John C, Danforth Center on religion and politics at Washington University in St. Louis. And today we're GonNa talk about preaching on Wax Lauren wrote a book preaching on Wax, Phonograph, and the shaping of modern African American religion, and this is an aspect of audio history that I was completely unaware of so Laura. Own. Can we just launch right in and have you talked about this fascinating research that you did into the early uses of phonograph records in the twenty s through the early forties to spread religious messages and I'd love to know more about why records were such a huge tool for black clergy during this time period store in first of all, thanks for having me what I tried to chronicle in the book preaching on lacks was the phenomenon of African American preachers signing record deals beginning in nineteen, twenty five with major record labels to court and sell their sermons. This process began acting twenty-five ended about nineteen, forty, one because of the outbreak of world to in there was a cap a limit put on certain types of production materials, particularly, SHELLAC, which is what early records were made of. Picks up again after the war with purchase recording again on wax of beginning after the war nineteen forty-five and until Zainal records sort of lost, their way to attract could set. The process over nineteen, twenty, twenty, five, in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty, one on one hundred. African. American preachers signed record deals with labels such as I. Columbia. Than paramount records and then some of the smaller labels. Okay. Records, and then even some of the chain store labels such as Montgomery reward. Of course, the the largest one would have been victor, which will later Victor Rca and their chain store label, which is called Bluebird. As well as Other chain stores also had record labels to lose a pretty large phenomenon in some of these records sold as much or more estimable popular abuse singers. Today Are Austin. Featured in sold alongside the likes of bessie Smith New Armstrong Duke Ellington. Slow on the same record labels at times, outsold some of those folks. Amazing. What we? It's a pretty, pretty amazing phenomenon what from what we can tell record labels in the early on prewar era didn't keep track of record sales away that we have today with soundscan in other organizations like that. But one way you can tell about sales. Through the record label archives, you can in the catalog, you can tell about how many records of a certain sermon or song were ordered in. There was a supplemental order. It gives you a key about the popularity in times though the summer property sold the most discern by the of a pitcher out of Kansas City named JC Burnett. This call, the downfall of American Nezar, and that sermon had orders of up to close to ninety thousand. Records that Columbia records close orders for the record. But where? Right. Off. And these songs. These tracks on records was the downfall of Nebuchadnezzar. By JC Burnett was that a musical sermon or was it straight speech? So what J. J. Supernet and Reverend Gates do is that they do bring in. Call, and response, and so when you're when you listen to the sermon, you'll get a chance to hear people singing in the background or you'll hear people saying chanting a man preach or rats right, and says, you get more of a essentially a recording of evangelical expressive worship service all on wax, and so what those folks did was to sort of recreate the church moment. Now, the early Early Period Nineteen, twenty five is the first sermon. Those sermons are recorded in their very stayed the very more of a lecture style son, the popularity kicks off when the sermons are more expressive than sort of recreate in African American, expressive worship service. Where were they were? They recorded in the field. You know in in churches or were preachers brought into the studio to record you know kind of a Kansas sermon. In the early days, we'll beginning nineteen, twenty, five on the first preacher, Girls Calvin, Dixon is his name. He's out of Norfolk Virginia, he preaches a sermon called an equal stirs her nest, and he Columbia hears about him a local record town of record-dealer, talent, scout seasons, popularity, zone, small church network. He travels to New York in records and Columbia Studios, and that's during the days of acoustic recording where you had a horn connected to a stylist that would you would speak.

