32 Burst results for "Africa Asia"

Because of Vaccines, Ultra-Cold Freezers Are the New Hot Buy

Business Wars Daily

03:58 min | 3 months ago

Because of Vaccines, Ultra-Cold Freezers Are the New Hot Buy

"In a sea of stress. Inducing headlines there is one seemingly perennial bright spot these days vaccine news the scientists researchers and doctors that have been working on a covid nineteen vaccine seemed to have made great strides toward finding effective inoculations to help protect us from the virus. Pfizer was the first to announce its vaccine in early november. The company said it showed more than ninety percent effectiveness but the vaccine also has an inconvenient distribution issue it has to be stored at minus seventy degrees celsius. That's colder than antarctica in winter. Maderna's vaccine announced later in the month had similar efficacy rate and similar storage needs. Both vaccines must be sold in special ultra cold freezers throughout their journey from manufacturing plant to where the vaccine will be administered. Those super cold freezers cheap. Their price tags may be as high as thirty thousand dollars but those frigid freezers are selling like hotcakes. Hospitals in government entities have been snapping them up to help distribute the vaccine to the masses even employers are getting on board. Automaker ford bought twelve ultra-cold freezers last month. In an effort to ensure its employees can get the vaccine tra- cold freezers. Aren't your garden variety ice cream and frozen pizzas storage units. They're typically the domain of university labs in hospitals that need to store cell extracts dna or other specialized materials at extremely low temperatures. Both a ba leading vaccine's use a relatively new technology called synthetic messenger are in a or emaar in a which attaches to the virus helping the immune system recognize attack it. The challenge is that ima- a needs to be kept super cold. Keep enzymes from breaking down according to smithsonian magazine when the team at so low environmental equipment manufacturer of these units got wind of the pfizer. Vaccines storage requirements. The company started ramping up production so low vice president dan hesler toll cnbc quote. It's been crazy. The company stockpiles been depleted in orders or taking six to eight weeks to fulfil one of solos biggest. Competitors thermo fisher. Scientific was ramping up production at the fastest rate in its history according to a company spokesperson talking wwl a local abc television affiliate in asheville north carolina. The company expects fourth-quarter earnings to grow about sixty percent over the same period last year driven by covid nineteen response but even with ultra low freezer manufacturers. Hard at work to meet demand. These vaccines have unveiled another weakness in the supply chain the cold chain. Most vaccines need to be kept at a specific temperature until they're administered. That's typically around thirty five to forty five degrees wired reports but the super low temperatures that the most promising covid nineteen vaccines require. Make it tough to distribute the vaccines widely in the highly developed north american economies. Let alone in places where equipment capacity isn't close to sufficient like parts of africa. Asia and south america wired estimates that upward of twenty five percent of all vaccines are lost because of a lack of reliable coal chains in some countries. Just one ten. Health centers have a proper vaccine refrigerator according to that report and that includes rural hospitals in the us. Allen morgan chief. Executive of the national rural health association told stat news that poorer hospitals can't afford the pricey ultra-cold freezers nearly half of us. Rural hospitals were operating at a loss as of april of this year and the pandemic has only made things worse that means that workers and residents in these areas may not have access to the vaccine. It's possible that the manufacturers may update their cold-storage guidelines or that new vaccines. That don't require such ultra-low temps may come along. But for now lack of a stable co chain to distribute the vaccine to some people who need it most is a situation with legitimate chilling concert

Maderna Pfizer Smithsonian Magazine Dan Hesler Thermo Fisher WWL Antarctica IMA Ford Cnbc Asheville ABC Allen Morgan
Antimicrobial resistance - the next pandemic?

UN News

05:21 min | 3 months ago

Antimicrobial resistance - the next pandemic?

"Around the world people plants and animals are dying from infections that cannot be treated even with the best medicines available. That is because of the rise in antimicrobial resistance the increasing failure of antibiotics and other life-saving drugs to treat diseases. It is a global problem that threatens to be the cause of the next pandemic is the food and agricultural organization or fao chief veterinary officer keith. Suction explains to fao's. Two lamas is antimicrobial resistance. The next pandemic. We've been facing this problem antimicrobial resistance for some time. It is spreading. It is affecting every country on the planet so in that sense it is already in a pandemic and perhaps People are very aware now of the impacts of the covid pandemic but they may not be so aware that the antimicrobial resistance that we face is equally if not more important in terms of its long term impacts on the planet on human health. It's already a estimated. Seven hundred thousand people a year die from drug resistant infections. In other words infections that normally could be treated. But because of antimicrobial resistance those have become untreatable. Were not able to be treated with what was available and it's a situation that is expected in many ways to really worsen over the next decades and if left unaddressed we expect it could cause around ten million deaths a year by two thousand two hundred fifty. What exactly drives antimicrobial resistance. Essentially we are. The reason that antimicrobial resistance is growing. It's the way that we use these precious chemicals. These precious molecules to treat infections We've become accustomed to using antibiotics to deal with our health problems. We use the main people to Treat infections We also use them animals and they used also in other agricultural sectors to some extent we live in one planet We have really what we consider as is common resources of water which are used between people and animals and in our environment the exchange of drug resistant microbes is taking place. And that's because those microbes Have developed resistance. Because of the behaviors we have with The way we use antimicrobials so in the end it's a problem that affects all of us but it comes in the end from our own behaviors. And how do we tackle this problem. Are there any lessons. That can lunch from our response to the covid. Nineteen pandemic of changing our culture of quite significant. Do we really get past this behavior. That when disease strikes we think of using antimicrobials At the same time preventing those infections in the first place would be even better. If we didn't have those infections to start with. We wouldn't need anti microbial so it is important to really reduce the risk of disease for animals for people and that will actually reduce the antimicrobial use convincing enough people around the world that we need to change our behaviors. That's not a small thing so we've seen in the pandemic cow Practices can help to reduce the risk of becoming ill the way that we wash our hands the way that we use mosques the way that we would keep distance. We've learned a number of things now. We also have to apply those lessons. The behavior change. It is possible it sometimes can be done really quite quickly so i think we've some things that we can apply to this more silent pandemic of antimicrobial resistance so all of us have an an opportunity to make a difference. All of us can participate in in controlling antimicrobial resistance. What's can countries due to tackle this global problem and how is fao supporting them. Changing the way that we utilize antimicrobials had to large scale and at an individual scale is important to To control fao has been working now for more than five years to to help countries to put into place then national action plans. Full control of antimicrobial resistance Currently working in over forty countries in africa asia and latin america at country level. We need to see a combined effort of sectors medical battery agricultural and from the side of policy legislation and the environment that signs difficult but through one health platforms for antimicrobial resistance device a tool that's used by countries to bring those sectors together because really this is a problem for all of us We all have a role to play We need others to play their roles as well. We have to work together and together. We're already seeing that That will make a difference at national level and bring us back on. Track to control antimicrobial resistance.

FAO Keith Latin America Asia Africa
Let's Talk About Toilets

Why It Matters

04:31 min | 4 months ago

Let's Talk About Toilets

"So world toilet day is coming up and the response to hearing that there is a serious. Un sponsor day for toilets might make people laugh or feel a little iffy on discussing it. So why would we need a day like that. Well what would you do if you didn't have a toilet a fair point. This is brooke yamaguchi. She's a water sanitation and hygiene specialist at the united nations children's fund also known as yuna south based in new york. She knows a lot about toilets. I mean the ability to manage our bodily functions and these things that we frequently don't talk about but are so core toss bodily functions of urination defecation for half the population menstruation. Really at the core of our dignity. it's also a foundation for health without a toilet that contains waste and then separates it from people coming in contact with that waste. We would all be exposed to harmful pathogens that cause many different illnesses and diseases and it doesn't stop at the toilet either so without waste being safely transported away from our toilets and from our homes and treated somewhere we would all be surrounded by wastewater and our neighborhoods and in the environment so in terms of the numbers. Can you give me a wide angle view of toilet access as global issue. Will there are three main things that we measure the global level. This is tom sleigh maker. he also focuses on global monitoring of drinking water sanitation and hygiene at unicef headquarters in new york. He sees the big picture of how this plays out around the world. He spoke to us on a rainy day from london to one. Is the population here. Practice open defecation. So that man's added kind of told us a tool a may just is that bush's fails beaches little. Walter crosses the other thing that we measure is the population with basic sanitation service. So means that they have. Some kind of hygienic toilets but is not being shad with other people. It's not shadow the household and then the next level of service up is what we call safely managed sanitation. I'm not means that you not only have a hygiene twins but you also have a mechanism in place to ensure shaming west. That's produced is then being treated on despised safely before being discharged pakistan arm and how many people fall into each of these categories so the global level resell have six hundred. Seventy three million people practicing cash there about two billion people still lack even basic level of service wanting people worldwide and if you look at the population without sanitation that's more like four point. Two billion people that is more than half the people on earth and runs the risk of getting sick every day. Do we have an idea of how many people die as a result of this problem. Whol have estimated globally around one point. Two million deaths could have been prevented through access to cat drinking water sanitation hygiene. The problem is particularly acute for young. Children are very vulnerable. And so i think we estimate there around three hundred thousand children under five who die each year as a result of not having bicyc- water sanitation and hygiene. So when you look at a map where do you see this happening. While some regions and countries have much further to go. If you look out you'll say that particularly sub saharan africa asia and will say ice yanni of civic have much lower levels of coverage of sanitation. And this is polly today with greenwich stages of developments in my slate core countries. But even if you move up the ladder you start to look at issues of treatments and disposal of waste even in europe and north america and australia and new zealand. We're still only at about three quarters of the population that has high says site. All countries have further to go in order to improve sanitation but obviously by roles starting at different positions.

