39 Burst results for "Afghanistan"

Fresh update on "afghanistan" discussed on Silicon Valley Insider with Keith Koo

Silicon Valley Insider with Keith Koo

00:58 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "afghanistan" discussed on Silicon Valley Insider with Keith Koo

"President Trump is ordered most American troops out of Somali Here's correspondent Mike Rossi. President Donald Trump has ordered the Pentagon to withdraw most of the U. S troops stationed in Somalia, continuing a drawdown of U. S involvement in counterterrorism missions abroad. In a short statement, the Pentagon said a majority of U. S troops and assets in Somalia will be withdrawn in early 2021. They're currently about 700 troops in Somalia training and advising local forces that have been in a long running fight against the extremist Al Qaeda affiliate Al Shabaab. Trump also recently ordered draw downs of U. S troops in Afghanistan and Iraq might cross you. Washington. The head of the World Health Organization says positive results from Corona virus vaccine trials are encouraging but warns against poor countries being left behind and addressing the U. N General Assembly on Friday. He said vaccines must be shared as what he called a global public. Good. More details on these stories to be found in town hall dot com. Balance of nature's fruits and vegetables in the capsule changing the world one life at a time. I think this stuff worked. I don't seem to have the highs and the lows, you know, sometimes you get real slow in love during the day, and I'm a type a guy, So I go a lot and I'm or alert and it seems like I don't seem to feel famished. And it's not very expensive in the idea of having that freeze dried or that nutrient in that capsule and who's gonna eat all those vegetables? You know, most of us don't eat right anyway. So whatever the science behind it, I think, Donald your nature is a great idea. I'm gonna probably stay with it until I drop Had a.

President Donald Trump Somalia Pentagon Mike Rossi Al Shabaab World Health Organization Afghanistan U. S Washington U. N General Assembly Iraq
Trump Orders All American Troops Out of Somalia

Radiosurgery New York

00:20 sec | 13 hrs ago

Trump Orders All American Troops Out of Somalia

"The Pentagon said a majority of U. S troops and assets in Somalia will be withdrawn in early 2021. There are currently about 700 troops in Somalia training and advising local forces that have been in a long running fight against the extremist Al Qaeda affiliate Al Shabaab. Trump also recently ordered drawdowns of U. S troops in Afghanistan and

Somalia Pentagon U. Al Shabaab Al Qaeda Donald Trump Afghanistan
Fresh update on "afghanistan" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:37 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "afghanistan" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Bible dot horde. It's 10 35. The Trump Administration has reportedly refused to allow members of President elect Joe Biden's transition team to meet with officials that U. S intelligence agencies that are controlled by the Pentagon Officials tell The Washington Post The Biden team has not been able to engage with leaders at the N S. A and Defense intelligence agency. That's despite a General Services administration decision last month, clearing the way for federal agencies to meet with representatives of the incoming administration. The delays came. Even his Biden advisers spent much of this week meeting with officials at the office of the director of National Intelligence and the CIA, which are independent of the Defense Department. That all comes as the president elect gets ready to deal with a host of threats. There are urgent international concerns like Iran, which has vowed to get revenge for the assassinations of two of its military leaders. Then there's North Korea's nuclear weapons. The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan could reignite with the withdrawal of US troops. But perhaps the number one concern is the large number of American government workers retiring. They're part of the baby boomers. This group, according to the FBI has caught the eye of foreign agents willing to offer them large paydays to sell sensitive information about the U. S. A J. Green W. T O P News. Two bodies have been found in a military training area at the Army's largest base. The bodies were found at Fort Bragg in North Carolina on Wednesday, and officials say their deaths were not related to official unit training. The bodies are those of a 44 year old army veteran and a 37 year old master sergeant and investigation is ongoing..

Joe Biden President Trump Trump Administration North Korea Fort Bragg Army North Carolina National Intelligence Defense Department Iran FBI U. S United States Pentagon Iraq General Services CIA Director
Trump orders withdrawal of US troops from Somalia

Dan Proft

00:36 sec | 13 hrs ago

Trump orders withdrawal of US troops from Somalia

"Decision concerning US forces oversee President Donald Trump has ordered the Pentagon to withdraw most of the U. S troops stationed in Somalia, continuing a drawdown of U. S involvement in counterterrorism missions abroad. It a short statement, the Pentagon said a majority of U. S. Troops and assets in Somalia will be withdrawn in early 2021. There are currently about 700 troops in Somalia training and Rising local forces that have been in a long running fight against the extremist Al Qaeda affiliate Al Shabaab. Trump also recently ordered drawdowns of U. S troops in Afghanistan and Iraq might cross CEO Washington The Trump

Somalia Pentagon Donald Trump U. U. S. Al Shabaab Al Qaeda Afghanistan Iraq Washington
Fresh update on "afghanistan" discussed on 3 Dimensional Wealth Radio

3 Dimensional Wealth Radio

02:00 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "afghanistan" discussed on 3 Dimensional Wealth Radio

"From exercise, or even just getting older, you must order the three week quick start now discounted the only 1995 to see if it will work for you, too. I think it could give your body what it needs to heal itself. Got to really factored outcome. Call 805 183 84 early factor dot com. Railroad giant. CSX is acquiring a regional railroad in New England adulterous network in the northeastern part of the country. But it's Jeremy House reports one rival railroad says that deal could hurt competition. CSX is is acquiring PanAm Railways, the transactional expand CSX's 23 state network into Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine while adding to its reach in New York, Connecticut and Massachusetts. Norfolk Southern had raised concerns about the deal, arguing that by allowing CSX to buy PanAm, it could undermine competition between CSX and Norfolk Southern in the eastern United States. That is Correspondent Jeremy House Reporting zooms. Video conferencing service remains a fixture in pandemic life, but its breakneck growth is showing signs of tapering off. Now, investors are debating whether the company will be able to build upon its recent successes. Once a vaccine enables people to intermingle once again breaking news and analysis at town hall dot com. President Trump borders most American troops out of Somalia. Here's correspondent Mike Gratia President Donald Trump has ordered the Pentagon to withdraw most of the U. S troops stationed in Somalia, continuing a drawdown of U. S involvement in counterterrorism missions abroad. In a short statement, the Pentagon said a majority of U. S troops and assets in Somalia will be withdrawn in early 2021. There are currently about 700 troops in Somalia training and advising local forces that have been in a long running fight against the extremist Al Qaeda affiliate. Shabaab. Trump also recently ordered drawdowns of U. S troops in Afghanistan and Iraq might cross in Washington. The U. N health chief says positive results from Corona virus vaccine trials are encouraging but warns against poor countries being left behind it what he calls Stampede for vaccines. The World Health Organization director Pedro's Go bride who's addressing the U. N. General Assembly, about the issue on Friday. More details at town hall dot com. Imagine doing one thing that could give you an entirely different perspective about your place in the world. I assume you would feel it was worth it. Dennis Prager here inviting you to join me for a 10 day. Stand with Israel Tour through the land of Israel. October 2021 come with me to get firsthand insight into Israel's fascinating past and promising future. I'll introduce you to the geo political, economic and spiritual dynamics.

CSX Somalia Donald Trump Jeremy House Dennis Prager Town Hall Israel President Trump Pentagon Mike Gratia World Health Organization New York New England United States
Trump orders most US troops to withdraw from Somalia

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:23 min | 18 hrs ago

Trump orders most US troops to withdraw from Somalia

"Orders most us troops and all of them but most us troops out of somalia. He also said he was going to be pulling troops out of afghanistan in that. That order has been activated. So there's a number of troops coming out of afghanistan. I think the majority of them are coming out but not all wish you'd done that for years ago. Yeah a that's absolutely true. He shouldn't have waited It's too bad that he's doing all this last minute. And he's not going all the way but still he does serve credit doing something. And joe. what else did you want to say. Go ahead you know we. We've build roads and highways and infrastructure and other countries. You know we go there. We'll fight their war form. And then we're there for forever. But you know at least here in michigan the roads they really start to our tax dollars going and all these people all these people send your kid over there like i say the military. We gotta mind our own business. We can't fix the world's problems anymore. We don't have the money for it and it's not worth the blood and i'm just to remind everybody finds been there forever. He's just a neo con with the d. next to his name being him and all the other warmongers have been For the past forty years. I've been getting in trouble so that's it you guys have any joe.

Afghanistan Somalia United States JOE Michigan
Fresh update on "afghanistan" discussed on 5 Things

5 Things

00:37 sec | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "afghanistan" discussed on 5 Things

"Latest on the virus fight president. Donald trump has ordered most. Us troops out of somalia by early. Twenty twenty one. There are currently some seven hundred. Troops there man. The decision comes as part of a continued post-election drawdown including in afghanistan and iraq and the house has passed a federal marijuana legalization bill for the first time. But it's unlikely to move through the senate a reminder. We're always on on twitter at usa today. Podcast where he can stay up on five things stories and also joined the conversation with fellow listeners. That's at usa today. Podcast on twitter now onto the show president. Donald.

Donald Trump Somalia Afghanistan Iraq Usa Today United States Senate House Twitter
Trump orders most American troops to leave Somalia

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 20 hrs ago

Trump orders most American troops to leave Somalia

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting president trump orders most American troops out of Somalia president Donald Trump has ordered the Pentagon to withdraw most of the U. S. troops stationed in Somalia continuing a drawdown of U. S. involvement in counterterrorism missions abroad in a short statement the Pentagon said a majority of U. S. troops and assets in Somalia will be withdrawn and early twenty twenty one there are currently about seven hundred troops in Somalia training and advising local forces that have been in a long running fight against the extremist al Qaeda affiliate al Shabab trump also recently ordered drawdowns of US troops in Afghanistan and Iraq might cross yet Washington

Somalia Mike Rossi Pentagon Donald Trump U. S. Al Shabab Trump Al Qaeda Afghanistan Iraq Washington
Afghan Government, Taliban Reach Breakthrough To Proceed With Peace Talks

Emotional Management with Dr. Christian Conte

02:10 min | 1 d ago

Afghan Government, Taliban Reach Breakthrough To Proceed With Peace Talks

"Afghan government and representatives of the Taliban have jointly announced reaching a preliminary deal to push on with peace talks. Well, it's a start. I'm going to push him with Pete's talks. Uh, these talks would proceed discussions on the political road back for both parties. They've got a written agreement, actually. Between the two sides, and it marks breakthrough after 19 years of war. The procedure, including his preamble of the negotiation has been finalized, and from now on, the negotiation will begin on the agenda. They're people who represent the Taliban. On their political office and Djohar. Better. That a posted the same statement on their Twitter accounts. While the spokesman for the militant group as Retweeted it so it must be some progress said they at least have agreed on a framework for peace. Maybe just maybe we can pull our young troops out of there after 19 years of warfare. And I think that that's a hopeful sign. I'm glad to see him coming to some sort of talks, but it reminds me of back in my era, the Paris peace accords that they were trying to have, where they couldn't even agree on the shape of the table for a long time before they could come to some sort of peace With honor is President Nixon called it Well, well, this piece come with any honor to any of the participants. I doubt it. Hundreds of thousands of Afghans have probably been killed by the bombs that have been dropped. By American and coalition forces there. Um, uh. Least 2000 American troops are more have been killed. 6000 wounded horribly on have come home from that war, And now we sit here talking about Thank you for your service. Somebody tell me what freedom of ours in America where they fighting for in Afghanistan.

Afghan Government Taliban Djohar Pete Twitter Paris Nixon America Afghanistan
Afghan Government, Taliban Reach Breakthrough To Proceed With Peace Talks

Democracy Now! Audio

00:16 sec | 2 d ago

Afghan Government, Taliban Reach Breakthrough To Proceed With Peace Talks

"News from afghanistan. The afghan government and taliban have reached a preliminary deal to move ahead with peace talks. And what's being hailed as a major breakthrough. The two sides agreed on a three page written document to codify rules and procedures for future negotiations.

Afghan Government Afghanistan Taliban
Will the Afghan Taliban commit to ending the country’s lengthy and bloody war?

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:01 min | 2 d ago

Will the Afghan Taliban commit to ending the country’s lengthy and bloody war?