Reverend Gates JC Burnett Laurent Martin Jennifer Eric Klein Columbia Studios Victor Rca I. Columbia United States Zainal bessie Smith New York Kansas Laura Columbia St. Louis Washington University Montgomery associate professor
"african american" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"african american" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Groups of people who are often neglected. I believe it. This is gonNA sound like a really awful. All question you ever watch the TV show new Amsterdam. I just started watching. You know because I used to watch. This is us, but now it comes on the same time as black ish in makes a mix this which we're like both shows and stuff like that, so but the moment that black ish goes off. I always turn to Amsterdam. Because I remember I was looking for something because it's not ready to go to bed, I want something to watch TV or whatever and turn on a new Amsterdam in. They were working with These African Americans in the Barbara shop now it's. Getting that and is so funny, because I can't think of I got a Frat Bro. Memory kept off aside, but he's a matter of fact. He's from Oakland but he lives in Los Angeles and his. Event is called trapped medicine, and eventually they go to different barbershops around south, central Los Angeles and I think either. They get free haircuts and promote. Cardiovascular disease and awareness in her take care of herself. Menam can't think of his name bread. His organizations called trap medicine. He went to Morehouse. University, So, that's going to bother me. By I I. Encourage you guys to deafened. Look at the medicine because ever listened to this and. Is because he's doing some positive things. Djamil Lacy Djamil Lacey. Lacey yeah, told him out. The reason I brought that up was because. The white doctor was sitting in the black barbershops, wanting to promote cardiovascular health like blood pressure testing all that stuff, and he wasn't part of their community, so they were ignoring him, and so he gets the bright idea to teach. The Barber's how to do the testing now they're not medically trained. And of course, the board of the hospital has a tizzy fit, and I guess somebody goes, and and they see the barber is doing you know the test? I think they might have been do. Blood sugar testing to I watched Kinda late at night, and I watched for entertainment, and then just kind of it's brain doesn't doesn't i. don't need the details to remain. Should I just remember cover time I talk to you? I think about that episode. How you know he was trying the white director of medicine doctor was trying to help communities. Help themselves there's. An I think I think that's important it is. There's so much until Barbara Shop. It is a member because content about last time. We were hosting amateurs of called the power three in one of the places that really help promote was the barbershop and things from people. See that you're from a community and they blew what you're doing stuff like I. can only go to Barbara. Starr slower than other things to do, but those bombers are cutting hair all day in they kind of promote and they talked. talked to different groups of people about what you're doing components of it because you gave them the blueprint what to do, that's like additional promotion, and it was like a badge of honor, because my yards from the suburbs of Indianapolis in give him a haircut in West Chicago when I was taking classes when Dr Program and they thought so highly. Let me hang the poster. To light with all the other things that they promoted community like like like you know a badge of honor, and it's just one of from. We'll see because. When people see what you do, system to slow unique has aware northwestern. Psychology, switcher? And what happens like you could be in the most obscure area. And we'll say on team. Uncle, my Granddad, my grandma, my whomever. They have some Alzheimer's. They had a stroke they how all this stuff in? We didn't know what to do, but when we see you, let us pass you. Pester you with these questions because you're resource that we don't normally have, and that's why like that's so committed to like this whole idea of community, neuro, psychology and cognitive agent health disparity because I believe that this utility and I think like we're just at the tip of the. And so much more to do with it. I agree. Well? That's a wrap for this week. If you enjoyed this episode, you know the routine ratings reviews. Share this episode with friends family strangers. Follow me on social media, so you get to see all the other fun things that are going on in my caregiving life, and as always over in your ears again next Tuesday..

Amsterdam Djamil Lacy Djamil Lacey Barber Barbara Shop Menam Los Angeles Alzheimer Barbara Oakland Morehouse director Indianapolis Chicago Starr Dr Program
"african american" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"african american" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Am driving out of the parking lot, so it was really you know changing things up is really it's hard for me, but it was a really good thing to do, and I'm like okay well. If we ever start getting any rain like we had hundred and fifty percent last year so far this year we've had zero. Like hit or miss, I, guess I might do that class more. Often I might get my own gloves that we don't half borrowings from the gym, but it's just it's I find also being out in the sunshine helps me a lot. And when I take my mom out, I find in. Most people would not see this herbert she has just. It's like a little bit brighter. Light is on for a little while when we're outside in the nature in the fresh air, although we've been having some crappy air-quality lately because a fire. The Sunshine it's just the nature is so restorative. So I try to mix up my workouts between indoor and outdoor. Hopefully, we don't have one hundred fifty percent of our rain so that I don't feel like. Laying on the floor, crying in the winter. I definitely understand. I'll be nice Mike's. Yeah well once it was like. We had drought. We one hundred percent than we seventy-five than we had one hundred fifty. I wish Mother Nature would just be like. Here's The rain you need and our. Pleasant yeah, and then where I live, we don't get snow, but we're not that far away about two hours away from the snow for WanNa go the snow. That's what that's. What people like they're like. I actually had this woman asked me what was so great about California and I was like you did not just ask me that, and that's what I told her. I'm like from.