Brooke Yamaguchi United Nations Children's Fund Tom Sleigh Unicef Headquarters New York UN Walter Bush London Pakistan Saharan Greenwich Asia Africa North America Europe New Zealand Australia
A Toolkit For Modern Life

Mentally Yours

06:47 min | 5 months ago

A Toolkit For Modern Life

"Cioppino clinical psychologist for fourteen years and trained for years before that entire time as I trained in law school and did I. Two policemen geometry nine including asylum-seekers brain injury. And since that time I've worked in a range of services in Scotland different locations in Maternity Services Children's mental health out clinical health adult mental health and preen injuries valor new psychology. So just actions over the last fourteen years and do you. Specialize in a particular area. Now will have moved away from them now. I still work. Ihs Ask for the moment. I work can you? The psychology says with people who have any utilize condition or up lean injury and work with both the impact out breen rehabilitation but also the impact of that on their mental health. How's that will be affected during pandemic of interest at do you mean the actual services or the mental health of people we'll get onto the I mean just sort of your day to day. Just were working hair. Yeah well hugely. Because we still are not flatow face-to-face contact in the hospital so we have transformed our entire surface to online and that works great. Sometimes it's really helpful for people because they don't have to travel. We live in a rural eighty through the services are the city. Some people have to travel quite lonely so they don't have to travel anymore says great for them but obviously you also have the barriers of technology says some people find getting online more difficult to find it more stressful. How do the online appointment? So this kind of pros and cons but as a huge change for our So what kind of things might be will be coming to you with the moment at the moment. Nhs I guess I see People Brandon today so it would be the impact of and obviously at the moment. I think a lot of the services aren't running. So there's increased isolation increased stress increased Mental health difficulties results have not be able to get the imputed acquired. Maybe not progress into the same way the to normally so it's the same things are coming into the service with but we're probably seeing different pattern of what's emerging because of it will move onto your brilliant book and drawings just in a SEC opponents sweetie great to to chat to an expert in and Sudafed aside as what are your thoughts on how the government should have dealt with the pandemic contempt of the health service in what you think they do sort of to improve services. Vermont people with them kind of struggle with mental health issues. I think it's difficult because it's so different. Across every region is so different across golden England. We have set for Health Service in Scotland England so we all create very differently. Emo- services have kept running in our area so we also have in our own set up a new service which is look psychological cyrus or for anybody who's been affected by covered so there's been a lot of innovation associates fitness jazz and the services ongoing. So it's very difficult to come from a general perspective because it's so different across every service and every region bazaar only I think the impact Manchester's led to lot of innovation a lot of innovation with technology innovation with services ultimately thinking about how we run the services. And that's not all bad lots. We'll have a really good outcome for people. For example you know not having to travel to appointments some people really like that have an opportunity to half an online appointment so I think a lot of innovation that's coming to that will be really good long-term But obviously there is some media's Alaka services or services are not available to the same extent we have an impact people as across tiffany. It's really interesting that you said about the different services in Scotland because I never thought about that. Great deal is it sort of the quite a few of the differences in the way that people when they have mental health issues. There's Phoenician across Africa Asia in terms of mental health in available. And I think that's why it always important checking your locally at airports available to you and Scotland England. Yes proudly artificial Regions England dispel. Let's make fun out to the main thing that was that adjusting about Which is you'll lovely. But also I mean you're credible social media presence and BRIAN THE BRAIN. So thank you Joe. The critics should. I call them cartoons throwing all every whatever you want. We'll get insulted whether you call them. Branches Fight Brian the brains and they've really gone viral on social media. Haven't they and I sort of really explaining lots of stuff around mental health? And they've got really good tips and everybody's just kind of cute to look at and so when did that? When did you come up with that? Well I've always drawn as part of my clinical sessions so people would come into session. Legal we with our scribble bits of any s scrap p par with joins on it and then come back the next week often with the same join with them and then we'd scribble more in it and I never really thought about taking any further. It's always been something I've just don t kind of what we've been talking about. And also the Person House with them during the week or two weeks until I see them again and it kind of I came on social media really kind of with idea of want to promote evidence based mental health. And then I bought a you ipod. I bought Pan which my husband told me not to buy. But I'm really glad I did because it's results in the big and and I ask you start thinking well well well initially start. Jin Better joins the people I've seeing them not scrappy. Nice joined take away with them and then I thought well actually more people can benefit from this accused. You know the same things. Come out with people again. There's so many similarities and people's presentations obse there's differences across people but there's the same issues coming up again. I thought more people could benefit from not so started drawing them out and put them on instagram. And really that was kind of the. You know just bought an you how to do so. I thought well instagram and see what the pickup is. If people enjoy them and opposite like you say they have taken off and really Brian. The brain is kind of the idea that we internalize too much of what could for us. And we're GONNA see a test part of us but actually is kind of externalize and say well this the embarks. This is mental health barks. It's about human and we all have a brain so we can all identify with the Breen often it being kind of individual something personal about you which obviously is but the same time there are commonalities not as well

Scotland Brian Maternity Services Children Scotland England Manchester Golden England Breen Vermont NHS Africa Phoenician SEC Alaka Person House JOE JIN Don T Tiffany
'Ring of fire' solar eclipse of 2020 dazzles skywatchers across Africa and Asia

Mac and Gu

00:16 sec | 9 months ago

'Ring of fire' solar eclipse of 2020 dazzles skywatchers across Africa and Asia

"A rare solar eclipse this weekend for parts of Africa Asia and the Middle East it was a ring of fire eclipse also known as an annular eclipse where the moon doesn't completely cover the sun leaving a ring of light you can find pictures and a stream of the eclipse

Middle East Africa
News in Brief 26 June 2019

UN News

04:09 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 26 June 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations, the drowning of father and his toddler daughter in the Rio Grande is a heartbreaking, and preventable tragedy that countries should do all in their power to prevent happening in the future, the head of the UN refugee agency, UNHCR said on Wednesday, Philippa grandees comments about Oscar Ramirez, and his twenty three month old daughter, Valeria, followed the publication of a photograph showing them lying face down in the shallows of the river, that separates Mexico from the United States. They had come from El Salvador, and according to reports were carried away by strong currents in the fast flowing river on Sunday. In a statement, High Commissioner Grandy said that their deaths represented a failure to address the violence and desperation that pushes people to take dangerous journeys in search of a life of safety and dignity, a lack of safe pathways for migrants forces them to risk their lives. He said before adding that UNHCR has suggested ways that the United States can improve and strength. And processing of asylum seekers including conditions in detention calling once more for an international criminal probe into the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, special reporter, and yes, Calamar told members of the global community, the United Nations included that they should do more to protect human rights defenders and dissidents, presenting her report into the Saudi dissident's killing last October. In an stumble, the UN appointed independent rights expert told the Human Rights Council in Geneva, that there was credible evidence, supporting an additional investigation into the ball of high officials in the kingdom, including crown prince Mohammad bin Salman, the evidence gathered by inquiry suggest that the killing of Mr. cash Shoghi constituted, an extra judicial 'execution and enforced disappearance and possibly an act of torture, for which the state of the kingdom of Saudi Arabia is responsible. There are numero series as to the sickle stances of Mr. cashew is dead. Breath, but known leads other than to the responsibility of the state highlighting that Mr. castle. Jeez. Premeditated execution reflected, an increasing global phenomenon these special reporter insisted that if the international community ignored this, fundamental rights abuse. It risked threatening all other human rights perogatives in response to her claims. Abdelaziz Alessio Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the UN in Geneva said that she had not acted within the terms of her mandate, and neither Hatschi carried out her work professionally, and finally opioids which include both heroin and legal pain relievers were responsible for around two thirds of drug related deaths in two thousand seventeen and new U N report showed on Wednesday, the number of global opioid users contained within the world drug report. Some five hundred eighty five thousand people is more than double the previous estimate the study from the UN office on drugs and crime or unco DC also shows. Is that the negative health consequences associated with drugs? I'm more severe and widespread than previously thought with around thirty five million people. Suffering from drug use disorders and requiring treatment services of eleven million people who injected drugs in two thousand seventeen one point four million live with HIV and five point six million have hepatitis C. The overall figure for drug use in two thousand seventeen is an estimated two hundred seventy one million people. That's thirty percent higher than in two thousand and nine. This is partly attributed to a ten percent increase in the global population age fifteen to sixty four but also increased opioid use in Africa Asia Europe and North America as well as high cannabis consumption in north and South America and Asia, the manufacturer of cocaine reached an all time high in two thousand seventeen with an estimated production of two thousand tonnes in two thousand seventeen up by a quarter on the previous year at the same time. Seizures of cocaine rose thirty percent to one. Thousand two hundred seventy five tonnes another record figure. Daniel Johnson, U N news.

UN Saudi Arabia United Nations Unhcr United States Geneva Reporter Cocaine Human Rights Council Rio Grande Grandy El Salvador Oscar Ramirez Prince Mohammad Bin Salman Jamal Khashoggi Philippa Grandees Valeria Mexico Commissioner
It's that Prime Day time of the year again (The 3:59, Ep. 577)

The 3:59

05:30 min | 1 year ago

It's that Prime Day time of the year again (The 3:59, Ep. 577)

"The. The three fifty nine I'm Ben FOX Ruben. I'm forgetting, yes, it's time again for Amazon's prime day, the annual shopping bonanza that this year will include over one million deals worldwide. So exciting Alford. Do you ever buy anything on prime mostly by useless stuff on prime day last year I bought a cot it was half off? It was like a half off Kat. Okay. I don't know why don't use it anymore. And then I think the year before that, I bought a cat tree for like thirty bucks. That's a pretty good. Catch that catch Ray also. It's eighty dollars like when it's not on sales. So there are some good deals on prime day. There are also some stupid deals on prime day. You can just rest assure that they're going to be a lot of deals. And I'm sure people are going to be really excited about it. It's one of the new things that's going to be happening this year is that I know you're gonna love hearing about this. Amazon is planning on making prime day more of like an experience. So they had a live streamed concert with areana 'Grande last year. And they told me without many details, obviously to expect a lot more entertainment stuff, because it's not just for shopping, it's, you know, we're celebrating our prime members hate it. When brands do that. Like, look, we don't care about you, as a company or as an experienced, like people come to prime day or Amazon, at least for like deals like Jimmy cheap stuff. I'm not here to like see, like how cool Amazon is. Has a brand like wow. They got Milly vanilla to do a life dream concert. Get outta here like. I feel like they look at prime day as if it's going to be like the next Christmas, or for jars basically, that's exactly what they're doing. It's, it's, it's a primate tradition. And it's like no get out of here. We just want cheap stuff. Literally, it you don't you're not a person to me. You don't matter to me. I don't care that there's a person behind that screen, you are a company and I just want cheap stuff from you. I like this. I like this part of Alfred, and we look forward to doing a lot more of this type of prime day coverage. So look out for that. We wanna get to our next story cybersecurity for firm. Cyber reason cyber reasons, cyber is terrible name said it uncovered vast hacking operation in which hackers infiltrated multiple mobile carriers for years. They even had the ability to shut down communications at a moment's notice. How did this happen? Yes. So they had hacked more than a dozen mobile carriers in the Middle East Africa Asia, and Europe, not the United States. No, there has been no activity in North America that they discovered which doesn't mean that they're not in the network is just that they haven't found it. But yeah, so they basically hack them through either these companies had a public facing server, that had no password on it, which seems to happen a lot, or they fished in employee who just happened to cling, on any link link that pops open their inbox pretty, pretty typical hacker tools. Yeah, yeah. So it's not anything like really crazy, but the sophisticated but is about how they spread. So once they were in the network. It was basically. All right. How many computers does this log in have access to this many computers? Okay. So then let's access all those computers. And then, from there, once they have access to those computers continues, like breaking down, like a really bad pyramid scheme. But essentially, they do all that until they get escalated privileges which then they create accounts for themselves. Basically posing as the IT team sign crazy. Yes, they worked as kind of this shadow IT team within these mobile carriers, which gave them a lot of privileges like they were able to shut down the network communications that they wanted to fortunately, or unfortunately, I don't know from what your perspective is the focus of this attack was more about espionage rather than disruption. So they wanted to be in the network and steal information from specific people. So they had access to hundreds of millions of people's records, but they chose to only download gigabytes of data on, like targeted individuals like less than one hundred people this pretty while the sounds like a government was behind it. Yes. So it's suspected to be the Chinese government, even because it's all the all the hacking tools. Are, you know what the Chinese government has used same methods, same kind of, like think philosophy of, you know, stay there, quietly and steal as much information as you can. They did it. The noise. But the thing is, is that, you know, this could also be a government like NC trying to frame the Chinese government on this attribution is extremely hard insiders security, so it's still unclear but, you know, all signs point to China as so we're out of time, but I did want to mention one quick story, the head of Instagram confirmed that a social network has no policy on deep fake videos, defects, is obviously, in area that we've been focusing on a lot of nuts. So it's interesting to see that Instagram doesn't even have a policy yet about it. But we'll see if they end up getting one in the future, the still trying to balance what they say the difference between safety and speech, either way, if you want to read more about these stories, check them out on Ben FOX Rueben now Malvern. Thanks for listening.