"For the first time in nearly two decades of war a written agreement exists between the government of afghanistan and the taliban the question that now arises is the one concerning the value of the paper upon which it is written. The agreement follows some months of talks in doha. And at least in theory clears the way towards a ceasefire and some sort of roadmap leading to a lasting political settlement. It is not necessary to be outrageously skeptical however to wonder if the taliban amelie running out the clock in anticipation of the united states entirely losing interest joined with more on this by michael semple former deputy to the eu special representative for afghanistan and michael. Welcome back to the briefing the agreement in itself if we take it as face value. How big a deal is it. It's a small positive step. it allows us to move. It allows us to to move One one step forward a in these long negotiations. How certain can anyone be though that the taliban in particular negotiating or have been negotiating in good faith. Well i'd say that nobody should be certain about this. There are two diametrically opposed ways of looking at this and time will tell our one hour one view which is the ones. Some of the western diplomats are taking is that the taliban have realized that they can't actually win this war on that they would benefit from being part of some kind of a compromise settlement a which would allow c- a government jointly formed between the people who are currently in power in kabul on the taliban on would have international support So thoughts the idea that they're involved in difficult but good faith negotiations. They other view. Is that the taliban are using. These talks to provide political cover for their real game which is trying to win the war on the battlefield. Because of course you don't need a long memory or at least if you live in afghanistan. You don't require long memory to remember a time when the taliban were actually in charge of the country which they were for nearly a decade up until late two thousand and one is there any indication that the taliban thinking on governance has evolved at all since then or does afghanistan as it was in the ninety s. Still seemed to be very much what they would like afghanistan to be again well. This is the crux of the matter. Some of the taliban diplomats in cutter have put a lot of effort into persuading every body that they have matured that they wouldn't like to to force anything down. The throats of unwilling population are but if we wants to get an idea of what taliban governance looks like. We don't have to look back two decades in the past. We often look what is happening in areas. Which are controlled by the taliban today because they do hold sway in many parts of rural off. Stan i'm i would say that The taliban approach to governance in those areas is remarkably reminiscent of the way they run the country until two thousand and one. It's it is ruled by the barrel of a gun. Well one other thing which may or may not of course change. The dynamics of these negotiations is the imminent change of administration in the united states. Do we yet fully understand whether president joe biden will be as kane on president trump as president trump rather of ending the united states' involvement in afghanistan entirely. I think this is going to be one of the critical decisions that the administration will have to take in the early stages of despite trying to focus on other priorities But just the timetable dictates that in the though withdrawal process that the us has been involved in which is really for dramatically reduce the numbers of troops on the ground. The official position is that it's conditional upon they taliban sticking to the commitments which they gave to the us in their agreement signed on the twenty ninth of february now. Many of us believe that the taliban have not stuck to those commitments but of course their diplomats in in cutter asserts that they are doing so until now the trump administration has essentially turned a blind eye to for to taleban breaches of commitment and they the vitamin ministration. When it comes is going to have to look at look at the position on c- Do they continue turning the blind eye out or do they say the taliban the commitments and therefore does the. Us react to that down. The process of withdrawing troops

Taliban Afghanistan Michael Semple Doha United States Kabul EU Michael Stan Joe Biden Kane Trump Administration
Afghan and Taliban Negotiators Agree on Peace Talks’ Procedures

The Dan Proft Show

00:35 sec | 2 d ago

Afghan and Taliban Negotiators Agree on Peace Talks’ Procedures

"Representatives of the Afghan government of the Taliban say they've reached a preliminary deal to proceed with their peace talks. Latest deal on rules and pay We for the Afghan and Taliban negotiators to advance to the next stage of the talks are con Media reports say that 21 Point agenda on procedures will include Islamic prayers at the beginning and at the end of every session. Mutual respect for delegates and a ban on inappropriate language. The U. S envoy on Afghanistan tell My parents aren't said that three page agreement was a significant milestone in the negotiations on a political road map on a

Afghan Government Taliban U. Afghanistan
Australian leader calls China's graphic tweet 'repugnant'

BBC World Service

00:58 sec | 5 d ago

Australian leader calls China's graphic tweet 'repugnant'

"Prime Minister, Scott Morrison has demanded an apology from Beijing of what he called a repugnant tweet about Australian troops in Afghanistan. In an escalation of tensions between the two countries. China's Foreign Ministry official posted a fake image of an Australian soldier holding a knife to an Afghan child's throat. It follows a war crimes inquiry the found incredible evidence of unlawful killings by Australian troops. Mr Morrison said he does Twitter to take down the post. It is utterly outrageous. And it cannot be justified on any vices whatsoever. The Chinese government. Should be totally ashamed. Off this post. It diminishes them in the world's eyes. Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman rejected his criticism, She said Australia should be ashamed of its troops behavior.

Foreign Ministry Scott Morrison Mr Morrison Beijing Afghanistan Chinese Government China Chinese Foreign Ministry Twitter Australia
Afghan officials say at least 34 killed in separate suicide bombings

WBZ Afternoon News

00:40 sec | 5 d ago

Afghan officials say at least 34 killed in separate suicide bombings

"34 people have died in Afghanistan today after two separate suicide bombing in eastern Ghazni province. Afghan officials say 31 soldiers were killed and 24 others were wounded today when an attacker drove a military Humvee full of explosives onto an army commando base before detonating a car bomb in southern Afghanistan. A suicide car bomber targeted the convoy of a provincial council chief and sizable, killing at least three people and wounded 21. Others, including Children. The provincial council chief survived the attack with minor injuries, and there's no word yet on who is responsible for those attacks.

Afghanistan Ghazni
Afghanistan: 34 people killed in two suicide bombings

WBZ Afternoon News

00:41 sec | 6 d ago

Afghanistan: 34 people killed in two suicide bombings

"Officials in Afghanistan say at least 34 people have been killed in two separate suicide bombings in Easter Ghazni province. They say 31 soldiers were killed and 24 others were wounded today when an attacker drove a military Humvee full of explosives onto an army commando base before detonating a car bomb in southern Afghanistan. A suicide car bomber targeted the convoy. Provincial council chief and double killing at least three people and wounding 21. Others, including Children. The provincial council chief survived the attack with minor injuries, and there's no word yet on who is responsible for all of those attacks.

Afghanistan Ghazni Easter Provincial Council
Car bomb kills at least 34 Afghan soldiers

KYW 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 6 d ago

Car bomb kills at least 34 Afghan soldiers

"Afghan officials say at least 34 people have been killed in two separate suicide bombings today in the Ghazni province. Officials say 31 soldiers were killed, 24 others injured when the attacker drove a military Humvee full of explosives. Into an army commando base before detonating that car bomb and in southern Afghanistan, officials say a suicide car bomber killed at least three people and injured 12. Others, including several

Ghazni Afghanistan
Afghan officials say 34 have been killed in separate suicide bombings in country's east and south

WBZ Morning News

00:36 sec | 6 d ago

Afghan officials say 34 have been killed in separate suicide bombings in country's east and south

"In Afghanistan. At least 34 are dead in two separate suicide bombings in eastern Ghazni province. Officials say 31 soldiers were killed, 24 others wounded. When a suicide bomber drove a Humvee full of explosives into an army commando base and detonated it and at least three others killed in southern Afghanistan, where officials say a suicide car bomber targeted the convoy of a provincial council chief and sue ball. He survived, but 12 others, including Children. Were injured. No immediate claims of responsibility for those attacks

Afghanistan Ghazni Sue Ball
Afghan officials say 34 killed in separate suicide bombings

Great Outdoors with Charlie Potter

00:28 sec | 6 d ago

Afghan officials say 34 killed in separate suicide bombings

"Afghan officials say at least 34 people have been killed in two separate suicide bombings in eastern Ghazni province. Officials say 31 soldiers were killed, 24 wounded when the attacker drove a military Humvee full of explosives onto an army commando base. In southern Afghanistan, officials say a suicide bomber targeted the convoy of a provincial council chief in zoo ball, killing at least three people, wounding 12. Others, including Children.

Ghazni Afghanistan
Afghan Leader Digs In on Peace Talks Despite Progress, Officials Say

Frontlines of Freedom

02:25 min | 6 d ago

Afghan Leader Digs In on Peace Talks Despite Progress, Officials Say

"Afghanistan's chief peace envoy, Abdullah Abdullah, said that the U. S decision to begin withdrawing troops from Afghanistan has come too soon as his country is still struggling to attain peace and security amid an ongoing conflict. Abdullah spoken and Kara, where he saw it. Turkey's support for negotiations between the Afghan government and the Taliban that are taking place in cutter to find an end to decades of war. The talks have made little progress so far. Abdullah said of the US's decision to reduce troop levels in Afghanistan from over 4.5 1000 to 2.5 1000 quote. This is the decision of the U. S administration and we respect it. And quote, acting Defense Secretary Christopher Miller announced that we would reduce troop levels in Iraq and Afghanistan by mid January, in line with President Trump's pledge to bring our forces home. Afghan officials have expressed concerns that a rapid reduction in American troops could strengthen the negotiating hand of the Taliban, while the militants are still waging a full fledged insurgency against government forces. Abdullah said it's not like things will go a zwei wish, adding however, that he welcomed to the fact that 2500 troops will remain and NATO will also retain its presence. Abdullah said, quote what form or what shape it will take. That remains to be seen, but they will certainly push for a peaceful settlement and quote Washington signed a deal with the Taliban in February to pave the way for the dough, hot talks and American forces eventual withdrawal. We championed the deal as Afghanistan's best chance at a lasting peace. Folks, This is an endless war. Regardless of what the Taliban agreed to, and negotiations they can and have broken agreements before. Both Turkey and cutter are supporters of Isis and their friends in Afghanistan hasn't built a solid military defense. After all the money and support we've been giving them for years and years and years. Why should we think in a few more years will make a difference. America is not the world's cop. If these nations can't get along, that's an issue for them and their neighbors, not

Afghanistan Abdullah Afghan Government Taliban U. S Administration Defense Secretary Christopher Abdullah Abdullah President Trump Kara U. Turkey Iraq Nato United States Washington America
United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has called for an “immediate, unconditional ceasefire” in Afghanistan

UN News

01:12 min | Last week

United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has called for an “immediate, unconditional ceasefire” in Afghanistan

"Secretary general antonio guitarist has issued a strong appeal for an end to bloodshed in afghanistan to save lives and prevent the further spread of covid. Nineteen reiterating his call for an immediate unconditional ceasefire. Mister gutierrez. on tuesday told pledging for development conference in geneva that an end to fighting could only help ongoing peace negotiations. His message follows continued high levels of violence inside afghanistan including an attack earlier this month at kabul university where gunmen killed more than twenty students. A halt to the high levels of violence blighting. The country would represent a major opportunity to achieve long-held aspirations of the afghan people the un secretary general explained c- called for an inclusive peace process in which women young people and victims of conflict were represented in negotiations in qatar. Mister guitarist highlighted how afghan women had paid a high price in the conflict. Many have been subjected to extreme violence while others had lost loved ones or were denied opportunities. Despite these setbacks women continue to play a central role in creating peaceful inclusive communities with more opportunities for all the un chief said showing on a daily basis that their efforts towards sustainable and development can change lives for the better

Secretary General Antonio Guit Mister Gutierrez Afghanistan Kabul University Geneva UN Qatar
UN, partners seek funds for Afghanistan at donors conference

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last week

UN, partners seek funds for Afghanistan at donors conference

"Top officials including the U. N. secretary general and secretary of state Mike Pompeo the taking part in the launch of the virtual pledging conference for Afghanistan on the online gathering is the latest effort to drum up aid on support for country where Taliban fighters are making inroads against the government originally set for Geneva it was expected to draw diplomats civil society advocates and international organizations some of the seventy countries in the first such event in four years the pledging overshadowed in part by the Cleveland nineteen pandemic seeks to lay out objectives for the next four years for Afghanistan and it is hoped it will generate billions for the poll and insurrection wracked nation I'm Charles collect as much

Mike Pompeo Afghanistan Taliban Geneva Government Cleveland Charles
Rockets Strike Kabul as Mike Pompeo Plans to Meet with Taliban

WBZ Afternoon News

00:35 sec | Last week

Rockets Strike Kabul as Mike Pompeo Plans to Meet with Taliban

"Rocket attack on Kabul this time inthe e. Afghanistan, Capital Cities, heavily fortified diplomat Excuse me diplomatic area. The assault happened just hours before meeting between Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Taliban negotiators in Qatar. It follows the outgoing Trump administration's announcement. It plans to withdraw 2000 troops from Afghanistan by mid January, raising concerns about the Afghan government's ability to deal with violence like this on its own. Was CBS Is MTs tie up reporting from London.