WanNa herbert California Mike
"african american" Discussed on The Zest

The Zest

16:38 min | 2 years ago

"african american" Discussed on The Zest

"Tony Tipton Martin won a James Beard Award in two thousand. Sixteen for her book. The Jemima Code Two centuries of African American cookbooks. Her latest work is jubilee and it's a collection of recipes from those anti cookbooks that she researched for the Jemima Code in February. Tony came to Saint Petersburg to speak at the third annual Tampa Bay Collard. Greens festival held at the Carter G Woodson African American Museum. That's where she sat down with his desk producer. Delete Cologne. You're everywhere I look at your instagram. I look at your schedule online. There are so many places you could be. Why did you want to come to the Collard? Green Festival in South Saint Pete Florida. Well I have been everywhere. You're absolutely right and besides the lovely weather. I love the excitement of what's happening here in the food world. There's just so much appreciation for African American food history on the association with healthy eating especially as pertains to eating dark leafy Greens. I'm a nutrition writer so dark leafy Greens matter to me and so I really thought this would be a great place to bring my tour. Tell me about your latest book. I'm so my latest book is called Jubilee and it includes one hundred twenty-five recipes and beautifully photographed dishes that represent a new not new in terms of African American knowledge but certainly knew as in terms of What the rest of us have all thought about what it means to Cook African American Food. It represents more than the sole survival style of cooking and the food that we tend to think of associated with African Americans turns with survival cooking. So what does African American cooking mean as an African American when I think of traditional African American food I do think of like Collard Greens and Ham Hawks? Macaroni and cheese sweet potato pie. Is that what we're talking about here? Does it go beyond that? We'll certainly those foods are part of the African culinary tradition and we don't want to disparage those marginalized them or otherwise. Try to say that they need to be improved upon enhanced uplifted or any of those terms that a lot of people have been struggling to try to find a way to place in a broader Canon of African American cooking but what we have neglected in all of these years is a broader perspective on African American cooking meaning the inclusion of Diaz bork cooking. We're not we haven't been talking a lot about west African traditions. We haven't talked about the Caribbean And the culture or the part of our culture that we have most blatantly ignored are the people who prepared food as part of our professional class people who cooked for a living and that goes all the way back to the people who work in the plantation kitchen. We have not thought about those people as professionals who were creating an aspect of African American food but they were French. Trained many of them classically trained and those tendencies those traditions. Those practices have been handed down through generations of black hooking. We just have an identified them as classic cooking so for example the idea of making gravy right our recipes. Our ancestors would just say I made gravy and what we are really talking about is a French technique that begins with making a Roo And so I have really just looked at the culinary practices through the Lens of of the Culinary Academy like the using their curriculum to extract. What were African Americans Doing When they were cooking food as trained cooks as plantation cooks as folks working as ranch cooks people who were restaurateurs who had oyster houses in the Northeast Hotel owners. There is a broad category of entrepreneurs that can serve as inspiration for the next generation. That's such a good point about who gets to be considered kind of a legit chef and who is just cooking to feed someone and you could say the same thing about female cooks a lot of home cooks. Haven't gotten maybe the respect that they deserve. Why do you think now is the right time for people to be receiving your message? Could you have written this book twenty years ago and have it have been received in the same way where there's a lot to unpack in that question number one? This is not a book about home cooks. This is about professional cooks. And that again is not to disparage what happens in home cooking but we honor today celebrity cooks for the food that they prepare work so we respect and honor our TV. Food people. we honor mainstream chefs for the food. They prepare in restaurants and in their cookbooks and we have neglected to offer African Americans that same level of dignity and respect so while home cooking is certainly valuable. My intention with this book is to direct our attention to the professional level cooks. I'm what does it mean to be a chef? That is a definable word. Tends to mean supervisor of a kitchen. It's out of the French tradition and so again the idea that African Americans have held that position. They have been managers of kitchens. They have functioned in very organized. Meticulous ways they have understood the quality of their ingredients. They have managed other people. Even if in the in the case of enslaved people there were managing children