Amazon Chinese Government Ben Fox Ruben Instagram Alford KAT Ben Fox Rueben Areana 'Grande Milly RAY North America Middle East Africa Alfred Europe Jimmy United States
It's that Prime Day time of the year again (The 3:59, Ep. 577)

The 3:59

05:30 min | 1 year ago

It's that Prime Day time of the year again (The 3:59, Ep. 577)

"The. The three fifty nine I'm Ben FOX Ruben. I'm forgetting, yes, it's time again for Amazon's prime day, the annual shopping bonanza that this year will include over one million deals worldwide. So exciting Alford. Do you ever buy anything on prime mostly by useless stuff on prime day last year I bought a cot it was half off? It was like a half off Kat. Okay. I don't know why don't use it anymore. And then I think the year before that, I bought a cat tree for like thirty bucks. That's a pretty good. Catch that catch Ray also. It's eighty dollars like when it's not on sales. So there are some good deals on prime day. There are also some stupid deals on prime day. You can just rest assure that they're going to be a lot of deals. And I'm sure people are going to be really excited about it. It's one of the new things that's going to be happening this year is that I know you're gonna love hearing about this. Amazon is planning on making prime day more of like an experience. So they had a live streamed concert with areana 'Grande last year. And they told me without many details, obviously to expect a lot more entertainment stuff, because it's not just for shopping, it's, you know, we're celebrating our prime members hate it. When brands do that. Like, look, we don't care about you, as a company or as an experienced, like people come to prime day or Amazon, at least for like deals like Jimmy cheap stuff. I'm not here to like see, like how cool Amazon is. Has a brand like wow. They got Milly vanilla to do a life dream concert. Get outta here like. I feel like they look at prime day as if it's going to be like the next Christmas, or for jars basically, that's exactly what they're doing. It's, it's, it's a primate tradition. And it's like no get out of here. We just want cheap stuff. Literally, it you don't you're not a person to me. You don't matter to me. I don't care that there's a person behind that screen, you are a company and I just want cheap stuff from you. I like this. I like this part of Alfred, and we look forward to doing a lot more of this type of prime day coverage. So look out for that. We wanna get to our next story cybersecurity for firm. Cyber reason cyber reasons, cyber is terrible name said it uncovered vast hacking operation in which hackers infiltrated multiple mobile carriers for years. They even had the ability to shut down communications at a moment's notice. How did this happen? Yes. So they had hacked more than a dozen mobile carriers in the Middle East Africa Asia, and Europe, not the United States. No, there has been no activity in North America that they discovered which doesn't mean that they're not in the network is just that they haven't found it. But yeah, so they basically hack them through either these companies had a public facing server, that had no password on it, which seems to happen a lot, or they fished in employee who just happened to cling, on any link link that pops open their inbox pretty, pretty typical hacker tools. Yeah, yeah. So it's not anything like really crazy, but the sophisticated but is about how they spread. So once they were in the network. It was basically. All right. How many computers does this log in have access to this many computers? Okay. So then let's access all those computers. And then, from there, once they have access to those computers continues, like breaking down, like a really bad pyramid scheme. But essentially, they do all that until they get escalated privileges which then they create accounts for themselves. Basically posing as the IT team sign crazy. Yes, they worked as kind of this shadow IT team within these mobile carriers, which gave them a lot of privileges like they were able to shut down the network communications that they wanted to fortunately, or unfortunately, I don't know from what your perspective is the focus of this attack was more about espionage rather than disruption. So they wanted to be in the network and steal information from specific people. So they had access to hundreds of millions of people's records, but they chose to only download gigabytes of data on, like targeted individuals like less than one hundred people this pretty while the sounds like a government was behind it. Yes. So it's suspected to be the Chinese government, even because it's all the all the hacking tools. Are, you know what the Chinese government has used same methods, same kind of, like think philosophy of, you know, stay there, quietly and steal as much information as you can. They did it. The noise. But the thing is, is that, you know, this could also be a government like NC trying to frame the Chinese government on this attribution is extremely hard insiders security, so it's still unclear but, you know, all signs point to China as so we're out of time, but I did want to mention one quick story, the head of Instagram confirmed that a social network has no policy on deep fake videos, defects, is obviously, in area that we've been focusing on a lot of nuts. So it's interesting to see that Instagram doesn't even have a policy yet about it. But we'll see if they end up getting one in the future, the still trying to balance what they say the difference between safety and speech, either way, if you want to read more about these stories, check them out on Ben FOX Rueben now Malvern. Thanks for listening.

Amazon Chinese Government Ben Fox Ruben Instagram Alford KAT Ben Fox Rueben Areana 'Grande Milly RAY North America Middle East Africa Alfred Europe Jimmy United States
Vatican Opens Door to Limited Ordination of Married Men as Priests

All Things Considered

02:55 min | 1 year ago

Vatican Opens Door to Limited Ordination of Married Men as Priests

"Meeting of Roman Catholic bishops from Brazil and nearby. Countries could prove historic the Vatican today gave the bishop's permission to discuss whether married men in the Amazon region might join the priesthood here's NPR's Tom gjelten all that happened today. Is that the Vatican said the agenda for the bishop's meeting in the fall can? Include discussion of whether some married men in an emergency conservative priests the bishops still have to debate the question at pope Francis would have to approve any change in the church's celibacy requirement. But just allowing the bishops to discuss it is shift from the previous attitude in Rome would crack down on any Bishop, any major figure in the church who dared to say the preschool possibly get married. Rocco Pomo is editor of the website whispers in the lodge. He is speaking via Skype here, you have Vatican document, basically saying, green light, you can talk about the reason being, there's a critical shortage of priests in the region, only about one for every ten thousand Catholics bishops in the region for years of said, something has to be done to reach more people Paul says Catholics who care for the salvation of souls, should be concerned about the plight of people living in these remote areas. They can't have a priest for weeks or months, which if they can't appraise that means they can have. Mass. They can't have Nash. They can't have Eucharist. Holy communion. The thing the Catholics considered to be the bread of life. If thing that keeps us alive. Spiritually some Catholic activists have advocated an end to celebrate in and the Catholic priesthood but John Gehring the Catholic program director at the faith in public life organization, says this situation is unrelated to that push coming, some, the church needs of the region affects on the ground on Amazon saying, this is an urgent crisis, and we need to rethink in this particular context. How we respond to it. I mean, this is not an advocacy group saying, let's push this agenda. Another point this would not be the first time. There'd be married priests. Some married clergy have left the Anglican church and joined the Catholic priesthood with their wives. That was approved. Nearly forty years ago by Pope John Paul the second and reaffirm by Pope Benedict. Still allowing married priests in the Amazon region because of an emergency there. Could set a precedent. Massimo fudgy, Oli theologian at Villanova university notes that priest shortages are developing in other places as well. Which means that every church in the world can request this Europe, America Africa Asia. So that could be the beginning of a general overhaul of the Catholic church is dealing with telly. A final point for hundreds of years in the early church priests were allowed to marry celibacy in the priesthood is what Catholics call a discipline, not a doctrine Tom gjelten, NPR news.

Amazon Pope John Paul Tom Gjelten Rocco Pomo Catholic Church Pope Francis NPR Anglican Church Massimo Fudgy Brazil John Gehring Pope Benedict Villanova University Rome Nash Skype Europe
News in Brief 3 June 2019

UN News

03:17 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 3 June 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations pregnant women are putting their lives and their babies at risk because of catastrophic and prohibitive healthcare costs before during and after childbirth UNICEF executive director, Henrietta, four said on Monday. Her comments, a company, a new report, highlighting, how few of the world's poorest pregnant women have a doctor, nurse or midwife at their side, when they need them, according to the UN children's fund more than five million families across Africa Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean spent at least forty percent of their food household expenses for the entire year just on maternal health services, and it says that eight hundred women die every day from complications while yet. More mothers live with debilitating outcomes compared with most rich countries where a skilled birth attendant is present at almost all deliveries. The tiny drops significantly in least developed countries, the Eunice f- research shows these states include Somalia where professionals are present. In less than one in ten births and south Sudan, where only one in five deliveries is assisted to chat now where the killing of reporter. Oh, bed Nang butner brings to nineteen number of journalists killed around the world, so far in two thousand nineteen Mr. noncombatant, who was forty two worked for public broadcaster. Tele chad. He was fatally wounded when the military convoy he was with hit a landmine which also killed four soldiers late last month. He was reportedly traveling to the northern side of Lake Chad to cover the aftermath of an attack on army positions by Patna extremists. In a statement condemning the attack director, general of UNESCO ultra as ULA appealed for better safety for journalists in conflict situations, including the Lake Chad region. And for safety protocols to be fully respected. And finally, an original take on the issue of sustainability an art exhibition that's been inspired by the twenty thirty gender and the seventeen goals that the international community adopted in twenty fifteen installed temporarily in the UN palace of nations by the mission of Canada. Awakening features deceptively complicated works by Canadian ended digital artists. One of them is a large photograph of a huge open Coppermine with a seemingly beautiful turquoise lake at the bottom, it's actually a toxic tailing pond. That's full of chemicals and other mining byproducts as Tara Pont from the candidate council for the arts explains, what strikes you in this work is that it's, it's beautiful to look at it. You see color, variation, you see texture. But when you realize what you're looking at in this case, a copper mine in Utah. You also realize that this is the impact of man scraping away at the natural landscape for its own purposes. Ios and that gorgeous pool of green is in fact, tailing pond. So not really so beautiful. But rather dangerous to us accompanying the exhibition is a series of sei's underscoring the urgency of cheating each of these estate development goals. Composed by leading international figures, including UN deputy chief. I mean, Mohammed, and former head of the World Bank. Jim Yong Kim Daniel Johnson, UN news.