Mike Pompeo Kabul Afghanistan Trump Administration Taliban Qatar Afghan Government CBS London
"afghanistan" Discussed on The World Next Week

The World Next Week

07:37 min | 2 weeks ago

"afghanistan" Discussed on The World Next Week

"Sir thank you. I'm going to go next to wallace. Ford who has raised his hand and also written a question but wallace. Why don't you ask it yourself if you can. I'm yourself that would be great. Okay great we are officially a muted and thank you very much Thank you for your Excellent presentation my question really has to do with one at Have been a set Oh yes professor. At medgar evers college part of the city university of new york in brooklyn and I don't doubt certainly consider to be an expert with respect to the situation afghanistan but certainly have been observing it for now what is it. Nineteen years and My question really becomes is is is really the united states kind of caught in this Kind of like riding the tiger kind of a situation where If it lee. If the united states does indeed withdraw troops fully and leave or even half the troops as being proposed by president trump Do we find ourselves in a position. Where the taliban. We learned that the taliban it was just playing for time on this you know. Is it using a sports analogy at some point You know the other side is going to like Give up where out whatever it is and then you know whatever commitments May have been made as part of these negotiations really At that point and So the bottom line of my question was You know is their way that You know these commitments particularly with respect. What may happen with women's rights human rights it freedom of the press. The list goes on and oh yes. Terrorism issues as well You know. Is there any way that these commitments can be The enforced without us or some type of international presence going forward. Thank you all great questions. this is a concern both inside afghanistan those who have been working on on afghanistan region for a long time that the commitments that the taliban make are going to be very challenging That there is very much that perception that wants the troops withdraw that they are going to be pushing the end of the. They're very conservative and extremist agenda as they had when they were less than power and certainly the the fact that the taliban had are enacting very a regressive measures in areas that are under their control inside afghanistan contribute contributes to that fear now There is also the argument that the us cannot stay indefinitely in afghanistan to protect women's rights and human rights and and it becomes sort of a i think an argument polarization of One side saying we we just. We need to leave because we can't continue just staying there indefinitely to support women in minorities And protect our our other more vital interests and others that says no have to stay there forever I believe that That we need to. We need to anchor those much more in this peace agreement and there's a long way to go. We were just at the start of this process. Now what are the taliban interest in the two to twenty five hundred troops. They are important in some ways in terms of infrastructure the even more important in terms of once the troop leaves financial support for afghanistan is also likely to to really a decline on because congress to wear where the troops are money follows. That's the other issue. And then of course. There's issues of infrastructure and infrastructure at our our ability to maintain military infrastructure in the country. Those are the concerns that i have and then of course the broader messaging and and Stood at the psychological component of the us withdrawal at depending on how it's done in terms of our lovers. I don't think it's our only lover at all. I think that they're the what do the taliban want. The taliban want trip with but they also want a they want financial aid they recognize that they will also afghanistan is heavily financially dependent country. It will need still even after the peace agreement up to anything from two to eight billion dollars probably more closer to five six billion dollars. I think annually and And this is not a country. That is self sustaining. That points will. It will need that. They want international legitimacy. One of the things that i think really stinks. The taliban is the fact that they were made an international pariah for so long right now. They are loving the fact that they have this international. Jim c. n. They don't wanna lose it so. I think that we would still have some lovers. On the taliban in terms of protecting the interests that are important to s Certainly terrorism front but also the the social and political gains achieved. And i think that what i would like to see is with the troop. Withdrawal couched within the political process. Is that we continue to work with our partners inside afghanistan in courageous women and civil society leaders media leaders who are really at the at the frontlines and london their support both in terms of create leveraging them giving the political space as well as ensuring that. There's going to be financial support for these hoops to advocate on their own behalf. Thank you so there are a couple of questions that are dealing with women's rights in in the chats from camilo rava gone. She's masters students at the school of governance in berlin Wanted to talk a little bit more about the role of women in the peace process. And do you think the achievements of increase women. Participation are at risk of the taliban gets more power than national level. And then joe kaufman asks what protections legal through pre police and otherwise. We'll be put in place or should be to protect women's rights once the taliban regime's power in q. I'm glad it's hardens meet. There's a lot of concern about women's rights it is some an issue very close to my heart I think realistically yes. Women's rights are under incredible threat. And sadly not just from the taliban you also have conservatives inside of the country who are not really happy with how much gains that women have have made And so the their rights are going to not simply be under threat from the incoming taliban regime. But it's going to create a climate of a where it becomes permissive to to once again. Crackdown on women's rights. I think it's going to be far. Worse outside of urban centers. A trid parts of the southeast and south and an east I think you're going to see much more reduction of rights even the rights an unfortunately and those parts of the country particularly more And poorer and more isolated areas source..

taliban afghanistan united states Ford medgar evers college wallace professor brooklyn city university of new york president trump camilo rava congress joe kaufman Jim c. berlin
"afghanistan" Discussed on CFR On the Record

CFR On the Record

02:40 min | 2 weeks ago

"afghanistan" Discussed on CFR On the Record

"They're very conservative and extremist agenda as they had when they were less than power and certainly the the fact that the taliban had are enacting very a regressive measures in areas that are under their control inside afghanistan contribute contributes to that fear now There is also the argument that the us cannot stay indefinitely in afghanistan to protect women's rights and human rights and and it becomes sort of a i think an argument polarization of One side saying we just. We need to leave because we can't continue just staying there indefinitely to support women in minorities And protect our our other more vital interests and others. That says no have to stay there. Forever I believe that That we need to. We need to anchor Those much more in this peace agreement and there's a long way to go. We're just at the start of this process now. What are the taliban interest in the two to twenty five hundred troops. They are important in some ways in terms of infrastructure that even more important in terms of once the troop leaves financial support for afghanistan is also likely to to really a decline on because congress to wear where the troops are money follows. That's the other issue. And then of course. There's issues of infrastructure and infrastructure at our our ability to maintain military infrastructure in the country. Those are the concerns that i have and then of course the broader messaging and and Stood at the psychological component of the us withdrawal at depending on how it's done in terms of our lovers. I don't think it's our only lever. I think that they're the what do the taliban want. The taliban want trip with but they also want a they want financial aid they recognize that they will also afghanistan is heavily financially dependent country. It will need still even after the peace agreement up to anything from two to eight billion dollars probably more closer to five six billion dollars. I think annually and And this is not a country. That is self sustaining. that points will be. It will need that. They want international legitimacy. One of the things that i think really stinks. The taliban is the fact that they were made an international pariah for so long right now. They are loving the fact that they have this international..

taliban afghanistan us congress
"afghanistan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

14:24 min | 9 months ago

"afghanistan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Meghna Chalker Bardy. We're talking this hour about the agreement. Signed between the United States and the Taliban this weekend Indo harm and what that means for next steps in Afghanistan. We talk about endless. Wars are now in a phase of endless peace. Well let's listen to what General John Allen had to say he's former commander of the NATO International Security Assistance Force and US forces in Afghanistan. He called the agreement an important step forward in an interview with the BBC's news hour this weekend Allen also said the agreement did not go far enough to protect women in Afghanistan. I think for the United States have signed this agreement without having enshrined in it somewhere that the Taliban would adhere to a US formulation of how women should be treated in the aftermath of the inter-afghan dialogue. Which is phase two of this process? I think leaves women exposed. I think leaves them vulnerable at all that we have accomplished over these many years of conflict? I think we'll have been for naught if we can't get this into the agreement General John Allen. Speaking to the BBC well Muhammed's hill. Shaheen is a member of the Talibans negotiation team. Cnn's Nick Robertson asked Shahin about the guarantees. The Taliban will give to him in about The role of women their education. Because we're women want to have education and women won't have right of work. We do not have any problem with that Mohammad. Sohail Shaheen speaking to CNN. Well joining us now. From New York is Mariam Wardak. She served under two presidential administrations in the Afghan government. Most recently in the office of National Security of the National Security Council President Ghani's administration. She's anchor of South Asia. Diary with Mariama Daca weekly show on world news and Indian based network and she's also founder of her Afghanistan and online platform supporting Afghan women. Mariam Wardak welcome to on point. Thank you for having me and also with us from Washington is Michael Schulman. He's director deputy director and senior associate for South Asia at the Wilson Center. Michael Welcome to you banks great to be here so Mariam first of all. Let's just take this question of the future of for Afghan women had on. Do you think the what do you think of what General Allen had to say that? He's concerned about next steps for women in Afghanistan. I think it's very generous that the world community in general is concerned for the women of Afghanistan but I think that we also need to reflect that the world community did not know what was best for Afghan women at the time when they entered Afghanistan As an afghan-american. I felt that I had a responsibility. Show the best of both sides to both nations. When I was in Afghanistan for the past ten years I had to constantly explain to the Afghans. That isn't American. That Americans were not here to kill innocent Afghans but to fight the spread of violent ideologies in my time in Afghanistan the Afghan rule the people in the rural community did not understand why foreign forces were in Afghanistan. It was properly community to communicate it to them in why they focused so much more on Western ideologies being forced on the Afghan public especially when it came to women empowerment. And this this There was a larger influence in Kabul We should make a caveat here that Kabul does not represent the whole country in fact. It's quite disconnected. Those that are in Kabul are well are well aware of the current events and understand the foreign footprints and why the war is ongoing and Through their engagement with the diplomatic missions and private investors or journalists but that cannot be the same account for people in Helmand and Nuristan. I've witnessed early in my career that the disconnect and the The lack of communication amongst the people and Afghan government is where the issues rise and this is the sensitivity of Afghan women the Western ideology of empowerment cannot be accepted in Afghanistan. If it has not been expect accepted the region. Currently if you look at the region we have issues of female. Ah IN THE GENDER GAP within Pakistan India Iran. So how can we go into Afghanistan? That is much smaller nation and less established but all of a sudden wanted to provide all these rights and not even explain to the women's water not even explained to the women what their rights are. So what we are here for a second because this is very interesting. Mariam and I appreciate you opening up opening our eyes to this because as you well know Any number of senior level. Us diplomats and members of the military that that clip from General Allen. Being just one of them when asked again from the American perspective granted. What's the one thing that made it made these past eighteen years justified frequently? They will point to women in Afghanistan. What they tell the American people that that Eighteen years of conflict and war in Afghanistan was worth it because of what the US helped usher in for Afghan women. Are you saying that that's not true? Now the eighteen years was worth it because we have education opportunities in Afghanistan. The eighteen years are worth it because we have access to healthcare in Afghanistan. The eighteen years are worth it because Afghans were able to move away from from a certain segment of war. Being in the civil being the Dean did not only fight the Red Army but they also ABC Ganz especially in the rural areas so when the foreign forces came that diverted dot engagement. Yes we're we can stay where we are still in current state of war. The Afghan Taliban just announced that they're only fighting the Afghan National Defense Security Forces. That's the current state of war however the eighteen years are the opportunities that were provided. Were for all odd Ganz. It was not only for the Afghan women and if we want to look at the progress of Afghan women. I want to let you know that many of the women that are in power are there. Symbolically they very rarely have executive Power and this is a concern and this is something that I've fought over and over with multiple officials within the Afghan government. That you can't just have a female in the room and I give her voice. She needs to be incorporated into policy making decision and executes in the certain decisions. However it's very superficial and can I just I'm so sorry but are are the the gains that you just laid out that we're gains for all Afghan people. Are they at risk of slipping back if we eventually do see a progressive drawdown of US troops in Afghanistan? I mean I I only go by. What the Afghan Taliban stating and what other parties are stating the Afghan. Taleban have been very clear. That education will be eliminated. They're not going to continue to burn schools or or break down these opportunities. They're saying that the access to healthcare will be available so based on these committees these terms that they've clearly identified. I don't think that we will fall back. I know that everybody has a mixture of hope and fear here especially the Afghans but fear is because of the unknown. They don't know what's going to happen. And this is where the world community is responsible because you have to continue to monitor and you have to engage in into a and intervene when you find that. Many of the gains of the past eighteen years are not accessible anymore right so when it comes to Afghan women We have to look at this population as Afghans together highlighting Afghan women the game for the past eighteen years you're causing friction within the Afghan men and women in Afghanistan And it's enough that the Afghan men are fighting one another. We cannot have this engagement with the women and the men you have to. The whole community needs to evolve. Because when you are leaving a man that's behind and there's going to be tension within the household and you have to understand the Afghan culture. It's a very traditional culture the Afghan men the Patriarchal Society as much as we've had many narratives that it is starting to rise as a Matriarchal Society because we've Lost. Many men and women are now leading the households but many of the men have a larger. Say with a woman is going to leave. She's going to have educational opportunities if she's going to work. It's with the permission of her husband. Her father or her brother within that household so we have to evolve as a community We'll let me just let me. Just let folks know that we just to remind them that we are talking about the. The agreement signed between the United States and the Taliban this weekend and we want to hear from listeners. If your Afghan do you think the signifies a major turning point the agreement is being called historic if you served in Afghanistan. What do you think about the fact that the US and the Taliban reached this point does it mean anything significant to you based on your experience when deployed in Afghanistan Michael I appreciate your patience a lot here but just reflect on what you've heard. Marry him say so far about about Afghan women in sort of the fundamental changes. That have happened in the country. I think it's true that there have been some very notable changes in Afghanistan including once for the better and you know it seems that over the last two years for good reason. Afghanistan has been one big bad news story particularly in in media coverage here in the US as it should be but indeed there have been a number of advances. And I I would argue that Women's rights women's education has been a major advance and that certainly those advances could be squandered If the peace process doesn't start Or if it falls apart but You know I think that the the the major pointed to highlight is that what happened on Saturday the deal between the US and the Taliban it really is a milestone because it really is the first formal type of agreement or deal That the Taleban sign with anyone particularly the United States. And you know at the end of the day it puts off Ghanistan On a potential path to launching a peace process and I emphasize potential for all the reasons that we heard from Ambassador Dobbins earlier there was a lot of obstacles and I think what for me. What really stands out about this agreement is that yes. It's a milestone but also it's a huge gamble because it appears to give the Taliban a lot without requiring much in return. I mean we've been dealing agreement says it in just a few months. Several thousand troops will leave with no conditions. They're supposed to be a release of five thousand Taliban prisoners in a few days. They're going to be efforts to try to get the Taliban off. Un sanctions lists by the end of May and in return. What do we have? The Taliban agree to do sever ties with international terrorists in ways that are laid out in the agreement but in somewhat of a vague way and without any clear indication of how the Taliban how efforts by the Taleban to sever those ties with international terrorist will actually be monitored and enforced so it sounds like the bare minimum in exchange. Then right and there's also been some mixed messaging I mean I we've heard senior. Us Administration officials over the last few days. Say things at odds with what's in the agreement. The agreement does not remain suggests that the Taliban needs to be talking to the Afghan government and US forces. Were start leaving with the idea of having all. Us forces leave Within the next fourteen months. But then you had Defense Secretary. Us Defense Secretary say yesterday that no the Taliban really needs to be focused heavily on talking and making progress talking about a ceasefire So there's just a lot of Nicks neces- Djing and a lot of confusion. Which makes it complicated process all the more difficult to make sense of well. Mariam help us understand something because it sounds like everything regarding the future for for the Afghan people themselves a completely hinges upon the Taliban and the Afghan government's willingness to talk the those intra Afghanistan talks. You have optimism about that happening in a meaningful way. The Afghan government is supposed to represent the Afghan public. But unfortunately we've witnessed that. This was the lowest turn out and a president one on one with razor thin blade With raise them blame ratio here And during my years within the Afghan government I'm noticed there is a gap between the government. And the people so. I think that the Taliban shouldn't have completely excluded. The Afghan government should allow a seat. But I understand the will for the Afghan Taliban to just speak to the public directly. Now we have to. There's a few things that you need to. It's I understand why why the Afghan government is also upset now. Gang give government here are fighting multiple voices. They're fighting international terrorist regional terrorist the Afghan Taliban end criminal activity so they're stretched very thin but I've also noticed that they're also trying to engage with. Afghan Taliban president has yet to make a national address in the national language sending a message Taliban to come communicate directly to me. He speaks at them rather than to them and he speaks Through certain messages from the United States or through other allies. There is a a an issue here that the the world community has failed Afghanistan after the defeat of the US SR so there is a trust deficit between the ABC Ganz and the world community. And that's the fear of abandonment and that fear of abandonment is what's going to cause the friction within the agan people speaking to the Afghan Taliban. Because they don't want the international community completely leave so the reduction in violence which has ended today and many assume that ended because President..

