35 Burst results for "Afghan"

Gunmen kill two women judges in Afghan capital

News, Traffic and Weather

00:14 sec | 2 d ago

Gunmen kill two women judges in Afghan capital

"A court official says Gunmen have fired on a car in northern Kabul, killing two women judges who worked for Afghanistan's high court and wounded the driver. It was latest attack in the Afghan capital during peace talks between Taliban And Afghan government officials.

Kabul Afghanistan Afghan Government Taliban
Female judges gunned down in Afghan capital, court official says

Mental Health America: Morning Addition

00:33 sec | 2 d ago

Female judges gunned down in Afghan capital, court official says

"To assassinations in Central Asia. Today, gunmen opened fire on a car in northern Kabul, killing two women judges who worked for Afghanistan's highest court. An Afghan court official also says the gunman wounded the driver. This marks the latest attack in the Afghan capital during peace talks between the Taliban and Afghan government officials in Qatar. And Afghan Supreme Court spokesman says the women served as judges for the high court but didn't identify them by name. No one has claimed responsibility for the attack. The Taliban maintained they were not

Afghan Court Central Asia Afghan Government Kabul Afghan Supreme Court Afghanistan Taliban Qatar
Female judges gunned down in Afghan capital, court official says

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:15 sec | 3 d ago

Female judges gunned down in Afghan capital, court official says

"Court officials is Goodman have fired on a car in northern Kabul today, killing two female judges who worked for Afghanistan's high court and wounding the driver. It's the latest attack in the Afghan capital during peace talks between Taliban and Afghan government

Goodman Kabul Afghanistan Taliban Afghan Government
"afghan" Discussed on The Journal.

The Journal.

03:35 min | 4 d ago

"afghan" Discussed on The Journal.

"Of those talks which took place in doha. I think it was also good for the telephone to see that i. I eat engage with women. I think talamon believe really believe that women are less than like their lesser beings and so engaging with women were intelligent and articulate and who challenged would ask questions would object to their views nine and that must have been interesting for them at the time shazad had just given birth to her son and she brought both her son and her husband to the concentrations in doha unusual enough to have an afghan woman at the table for conversations like that but it's completely unheard of that. Her husband is on the sideline and it's just sitting there accompanying her to take care of the child. This was also kind of people feel stage awkward. Like how can he be clue at his wife as part of litigation. And he's not he's just here to take care of the baby and it was emotional for both affairs at mytalk office and to bring your child to defense because of course as parents. We want something better than this for our child. We don't want him to graph in afghanistan. that's.

afghanistan shazad both both affairs afghan nine talamon doha
Afghan officials: Bomb kills 3 in Kabul amid peace talks

BBC World Service

00:20 sec | Last week

Afghan officials: Bomb kills 3 in Kabul amid peace talks

"Spokesman for Afghanistan's Public Protection force has been killed along with two others by a bomb attack in Kabul is the latest in a serious of assassinations of government officials, journalists and human rights activists. You tied coincides with the resumption of peace talks between the Afghan government on the Taliban.

Public Protection Force Afghanistan Kabul Afghan Government Taliban
Afghan women's rights activist shot dead

Morning Edition

00:36 sec | 3 weeks ago

Afghan women's rights activist shot dead

"Gunmen in Afghanistan have shot and killed an Afghan human rights activist. As NPR's DEA Hadeed reports. It's the latest in a spate of assassinations that's rocked Afghanistan. One official recalled flesh that cost Donny as a woman who cared deeply about other Afghans and who lobbied him to help a family stricken through the pandemic. There was no claim of responsibility for cost on is killing. It follows the assassination of several journalists, doctors, police and officials. A security official blamed the Taliban for most of the killings, but residents adjust is angry with the government for not protecting them.