United Nations Lake Chad Jim Yong Kim Daniel Johnson Unicef Nang Butner Somalia Executive Director Turquoise Lake Caribbean Henrietta World Bank Tara Pont South Sudan Africa Patna Canada Deputy Chief Mohammed
A world without bees would wipe out many staple crops, UN warns on World Bee Day

UN News

06:30 min | 1 year ago

A world without bees would wipe out many staple crops, UN warns on World Bee Day

"And welcome to Haagen zero hung up a putt costs that explores the food challenges and solutions of our time. Brought to you by the food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations on your host show. Lotte Lomas may twenty marks will be day. It's a day to highlight the importance of bays and the threats they face most of the fruits and vegetables, we ate wouldn't exist without bees and other pollinators. They're essential to our food security, and to conserving, the world's by diversity, but base face a very serious, existential threat to learn more. We're joined by FAO's Abram Bixler an agricultural officer with a passion for pollinators. Welcome abram. Thank you very much. Pleasure to be here. So how Di is the state of bays in other pollinators right now the figures are not looking very good for bees in, in pollinators. And we talk about pollinators a lot of. People think of, of honeybees, which is really important part of Edgar Coulter. But there are many, many diverse wild pollinators as well. So about twenty thousand from be species insects, and other vertebrates other animals, like bats, and hummingbirds, and even monkeys can be pollinators. And so when we look across pollinators, there are many threats facing pollinators and globally. They're, they're facing a real decline managed honeybees, the number of honeybees are actually increasing, but the wild pollinators across the world are decreasing in even the honeybees are facing many threats. And there's a lot of issues facing those as well. Let's talk about those threats for what's killing pollinators could use run through the full list threats facing. So it's really company of, of factors kind of all come together all of which are driven by by human. Activity. So climate change is a factor. Habitat loss is a factor. The overuse of pesticides is, is a big factor. But also, there are many diseases in pests as well that are affecting our pollinators. And so when those are taking together pollinators really facing a hard time. How severe is the existential threat to base, and should we be worried. We should we should very much be be worried where the data is especially North America in Europe. There is major declines happening, not only on these, but other insects, especially in, in general, one of the big things is that we still lack most basic data on a lot of pollinators in other parts of the world, Africa Asia, and also, South America, and one of the big fears is that with habitat loss and destruction along with global climate change. We can't even in summer. Regards know what pollinators are out there. So our best estimates are about twenty thousand different beast species alone, but of those only about ten thousand have actually been identified. And so we're worried that we are losing species that we don't even know could you paint of a wealthy bees and just sort of give us an idea of the range of fruits and vegetables that we would lose a world of bees and other pollinators would be very bland in very scary Biesen other pollinators are are essential for pollinating about seventy five percent of the leading food crops that humans depend on for food, particularly when it comes to fruits and seed crops, that, that we need. So if you can imagine a world without raspberries, a world without peaches, apples, melons, and members of the, the squash, family. That's what we'd be dealing with what he's doing to protect. The wills pollinators. We're doing a couple of things to protect the world's pollinators one is that we're raising awareness, just much like this podcast just trying to bring to the forefront, the threats facing bees and pollinators and the, the, the dire state that they're in one is that we work with policymakers. And so we're, we're providing advice the policymakers on pollinator-friendly practices in agriculture especially, but pollinator-friendly practices, such as ecological based farming systems, such as the reduction of hazardous pesticides promoting ecology as a away for sustainable food, Negra cultural systems. We also work at the ground level as well in terms of, of projects and trying to better mainstream the importance of biodiversity like these pollinators in food and agriculture systems, but also delight. Hoods because many people depend on, on supplemental income from the products of these Impala maters. And so what about us ordinary citizens? What can I do to help ensure the future of obeys? You know, one thing that you can do is. I think you have a respect for bees, pollinators in what they do and they killed them. Don't heal them. Don't feel frayed of them, but you can also do simple things like if you have a garden, reduce the pesticide in your garden plant different be friendly flowers and other nectar sources for them, you can create an insect hotel for them. What's, what's it insect, Hato insect hotel? You can find out more on the ethical website, but it's a it's a very simple. It's a it's a box or pieces of wood, and hollow openings that, that insects beyond beasts can use the nest in b but the big thing is promoting their habitat. You can also talk to your policymakers and share about the importance of bees in pollinators for for food security for reducing poverty, and also for the production of the products, we love beeswax, and Honey. That was Abram big slow and agriculture officer at the food and Agriculture Organization in Rome.

Abram Bixler Agriculture Organization Officer Lotte Lomas FAO Edgar Coulter United Nations DI North America Rome South America Africa Asia Europe Seventy Five Percent
Measles, United States And South America discussed on Katz's Corner

Katz's Corner

02:04 min | 1 year ago

Measles, United States And South America discussed on Katz's Corner

"The measles outbreak in the United States and around the world has sparked misinformation on social media one false Facebook me blamed illegal immigration from South America. But the virus was eliminated across both north and South America in twenty sixteen. The recent outbreak is due largely to inadequate vaccination rates in some communities. Measles was eliminated in the United States in two thousand and as mentioned from the entire north America, South, America continent. Six years later, elimination means cases can still occur. But that's the disease hasn't been continuously spread for. A year or more recently? The virus has been brought into the US by people who have traveled to places where there is an outbreak where the disease is still common such as parts of Europe Africa, Asia and the Pacific, according to the centers for disease control and prevention from those travelers the disease can then spread and US communities that have unvaccinated people the Pan American Health organization said the measles outbreak in New York City, which started in twenty eighteen and spread in the orthodox Jewish community was brought on by travelers who had been in Israel. Where large outbreak is occurring. The CDC has said this year marks the largest number of measles cases, since the disease was eliminated in the US. And it said misinformation about vaccine was quote, a significant factor contributing to the outbreak. Similarly, the executive director of UNICEF and the director general of the World Health Organization issued a joint statement that cited online misinformation about vaccines. Scene safety as a contributing factor in the rising number of measles cases in high and middle income countries. Some major social platforms have recently taken steps to curb the spread of misinformation Facebook announced in March that it would reduce the visibility of vaccine misinformation and YouTube said in February that it would prevent users who promote vaccine misinformation from running

Measles United States South America Facebook North America Pan American Health Organizati World Health Organization America Executive Director Unicef Youtube CDC Director General New York City Asia Israel Europe Pacific Africa
What is China's Belt and Road Initiative?

Nature Podcast

04:03 min | 2 years ago

What is China's Belt and Road Initiative?

"Over the next couple of weeks nature is publishing a series of feature articles that focus on China's massive belt and road initiative. This project will connect the country to others around the world by building infrastructure, including high speed rail networks, airports and even whole cities to date one hundred twenty six countries from Africa, Asia Europe and South America have signed up to the project, which is designed to transform the global movement of goods and services. The features in nature are looking at the effect that the Belton road initiative is having on scientific research and different parts of the world. The first two of these features are written by science policy journalist s and Massoud who dropped by to tell us more. So the Belton road is six years old when he finishes it will be the largest infrastructure building project coming out of one nation since probably the Marshall plan in which the United States. It's mostly financed. The rebuilding of Europe. After the end of World War Two. It was a mix of grants and loans to European nations. This is mostly loans and some grants from China to the nations that go towards its west and leading up all the way to eastern Europe conservative estimates. Put the cost of the Belton road initiative at over a trillion dollars on the project, which was launched in twenty thirteen by China's president Xi Jinping is designed to connect China to countries around the world by an expensive network of land and sea routes. It's about building railway lines. It's about building motorways. It's about building airports, and it's about either building newports or Chinese companies taking over the management and the running of seaports the Belton wrote initiative or be R is is sometimes known aims to transform China's global trade networks and access to markets. But shortly after its launch it became clear that science was going to be a big part of the initiative as well. This aspect of the Belton road is overseen by the Chinese Academy of sciences president by Choon Lee who last year roads in the bulletin of the Chinese Academy of sciences that quotes science technology and innovation of the core. Driving force for the Biaro development. The Chinese Academy of sciences as invested over two hundred fifty million dollars into Belton road signs and technology projects opening centers of excellence in China and building research and training centers across the world. His also setting up the digital Belton road is data sharing platform for participating countries alongside all of this comes a big investment in the training of PHD students from Belton road countries. Just in Pakistan's to one country right now, the total numbers of scholarship holders masters and PHD scholars is about seven thousand a year. Now just a few weeks ago, the Chinese ambassador to Islam abide said that he wants to increase that number to twenty thousand and this is just like one country. So you're looking at quite large numbers of people who right now, very young going to go to China going can do that PHD's learn Mandarin when they come back. They will outnumber the English speaking community of scientists in PHD Holden and say China's really looking to the long term in terms of both building capacity, but also making a sort of very strong case for very China friendly. Scientists into the future. The majority of these students studying in applied sciences or engineering and being trained in areas, particularly important to their home countries. It seems like a win win China build his global research networks and the country's build relevant research capacity within the countries themselves and particularly at the level of the early career researcher. There is hardly any criticism of what's happening here. I think people are genuinely surprised, but in a good way that a superpower like China is suddenly interested in the training of scientists.

China Belton Chinese Academy Of Sciences Asia Europe Choon Lee Africa President Trump South America Massoud Europe Xi Jinping United States Pakistan Researcher Holden Two Hundred Fifty Million Doll Trillion Dollars Six Years
What Exactly Are Frankincense and Myrrh?

BrainStuff

06:42 min | 2 years ago

What Exactly Are Frankincense and Myrrh?