Afghan Taliban Afghanistan Afghan government United States Afghan National Defense Securi Mariam Wardak General John Allen US BBC John Allen ABC Ganz Chalker Bardy South Asia Us Administration Muhammed Kabul Sohail Shaheen Cnn NATO International Security As
"afghanistan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

11:12 min | 9 months ago

"afghanistan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Ties with al Qaeda. The Taliban wants to make a deal. We'll see if they WANNA make. It's got to be a real deal but we'll see that last clip from President Donald Trump this past November. Well on Saturday in Doha the US and the Taliban did sign an agreement. So what does signal? And what will come next this point dealing with the Taliban and we're going to begin today with Ambassador James Dobbins. He joins us from Washington. He's a senior fellow and distinguished chair in diplomacy insecurity at the Rand Corporation. He was the special envoy for Afghanistan in the administration of George W Bush and Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan in the Obama Administration as well Ambassador Dobbins welcome to you. So what's your first thought on the significance of this weekend signing US Taliban Signing A agree the agreement. I think it's a positive step. I think the hard part is still to come. I think the timetables set out in the agreement are probably a little unrealistic. Aren't going to be rich but it's a it's a step in the right direction. Step in the right direction. And what is that direction well? The direction is a peace agreement between the Taliban and the Afghan government and departure for American forces. So tell me more about that because that seems to be one of the critical questions here about whether The the the Taliban Afghanistan government are going to reach some sort of agreement themselves. But I agree I. That's why I say the hard part is still to come. There are big issues that they have to face how to. How do they combine to form a coalition government? How do they combine the Taliban fighters and the arm for the army and police of the Afghan Republic into a single National Force? Those are big issues that will take a long time to work out. Well then let's let's go back a little bit or a long bit ambassador given the United States has been Involved at war in Afghanistan for eighteen years. The what is the what are some of the moments that you remember early in your time in Afghanistan that perhaps. If we had handled differently it would have taken US less than eighteen years to get here. I think in the first in the first few months we made three basic mistakes. One wants to believe that A new government With no army. No police force could be responsible for the security of its population. And Its territory. The second mistake was to Not Take advantage of outreach. From senior Taliban leaders including the top leadership who were prepared to surrender And the third Was To not recognized that although Pakistan has ceased supporting the Taliban government they hadn't see supporting the Taliban the combination of those three failures took a long time to remedy. And by the time we did remedy the Taliban had reorganized re-equipped refunded and And resumed a significant insurgency throughout Afghanistan. I see and so so therefore those those missed opportunities or those mistakes prolonged wars essentially they they created the opportunity for an insurgency to arise and create a violent resistance to the American presence There was no we talk about having been at war for eighteen years but for the first three or four years there wasn't a war that was a very small American presidents smaller than it is today And they were mostly focused on one thing down. AL QAEDA FIGURES And the Taliban were licking its wounds in Pakistan and getting ready to come back. So what do you think are the critical things to watch for in the next couple of days or weeks as the ink tries on this agreement between the US and and the Taliban calls for two things to a car over the next few days one is a prisoner exchange and the second is Opening of talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban They're both supposed to have a car by a tenth of arch. That's one of the deadlines. I think we'll be missed but those are what to look for The prisoner exchange And whether it takes place and then whether President Ghani Is is willing and able to form a broadly-based representative delegation to talk in. Dallas on whether to tell about are prepared to meet with them although they have said they would. We know. It's interesting because just today we're seeing reports from the AFP for example the says the Taliban are resuming offensive operations against Afghan security forces essentially ending the partial truce that preceded the signing of the deal in Doha on Saturday and that that this is happening just a day after president. Ghani said he would continue this partial truce until those talks March ten. So what does that signify to you? Look Reuss was only supposed to last for seven days And it did last for seven days There's no agreement to continue it president. Connie express the hope that it would continue the US expressing the hope that we continue but the Taliban only agreed to a seven day truce. So so this isn't a collapse of any kind of ceasefire then. It's not static collapses the agreement if if if someone wants to make it a a make or break issue. If Gandhi says he won't negotiate as long as fighting continues then the process will come to a halt. But it's not a violation of the agreement. I I was because I was just I was wondering if the resumption of attacks from the Taliban would put those future talks in peril and it sounds like I guess. I am headline okay. It might. Yeah Yeah I mean. There's so many things that could go wrong. This is a very delicate process and And that's why I think it's GonNa move haltingly but It you know. The Taliban did demonstrate capable of maintaining a ceasefire. That's an important point that they have sufficient command and control to do it And they get it for a week. Which is what they agreed to let me ask you. What do you think it works in this agreement? What do you think has been done right? Well I think you know we've been talking to the Taliban for ten years. We we started in two thousand ten in these negotiations and The major blockage for most of that time was we wouldn't negotiate in the absence of the Afghan government and the Taliban wouldn't negotiate in the presence of the Afghan government so trump and Khalilzad rather artfully Steps you know. We went around this obstacle by by forging this two stage process in which we could negotiate an an early preliminary agreement and then the larger talks with the Taliban and the Afghan government would begin and so the real question is will. They begin and we'll have to wait and see. What do you think the biggest differences regarding the US's position now versus what it was in two thousand to two thousand five two thousand six every year preceding preceding this moment now well two thousand to The US was refusing to talk to the Taliban Or even to to allow Taliban leadership that wanted to come over and Surrender To do so Those who did were sent to Guantanamo prison in American run prisons Afghanistan for for years Even below Ma. The top Taleban leaders are offered the cars that he would surrender if he was offered immunity and and the position at the top of the of the Bush administration this time persuaded Karzai to turn that down although he was inclined to to agree. So so that's a big change and that change occurred in two thousand ten under Obama when we decided we would talk to the Taliban the second big change who cared about a year ago when the US agreed to begin negotiations with the Taliban without the Afghan government in the room on a preliminary agreement that being a significant change. Yeah Yeah I was wondering if a third big difference is that the United States simply just doesn't have the will to in Afghanistan anymore. I think I mean I think that that's not that's not a total change. I mean Obama wanted to handle for Obama in fact declared in two thousand fourteen. We would be out by the end of his term. Whether or not there was an agreement. now three weeks after he made that decision Islamic state I out of Syria much pates Baghdad and And nearly took over the country and that was in evidence of what happens if you abandoned one of these campaigns prematurely so about backed off but Obama was insistent and trump was about ending the war and was willing to do so unilaterally if necessary and trump has been You know has wavered on this On occasion he's he's made very bellicose. Statements imply we'll stay as long as we need and other times he's talked about ending the war even even unilaterally. So I I think that that that war weariness on the part of the US is certainly one One factor that encourage the Taliban to believe that they were it was worth negotiating with the US. And uncertainty about whether we would leave was one of the factors they were certainly would leave and they wouldn't have negotiated so the uncertainty actually created an opportunity for negotiations well ambassador James Dobbins Senior Fellow and distinguished chair in diplomacy and security at the Rand Corporation. He was also special envoy for Afghanistan the administration of George W Bush and Special Representative to Afghanistan and Pakistan in the Obama administration as well Ambassador Dobbins. Thank you so much for joining well when we come back. We'll talk a lot more about the agreement signed between the US and the Taliban this weekend from the Afghan perspective. We'll hear from you as well. This is on.

Taliban US Afghanistan Taliban government Afghan government Special Representative for Afg Ambassador Dobbins Obama James Dobbins Obama Administration Donald Trump President Ghani Rand Corporation George W Bush president Pakistan Representative Washington
"afghanistan" Discussed on First Person

First Person

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"afghanistan" Discussed on First Person

"What if he come out? The government in Afghanistan is unable to fight the Taliban the Taliban regained control of most. If not all of his son and end the various global jihadi terrorist groups three congregate not because of any other reason but because it logically they and the the Taliban have much more in common and will be welcomed much more easily than they would be in a country where the government really runs and extremists. He misses from another country are really not allowed to set up right now. The US has created a framework agreement with the Taliban but Afghan government has said. It won't participate participate. But I what is the framework agreement. The framework agreement is essentially That the US would draw injured done for a week. Taleban Bon promise that they will not support international jihadi terrorist groups but the Taliban themselves that an international terrorist group. They've attacked Americans have attacked attack. The American embassy more than once attacked Germans French British Canadians. Australians I can't understand how dare I promise that they will not allow or Isis to come back into Havana. Stan and be considered worth the paper. It's written aunts. I really really don't see. There's a framework agreement. All I see is a promise for those who just really want out so that they can use it as a fig-leaf Gli forgetting out. What is the legacy of the? US's seventeen eighteen years in Afghanistan. Oh there's a lot of positive legacy I mean a lot more would've gone. Young women are going to school. The Taliban didn't allow that the Taliban played football with human heads. If you remember. The Taliban were one of the most atrocious atrocious regimes in human history and all of that is gone and now the Taliban are themselves saying all of that was wrong so that is definitely a positive. The legacy that Americans can be proud of a government has been created in Afghanistan that with all its weaknesses and flaws and by the government doesn't have flaws at the same time there was always a concern that the US cannot afford to antagonize Buxton. Buxton is a nuclear armed country. Buxton has been an American ally for several several decades. It would complicate the situation if Pakistan was put under too much pressure so in a way basically the failure of the US in relation relation to Afghanistan has not been failure of its actions in Afghanistan but off its inaction in relation to a Taliban based in Pakistan Kazakhstan. I'm curious if there's anything else that you went off our listeners that I haven't asked you will. I would just say that your listeners need to think about what is common cullman. Between Vietnam Iraq Afghanistan countries America went in guns blazing and kind of came out route without a visible success. And I would say that. The real reason is a failure to understand the regional dynamics except politics and an inadequate understanding of the culture of the politics of the country. You're going when you intervene in another country entry You should know who Elisa You should have a minimalist agenda of what you're going to change to not going to change and you should have a time line in your own mind. In each of these cases those requirements were not fulfilled People that you supported like Hamid Karzai ended up running on you in being critical of you and yet you don't feel that you have somebody in Afghanistan and that you can trust as your ally so those are the errors that I think are the big lesson of Afghanistan and even now I would say that instead of announcing scheduled withdrawal America should be clear of what it wants in Afghanistan. Not when it wants it enough Afganistan thank you Mr.