Afghanistan DEA NPR Donny Taliban
Large car bomb kills 9 in Afghan capital

Understanding CBD

00:11 sec | Last month

Large car bomb kills 9 in Afghan capital

"Afghanistan's Interior Ministry says a car bomb blast direct the Afghan capital this morning it killed at least nine people and left 20 other people in Kabul injured amongst them a member of parliament

Interior Ministry Afghanistan Kabul
"afghan" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

01:37 min | Last month

"afghan" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

"And there's certainly some truth to this much of the present. Taliban were born out of m- addresses in pakistan there also a means for pull people to have their children educated to feed them to house them. I think that the members of these one units and their american mentors and advises believe that by attacking the students of these addresses. They're eliminating future enemies the way the international forces have conducted themselves since the beginning of the afghan war. Either leave has had a huge impact on building the enemy. The taliban has always credited civilian casualties as being a great recruiting mechanism for them and was no different in this case rather than appeasing the population by bringing security. They were imposing this. There's no other woodford. But tara certainly on the population of wardak not only was it distancing that population from the government. It was turning them against it. The watt.

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US troops drawdown from Afghanistan

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:50 min | Last month

US troops drawdown from Afghanistan

"Donald trump has done more for peace than the nobel peace prize winner who dropped an s ton of bombs in his time as president. Barack obama did so has trump has dropped a lot of bombs to. There's no doubt about it but not any new places and he's removing troops from afghanistan. According to fox news the draw down is under way after almost twenty years bases are being closed and troops are heading home. General mark milley chairman of the joint chiefs of staff suggested that just two large bases and several satellite ones will remain for the twenty five hundred soldiers. Who stay so. They're still going to be a couple thousand troops on the ground there but on the ground. The situation is getting worse. The taliban is launching more attacks and taking more ground and thousands have fled their homes for those people. A peace deal seems a long way off and many are losing faith that it will succeed. The rise in violence is thought to be a tactic by the taliban to gain leverage in negotiations secretary of state. Mike pompeo said that it puts the peace deal at risk adding quote. I made clear to them that the violence levels can't continue all these negotiations go on won't work and so we've asked all of them stand back and indeed stand-down unquote. The afghan army has been trained at the same thing. That trump said to the proud right standby and stand down. I think or stand-down standby say. The afghan army has been trained by the us to fight in its place and conduct ground missions and ninety six percent of air missions themselves. But it's not thought that it can stand up to the taliban alone even after the draw down the. Us will continue air support funding and training all in accordance with the deal they made with the taliban and about sixty five hundred other. Nato troops remain but for america. This country's longest war is winding down

General Mark Milley Afghan Army Taliban Donald Trump Mike Pompeo Joint Chiefs Of Staff Fox News Barack Obama Afghanistan America Nato
"afghan" Discussed on NPR's World Story of the Day

NPR's World Story of the Day

03:28 min | Last month

"afghan" Discussed on NPR's World Story of the Day

"No prisoner biden has said he'd like to keep a few thousand troops in afghanistan and iraq to continue such a counter terror mission rachel but the us taliban agreement signed in february says all troops have to be out by the spring as long as the taliban agree to certain conditions. Like breaking with al-qaeda d- Is the us is the coordination between the us and the afghan government or afghan defence. Officials is that is that going well right now so to senior afghan security officials that i spoke to say the americans aren't coordinating in detail with them that being informed in general about what's going on but frankly one of them also told me that he's often short the americans knowing what's going on because president trump is an erotic announce it by tweet decision maker. Tom we heard dea earlier in the conversation. Talk about how. There are all kinds of tax happening in kabul right now and that afghans. Feel very unsafe. I mean what does that mean about. The us investment in the afghan security forces the us has invested billions of dollars in training. These forces. Are they really going to be able to step up as us forces step away. We'll that's still a big question rachel. The rank and file soldiers need a lot of help and are suffering heavy casualties from the taliban even more so in in the past few months the afghan special forces commandos are quite good. We've gone out with them on occasion but they're just simply aren't enough of them in there's also a small afghan air force. That's coming along. They can mount bombing runs that can ferry and evacuate troops but they too need a lot of help especially with maintaining the aircraft. They're going to need american contractors for many years to come the. Us has been in afghanistan for almost twenty years now. What difference has that. Us presence made for good and for ill. The legacy is really mixed. It's given security bubbles for off guns in the centers and that's given space for women for instance to fight for their rights in rural areas. It's been terrifying. Many afghans live in fear of the taliban on one hand but on the other hand they're also freight of special forces conducting raids and s strikes by foreign forces in the afghan government but after twenty years of american involvement in afghanistan. I think the thing that i find most damning is that many afghans is still desperately poor and they hungry right so much food insecurity there and finally tom has the. Us military thinking about this moment as the troop presence is reduced. Their i mean. Multiple generations have now served in this war. That's right it's mental law to the us military hundreds of thousands of served in also trained to find insurgents as opposed to large scale war. It means the. Us military has not had the time or money or training to focus on what sees future threats china and russia or by the types of arms and equipment needed. You'll see more of a focus on that in the coming years. But you know rachel a few years ago. I asked to a general if in afghanistan if this mission was worth it was worth the human cost and he said it all depends on how afghanistan turns out. Npr's pentagon correspondent. Tom bowman npr's d d to also joined us. She's back at her base in pakistan after a reporting trip to afghanistan. Thanks to you both. You're welcome you're welcome..