right and so none of us accept people that have children who understand what it means to actually have a child messing around underfoot. While you're trying to cook or otherwise concentrate could even have respect for people who were Women in particular who were functioning in these plantation kitchens with fireplace hearths that were half the size of their bodies in hoop skirts. That could easily catch on fire. And now you have children running around these big heavy cauldrons made out of cast iron that you are navigating and negotiating and you are also trying to maintain the heat level. There is no thermostat. There's no temperature control on your fire place and so when the mistress wants toast for breakfast you are toasting bread over an open flame and we've just not giving these people to kind of credit that they deserve and so finally As part of your the rest of your question I wrote a book. Several years ago called the Jemima Code and it was designed to draw attention to these people. Jubilee is a collection of the recipes from the authors represented in the Jemima Code so initially when I published proposed the idea of the Jemima Code. No one was interested in promoting that message. Publishers and literary agents would not carry my product into New York and African Americans. Frankly had some hesitancy about the idea of a book that uses a image of a servant as its banner but I am reclaiming the Bandanna my logo and slogan are we are to embrace the BANDANNA. We are reclaiming the legacy and the dignity associated with servitude servant heartedness. We have been sold a bill of goods about African Americans and the food tradition. Where else do we have an African American women who is on the cover of a box and her identity represents quality and the ability for you to perform really well in your kitchen meaning to make really great pancakes? We've missed that message. It's an encoded message. At one point it says she is a perpetual slave and we got stuck on that right. We have not been willing to see the other side of that which means quality so many good points and when you're talking about the women managing children while they were cooking. I mean my three year old was just in here and we had to remove him from this office. Because I couldn't speak to you without him interrupting and causing you know just a ruck his so I have so much respect for these people and the message that you're bringing. Are there any recipes that stand out to you or that people may be surprised to find in the books? We'll everyone ask that question. So it's a great compelling question. I explained often. There's a difference between what is my favorite recipe. And what was the most surprising curious recipe to me and I love to point out the celery braised celery recipe. There was a time in our history when we were living close to the soil. Celery was a coveted item on the table. it's a vegetable. That's really great for people that are suffering from hypertension because of its diuretic process cities and African American cookbooks throughout history have often included a dish called braised celery or the celery was in some kind of a gravy or sauce but what I discovered doing more more research to put the dishes social context was that it mimicked a dish that restaurateurs were selling called celery. Victor and so obviously these women who were caterers. Place the dish on their menu possibly because it represented something that their clients were consuming in restaurants. Wow celery who knew right and so there will be those who look at this book and think well these are not dishes that represent my family tradition. And that's the point We have been narrowly defined as if we only had one one way of cooking and that doesn't apply to any other culture other people who've come to this country came as immigrants and African Americans were not immigrants We were brought here against our will as captives and that means that we brought with us traditions just like everyone else but we were forbidden to display those. It doesn't mean that we did not possess those skills and traditions. It just means we have lost our lives if we had exhibited them. And so what happened was there is a subconscious subtle imprint. That African Americans have left on traditional American cooking and now scholars are beginning to tease that out to try to understand. What did it look like to be cooking in pre colonial Africa and to see what kinds of culinary theory is visible in those old ways? Food Ways and how those might have been embedded in particularly in southern food. Yeah you've already educated me I had no idea about the celery to give celery another. Look who did you have in mind when you were writing this book? I'm African American and your educating me. I'm sure that people of all backgrounds would learn something from reading your books. Was there a reader that you had in mind that you really wanted to target when you were going about this? Well you know Publishers one of the questions. They always ask you when you make book is who is your audience and you are thought to be not very thoughtful if you just stay everybody. But the reality is that everyone can benefit from the reading of my work But in my mind I was particularly amp particularly interested in spurring on the next generation. I'm it took me a year to find the