"Support. For brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans are excited to introduce their all new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home rate shield approval is a real game changer. And here's why first Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop, but here's the crucial part every up your rate stays the same. But if rates go down your rate also drops either way you win. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender. To get started. Go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff rate shield approval. Only valid on certain thirty year purchase transactions. Additional conditions or exclusions may apply based on Quicken Loans. Data in comparison to public data records, equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states and m s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, bring stuff Lauren Vogel bomb here. If you've heard of frankencense and Moore, it's probably thanks to the biblical account of the birth of Jesus. According to the book of Matthew chapter, two wise men. Followed a bright star in the east of Bethlehem to where Jesus had been born and presented him with gifts of gold frankencense and Moore during the Christmas season depictions of this event, Argub it quits in American culture, decorating, churches, and shopping, malls alike. But don't let the shiny tinsel and festive candidates distract you from our question today. What exactly are frankencense and mirror? Both frankencense are derived from tree sap or gum resin and are prized for their lowering fragrances frankencense is a milky white resin extracted from species of the genus bus. We Leah which thrive in arid cool areas of the Arabian peninsula, east Africa and India the finest and most aromatic of the species is bus willia- sacra, a small tree that grows in Somalia, Oman and Yemen, these plants which grow to a height of about. Sixteen feet or five meters have papery bark sparse branches of paired leaves and flowers with white petals and a yellow or red center murder is a reddish resin the comes from species of the genus come four, which are native to northeast Africa. And the adjacent areas of the Arabian peninsula. Come a foreign Mira a tree commonly used in the production of Moore can be found in the shallow. Rocky soils of Ethiopia Kenya. Amman Saudi Arabia and small it boasts shiny branches was sparsely that grow in groups of three and can reach a height of nine feet or about three meters. The process for extracting, the sap of these trees is essentially identical harvesters make a longitudinal cut in the tree's trunk which pierces gun resin reservoirs located within the bark the sap slowly uses out from the cut and drips down the tree forming tear-shaped droplets, they're left to harden on the side of the tree. These beans are collected after two weeks people in east Africa and the Arabian peninsula, had produced frankencense and Merv for some five thousand years for much of this time these. Medic resins were the region's most important commodity with a trade network that reached across Africa, Asia and Europe today. Demand for frankencense and Moore has subsided a bit, but numerous Chinese Greek Latin and sanskrit texts reminders of their past importance frankencense and Moore were desired for personal religious and medicinal use in a time before daily bathing people would use the sweet smoke from the resins to make themselves. Smell better. Egyptian women would mix frankencense ash into their I shadow these substances were also widely used in religious ceremonies and burials, according to the Greek writer here notice Egyptians used both frankencense and myrrh in preparation of animals sacrifices and human mummies Jews incorporated them into their religious ceremonies by the third century, BC and Christians by the fourth century, CE the residents also had medical uses in the papyrus Ebbers from fifteen hundred BC priests recommended both resins for the treatment of wounds other ailments. They were once reported to cure included, hemlock poisoning leprosy were. Terms snake bites? Diarrhea plague scurvy and even bald this the high demand for frankencense and Moore created a booming trade in the Middle East lasting several hundred years in the first century, CE around the height of this trade. Plenty the elder claims that Arabia produced approximately one thousand six hundred eighty tonnes about fifteen hundred metric tonnes a frankencense and around four hundred forty eight tons or four hundred metric tons of mir- each year, one of the most important trade centers surrounded and a waste and modern day. Southern Oman this outpost exported frankencense across best Petya India and China for about three hundred BC e to the third century. See the ruins of the settlement remain as UNESCO world. Heritage site known as the land of frankencense, clearly frankencense and Moore were widely available when the wise men visited the baby Jesus around five BC and would have been considered practical gifts with many uses the expensive resins were symbolic as well. A frankencense which was often burned symbolized prayer rising to the heavens like smoke. While mirror, which was often used in bombing symbolized death. So scholars think that frankencense was presented to the infant Jesus to symbolize his later role as a high priest for believers while Mur symbolized, his later, death and burial frankencense and Moore may not be as popular as they once were. But they're still used today in some ways that you might not expect their common ingredients in modern, perfumes, and cosmetics. Continuing a tradition that's lasted years. Scientists are finding new uses for the substances as well. Recent studies suggest that frankencense or its extracts may help intriguing asthma. Rheumatoid arthritis Crohn's disease, and osteoarthritis researchers have also discovered possible benefits of murder in the treatment of gastric ulcers tumors and parasites. This episode was written by Clint pump free and produced by Tyler claim for more on this and lots of other spicy topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. You know, people say necessity is the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah. Or pure accident. How about ego maniacal delusion? Absolutely. Or just a desperate longing. To be cool. I'm Robert lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick. You're the host of the science podcasts stuff to blow your mind. And now we're branching off into the exploration of invention. Invention is the story of human history told one piece of technology at a time the things we made and how they made us invention publishes every Monday, listen and subscribe to invention on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever

Frankencense Moore Quicken Loans Murder Oman Jesus Amman Saudi Arabia America East Africa Lauren Vogel Bethlehem Leah Africa Gastric Ulcers Ethiopia Matthew Middle East Arabia
"africa asia" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

05:22 min | 2 years ago

"africa asia" Discussed on KNSS

"And welcome back to coast to coast with, Dr. Jonathan quick we'll get to your calls in just? A second Jonathan how did you get involved in studying these pandemics Well I've been working in in a family. Physician by training and spent a couple of. Years practicing in in Oklahoma after, doing, my residency but taking care of gunshot wounds and and snake bites and delivering babies but I decided like having whole is patient. So I've been working in Africa Asia Latin America in countries to help them build strong locally lead health, systems that can tackle the problems like eight eight TB malaria but what got me interested in, this was in the middle of the people break, in. Two thousand thirteen and there was a lot of Delay and then everybody. Was kind of came in, I was working on it and I asked I said where things going to be in three years from now how do we. Get into this situation with with an out of out of control epidemic. And no vaccine, no medicine and indecisiveness in in different places so I look back at the last hundred years of epidemics instead okay what can we, do to be sure that this doesn't keep happening because we have the. Cycle of panic headlines promises we're gonna do. This that the other thing and, you, look back three years later if you look the first we took twenty years to get going on on aids on the I. Knew human pathogen of the twenty first century something pulsars it came out of China and in the the. Economy of Asia horrifically lots of MRs may three years later nothing we had a avian flu in. The nineties same thing lots of, excitement but but then much mood so I. I really wanted to try to do something, that would, shake us out of this cycle of panic and complacency, or is it like the boy who cried wolf sometimes where they you know scream from the top of, the mountains that it's the end and then. Nothing happens no I think that's one of the things we need, to, we need to understand is this is out of exact size it's it's like it's like weather prediction it away and. You gotta you gotta get the right balance because complacency kills is much as overreaction. So I think the key, thing is is that the people communicating need to be factual and neither hold back and and it's typical of governments to hide up China did that with with with this SARS outbreak I mentioned from. There start In China they hit somebody governments in west Africa hit. It for a while so you wanna get that right balance between alerting people and and not not either under reacting overreacting and we need. To understand is a public this this, this isn't quite aware weather prediction is all right let's go to the phones we'll start with our international line as we go to Ben in Doha Qatar Ben welcome to. The program sir go ahead Hey georgia Elemental and the whole DOD they were talking about? The. Defense yes I think a lot of the reason that we not at this time we have shut. That down pretty much is unbelievably hard to control. These. Viruses same we, make, wine How. Do. We keep it from jumping into our true exactly yeah exactly and on top of that we do. Keep a contingent Iran but they mostly wake and. See. What works thirty What? Were, see, what. Doesn't work see the spread, raids calculate the spread rates telecom, wait you know basically the defenses against these bugs He wanted to say? Hey let me ask you one? Quick question you you, sit you seem to, know, a, lot about, this are you in the military Oh my wife for about. Chaining. Anchors, okay well thank you I, won't press you, any more than that we get. Calls from all over, the, planet Jonathan and that was from Qatar. Good now he's. Got a point though so they make let's. Say they make these viruses And then something, really, goes wrong how can you use them on let's say, enemy troops and then protect your own no well that's exactly that's a that is is is probably the. Most important reason why why they're has not been more bioterror you can't control you can't. Control it now but but when you look at, the different scenarios for, something, how like how smallpox might would. So. Smallpox, is probably. The most horrific disease that humans had had. Kills it kills is many as a third, of, the people infected and scars..

Dr. Jonathan China smallpox Africa Asia Latin America Oklahoma Asia Doha Qatar DOD wolf west Africa Iran three years eight eight TB hundred years twenty years
"africa asia" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"africa asia" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"And welcome back, to coast to coast with Dr Jonathan. Quick we'll get to your calls in just a. Second Jonathan how did you get, involved in studying these pandemics Well I've been working in in on a family. Physician by training and and spent a couple of. Years practicing in in Oklahoma after, doing, my residency but taking care of gunshot wounds and snake bites and delivering babies but I decided to like having whole is patient. So I've been working in Africa Asia Latin America in countries to help them build strong locally lead health. Systems that can tackle the problems like eight eight TB malaria but what got me interested in, this was in the middle of the Ebola outbreak, in. Two thousand thirteen and there was a lot of The delay and then. Everybody was kind of came in I was working on it and I asked my so where things are, gonna be in three years from now how do we get into this. Situation with with an out of out of control epidemic and Novak seen no. Medicine and indecisiveness in in different places, so I look back at. The, last hundred years of epidemics and said okay what can we do to be sure that this doesn't keep happening because we have the cycle of, panic headlines promises we're gonna do this that the other thing and. You look back three years later if if you. Look the first and we took, it, to twenty years to get going on on aids the first new human pathogen of the twenty first century something called SARS it. Came out of China and and knock the the economy is Asia horrifically lots of promises made three years. Later nothing we had a avian Influence in ninety same thing. Lots of excitement but but then not, much moved, so I really wanted to try to do. Something that would shake us out of this this cycle of panic complacency or is it like the boy who, cried wolf sometimes where the you know scream from the top of the mountains that it's the end and then nothing happens I think that's one of. The things we need to we need to understand is this is not, an, exact science it's like it's like what a prediction it away and? You got it you you you gotta get the. Right balance because complacency kills is much as overreaction so I think the key thing. Is is that the people communicating need to be factual and neither hold back and it's typical of governments, to hide up damage China did that with with with this SARS outbreak. I mentioned from there it started in China they hit somebody governments in. West. Africa headed for a while so you, wanna. Get that right Bill Balance, between alerting people and and not not either under reacting you're overreacting and we need to understand is public that this this. Isn't quite severe weather prediction is all right let's. Go to the phones, we'll start with our. International line as we go to Ben in Doha Qatar Ben. Welcome to the program sir go ahead George the whole. DOD thing they were talking, about. The defense Yes I, think a lot of the reason that. We had this Nathan. We shut that down pretty much Is it on believably hard, to control these viruses make wine How, do. We keep it from jumping into our true exactly yeah exactly and dotted top it bad on we do You. Keep a contingent Iran but they. Mostly like Works thirty What, we're see what does the more fever, spread raids calculate Pittsburgh rates, tells you, you know basically defensive against the mugged Let? Me ask you? One quick question you you sit you seem to know a lot, about this, are you in the military Oh my word for, about, ten years okay well thank. You. I, won't press you any more, than that we, get calls from all over the planet Jonathan and that was from. Qatar good now he's got a? Point though, so they makes let's say they make. These. Viruses, and then something really goes wrong how can you use them on let's say enemy? Troops and then protect your own no well that's exactly that's. A that is is, is, probably the the most important reason why why they're have not, been more bioterror then you can't control you can't control it not but but when you look at the different scenarios for something how like. How smallpox smallpox is probably the most horrific. Disease that humans. That had kills it kills is a third..