afghan government taliban us afghan defence afghanistan rachel biden qaeda dea kabul iraq al Tom tom russia Tom bowman china Npr pentagon npr
Kabul's Deputy Governor Killed In Bomb Blast

BBC World Service

00:48 sec | Last month

Kabul's Deputy Governor Killed In Bomb Blast

"In Afghanistan, say the deputy governor of the capital Kabul, has been killed by a magnetic bomb that was attached to his car by unknown assailants. Hubbell. Um Hey, B was traveling with his secretary who was also killed. Sikander Kamani reports, it seems as if every other morning brings news of another assassination in Afghanistan. The deputy governor of Kabul, Mohibullah Muhammadi and a colleague, the latest victims. As well as government figures. Human rights activists, lawyers and journalists have all been targeted to the attacker is often using magnetic or sticky bombs, which they attached to cars. Majority of such attacks go unclaimed by any militant group. Peace negotiations between Afghan officials and the Taliban have been taking place in dojo are the violence, however, continues.

Kabul Sikander Kamani Afghanistan Mohibullah Muhammadi Hubbell Taliban
IS says it killed female TV anchor in eastern Afghanistan

Here & Now

00:33 sec | Last month

IS says it killed female TV anchor in eastern Afghanistan

"Afghanistan, where gunmen have shot and killed a female television anchor this following the killings of two other Afghan journalists last month. NPR's D. Hadid has the latest Malala May, 1 was a journalist and an advocate for Afghan women and Children. It wasn't clear why she was killed by gunmen who opened fire on her car shortly after she left her house Isis militants active in the area, But so are the Taliban journalists, activists and security officials have all been targeted by shadowy gunmen in recent months. MPR's DEA Hadeed reporting from Kabul.

D. Hadid Afghanistan NPR Taliban MPR DEA Kabul
Afghan Government, Taliban Reach Breakthrough To Proceed With Peace Talks

Emotional Management with Dr. Christian Conte

02:10 min | Last month

Afghan Government, Taliban Reach Breakthrough To Proceed With Peace Talks

"Afghan government and representatives of the Taliban have jointly announced reaching a preliminary deal to push on with peace talks. Well, it's a start. I'm going to push him with Pete's talks. Uh, these talks would proceed discussions on the political road back for both parties. They've got a written agreement, actually. Between the two sides, and it marks breakthrough after 19 years of war. The procedure, including his preamble of the negotiation has been finalized, and from now on, the negotiation will begin on the agenda. They're people who represent the Taliban. On their political office and Djohar. Better. That a posted the same statement on their Twitter accounts. While the spokesman for the militant group as Retweeted it so it must be some progress said they at least have agreed on a framework for peace. Maybe just maybe we can pull our young troops out of there after 19 years of warfare. And I think that that's a hopeful sign. I'm glad to see him coming to some sort of talks, but it reminds me of back in my era, the Paris peace accords that they were trying to have, where they couldn't even agree on the shape of the table for a long time before they could come to some sort of peace With honor is President Nixon called it Well, well, this piece come with any honor to any of the participants. I doubt it. Hundreds of thousands of Afghans have probably been killed by the bombs that have been dropped. By American and coalition forces there. Um, uh. Least 2000 American troops are more have been killed. 6000 wounded horribly on have come home from that war, And now we sit here talking about Thank you for your service. Somebody tell me what freedom of ours in America where they fighting for in Afghanistan.