photographer. I wanted a black food photographer. And there are so many career paths that young people can take within the food industry that don't require them to be participants in food service to try to have restaurants to be authors to be celebrity chefs. There is way more than that. We need more students who are doing research like mine who are taking oral histories. People who are interested in restaurant design and architecture photographers. We need more food stylist. There are so many opportunities for Young African Americans in the food world and by Providing images of role models in the Jemima Code and then demonstrating their recipes in jubilee. Hopefully this legacy rich. Legacy of African American Culinary Entrepreneurship and knowledge will translate to the next generation. Let's talk a little more about the recipes. We tend to talk about African American cooking. And it's make do qualities well when you're making do with oranges and or asparagus. Or whatever is seasonally and locally available that similarly can be called make do but Would I have preferred to call? It is cooking sumptuous cooking when ingredients and resources permit. I mean that's what people basically teach today is to eat seasonally whatever's the cheapest fruit at the grocery store in season. So it's probably going to taste the best anyway so it's so simple and profound at the same time. Did you learn anything about seafood? Seafood is so big here in Florida. I did and again. The inclusion of seafood represents regionality. But when that same seafood is inserted in a recipe in a region where food is plentiful than it reflects affluence and access so for example free tonight in nineteen forty eight published. A book called date with the dish and it was later adapted. The title was changed to the Ebony Cookbook because she was the food editor at Ebony. Magazine and Ebony magazine was targeted at Middle and upper class African Americans. She includes a recipe for deviled eggs with crab which occurs in many of the cookbooks. And if you are in the southeast or along the Gulf coast than the idea of adding crab to adjust doesn't seem all of that extravagant it seems like make do it seems like low income it seems like poverty cooking. All you do was go out into the area and harvest the crab but if you were in a landlocked state and crab is a rarity than the idea of including crab in a dish expresses affluence because you were able to purchase that crab and so definitely there are regional variations that can be interpreted as more sumptuous cooking depending upon where the cook is. Yeah I think about my grandparents living in Philadelphia in their little row house and they always have a stack of Ebony magazine's and how luxurious crab would have seemed to them compared to like a cheesecake or something they're such a fervor. I pulled up and a block before I got to the festival. Traffic was backed up. There are people of Color every age here at the Collard Green Festival and there seems to be an appetite no pun intended for this type of information and just this cultural exchange..

Cook African American Food Jemima Code African American Museum African American Culinary Entr Collard Carter G Woodson James Beard Award Tony Tipton Martin Collard Greens Ebony magazine Tampa Bay Collard Saint Petersburg South Saint Pete Florida producer Collard Green Festival food editor Caribbean
"african american" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"african american" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"You you said African Americans and Latinos should avoid alcohol drugs and tobacco fields and do it for you while I do it for big Mamas and there's some people there's some people online there are really affected by that language and the idea that you're saying behaviors might be leading to these efforts could you talk about whether or not people could you respond to people who might be offended by the language he used use that language because that's the language I've been meeting with the N. double ACP with the national medical association with others and I actually talked with with Derrick Johnson multiple times this week the head of the N. double ACP and we need targeted outreach to the African American community and I use the language that is used in my family I have a Porter Rican brother in law I called my Grandaddy Grandaddy I have relatives who called their their their grandparents big mama so that was not meant to be offensive that's the language that we use and that I use and we need to continue to target our out reach to those communities it is critically important that they understand it's not just about them and I was very clear about that it's not just about what you do but you also are not helpless we need to do our part of the federal level many people to do their parts of the state level and we need everyone black brown white whatever color you are to follow the president's guidelines the coronavirus guidelines and do their part because when I talk to the N. double ACP and three weeks ago it's important to note that the one of the things they ask me what can you help dispel the myths in this community that I let people actually can't get corona virus if they're black that would admit that without that it's actually very important for us to squash here all Americans avoid tobacco alcohol and drug use.