Taliban Afghanistan America Buxton Hamid Karzai American embassy Stan Pakistan Isis Havana cullman Kazakhstan
"afghanistan" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

06:53 min | 1 year ago

"afghanistan" Discussed on Post Reports

"From the newsroom is room of the Washington Post High. There is the mayor wrestling with the Washington Post. Pick your brain on and this is coach. Reports I'm Martine powers. It's Tuesday December seventeenth today vets respond to the Aghanistan an Alaskan town facing an existential prices and controversial new law in India. The last week the Post published a collection of secret documents and audio recordings of government officials talking candidly about the failures of the war in Afghanistan and how those realities were hidden from the public generals ambassadors and aid workers ars and troops. WHO said this war was a mess and our strategy failed and we didn't know what we were doing literally use those words? That's Craig whitlock the the reporter that broke the story and fought for years to make these secret documents public while on one hand it makes sense because people have known the war hasn't been going well which is why we've been there. Eighteen years to hear a read these people who are in charge of the war admitting how the war was screwed up and that what the American people are being told about the wars wasn't true. It's really kind of mind boggling. If you haven't yet listen to that story from last week I recommend that you go back to hear those recordings. It's it's really remarkable and when the post published this investigation we asked for feedback from some of the people that have been impacted the most veterans who served in Afghanistan Stan and so far we've collected over one hundred and fifty responses so we're going to play some of them. I was like finally. Finally there's proof data that that it's unwinnable that every report that were most. The reports are being written was ally for all of us that went over there and worked so well hard and put our families through so much and there was never a strategy. We were just going through motions chasing ghosts through mounds me and my friends none. All of us were surprised like everything. That's what I'm saying like I when I came back I realized goes like this is not like a war war. This is like this is usually borderline. Ocupation this is not new. This is not news. I mean as news that it was known at that level among multiple administrations. But it's not new anyone anyone that's been paying attention for the last decade and it was the day after I got home. I was visiting friends and I walked into this whole foods. And it's like I hate him off. The poor people hate you all because none of you even remembers that there's a war happening. It's so far removed. And why do you guys get to not care about it when it's your John it's your responsibility is is is the care. And I just can't help but feel like no. We paid the price for a decision maker in Washington. DC's mistakes and it wasn't just us in the price also. Yes any people themselves after you know three years there and you don't see any progress from your perspective when you start to question. What the hell are we doing? There's a lot of feeling like you're you're sisyphus pushing the rock up the hill and you go home for six months and you come back and the rocks at the bottom of the hill and you're like well are pushing it again. You know why when we were there. We had the local elders. They came to US requesting to build the small dam down. Prevent the spring floods earliest limit. Their damage Plans together. Set them up to our headquarters in they came. I'm back the small damn it morphed into a massive hydroelectric dam and the residents of evaluating the overall subsistence farmers who had small herds of goats and sheep. We didn't know what they were going to do. With giant hydroelectric dam. It's not something did they wanted. is practical. Like we couldn't do anything with that and it was just the giant disconnect from what we were seeing you know living with these farmers in alley in what they thought they could do at either the Pentagon or On Barbara was a huge disconnect. It was night and day is basically traveling around interviewing Afghan police. My sense of this has always been that when it came to the police in particular in the quest to build up those forces as quickly as possible particularly particularly twenty ten when we really started to build police in quantity there. Was this feeling of you know. They're being created individually. The screening didn't appear to be very good for who got into had a lot of people coming into the forest who were on drugs a lot of people coming into the forest who are being brought in sort of defacto on mass because they were the militia forces of powerful people who were in police. He's not ready. So you know I would go to places where everyone I would talk to was a cousin of the head of whatever that police police station was and I can you. Can someone bring me someone who's not a cousin of the commander and there just wasn't anyone. There wasn't a family member on NAFTA. You got a lot the cronyism at local levels. I still to this day. Don't question why we went there. But it is clear that we transitioned from eliminate Afghanistan a harbor for transnational terrorist organization to liberals should go to school. And that's important and I like Mike Matt idea but as national security professional that's beyond the strategic abilities. The arming certainly our mission was pretty much. Screw the elections and area we were in. We were in our south. I I noticed it on election day when at two thousand nine when cars I got reelected when I saw the stuffing ballots. I said some squad leader Rosa K.. Like they're stuffing ballots stuffed ballots. I said no one has come your vote today but they're shoving papers into his box. That look like voting ballots. Aren't we here to make sure that this election goes smoothly. It doesn't look like it's going smoothly so I started getting a little. You know deter was there. He was telling what I was saying. Big Up you know. The didn't really appreciate what I was saying to them. So my squad leader put myself instead just monitor the radio. That's what you're we're GONNA do. Tell him to stop doing that as their country their rules and after that I was just like wow this this whole shit is is bogus after that I was just like. I don't know what we're doing. Yeah this is just. I didn't know what we're doing. Why are we there? If they weren't doing things properly.

Afghanistan Washington Post Washington Post High Craig whitlock India Washington reporter DC US NAFTA cronyism Stan John Pentagon Mike Matt commander Rosa K Barbara
"afghanistan" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"afghanistan" Discussed on Front Burner

"Do you you think Murray that. The Canadian government was honest with the public about how the war was going. I mean reading these documents. Afghanistan papers It certainly seems like American officials were deliberately misleading the public for example one. US Army Colonel Said every data point was altered to present the best picture. Sure Possible. What about Canadian officials? I think that Kenyan officials did their best to be honest and with the public but there were points in time when they were trying very hard to sanitize the war the best I example that I can give you was that when I was on the ground in twenty ten there was a soldier who died in hospital after being wounded in Kandahar this Ohio the soldier died at home At Hospital at home and it was a shock to those of US round the ground. Because normally the the the military would Let you know if there had been a firefight and if someone had been wounded but the quietly stopped that practice in in two thousand nine. They did that because they said they. Don't WANNA give the Taliban battle damage assessment but it was inevitably predictably a chance to sanitize the war in the sense. That if you didn't report on the wounded because we always you couldn't avoid reporting on On soldiers had been killed. But if you didn't report on the wounded that gave you the impression this is a bit of a bloodless conflict right people don't know know exactly and and I came face to face the soldier from One CR the Royal Canadian Regiment who had fought a particularly brutal summer in two thousand and ten and like like he just like he had blood in his eyes when he saw me there. Because it was very rare at that point in the war you'd see a reporter out in the combat outposts and he said it to me. You're not doing your job. He said you know there are guys out here getting blown up and shot every day and and you're not reporting on it. And what did he say to him. What I did was because I'm I am a very very detailed note. Taker and I am a record keeper and what I did was I pulled from my laptop literally. The story that I had written that previous spring. About the prohibition on reporting on wounded which which had become a political issue in the House of Commons and then just put it in front of him said. This is why you're not seeing it. How did he respond to that? He was gobsmacked he was like it because he had no idea and he and then he actually went away angry at is government and government..

US Canadian government Royal Canadian Regiment Murray Taliban home At Hospital House of Commons Afghanistan Kandahar reporter Ohio
"afghanistan" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"afghanistan" Discussed on Front Burner

"Hi Mary Harry Hi Jamie. Thanks so much for being with me. Today you're welcome so I want to start with just these so-called Afghanistan papers. What are these papers while? These papers are Lessons learned reports. This was taking stock. Exercise by the United States began a few years ago and it was not being conducted in secret but they they made an effort to talk to many of the people who were In charge of the war but from either from a political or institutional or military point of view. And what's really important about these papers is not necessarily This they sort of dysfunction and the the disconnect. Because I think at at least for those of us who were covering the war or had a ringside seat to to a lot of this this new right General Stanley McChrystal's long-awaited strategic assessment were leaked to. US media troops behaving like an occupying army. I'm more concerned about protecting themselves than the Afghan population and far too few in number to beat the Taliban but the fact that they're actually taking thing stock of what happened and what went wrong and that Americans are actually for the first time in eighteen years asking themselves. Why are we still there and you what went wrong? And that's something that that that that we have not done in Canada and I wanNA talk to you in a moment about why you think that's the case. But what is it been like for you to read through these documents assembly who followed this war so closely. It's been a flashback. Flashback in many respects to some of the issues Some of the frustrations at one point I was reading through Some of the some of the testimony but some of the interviews of some of the US officials and you can almost feel their frustration dripping off the page and It's a frustration that a lot of people who were intimately involved in this war will regardless of whether you were an official whether you remember the military whether you were a journalist or whether you were an Afghan civilian on the ground around the frustration and the inability for NATO and for the United States to be able to prosecute the war to a successful conclusion. Breath.

United States Stanley McChrystal Taliban Mary Harry Afghanistan NATO Canada official
"afghanistan" Discussed on The Current

The Current

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"afghanistan" Discussed on The Current

"Younger generation to stand against option for you know women's rights and human rights or the justice and for you know better forms of governance Examples are evident in departments in the Afghan civil society and even into government in in government despite the challenges that we have with the government in Afghanistan and challenges. Are there can be a long list of it that I can say but we can see it's mostly led by by a younger generation. Average age is somewhere between Thirty five to forty four. The people got serving serving as key leadership. The government right and you are the director of Afghanistan's largest think tank that wouldn't have been possible under Taliban rule so what you just said and your presence in this job. Does that suggest that there have been improvements as a result of of the US. Lead presence in Afghanistan. Well yes but I tell you this sir. We cannot conclude eighteen years of intervention with a complete failure or complete success story. This is story has both insights one side of it. As I mentioned that I mentioned this now I was mentioning as an activist from the grassroots movements of you know home based literacy classes. as-as back in the time of the war. I'm talking about you know October. November two thousand one I was saying then that military solution was was not a solution to this conflict. And I'm saying it now. Eighteen years on that what I was claiming them as a young Afghan from the grassroots was right is pruned proved right. Because this war is not a war to be fought by bombs by airplanes by dismantling or eliminating some forces it's a war that's requires development requires interventions in poverty. Reduction requires intervention in building infrastructures education providing more opportunity for a country that is deprived because of the war prior to US led war. That started here. So militarization is an absolute absolute failure side but this intervention of the past eighteen years has lots of advantages. The thanks to which I am able to today live in work eric in this country. Thanks to which we have thousands of women working in serving in government. We have hundreds thousands of girls going to school the schools infrastructures or there and it's unprecedented. In comparison to any other time in the history of Afghanistan. The number of schools in the country across across the country particularly in rural areas is unprecedented however when it comes to quality when it comes to train teachers we have a long long way to go so there are positive elements. There are some signs of success that you can see in this past eighteen years but of course it also failures so for people in Canada who are who are reading about these new papers May and who may be asking themselves whether this war was in vain. What's your response? Why does sponsors? That part of his should have not happened. The military part should have not happened. No Canadian deserve to be killed killed here. Just because they've attacked some people on this side. The sources of terrorism in Afghanistan was not hidden here the sources were elsewhere which was not not salk at and so for that reason that part of it sending your sons and daughters for military services in Afghanistan was not really worth it. But then sending your money to rebuild this war ravaged country. Thank you for your for your money and think tanks to your financial assistance in the development inspectors now. We are much better place than any other time before. I'm I'm sure that that some Canadians are listening to you now but they also still worry. Sorry about the specter of corruption in Afghanistan and whether their money actually goes where. It's supposed to go. What do you say to that? Unfortunately corruption is a phenomenon that is the result of massive level of You know financial intervention without any accountability. the sources of corruption Shen or not only national national as well as International. I were making them as for. Accountability are so weak internationally. That bullpens the space where this corruption. So my message to Canadian I please. The Afghan people are taking more Strong steps to the word you know keeping their governments there non-governmental organizations Gore and more accountable more community based system of accountability is the solution to tackle the massive issue of corruption and that's requires some level of conditionality in the funding and support the Canadians and other international partners thus providing to Afghanistan whether they are private sector NGOs or government. All right we will leave it there. Thank you thank you or Zele. The name is the director of the Afghanistan research and evaluation unit an independent research institute based in Kabul. She is in Kabul Afghanistan..