Dr Jonathan China Nathan Oklahoma Africa Asia Latin America smallpox Qatar Doha Africa Bill Balance Ebola Asia Novak DOD wolf Iran George Pittsburgh three years eight eight TB
"africa asia" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"africa asia" Discussed on KSRO

"And welcome back to coast to coast with Dr Jonathan quick will get to your calls in just. A second Jonathan how did you get involved in studying these pandemics well I've been working in in a. Family physician by training and and spent a couple of years, practicing in in Oklahoma after doing my residency. But taking care of gunshot wounds and and snake bites and delivering. Babies but I decided to like having whole country's patient so I've been working in. Africa Asia Latin America in countries to help them build strong locally lettuce health, systems that, can, tackle the problems like eight eight, TB malaria but what got me interested. In this was in the middle of the Ebola. Outbreak in two thousand thirteen and, there was a lot of Delay and then everybody was. Kind of came in I was working on it and I asked my so where thanks going to be in three years from now how. Do we get into this situation with with an out of, out. Of control epidemic and Novak seen no medicine and? Indecisiveness, in in different places so I look back at the last hundred years of of academics and said okay what can we do to be, sure that this doesn't keep happening because we have the cycle of panic. Headlines promises we're going to do this that the. Other thing and you look back, three, years later if if you look the first we took twenty years to get going on on aids on the first new human. Pathogen of the twenty first century something called SARS it came out of China and and not the the. Economy of Asia horrifically lots of Promises made three years later nothing but we had. A avian flu in the nineties same thing lots of excitement on but. But then I'd much moved so I I really wanted to try to do something that would shake us out, of this this cycle of panic and complacency or is it like the boy who cried wolf sometimes where the you know scream from the top of. The mountains that it's the end and then nothing happens I think that's one, of, the things we need to we need to understand is this is? Exactly size it's like it's like weather prediction it. Away and you you got it you you you gotta get the right balance because complacency. Kills is much as overreaction so I think the key thing is is that the people communicating needs to be factual and neither hold back and it's typical of governments. To hide academics China did that with with with the SARS outbreak I mentioned. From there Started in. China they hit somebody governments in west Africa hit. It for a while so you want to get that. Right balance between, alerting people, and and not not either under reacting overreacting and we need to understand. Is a public that this this isn't, quite aware weather prediction is all right let's go to the phones we'll start with our international line as we go. To Ben in Doha Qatar Ben welcome to the. Program sir go ahead Hey George down the whole. DOD thing they were talking about the defense yes I think a lot of. The reason that we not, a. Bad day We shut that down? Pretty. Much is it unbelievably hard to control these viruses same we make wine How do we keep. It from jumping into arch truth exactly yeah? Exactly. And dot bad We do keep a contingent Ron but mostly. Wait. And, see. What works thirty See. What, were see, what doesn't work see the, spread raids calculate the spread rates, wait you know basically the defenses against the Bugs, and then the brand new Wanted to hey let me ask. You one quick question you you you seem. To know a lot about this are you in the military Oh my, wife, for about ten years okay? Well. Thank. You I won't press you any, more than that, we get calls from all over the planet, Jonathan, and that was from Qatar Yup good now he's. Got a point though so they make let's. Say they make these viruses And then something really, goes, wrong how can you use them on let's say enemy, troops and then protect your. Own no well that's exactly that's a that is is is probably the. Most important reason why why they're has not been more bioterror event you can't control it..

Dr Jonathan China Africa Asia Latin America Oklahoma Outbreak Asia Doha Family physician Qatar Novak DOD wolf west Africa George Ron three years hundred years twenty years ten years
"africa asia" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

05:20 min | 2 years ago

"africa asia" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"And welcome back to coast to coast with Dr Jonathan quick we'll get to your, calls in, just a second this Jonathan how did you get involved in studying these pandemics well I've been working. In in on a family physician by training and spent a, couple of years practicing in in Oklahoma after. Doing my residency but taking care of gunshot wounds and hence snake. Bites and delivering babies but I decided to like having whole coaches patient so I've. Been working in Africa Asia Latin America in countries to to help them build, strong locally, lead, health systems that can tackle the, problems like eight eight Stevie malaria but. What got me interested in this was in the middle. Of the break in two thousand, thirteen and there was a lot of And then everybody was kind of came. In I was working on it I said where things going to be in three years from now how do we, get into this situation with with an audit. Control epidemic and no vaccine no medicine and indecisiveness in in different places, so, I look back at the last hundred years of of and said? Okay what can we do to be sure that. This doesn't keep happening because we have the cycle of panic headlines promises we're gonna. Do this that the other thing and you look back three years later if you look the first and we took it for twenty years to get going on on aids on, the first new human pathogen of the twenty first century something called stars they. Came out of China and and not, the, the economy of Asia horrifically lots of promises made, three years, later nothing but, we had a avian flu in the nineties. Same thing lots of excitement But but, then not much mood so. I I really wanted to. Try to, do something that would shake us out of this this, cycle of panic and complacency is like the boy who cried wolf sometimes where the you, know scream from the top of the mountains. That it's the end and then nothing happens I think that's one of, the, things we need to we need to understand is this is exact? Size it's like it's like weather prediction it away. And you you got it he you you gotta get the right balance because complacency. Kills is much as overreaction so I think the key thing is is that the people communicating need to be factual and neither hold back and and it's typical of governments to, hide evidently China's did that with with with the SARS outbreak I mentioned from. There it started in China they hit, somebody, governments in west Africa hit it for a while. So you, wanna get that The right balance, between alerting people and and not not either under reacting overreacting and we need to understand is a public this this. Isn't quite severe weather prediction is all right let's go. To the phones we'll, start with our international. Lined as we go to Ben in, Doha Qatar Ben welcome to. The program sir go ahead Hey George. Down the whole DOD we're talking about the defense yes I think a lot. Of the reason that we, none. Of that We have shut that down pretty much Unbelievably. Hard to control these viruses make wine How do. We. Keep, it. From jumping into our truth exactly yeah exactly and top of that Keep a contingent Iran Mostly like What works thirty He what we're see, what doesn't work see, the spread rates calculate, that spread. Rates telecom, late you know basically the defenses. Against the bugs Let me ask you. One quick question you, you you seem to, know a. Lot about, this are you in the military Oh my wife for about, ten, years okay well thank you. I. Won't, press you any more than, that we get, calls from all over the planet Jonathan and that was from Qatar. Good now he's? Got a point though so they make let's say. They make these viruses and then something really. Goes wrong how can you Use them on let's say enemy troops and then protect your own no well. That's exactly that's a. That is is is probably the most important reason why why. They're has not been more bioterror then you can't, control it you can't, control it now but but when you look at the different scenarios for something how like how smallpox smallpox is, probably, the most horrific disease that humans. Have. Had, kills it. Kills is many the third of the people..

Dr Jonathan China Africa Asia Latin America Oklahoma family physician Asia Qatar DOD wolf Ben George west Africa Iran three years hundred years twenty years
"africa asia" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

05:20 min | 2 years ago

"africa asia" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"And welcome back to coast to coast with Dr Jonathan quick we'll get to your. Calls in just a second Jonathan how did you get involved in studying these pandemics well I've been working. In in on a family physician by training and and spent a couple of years practicing in in Oklahoma. After doing my residency but taking care of gunshot wounds and hand. Snake bites and delivering babies but I decided like having whole country's patient so I've. Been working in Africa Asia Latin America in countries to to help them build, strong locally, lettuce, health systems that can tackle the, problems like eight ATV malaria but what. Got me interested in this was in the middle of. The Ebola outbreak in two thousand, thirteen and there was a lot of Delay and then everybody was kind of came. In I was working on it And, I asked I said where thanks going to be in three years from now how do we get into the situation with with an out of out. Of control epidemic and Novak seen no medicine and indecisiveness in in different places, so, I look back at the last hundred years of of epidemics and? Said okay what can we do to be sure. That this doesn't keep happening because we have the cycle of panic headlines promises we're. Gonna do this that the other thing and you look back three years later if you look the first and we took it to point eight, years to get going on a on. A on the first new human pathogenic the twenty first century something called SARS. It came out of China and and, not, the the economy of Asia horrifically lots of promises. Made three, years later nothing but, we had a avian flu in the nineties. Same thing lots of excitement But but. Then much moved, so I, I really wanted to try to do something that would, shake out of this this cycle of panic and complacency or is it like a boy who cried wolf sometimes where the screen from the top of. The mountains that it's the end and then nothing happens law I think that's, one, of the things we need to we need to understand is this? Is not an exact size it's it's like it's. Like what a prediction it away and you you gotta you gotta get the right. Balance because complacency kills is much as overreaction so I think the key thing is is that the people communicating needs to be factual and neither, hold back and it's typical of governments. To hide epidemics China did that with with with this SARS outbreak I mentioned. From there it started in China they, hit, somebody governments in west Africa hit for well so. You want, to get that The right balance between alerting, people and and not not either under reacting overreacting and we need to understand is a public this this isn't. Quite aware weather prediction is all right let's go to. The phones we'll start. With our international line. As we go to Ben in Doha Qatar Ben welcome. To the program sir go ahead Hey George edges down. The whole DOD thing. They were talking about the. Defense yes I think a. Lot of the reason that leave not of that we have shut that down. Pretty much unbelievably hard to, control. These viruses Siwi we make wine How do we keep it from? Jumping, in, arch. Route exactly yeah exactly and, on top of that we do, keep a contingent Iran but. They mostly like And, see what works thirty What. We're see what doesn't, work see this spread, raids calculate. The spread, rates telecom late you know basically the defenses against the bugs Let? Me ask you. One quick question you, you you seem to, know a. Lot about, this are you in the military Oh my wife for about, ten, years okay well thank you? I. Won't. Press you any more than that, we get calls, from all over the planet Jonathan. And that was from Qatar Yup good now he's. Got a point though so they make let's. Say they make these viruses And then something really, goes, wrong how can you use them on let's say enemy, troops and then protect your. Own no well that's exactly that's a that. Is is is probably the the most important reason why why they're had not been more bioterror you can't. Control it you can't control it now but but, when you look at the different scenarios for something how like how smallpox Mike so smallpox is probably the most, horrific, disease humans that had kills kills. Is. Many, as a..