African American community president Derrick Johnson
"african american" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"african american" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"The African American community has been hit disproportionately hard by corona virus why is that and what is the message to that particular community Erica joy Daniels is the senior vice president of diversity and inclusion at advocate Aurora Erica joy thank you so much for being with us this afternoon yes thank you for having me info could be apart why do you think that community has been hit harder you know it's interesting down is a think about how a community can get plagued by challenges only think about the African American community they're already very high rates of hypertension I have loved to Turkey dishes and diabetes sold very condition are the high risk factors factors for covert nineteen and so it's all the layering impact on the community that that put them in an adverse way what are you hearing from leaders in the African American community about what needs to happen as far as better health care or maybe it's partially education or what needs to be happening yeah to be honest all the above one we want to make sure they were getting the right information out there and a very culturally relevant way we want to make sure that we can debunk any myths or misconceptions that people have about being due to the condition that look unfortunately over there but haywire what Kobe first came out and then encouraging individuals to understand what their true health conditions are at the same time because all asking for support where is our trusted healthcare partner still advocate Aurora health we could catch about getting out there using the channel is really our committee partners to help us to advance their education and to hear from them what what are they looking for because at it's one thing to think what's going to happen after Kobe but even when a pandemic Thursday client they're still alive the disparities opportunities we have to address the health of our communities Erica joy Daniels is with us from advocate Aurora senior vice president of diversion diversity and inclusion listen I've talked often about the stigma of wearing a mask out and when will we be comfortable wearing a mask and if people look at you weird if you're in the grocery store and that sort of thing and I've read that in the African American community there is a particular diversion of that particular is not wanting to wear the mask especially in some circles can you talk about that yeah if you think about the the low supply right of regular hospital mask there are many alternatives where there's some D. I. Y. projects you can do at home to create a bath which can result in a ban bandanna tied around your face even the things that are being sold on Amazon they they they are motorcycle master think that did have the I. shelling and unfortunately it really hit home for me with my eleven year old when I ordered back for the home and he said mom do you think it's really safe for me to go out and the young black boy the massacre you want a different impression and so that there is another version of the plane this is the comfort because what if people have the misconception they're biased and have a reaction the scene but want to make the fall over I have had a long reaction to what they see so that's a very real fact about community are you seeing that enough people are taking the safer at home order seriously I think it's increasing I think what's really helped even just this week but our consumables of social media posting that we used to we had a great sunny day that encouraging that as much as we all would love to go out and enjoy the weather I'll be quick at our networks to remind people it is wiser and it it so the year to be safe right now we know that we also had the opportunity of election day so when there are things that are drawing people on the committee we have to still be mindful but I think people are hearing understanding question we can connect with them in a real way you might have touched on this earlier by we talk about education what is being done right now to get into the tighter knit communities that may not be seeing everything on the internet may not be watching the news at night as there are other ways they're getting their information the site's people around them absolutely we had to move very fast and and be agile to activate education dissemination one of the biggest help is is with our community partners to find our committee partners for example dropping leaflets and pamphlets with the boys and girls clubs who were distributing meals the account look throughout the week identified those who have either private Facebook pages are court challenges look at the letter well we can put in the hands of individual patients that they're being discharged so we have to be very very mindful of the civil rights we'll have to be acceptable posting up at different department facility the information that we can provide but believe they are the legs and arms in a heartbeat community guide our faith leaders providing things to them so they can help to disseminate and it really takes a full he need help you need to.

African American community