Afghanistan US director Kabul Zele Shen Gore Canada salk
"afghanistan" Discussed on The Current

The Current

10:07 min | 1 year ago

"afghanistan" Discussed on The Current

"On with New York City on my own. The United States military has begun a gun strikes who'd been at war for eighteen years now. We're not winning. We're not losing presidents. Come and go but nothing really seems to change vital national interest to send an additional thirty thousand. US troops staff Ghanistan. Our troops will fight to win. We will fight to win. US presidents Bush Obama and trump have all tried to win the war in Afghanistan but the words of those presidents are in stark contrast to a trove of documents published by The Washington Post. It's it's being compared to the Pentagon papers that revealed the failures of the war in Vietnam. The documents show top officials warn. There was no clear plan in Afghanistan. Some even believed the war was already lost. The documents also include revelations about Canada's role in the country the senior defense writer Murray Brewster has been looking into into this. He joins me from our Ottawa. Studio Hello Good Morning. Murray what did you make of what you saw the documents. I covered Afghanistan as the journalist or someone who has been intimately involved from the military development capacity or even politics a lot of what. We're reading here. The individual details. It doesn't surprise many people who have been closely associated with the war. What I believe is significant is to see it laid out in a huge compendium in just in all this detail? I think what's significant about. Vote what we're seeing is the for the first time I think there is now a stirring of conscience in the United States where they have begun to ask themselves very serious questions about why they have been at war for eighteen years. These were the results of interviews that are compiled by the Office of the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan reconstruction with the name of Cigar. Who did they speak to? They spoke to a vast array of United it states officials officials with NATO Both military and civilian political staffers and there's it's a mixture of interviews but also material that they've gleaned notes from Conferences among the documents. You're going to see. Some of the names blanked out there reductions etc where cigar was Attempting to get These people go on the record to talk about it. One of the things that I found incredibly fascinating where some of the lessons learned interviews that were conducted particularly with the the senior military officials and and As someone who sat and interviewed many of the senior military officials I it's interesting to you. Hear how pessimistic and Unguarded they were in those interviews in comparison to some of the Times that I've spoken with them. I'm sure yeah that's true. How prominently did Canada figure in in the interviews? There were a number of documents. I'd say about three dozen documents. That reference Canada into the documents are divided into two thousand documents divided into bins and There's a like looking at corruption option looking at the overall war strategy but looking at NATO as well NATO's involvement and That's where you find. Most of the references to Canada is in NATO and end in the timeframe roughly of two thousand and six two thousand. Seven where there seems to have been A lot of talk either by I US officials who were watching the deteriorating situation in two thousand six and seven Afghans Stanford closely or by military military officials notably General Sir Sir. David Richard Who was the commander of NATO forces in Afghanistan at that time He did an interview with seagulls representatives. And he's He's British I remember interviewing him myself and thinking of him as fairly plain talk talk man but he revealed things in his interviews with this with his Rick with reconstruction report that we hadn't heard before what did he reveal about the situation in Kandahar and during his command he was very blunt and very plainspoken and he talked about how there were not enough troops on the ground and one of the things that I found incredible was that he recounted a conversation that he had with the then. US Defense Fence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld where he said directly to the US defense secretary there are not enough troops on the ground because Donald Rumsfeld was gobsmacked act at the increase in violence in two thousand and six and Essentially Richard said that we don't have enough resources and we don't have enough troops on the ground and end Rumsfield blew him off basically dismissed him and said that I don't agree with you like move on general and that's significant for Canada because at that point in the war. Canadian troops were under daily assault by a resurgent Taliban and There were casualties. we were suffering at that time as a nation. Our first major casualties in terms of killed and wounded almost on a daily basis and it led up to the fall of two thousand six the operation Medusa where because the Taliban had dug in west of Kandahar city and they had to be removed and it was just a spiral of violence and it shocked not only the Canadian public but the Canadian government. The Canadian government was looking for reinforcements was looking for NATO to send help to southern Afghanistan and here Donald Rumsfeld was essentially blowing that off. Why Hey he was blowing off I think for a couple of reasons? The first is that The Americans were fully engaged in Iraq at that point Iraq Iraq had Completely spiraled out of control and the US pouring more of its or most of its attention and money and its troops into Iraq to stabilize the situation there. That's the first thing but also to the Bush administration subscribed to a a notion that wars could be fought with lightly Light forces not a lot of Like heavy I'd guess Big Armies the best way to describe it Forces where you have a large amount of troops going into an area to suppress it and it took several years for not only the The Bush administration but for commanders including Canadian commanders to come around to the idea that that they needed an incredible amount of Of reinforcements to stabilize the situation in Afghanistan. Now now on Monday Our Defense Minister who served in Afghanistan was asked about these revelations. He had this to say there's no conflict It is very very complex once. We had a good understanding of what was going on. That's when figuring. This is not just a military solution. You need to start looking. At how how you do development. How do you look at the capacity building so a lot of lessons were learned very early on one thing that I can probably say the cleaner on horses and Resources that was put in by Canada had a substantial impact. What do you make of that response? Well let me just put it this way. I think it took the Canadian military. Awhile to make that logic leap the ministers talking about how You know once they had figured it out well it took them an incredible amount of time to figure it out. It took them a couple of years to do that but also to what the documents Kamenz show is that Canada knew that it did not have not only enough troops on the ground but enough financial financial resources to help stabilize the situation. It's one of the things that that General Richards mentions in his debrief to Seger. Is that Canada and in Britain did not have enough financial resources. Because you see when you go into a conflict and when you try to stabilize An an area during a counterinsurgency war you have troops that go in to clear the area but then they're followed up by development projects reconstruction to be able to Win Hearts and minds if we have to use that well worn phrase and there was an acknowledgement by Richards in these documents that the Canada and Britain which was in Helmand province adjacent Kandhar did not have enough resources to be able to do that. And that contributed to to the deterioration of the situation and the the extension of the war and It Richards noted that it was only the United States that had had the resources and the ability to be able to go into a certain area and be able to put enough troops on the ground and then then stabilized belies with by putting by rebuilding roads but rebuilding bridges by getting the power stations. Working again all right Mary much more to talk about. But we're going to have to leave it there for now. People people can see more reading reading your stories online today at CBC DOT CA. Thanks so much Mary you're welcome Murray Brewster the CBC's Senior Defense Redder. He was in our Ottawa Studio Studio. Retired colonel pat stolen can relate to the revelations in the Afghan papers. He was a key commander during Canada's move into the volatile Kandahar province in two thousand thousand six and he later became Canada's.

Afghanistan United States Canada NATO Kandahar Murray Brewster Donald Rumsfeld commander It Richards New York City Iraq Canadian government CBC Ottawa Studio Studio Ottawa Pentagon Mary
"afghanistan" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"afghanistan" Discussed on Post Reports

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> So <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> if the <Speech_Male> original concept <Speech_Female> of conducting <Speech_Male> all of these incredibly <Speech_Male> honest interviews <Speech_Male> was <Speech_Male> to make something <Speech_Male> that was essentially <Speech_Music_Male> lessons <Speech_Male> learned <Speech_Male> the fact that <Speech_Female> they haven't <Speech_Female> been made public the <Speech_Female> fact that there has been a <Speech_Female> huge fight to <Speech_Female> get them out <Speech_Female> into the world for people <Speech_Female> to be able to read <Speech_Male> and understand what's in <Speech_Male> them do. Do <Speech_Female> you feel like <Speech_Female> lessons are <Speech_Male> actually <SpeakerChange> being <Speech_Music_Male> learned. <Speech_Male> No I think <Speech_Male> this is <Speech_Male> why they weren't <Speech_Male> and that's why we're still <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> there Afghanistan <Speech_Male> with no clear your <Speech_Male> plan for getting <Speech_Male> out. Although the trump administration <Speech_Music_Male> is trying to negotiate <Speech_Music_Male> a <Speech_Music_Male> peace deal with the Taliban <Speech_Music_Male> but <Speech_Music_Male> from the war objectives. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Those lessons <Speech_Male> are apparent. Errant <Speech_Male> what the problems <Speech_Male> were <Speech_Male> but in terms of learning <Speech_Male> a lesson and how <Speech_Male> to avoid them in the future <Speech_Male> and come up with a new strategy <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> or <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> especially if <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we ever get involved vowed <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in another war. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> think those lessons <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> still have not been <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> learned. People <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are aware <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of the problems <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in Congress <Speech_Music_Male> in the <Speech_Music_Male> government but it <Speech_Male> again. <Speech_Male> There has never really <Speech_Male> been public reckoning <Speech_Male> about it. There hasn't been <Speech_Male> a public conversation. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> There hasn't <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> been a public accounting <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of <Speech_Male> what went wrong. And <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> why and certainly <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> not to hold <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> individual officials <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> responsible <SpeakerChange> for any <Music>

"afghanistan" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

10:40 min | 1 year ago

"afghanistan" Discussed on Post Reports

"Proceeded to relate to us that the mob gotten out of control at the airport and had murdered two ministers solidification. He giggle while he related. This much later emerged. I don't know if it was ever verified immersed I am a fiend continent headmaster killed but I certainly came out of those opening months feeling that even by Afghan standards the person the substance of this is that the United Tastes had to work very very closely with Fahim Khan. For many years he died in two thousand fifteen. I believe it was and later in his recording crocker occurred is almost joking with the interviewer care. The good thing about him con is that he is dead. Check always talking but again. The perspective isn't just that he was this scary evil character but this is one of our closest allies is in Afghanistan. The question the war for them as who are the good guys who were the bad guys and in these interviews the documents and recordings people repeatedly say either this. They say I couldn't tell who the good guys were. The bad guys the troops who go over and say show me where the bad guys are so I could fight them and this was unclear. Clear a Lotta Times. A bad guys were on our side. That is the question the debate that still going on to this day and is reflected in these interviews documents and recordings things that there is real disagreement with among US officials as to where to draw that line do we just take him inside and have a stern talking tune intel not to do it again to demand the be kicked out a government to we arrest them by Michael Flynn for instance had a very different perspective from Crocker on on what to do about Fahim. Khan I mean that would've meant confronting people Fahim be small hunt. Yeah that's right and when that when that happened you may remember this. You know there was an attempt to confront Fahim 's crew air force generals right and I think you may remember how that turned out. I was in his office. I was not pretty and you know what arrest the guy. This is the combat zone so flynn was one of those people who was saying that he felt the. US should have been more aggressive in trying to keep people in line or to Dole out punishments to people who they felt. Were doing doing bad things being corrupt Flynn would say yes. We didn't hold people accountable enough high up in the Afghan government. I mean there's a a Lotta guys that should have been arrested. You know you got to have accountability and so that that's part of the problem of instilling confidence in a population that they see it happening right in front of their eyes. We see it happening and we. We don't look the other way we actually actually enable it. I'll give you a good story of probably one of the wealthiest people in Afghanistan. Today he started out as a young Surfer Flint tells the story of an interpreter. Who was working with you as military also calls him a Terp for short talk about lack of accountability? So so the military commander is using this term and commander says I need this to this guy. He's talking to WHO's an Afghan. It doesn't understand anything tells the term you know and the guy says he says I'll buy it from you and Terp says okay and he wants to buy from your are. Are you willing to sell. You is yes this is what I'll sell it for. And he says well. How much is a cell to me for? The TERP says talk to the Guy Guy says a couple of hundred dollars Terp says twenty thousand so says okay no problem gives the couple hundred talks. Takes the rest if you remember that the US military and the State Department and International aid organisations. They couldn't speak to two languages Afghanistan. The two national languages are Dari and Pashto. Even today. We're still in Afghanistan. You you tell me how many how many actual. US members hours of our military US members of the military or policy people from the state that actually speak are too. It's a handful. So that's Shane chain. That's a policy decision. So we're really dependent on translators and interpreters to help us communicate but also figure out the lay the land. This was a common scene. You'd see as as a reporter there. I would see this happen where it was military be dependent on interpreter and sort of operate on the assumption that the interpreter is seeing their best interests. When in fact Flynn is saying that the interpreters jacking up the price unbeknownst to the Americans and he keeps doing that and keeps running and keeps doing the money's more and more and he's cutting deals? Everybody loves this interpreter. Everybody thinks the world he would see these interpreters become multimillionaires over time. Probably one of the wealthiest people in Afghanistan today. He owns a couple thanks. He owns a rental. Su The service. He started out as a young trevor. He says this was clear. This was is going on but again the United States just kind of let it happen is trying to crack down on it. I just think that you know how many others of him are there. That's right that's right. I mean there's there's probably hundreds of those types of individuals who benefited. Because frankly we. I didn't know what the Hell we're doing. We're not exactly sure who. The interpreter is that General Flynn is referring to if he identified the person in his interviews cigar. That section was redacted by the Inspector General for privacy reasons So then if all of this stuff was happening on the ground in Afghanistan why couldn't US officials be more public about that. And what did Michael Flynn say about. About the fact that the state of things on the ground was pretty bad and yet we were hearing. This message of things are improving. Afghanistan is getting better with every passing ENGA- well if they admit things are screwed up then there would be public pressure to pull out or in the war and nobody went to admit defeat. And so this is a problem. You this on Vietnam to. This isn't the first time in a war this has happened. This is really has strong. Echoes what happened during the Vietnam War where the military commanders or the presidents or secretaries of state would say well. It's a tough road. They're still fighting going on but we're making progress. We're making in progress. Because they don't want people to think that people are dying in vain or that. We're sending more troops or money to Afghanistan if it's a wasted 'cause commanders. Commanders and policymakers on the spectrum of news they want to be always good news operational commanders and State State Department policymakers for Department of Defense Policy makers they are going to be inherently rosy in their assessments and be unacceptable accepting of hard hitting intelligence and yet Flynn's is saying that it was clear on the ground that we were losing. We were not winning that despite spite. What the American people are being talked publicly things were not going? Well after I think two thousand six for me it was irrelevant because we we were just telling so many people it was making any difference at all. It's hard for military commander to admit things aren't going well to say we screwed up where we made a mistake or our strategy was flawed. None of them are geared to say that and nobody would admit the reality what was going on. And that's what's so striking about what Michael Flynn and other people. Seeing these recordings and interviews say was apparent we were losing. It was apparent. Things weren't weren't going well and yet in public people in the government kept telling the American people things were were moving forward. We're making progress and you know. That's a pretty damning comment comment. We hear it time and time and time again in these things if you go back and you look at the mission statement for every battalion and every brigade from the beginning of the war the essentially are all the same. You know it's defeat and destroy. The enemy protect the population. So they all went in every whatever. Their rotation was for a year nine months six months whatever their rotation was they all went in and they and they were given that mission they accept the debt mission the executed that mission and then they all said when they left left the accomplish that mission every single commander. Not One commander is going to leave Afghanistan or Iraq or anyplace. Not One is gonNA leave and go. You know what we didn't accomplish our mission okay. So if the next guy that shows up up finds it screwed up that wow man we just did a right seat ride. We had a great right see by our week long. Did our high fives. We're now in there. They do their mission analysis once they get on the ground and then they come back and they go man. This is really bad but yet the last time and last regiment that you just replaced. They said they accomplish their mission. They got all these wonderful stats about what they did. But the next guy that shows up and I'm telling you this is from from two thousand and two until today okay so somewhere along our our system and this includes the State Department Basler's local down down at the local level. Everybody did a great job all doing a great job really so for doing such a great job. Why does it feel like we were losing?.