Dr Jonathan China Africa Asia Latin America Oklahoma Doha Mike family physician Asia Qatar smallpox Ebola Novak DOD wolf west Africa Iran three years hundred years
"africa asia" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"africa asia" Discussed on WRVA

"And, welcome back to coast to coast with. Dr Jonathan quick we'll get to your calls in just. A second Jonathan how did you, get involved in in studying these pandemics Well I've been working in on. A family physician by training and spent a. Couple of years practicing in in, Oklahoma, after doing my residency but taking care of gunshot wounds and snake bites and delivering babies what I decided like having whole country's patient. So I've been working in Africa Asia Latin America in countries to to help them build strong locally lead, health systems that can tackle the problems like eight eight TB malaria but what got me interested, in this was in the middle of the Ebola, outbreak. In two thousand thirteen and there was a lot of Delay and then everybody was kind of came. In I was working on it And I asked my where things are gonna be in three years from now how do we get, into this situation with an out of out. Of control epidemic and no vaccine no medicine and indecisiveness in in, different, places so I look back at the last hundred years of and? Said okay what can we do to be sure. That this doesn't keep happening because we have the cycle of panic headlines promises we're going. To do this that the other thing and you look back three years later if if you, look the first we took twenty years to. Get going on on aids The first new human pathogen of the. Twenty first century something called SARS it came out of China. And and, not the the economy is Asia horrifically lots of promises may. Three years later nothing we had a avian flu in the nineties same thing. Lots of excitement but then I'd much, mood so I I really wanted to try to do something that would shake out of this this, cycle of panic and complacency is it like the boy who cried wolf sometimes where the you know, scream from the top of the mountains that. It's the end and then nothing happens I think that's one of, the, things we need to we need to understand is this is not? An exact size it's like it's like what a. Prediction it away and you got you you've got to get the right balance because complacency. Kills is much as overreaction so I think the key thing is is that the people Communicating. Need to, be factual and neither hold back and and it's typical of governments to hide. China did that with with with. The SARS outbreak I mentioned from there it? Started in China, they hit, somebody governments in west Africa hit for a while so you want to get that. Right balance between alerting people and and not not either. Under reacting your overreacting and we need to understand is public. This this, this isn't quite severe weather prediction is all right let's go. To the phones we'll start with our international line as we go to Ben. In Doha Qatar Ben welcome to the, program sir go ahead Hey Georgia Dome the whole DOD, thing they were talking about the defense yes I. Think a lot of the. Reason that we a bad there's we have shut that down pretty much is. It on believably hard to, control. These viruses See we make wine How do we keep. It. From, jumping. Archery exactly yeah. Exactly and dot.

China Dr Jonathan Africa Asia Latin America SARS Asia Oklahoma family physician Archery Hey Georgia Dome wolf DOD west Africa three years eight eight TB hundred years twenty years Three years
"africa asia" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

05:19 min | 2 years ago

"africa asia" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"And welcome back to coast to coast. With Dr Jonathan quick we'll get to your calls in. Just a second Jonathan how did, you get involved in studying these pandemics Well I've been working in in on a family physician. By training and and spent a couple of years. Practicing in in Oklahoma after doing, my, residency but taking care of gunshot wounds and and snake bites and delivering babies but I decided to like having whole country's patient, so I've been working in Africa Asia Latin America in countries to to help them build strong locally. Lead health systems that can tackle the problems like eight TB malaria but got me interested in. This was in the middle of the Ebola outbreak, in. Two thousand thirteen and there was a lot of Delay and then everybody was kind of came in I was working on it and I asked my so where thanks going to be in three years from now. How do we get into the situation with with an audit control epidemic and no vaccine no. Medicine, and indecisiveness in in different places so I look back at the last hundred years of instead okay what can we do to be sure that, this doesn't keep happening because we have the cycle of panic headlines promises. We're going to do this that the other thing. And you look back three years, later, if if you look the first we took twenty years to get going on on a on the first new human pathogen of, the twenty first century something called SARS it came out of China and and not the the economy. Of Asia horrifically lots of problems MRs may three years. Later nothing we had a avian flu in the nineties. Same thing lots of, excitement on but but then not much moved so I I. Really wanted to try to do something that will check us out of this this cycle of panic and complacency, is it like the boy who cried wolf sometimes where the you know scream from the, top of the mountains that it's the end. And then nothing happens no I think that's one of the, things, we need to we need to understand is this is not an exact science this it's like it's like weather prediction. It away and you you gotta you gotta get the right balance because complacency kills is. Much as overreaction so I think the key thing is is that the people communicating needs to be factual and neither hold back and and it's typical of governments to. Hide evidently China did that with with with this SARS outbreak I mentioned from, there it started In China they hit somebody governments in west, Africa hit, it for well so you wanna get that right balance. Between alerting people and and not not either under reacting overreacting and we. Need to understand is a public that, this this isn't quite aware weather prediction is all right let's go to the phones we'll start with our international line. As we go to Ben in Doha Qatar Ben welcome. To the program sir. Go ahead Hey George edges, one other comment on the whole DOD they were talking about the defense yes. I think a lot of. The reason that we at. That is we have shut that down pretty much is it unbelievably hard to. Control these viruses have seen, we. Make wine How do we keep it. From jumping in our truth exactly yeah exactly and on. Top of that We do keep a contingent Iran but they? Mostly. Like, and. See what works thirty c See, what we're see what doesn't were. Spread raids calculate the spread race, telecom wait you know basically the defenses against. The bugs Let me ask you one quick question you, you you seem to, know, a, lot about, this are you in the military Oh my wife for about, ten, years okay well thank you. I. Won't, press you any more than, that we get, calls from all over the planet Jonathan and that was from Qatar. Good now he's? Got a point though so they make let's say. They make these viruses and then something really. Goes wrong how can you Use them on let's say enemy troops and then protect your own no well. That's exactly that's a that is is is probably the most important reason why why they're. Has not been more bioterror you can't control it, you can't control it now, but but when you look at. The. Different, scenarios for. Something how like how smallpox so smallpox is. Probably the most horrific disease that humans had, had, kills it kills is many. As..

Dr Jonathan China smallpox Oklahoma Africa Asia Latin America Doha Asia family physician Ebola Qatar DOD Africa wolf Iran three years hundred years twenty years eight TB
"africa asia" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"africa asia" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"I hope we get along well with iraq we've certainly spent a great fortune in iraq and many many lives thousands and hundreds of thousands of lives if you think on both sides which i always think about both sides not just our side and they had an election and i hope we're going to be able to get along and we'll see how that goes we've already been talking to the people that won the election i was not in favor of that war i was very much against that war i never thought it was a good thing but that's another deck of cards that i inherited and we'll do the best we can with it i think the election was pretty conclusive and again we've spoken to them we'll see what happens yes sir go ahead go ahead the next event we have time for one more question i'm from newspaper engineer i come from a very countries more countries in africa asia may question mr president you are we really admire what you are doing enough africa and really wish and hope that something again we'd be done in the middle east the void people more wars and more blood and marketing in the mid east with adjust peace process that gives everyone it's we're looking for peace and africa as you know is sonar very strong list but we're looking for peace we want peace all over we want to solve problems we're looking for peace africa right now has got problems like few people would even understand they have things going on there that nobody could believe in this room if you saw some of the things that i see through intelligence what's going on in africa it is so sad it's so vicious and violent and we want peace we want peace for africa we want peace all over the world that's my number one goal peace all over the world and would building up a tremendous military because i really believe through strength you get you get peace but we're going to have a military like we've never had before we've given out orders for the best fighter jets in the world the best ships to best everything but hopefully we'll never have to use them that would be dream to buy the best stuff to have the best stuff to have the best equipment in the world and to never have to use it would be a really great part of my dream thank you very much everybody.

iraq engineer president africa
"africa asia" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"africa asia" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"I have told you many times the great impediment to progress in africa asia but especially asia has progressed but in africa and latin america is corruption your clients had an enormously long piece corruption gutted south africa's tax agency now the nation is paying the price so they had a president jacob zuma when he was president very recently so the president his supporters are just want a few lines from this article use the upheaval with the tax agency to sees greater control of the national treasury further enriching themselves at enormous cost to the country according to government officials now trying to repair the damage sumo zuma was a thug symptom of a thug and the the increasingly corrupt anc has undermined this is the new york times that's the african national congress but then these people believe you know oh they're great because they're antiapartheid so they're going to be you know for black liberation and all that stuff and they people buy that stuff so what if they're socialists or even marxist anc case the shortfalls of left the nation with fewer resources to tackle what's most pressing needs housing education health in a society that has grown even more unequal under the anc mentioned this in the first hour that is the the whole took me a long time or read this article and the whole thing was worth it for that line south africa's more unequal under socialism than it was under apartheid hear that folks mindblowing is not a tweet that out.

asia south africa jacob zuma anc new york times congress africa president
"africa asia" Discussed on 1380 AM The Answer

1380 AM The Answer

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"africa asia" Discussed on 1380 AM The Answer

"I have told you many times that the great impediment to progress in africa asia but especially asia has progressed but africa and latin america is corruption your times having an enormously long piece corruption gutted south africa's tax agency now the nation is paying the price so they had a president jacob zuma when he was president very recently yeah so the president his supporters i just want a few lines from this article use the upheaval the tax agency the sees greater control over the national treasury further enriching themselves at enormous cost of the country according to government officials now trying to repair the damage sumo zuma was a thug simple a thug the the increasingly corrupt anc has undermined this is the new york times that's the african national congress but then these people believe you know oh they're great because they're antiapartheid so they're going to be you know for black liberation and all that stuff and they people buy that stuff so what if they're socialist or even marxist anc case the shortfalls of left the nation with fewer resources to tackle what's most pressing needs.

asia south africa jacob zuma anc new york times congress africa president
"africa asia" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"africa asia" Discussed on WGTK

"I have told you many times that the great impediment to progress in africa asia but especially asia has progressed but in africa and latin america is corruption howdy an enormously long piece corruption gutted south africa's tax agency now the nation is paying the price so they had a president jacob zuma when he was presidential very recently yeah so the president and his supporters have just want a few lines from this article use the up with the tax agency to sees greater control over the national treasury further enriching themselves at enormous cost to the country according to government officials now trying to repair the damage sumo zuma was a thug simple another thug and the increasingly corrupt anc has undermined this is the new york times that's the african national congress but then these people believe you know oh they're great because they're antiapartheid so they're going to be you know for black liberation and all that stuff and they people buy that stuff so what if they're socialists or even marxist anc case the shortfalls of left the nation with fewer resources to tackle what's most pressing needs housing education health in a society that has grown even more unequal under the anc i mentioned this in the first hour that is the the whole me a long time or read this article and the whole thing was worth it for that line south africa's more unequal under socialism than it was under apartheid you hear that folks mindblowing is it not out a tweet that out every every a westerner who believes in socialism is a fool by definition they are a full they may be kind and nice and sweet and loving and ben faithful.