Afghanistan Michael Flynn US commander Fahim Khan State Department crocker United Tastes Vietnam Surfer Flint intel Shane chain reporter Dole trevor Basler State State Department Department of Defense Policy Iraq
"afghanistan" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

09:17 min | 1 year ago

"afghanistan" Discussed on Post Reports

"Enormity of the task and what did he say about how the the US was doing in terms of trying to help build back some of Kabul and some of Afghanistan. Well there is a real debate going on in the Bush administration at that point. Do we get involved in. In nation building in Afghanistan. We leave that to other countries in the United Nations. One point we couldn't tell what the task was what the US was there to do. There was a significant difference in view in Washington as to whether we should embark on a long-term nation building effort or order we wanted to par rolling our agenda very minimal when George W Bush had run for President President in two thousand against Al Gore. One of his campaign themes was I don't think our troops ought to be used for what's called nation building and like our our troops ought to be used to to fight and win war. I think our troops ought to be used to to help overthrow a dictator. That's in our innocent. When it's in our best interests interests he had seen the Clinton administration had tried to do in Somalia and Haiti Somalia? Start off as humanitarian mission then changed into the nation building mission and that's where the mission went wrong and same with Haiti. I wouldn't have supported either but I'm GONNA be judicious as to how to use. The military needs to be in our vital interests and mission needs to be clear earlier in the exit strategy. Obvious so sure enough right. After Bush gets elected. He's faced with his choice. Now what do I do and Afghanistan they toppled the Taliban Taliban they chased al Qaeda Way. What responsibility do we have to rebuild Afghanistan and this was a debate that Crocker talks about we sure Gusau Rumsfeld at work saying minima minimum? Our job is about killing bad guys so we will have killed the bad guys. Who cares what happens next? That's their problem. And if in a decade and half we have to go in and kill more bad guys we can do that too. But we're not going to get in nation-building so so Ryan Crocker says. They were slow to come to that realization that they needed to take a key role in the reconstruction but that lack of initial widespread agreement about what exactly their role was and reconstruction. How did that become apparent on the ground in Afghanistan? Well for one they just always in we'd. US troops is there and diplomats and they had to function you know they had to try and get an embassy up and operating really. They were left with a shell of a building that they had occupied ski Pie twenty-seven years before how do they get from one part of the country the other there's no highways there's old goat as dirt roads toward a river because bridge was a very sobering experience. Then there wasn't almost literally nothing there. How do they get this country to? You can fly in and fly out. That took a long time just to do anything. In terms of military operations they needed to get some basic infrastructure up and going. You mentioned that one theme that came up in many of these interviews is the fact that people were really concerned about the corruption that they saw was that something that was the Crocker talked about during interview yes. Crocker was a key player in trying to determine how to respond to that particularly during his second second stint there in the. US Embassy in Kabul during the Obama Administration by then the levels of corruption had gotten very very bad in Afghanistan. Dan got very significant military presence. it'd be a whole lot of stuff you have to remember at that point. We're pumping the United States is pumping in billions and billions of dollars a year and Afghantistan whether it's direct aid paying for their troops troops and police paying to rebuild roads. Count on those amounts of money into a very federal state and society So it really ran the gamut the corruption it could be Afghan police having check points on the road demanding money money for someone to pass whether you're an Afghan farmer. Somebody going to school but also was very high level. Corruption terms of one of the biggest banks in Afghanistan Kabul Bank went belly up next customers have been pulling their savings out of Kabul bank as fast as they. Can you have to understand Ghanistan when we invaded. Aided they didn't have banks they just had money exchanges Hawalas which are the Islamic financial system of these money transfers but they build up a bank and the brother of Hamad Karzai Hamid Karzai's president of Afghanistan. One of his brothers helped run this bank. Kabo bankers biggest private bank in the country tree. This bank also was a repository directly or indirectly of most of the US and international aid. All this money to a large degree was is getting funneled through Kabul blank and it became apparent in two thousand ten that Kabul Bank. All of a sudden was on the verge of collapse that there were rumors was flying that they didn't have enough money to cover their loans because it was so mismanaged and because people were theoretically taking money out of mismanages and even cover it that that this is people giving loans to themselves millions and millions and millions of dollars in loans. Never having to pay them back so I think the investigators rescuers who were looking into say was more than mismanagement who was outright theft and fraud to such a degree that it was run like a Ponzi scheme former president doesn't Hamad Karzai his brother Mahmoud Karzai. He's denied any criminal or personal wrongdoing. Although of course acknowledges given that the bank almost melted down that there were a number of very serious management issues at the bank. So this was the kind of thing that Ryan Crocker was looking at and saying that as the chief U. S. diplomat in Afghanistan. He's confronted with this problem. Do we hold anyone accountable. By the time I was fairly clear to me that MM Cuban the entrenched in nature of corruption and the extent to which the establishment including Karzai's own family famously aimlessly Louis. Kahn was highly unlikely to be taken to bring people to account so Ryan Crocker says essentially. Oh his feeling was that the corruption was so bad in so ingrained in the government and the Afghan elite that there was wasn't much the United States could do about it and simply wanted nature corruption whether it's Kabul Bank or else is now beyond the armed the ability of common action president. Greg this unresolved unresolved problem that persists to this day really and Crocker's argument is yes they were corrupt. It was a mess but by that point it become so ingrained. I don't think there was realistically much we could do about it now. A Lotta other people will disagree with him on that. What are some of the other examples of corruption then? Dan Cracker notice in trying to deal with well. One person he mentioned in came up in his recording was a notorious Afghan warlord word called Muhammad Qasim Fahim Khan Dada Cash Tajik warlord who is one of our allies when we invaded Afghanistan in two thousand one you have to remember when we started bombing. The country in two thousand one on our allies were warlords for the most part people who were opposed to the Taliban and they were on our side only because they oppose the Taliban and al Qaeda but he he was also a pretty rough figure Afghans. This is a guy who had his own militia and suddenly found himself as the defense minister and vice president of Afghanistan. He's not a clean figure known for good government. This is a guy known for being pretty rough on his enemies Crocker had talked talked about first meeting Fahim. Khan being out and that point he he knew for him. Khan was this militia leader. He was the warlord from the northern part of Afghanistan. He was going to be in charge of the Afghanistan Defense Ministry not surprisingly. The early doesn't to the chargers got all messed up. You had people stranded at the airport and cold temperatures for hours if not days. There was a minister of civilization. was supposed to be in charge of all of this and one night. Jon Call the British Force Commander and I will meeting with Karzai fairly and seen Khan walked into the room. He was giggling.

Ryan Crocker Afghanistan US Kabul Bank Kabul Afghanistan Kabul Bank president Afghanistan Defense Ministry Muhammad Qasim Fahim Khan Dada George W Bush Mahmoud Karzai President President Dan Cracker Taliban Taliban United Nations Al Gore Taliban
"afghanistan" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

15:20 min | 1 year ago

"afghanistan" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"I want everybody to come to Camp David. It and I want to have talks with the government and talks with the Taliban and do this thing and have a big splashy deal result from it kate small problem the Taliban does not recognize the Afghan government as legitimate and they are not willing to roll into Camp David and and let Donald trump fix that historic conflict which is far more complicated then just withdrawing US troops and just withdrawing US troops. This is really really complicated. The Afghan government and President Ghani don't really want to do this Camp David thing either but they don't have much of a choice because elections ends are supposed to happen in Afghanistan at the end of this month and the United States has been Kinda saying I need you to hold off on those elections until we do this deal with the Taliban and a the political uncertainty surrounding the president of Afghanistan has kind of compelled him to come to the table but the Taliban says we aren't coming to Camp David until we have a final deal come to celebrate that deal but we will not come to finish it and we will not come to the table with Afghanistan's government armament so the Taliban as it does sins messages through violence and the violence starts ramping up including a car bomb that killed killed twelve people one of whom was an American soldier Army Sergeant First Class L. S. Angel- correggio Ortiz and that's when even the Camp David summit was never really on for sure it was decidedly off and there was no reason for any of this to be public but the president started tweeting about it. I love this sentence from the New York Times. It was highlighted in axios email this morning it says on display were all of the characteristic traits of the trump presidency the yearning ambition for the Grand Prize the endless quest to achieve what no other president has achieved the willingness to defy convention the volatile mood swings and the tribal in fighting that just about sums it up and I think what's so unfortunate disgusting tragic as that he's a TV president and we have all breathlessly debated the Camp David invitation the peace negotiation how realistic any of this was to begin with but the reality is that the people of Afghanistan will suffer real violence because of this have already suffered decades of violence because of the US policy in Afghanistan and because of the terrorism of Al Qaeda because of the Taliban and so to play this out for maximum impact to tweet about it to be ready and willing to shred these norms and to be so dismissive and flippant with these peace negotiations she ations. It's just these are the people whose lives hang in the balance not to mention our military members who are in Afghanistan and hurry put at risk and it's just it's so gross. It's like this is not a season finale. This is a real thing that has caused so much trauma in the lives of Americans in the lives of Afghans and there's no seeming recognition or acknowledgment meant that this is serious and this is not a reality show in that real people will lose their lives because of your flippant tweeting and I wanted to go back through that history because it is a reminder to me that this has been such a quagmire and all these talks are so fragile that we Marie living the situation where we were going to try to work with the Taliban under the Obama Administration and we lost that opportunity and we were there again at that fragile moment and you can debate all day the wisdom of trying to negotiate with a group like the Taliban and I have no idea what the right answer is. I think think pragmatically if the United States is going to see an Afghanistan not controlled by the Taliban we're going to be there forever right. There's just snow withdrawal and your history was good but the history of that country in violence and conflict like this starts way before September eleventh. That's the other thing I mean we're talking about. Sinche of conflict with major nations inside Afghanistan Russia England like with this is not that we're not the first ones at this Rodeo and the poor people of this country continue to suffer in the meantime and I think we're kind of shredding president trump trump for the wrong thing here is I do think working with the Taliban is just almost necessary if we are going to withdraw troops. I don't see another way and it's a huge gamble and I don't know if it will work in the precious I mean it just seemed like the most important media story was the preciousness of an invitation. I can't David and I'm like I don't. I think that's the takeaway here with love like if we want to have our station as a country about Afghanistan it's not because we need to treat the Camp David invitations with such sacredness and preciousness like that's not that's not the important part here. It's just isn't if conference it can't David could get this based on if that were meaningful to the parties at the table it might be worth thinking about you think about how many Americans have died in Afghanistan and how many civilians have died in Afghanistan Ghanistan. It might be worth doing that but that's not why Camp David was under consideration and that's not why the deal fell apart the deal fell apart in my reading of the reporting because this president wanted to do the final deal himself without understanding standing all of the intricacies of it and that is the prospective danger for the United States politically and as as you well said the danger for our soldiers and for people in Afghanistan is exponential because of this and and because he you decided to take it public when he didn't need to do that you know this I extended an invitation for the flash and razzle-dazzle of IT and now I'm re sending it for that. Same reason is a terrible way to conduct our foreign policy so we are not the only people who think that foreign policy via tweet is a bad idea. We are not the only people who think that inside the Republican Party because we have another Republican Party Challenger and here's a funny story when we were in California we we're going to record a nightly nuance about Joe Walsh and we started recording and I was like I mean it's not like he's still running ought to his girlfriend. In South American Beth those like hold up that's Mark Sanford and I'm like it's not him and then I thought it was the guy who yelled you liar at Obama and it wasn't him either and now to keep me doubly doubly confused now Mark Sanford the guy who ran off to South America actually is running against Donald trump in the primary. Yes he is and many of you. We reached out to us to say what is with the canceled primary headlines because Mark Sanford is end. Joe Walsh is in Bill Weld is in but there are several states that have announced they will not hold primaries so Friday Kansas said no caucuses here in twenty twenty for the Republican Party on Saturday South Carolina and Nevada did the same thing Arizona is expected to cancel as well so I want to try to answer the questions y'all asks. Can they do this. Yes they can the parties set their own rules about the primaries in the Republican Party the states decide what they wanNA. Do they have to lock Tober I to decide that the RNC doesn't have a role here. This is purely up to the state parties. has this happened before yes it has in two thousand four ten states canceled primaries to support George W Bush in Nineteen Ninety six eight states canceled primaries on the Democratic side to Support Court Bill Clinton Two thousand twelve ten state primaries were cancelled his support President Obama parties save a lot of money by not having their contests when they have an incumbent coming in the White House Nevada's. GOP says they'll save one hundred and fifty thousand dollars by not doing this Kansas will say two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. The point is the parties would rather spend their there money on the races that are competitive than have a primary when there is an incumbent and this has been really strategic the trump campaign has worked hard to take over the state parties and install their people bill weld told CBS News that he's not talking to state parties because they're all run by people and so this isn't unprecedented precedent. Did what I think is abnormal is just that donald trump is abnormal right but that's kind of where we are so I wonder what this means for for these guys running against him in the primary I mean it's happened before but in two thousand four I mean president. Bush didn't really have any major challenges so I wonder what this means for. These big name challengers injures how hard they'll push stay on the ballot in these state primaries you know Joe Walsh is probably going to be best positioned to make a stink about this just because he understands media so well. I've been thinking about Boris Johnson. Stay with me for a second in his decision to expel the MP's is who voted against him on the brexit timetable from the conservative partying and how disgusting I find that on one hand and how honest I find it on the other there is a part of me. That feels like maybe this is just another moment in that bone breaking process around whether the Republican Party is anything besides Donald Trump's party and it seems to me that it's not and I appreciate Mark Sanford Joe Walsh and Bill Weld while none of them are perfect messenger and we could spend a lotta time going through their imperfections but what's the point of that thank you to three people who've said what's happening is unacceptable and I'm willing to do something about it. Even though I know what I'll be put through that process I'm thrilled that they're doing this and I I also think the fact that two former governors and this party isn't going to hold a primary you know former representative in Congress these are serious various people who have benefited the party for a long time and if State Parties and the National Organization aren't pressing thing to have a real debate about whether future this party is when the incumbent president is as chaotic and divisive vices as this one then I think it is true that the GOP is not a party other than the Party of Donald Trump and maybe we just need to get there and say it out loud and acknowledge aged so that something else can form or whatever happens happens but I don't know I feel more. I expected to feel angry. Sorry about this and what I feel more just a continuation of sad an resigned. I also often think about how especially in a democracy when you try to silence it only makes the voices louder because you can't because as much as he would like to be an autocrat he's not and so when he tries to shut it down you know because he can't do that. Completely is just just going to give life. It's just emboldens people. It just makes them think that you're afraid of what they have to say. It's easy to accuse you of sort of strongman techniques techniques and being afraid of coming up against challengers and so I mean if I was the trump campaign I would say no leave the doors wide open. It's fine because the more you try to restrict restrict them. The more you give them oxygen to grow. I totally agree with that. I would love to see a a mass exodus of people from the party saying this is unacceptable to me. You know when I my first reaction when I read that New York Times piece about this was I'm just so glad that I changed my registration. I don't want any part live. This is awful and I don't want any part of it and I wish more people would step up to say I don't want any part of this. I've heard the argument and I made it for a long time. If you stay inviting fighting you try to shift it but the deck is clearly stacked. You know what trump noses casinos and the house wins in casinos and I think the party is right now Beth thirty one compliment this week. I'd like to Compliment Governor Gretchen Whitmer in Michigan. She has done something hard. She made a campaign promise that she would not sign a budget into the law that did not appropriate some meaningful amount towards two point five billion dollars needed to fix Michigan's roads and bridges and she has decided to push that to the side right now to move forward in negotiations to finish the state's budget by October first and I just WanNa say that stinks that is difficult. That's miserable and it is the hard realistic work of governing and I applaud her for recognizing recognizing that having a budget is better than not having a budget even if everything isn't as you want in that budget and I think she will build relationships and credibility ability and be able in the long term to continue working on these issues that Michigan deserves to have worked on because of her willingness to compromise here and and very few people people are going to give her any Kudos for this so I wanted to be one of the few that will so I want to compliment the University of Tennessee. This is not very political but I love it so much I can't stop thinking about it and I have to talk about it so this little boy hand made his own own University of Tennessee shirt like he drew logo on a piece of paper and pinned it to his tee-shirt and he got bullied because of it and they remained him so so as teacher sort of put a call out on facebook and University of Tennessee not only sent them a big box of University of Tennessee Paraphernalia. They then took his design and have made it a real T. shirt y'all and it just it is warming my heart so much also because I was a child who wants tried to make my own t shirt I wanted to Arthur t shirts so bad so at pinned a cardboard cutout of globe to a T. shirt and and I just the open heartedness and like they've they've like some of his like his drawing spray paint on a couple of things around campus. I just love the way they've responded to this and totally embraced this little boy in made his life and said like new monitoring your design. We love your design. It doesn't matter what anybody else says. I'm telling you tearing up right now. So sweet I love it and is a big thing for people sitting in Kentucky to complement. The University of Tennessee is right go to University of Tennessee Fan. That's enough to turn me. Oh next step..

Taliban Afghanistan president Donald trump Republican Party US Bill Weld Camp David New York Times Joe Walsh Mark Sanford Obama George W Bush Camp David summit President Ghani Afghanistan Ghanistan
"afghanistan" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"afghanistan" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"Washington. DC Susan Page and in Dallas with MJ Jay Hager so follow the Lincoln show notes and come see what we do live and in person. Let's start with Afghanistan today. Everyone knows the president resident did some tweeting over the weekend and it helps me to take a few steps back from the tweets which do elevate my blood pressure to think about where we are overall. You can hear so much more detail about all of this in this series that we produced last year commemorating September eleventh and we'll put a link to that in our show notes just to kind of level set especially if you weren't with us for that series after the September eleventh attacks we you got a joint resolution signed into law by President Bush authorizing force against those responsible for the attacks so that was signed on September eighteenth of two thousand one and and that is the basis for our invasion of Afghanistan among lots of other things and we are still there today because of that authorization nation from eighteen years ago after that authorization the United States commenced airstrikes al Qaeda and the Taliban so let's talk about those people are I just remember at the Taliban is a Sunni Islamic fundamentalist political movement in Afghanistan. The Taliban refers to itself off as the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan and in two thousand one when we got that authorization for use of force the Taliban was basically running running Afghanistan they held power over seventy five percent of the country and President Bush blamed them for giving safe haven to al Qaeda he believed that Al Qaeda could not have carried out the attack on the United States without the Talibans support so we've been at war Afghanistan ever since and it has I've had lots of ebbs and flows in two thousand four things were looking pretty good. Afghanistan created a constitution. We said that was a positive step toward democracy. There were elections in president. Karzai was elected with fifty five percent of the vote. Then things got really weird on both sides and particularly in America we started the processing what had happened on September eleventh. We started thinking about the invasion of Iraq and connection with that we got totally disillusioned and war-fatigued eight and that is a very short summary of what occurred President Obama gets elected. He vows to withdraw from Afghanistan but in two thousand nine there was escalating violence is there and he recommitted an increase our troops he tried to narrow the extremely broad and almost unknowable mission in Afghanistan to defeating Al Qaeda data and preventing its return then two thousand eleven president Obama says we're making progress here. We're going to draw down the troops. We're going to start holding peace talks with the Taliban's liens leadership in two thousand twelve the Taliban suspended those talks and accused America every nagging on promises to work toward prisoner swap that in two thousand fourteen President Listen Obama says we're going to withdraw most of our forces from Afghanistan. Here's a timetable for that and the administration worked to broker an agreement around new elections in Afghanistan and so we have to this this ebb and flow ebb and flow will two thousand seventeen comes along and president trump has been saying he's going to get us out of Afghanistan can but then Isis starts to take hold in Afghanistan and president trump decides that we're going to drop our most powerful non nuclear bomb tom on militants in the country and we do that but we start peace talks again and for about a year we've been in discussions shins with the Taliban not interestingly the government in Afghanistan so Afghanistan's president has not been part of these conversations conversations it has been our special envoy and a top Taliban official discussing withdrawing..

Afghanistan Taliban president Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan President Bush President Obama United States Susan Page Jay Hager Washington. Dallas trump Iraq America Karzai Lincoln Isis official
"afghanistan" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"afghanistan" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Rivalry comes from all right let's take a look at the soviets in afghanistan and how that rivalry plays into that and by the way i heard that we let the pakistanis help us decide who we back in that a witch which groups tribes to support and that of course since we're fighting communists they thought well we'll choose the most wildly religious ones because they are least likely to be absorbed by defeated by communism and so they got the most radical a couple things keep in mind right wondering the cold war pakistan was us allies to some extent and also to remember but you know when the us was fighting the soviets the directly to the cold war there was this real feeling of like you know they're the godless communists in the us is the country of religion so countries that were pro religion even if it wasn't christian religion were seen often favored by the us that was actually a key selling point with the saudis the saudis looked and said well could be with the russians could be with you americans well the americans at least are more of a kind of religious country so that that made a difference there but going to the afghan civil war and or some of the other stuff that happened in the region in the seventies late seventies and early to mid eighty s that's where the rivalry with the saudis and iranians of kept picking up steam because you had this iran iraq war so basically it wasn't just the saudis who are threatened by the iran revolution it was saddam hussein in iraq who is really threatened by the revolution because guess what he was leading a country that was majority shia and it wasn't that all the iraqi shia were like oh my gosh we just wanna do whatever the iranian leadership says not not all but there was this concern of hey we're going to be inspired by this revolution next door is going to destabilize me so what happened is saddam hussein launched a preemptive strike against iran basically big workout they're not gonna need me anymore because they have this new leader yeah not gonna need me or going to want to get rid of me and going to have some backing to get rid of me so he struck while he could struck while he could the saudis backed him and that angered the iranians as well and so basically became this coalition of the iraqis backed by many other arab states against the iranians this is going on at the same time as the war in afghanistan where the saudis and others are also funneling money to support some of these you heidi groups and afghan rebel groups against the soviet union i did the saudis support iraq and hussein because who was he fighting against iran their enemy yeah so ron was seen as much more of a problem now to be clear this saddam hussein in the saudis didn't have a wonderful relationship either if you remember in nineteen ninetyone after saddam hussein took kuwait his troops were on the border of saudi and there was a real concern that he was gonna roll into saudi arabia but it was kind of again one of these like enemy of my enemy is my friend things iran was seen as a bigger threat so they backed saddam all right let's take a break and we have one more segment to figure it all out here wbz with peter cross they open that big miles out came talk jay jay talking with bradley jay wbz newsradio ten thirty hey friends it's.

afghanistan
"afghanistan" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"afghanistan" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"But you've laid out a pretty pessimistic view of afghanistan you've noted that the taliban control the countryside no add that and they dominated helm on which apparently is the heart of poppy in opium production in afghanistan so the tally bonn have ample sources of funds you've noted that afghanistan's government is incredibly corrupt i think transparency international rates sir afghanistan hundred and sixty nine of one hundred seventy six countries you've noted that the government is shaky and not terribly effective i can certainly understand why american withdrawal from afghanistan will be bad for afghans because as you note there have been successes serb improvements in the quality of their life since two thousand in one but exactly how it a us withdrawal endanger us national interests why they're couple of concerns one is the the the broad terrorism problem there remain a number of groups operating in afghanistan alqaeda the islamic state lashkaritaiba which was involved in the mumbai attacks that do you retain relationships with local taliban commanders and so the concern is that an increasing taliban control of territory as we've seen in the past several years has opened up the opportunity for these kinds of groups to establish training camps to bring and foreigners to conduct training if you we look at the last several years the us has gotten lucky a few cases with knowledgeable azazi in two thousand nine and fis olzhas odd in two thousand ten both of whom had been trained in pakistan and afghanistan.

pakistan afghanistan taliban opium mumbai