asia south africa jacob zuma anc new york times congress africa president ben
"africa asia" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"africa asia" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"I have told you many times that the great impediment to progress in africa asia but especially asia has progressed but in africa and latin america is corruption you're an enormously long piece corruption gutted south africa's tax agency now the nation is paying the price so they had a president jacob zuma when he was presidential very recently yeah so the president and his supporters are just want a few lines from this article use the upheaval with the tax agency to sees greater control of the national treasury further enriching themselves at enormous cost to the country according to government officials now trying to repair the damage sumo zuma was a thug another thug the the increasingly corrupting nc has undermined this is the new york times that's the african national congress but then these people believe you know oh they're great because they're antiapartheid so they're gonna be you know for black liberation and all that stuff and they people buy that stuff so what if they're socialists or even marxist anc case shortfalls of left the nation with fewer resources to tackle what's most pressing needs housing education health in a society that has grown even more unequal under the anc i mentioned in the first hour that is the the whole three longtime read this article and the whole thing was worth it for that line south africa's more unequal under socialism than it was on the report tied you hear that folks mindblowing is it not tweet that out every every a westerner who believes in socialism is a fool by definition they are a fool they may be kind and nice and sweet and loving and ben faithful and loyal and honest and all these wonderful things but they're fools.

asia south africa jacob zuma nc new york times congress africa president anc ben
Soros foundation to quit Hungary after clash with government

Forum

01:58 min | 3 years ago

Soros foundation to quit Hungary after clash with government

"Foundation of american billionaire and philanthropist george soros says it is closing its office in budapest because of oppression by the right wing hungarian government impure sir howdy are psoriasis are haughty nelson reports from berlin that the announcement comes a day after budapest announced new restrictions on ngos the open society foundations says it will move its main european operation to berlin and we'll continue to support human rights and other nonprofit work in hungary from here the group said it has become impossible to work or protected staff in a quote increasingly repressive political and legal environment in hungary the decision is an ominous one for scores of ngos in hungary that received funding from foreign sources since his landslide victory last month prime minister viktor orban's has taken steps to clamp down on those ngos orban's rightwing government has accused the hungarianborn soros and his foundations of encouraging migration to europe from africa asia in the middle east as well as undermining hungarian sovereignty suraya sirhatti nelson npr news berlin northern california authorities have removed ten children from a home in charge their parents would neglect and torture lieutenant greg curl but with the fairfield police department i'm horrified by the statements that were given by these children we are now in this process and we have two children first and foremost in our mind fairfield police say the investigation began when they searched the family home i'm trial snyder npr news support for npr comes from focus features with pope francis a man of his word pope francis opens his doors for a conversation about human rights injustice faith and family a documentary film directed by them vendors only in theaters this friday and the annie e casey foundation.

Hungary Pope Francis Snyder Fairfield California Middle East Africa Europe Orban Prime Minister George Soros Berlin Nelson Annie E Casey Foundation NPR Fairfield Police Department Greg Curl Viktor Orban Budapest
"africa asia" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"africa asia" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The uniform go to where we send them to protect our country sometimes they go oh in large numbers to invade iraq invaded afghanistan sometimes they're working in small units working with partners in africa asia latin america helping them be better but the at the end of the day are helping those partners be better at fighting isis north at north africa to protect our countries so that we don't have to send large numbers of troops and the other someone who knows who knows a goal star fallen person john general thanks for being here thank you for your service don't portrait there has been some talk about the timetable of the release of a statement the three soldiers who were killed in these year you walk this time the release of information what part do the fact that a beacon was hanging during that time word were release of steady concerned that divulging information or early might jeopardize the sort of tip the first of all that that you know we are at the of at the uh that the highest levels the us government uh the people that will answer those questions will be the people at the other end of the military uh uh pyramid uh i'm sure there the uh the uh special forces group is conducting i know they're and vote in conducting an investigation that investigation of course under the auspices of uh africom ultimately will go to the white house go to the pentagon uh i've read the same stores you have actually know a lot more than a leading on so but i'm not going to tell you there is an investigation being done but uh as i say the the the men and women men and women of our country are serving all around the world i mean what what the hell is mice undoing back in the fight he's back to the fight because working with iraqi soldiers who are infinitely better than they were a few years ago to take isis on directly so that we don't have to do small numbers of marines where he is uh working alongside those guys that's why they're out there with us general john kelly is white house chief of staff who.

afghanistan pentagon john kelly iraq africa america north africa us africom chief of staff
"africa asia" Discussed on Discovery

Discovery

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"africa asia" Discussed on Discovery

"It was crucial to the business of empire at its height britain ruled over canada in the west as well as large swathes of africa asia and australia india with its vast natural and cultural riches was considered the jewel in its crown the survey of india set up in seventeen sixty seven is also being commemorated in the science museum's new exhibition on india curator matt kimberly showed me another key object from this survey excuse the noise in the background it's museum staff installing the exhibits as bespoke this is the great the all night and aptly named the the old light is an instrument the measures horizontal and vertical angles so you see here very intricate base on which there francis is set up and spirit level three scheuled that its own an even play and then this telescope on top through which measures relate very fine more things will around accurate measurement essentially all it does is tell you will be elevations is all about the angle of separation is in a horizontal thing but from taking two of those measurements and having a non distance you stop failed to calculate other distances from that essentially you triangulating you have the scientific motivation to push these new surveying techniques and india proves the perfect place do that it is lost in its scope because of british rule is increasingly politically unified so you don't have the issue that you would in europe of crossing national boundaries the keep surveying of such great distance there is also the political element of the story which is about the british establishing.

canada science museum india europe africa matt kimberly francis
"africa asia" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"africa asia" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"All right to else's out here all right let us go to arthur blunts town florida go ahead yet there yeah you're on shoot up a thank you for taking my call number one i'm so aggravated with the people wounded hair down the statute i'm just wondering if they want to go to graveyard may and take down headstones of confederate and union soldiers while they're not going to take down union soldiers a what i'm sure it wouldn't do that but but it is it just aggravate this do out of me for them do they do a myth and what is it gonna chang not a damn thing thank you and i i just don't understand it and on and on an hour area north florida balch georgia there's there's a lot of confederate uh gravestones and people go to visit their distant relative and just quarter our history um and i'm prowess and thank you for your call arthur you know the thing is ladies and gentlemen this isn't the only country that practised slavery release part of the country did two hundred fifty three hundred years ago slavery was practice in almost every part of the real the middle east africa asia europe of course we don't make excuses for it but we need to explain things history as an example you know other than isis in the taliban honestly are other cultures tearing down the historical markers isn't a weird isn't that weird be tearing these things down in the pretend we're chang them down because we don't want to honour these people who the hell honors these people i mean i find this to be astonishing quite frankly yeah but what do i know right i did want to get to one other thing doesn't fit precisely in to what we've been talking about but i want to hit it anyway what happened to north korean north korea's knows what happened to iran and iran's nukes what happened a russia had russia go away how how are all these stories nonstorage today by the way the ah the prime minister of spain has called the terrorist attack on his people ag hottest attack ag hottest attack something a course obama could never said and there's no new information on this uh i should repeat it for people.

georgia arthur middle east africa asia europe taliban north korea russia prime minister spain obama north korean iran two hundred fifty three hundre
"africa asia" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"africa asia" Discussed on KOIL

"Right to us is out here all right let us go to arthur blunts town florida go ahead yet there yeah you're on shoot a thank you for taking my call number one arm bo aggravated with the people wounded hair down the statute i'm just wondering if they want to go to graveyard may take down headstone of confederate am union toeger while they're not going to take down union soldiers what i'm sure it wouldn't do that but but it just aggravate that do out of me for them did they do and what are we going to change not a damn thing thank you and now i just don't understand an an an hour area north florida doubt the order there there's a lot of confederate gravestone than people go to visit their relatives and just quarter our history mm hmm per hour and thank you for your call arthur you know the thing is ladies and gentlemen this isn't the only country that practised slavery or at least part of the country did two hundred fifty three hundred years ago slavery was practice in almost every part of the world the middle east africa asia europe of course we don't make excuses for it but we need to explain things history as an example you know other than isis in the taleban honestly are other cultures tearing down the historical markers isn't it weird isn't that weird to be tearing these things down in the pretend we're turning them down because we don't want to honour these people who the hell honors these people i mean i find this to be astonishing quite frankly now but what do i know right i did want to get to one other thing doesn't fit precisely in to what we've been talking about but i want to hit it anyway what happened to north korea north korea's nukes what happened to iran and iran's nukes what happened a russia and russia go away how how are all these stories nonstorage today by the way the uh the prime minister of spain has called the terrorist attack on his people ag hottest attack ag hottest attack something of course obama could never said and there's no new information on this i should repeated for people who are just hearing this i don't know how many of those are out there but.

arthur middle east africa asia europe north korea russia prime minister spain obama florida iran two hundred fifty three hundre
"africa asia" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"africa asia" Discussed on KELO

"Nehra who else is out here all right let us go to arthur blunts town florida go ahead yet there yeah you're on shoot a thank you for taking my call number one i am aggravated with the people wounded hair down the statues i'm just wondering if they wanna go to you're graveyard may and take down headstone of confederate and union toeger while they're not going to take down union soldiers a what i'm kerry wouldn't do that but but it is it gets aggravate that to me for them to be doing and what are we going to change not a damn thing thank you and now ann dowd i just don't understand it an an an hour area north florida bowed georgia there there's a lot of confederate gravestone didn't people go to visit their relative and just quarter our history mm hmm now per hour thank you for your call arthur you know the thing is ladies and gentlemen this isn't the only country that practised slavery or at least part of the country did two hundred fifty three hundred years ago slavery was practice in almost every part of the world the middle east africa asia europe of course we don't make excuses for it but we need to explain things history as an example you know other than isis in the taleban honestly are other cultures tearing down the historical markers isn't it weird isn't that weird to be tearing these things down in the pretend we're turning them down because we don't want to honour these people who the hell honors these people i mean i find this to be astonishing quite frankly now but what do i know right i did want to get to one other thing doesn't fit precisely in to what we've been talking about but i want to hit it anyway what happened to north korean north korea's nukes what happened to iran and iran's nukes what happened a russia that russia go away how how are all these stories nonstorage today by the way the the prime minister of spain has called the terrorist attack on his people ag hottest attack akg hottest attack something of course obama could never say and there's no new information on this i should repeated for people who are just hearing this i don't know how many of those are out there have but.

Nehra kerry ann dowd georgia arthur middle east africa asia europe north korea russia prime minister spain obama north korean iran two hundred fifty three hundre