Afghan Government Taliban Djohar Pete Twitter Paris Nixon America Afghanistan
Afghan Government, Taliban Reach Breakthrough To Proceed With Peace Talks

Democracy Now! Audio

00:16 sec | Last month

Afghan Government, Taliban Reach Breakthrough To Proceed With Peace Talks

"News from afghanistan. The afghan government and taliban have reached a preliminary deal to move ahead with peace talks. And what's being hailed as a major breakthrough. The two sides agreed on a three page written document to codify rules and procedures for future negotiations.

Afghan Government Afghanistan Taliban
Will the Afghan Taliban commit to ending the country’s lengthy and bloody war?

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:01 min | Last month

Will the Afghan Taliban commit to ending the country’s lengthy and bloody war?

"For the first time in nearly two decades of war a written agreement exists between the government of afghanistan and the taliban the question that now arises is the one concerning the value of the paper upon which it is written. The agreement follows some months of talks in doha. And at least in theory clears the way towards a ceasefire and some sort of roadmap leading to a lasting political settlement. It is not necessary to be outrageously skeptical however to wonder if the taliban amelie running out the clock in anticipation of the united states entirely losing interest joined with more on this by michael semple former deputy to the eu special representative for afghanistan and michael. Welcome back to the briefing the agreement in itself if we take it as face value. How big a deal is it. It's a small positive step. it allows us to move. It allows us to to move One one step forward a in these long negotiations. How certain can anyone be though that the taliban in particular negotiating or have been negotiating in good faith. Well i'd say that nobody should be certain about this. There are two diametrically opposed ways of looking at this and time will tell our one hour one view which is the ones. Some of the western diplomats are taking is that the taliban have realized that they can't actually win this war on that they would benefit from being part of some kind of a compromise settlement a which would allow c- a government jointly formed between the people who are currently in power in kabul on the taliban on would have international support So thoughts the idea that they're involved in difficult but good faith negotiations. They other view. Is that the taliban are using. These talks to provide political cover for their real game which is trying to win the war on the battlefield. Because of course you don't need a long memory or at least if you live in afghanistan. You don't require long memory to remember a time when the taliban were actually in charge of the country which they were for nearly a decade up until late two thousand and one is there any indication that the taliban thinking on governance has evolved at all since then or does afghanistan as it was in the ninety s. Still seemed to be very much what they would like afghanistan to be again well. This is the crux of the matter. Some of the taliban diplomats in cutter have put a lot of effort into persuading every body that they have matured that they wouldn't like to to force anything down. The throats of unwilling population are but if we wants to get an idea of what taliban governance looks like. We don't have to look back two decades in the past. We often look what is happening in areas. Which are controlled by the taliban today because they do hold sway in many parts of rural off. Stan i'm i would say that The taliban approach to governance in those areas is remarkably reminiscent of the way they run the country until two thousand and one. It's it is ruled by the barrel of a gun. Well one other thing which may or may not of course change. The dynamics of these negotiations is the imminent change of administration in the united states. Do we yet fully understand whether president joe biden will be as kane on president trump as president trump rather of ending the united states' involvement in afghanistan entirely. I think this is going to be one of the critical decisions that the administration will have to take in the early stages of despite trying to focus on other priorities But just the timetable dictates that in the though withdrawal process that the us has been involved in which is really for dramatically reduce the numbers of troops on the ground. The official position is that it's conditional upon they taliban sticking to the commitments which they gave to the us in their agreement signed on the twenty ninth of february now. Many of us believe that the taliban have not stuck to those commitments but of course their diplomats in in cutter asserts that they are doing so until now the trump administration has essentially turned a blind eye to for to taleban breaches of commitment and they the vitamin ministration. When it comes is going to have to look at look at the position on c- Do they continue turning the blind eye out or do they say the taliban the commitments and therefore does the. Us react to that down. The process of withdrawing troops

Taliban Afghanistan Michael Semple Doha United States Kabul EU Michael Stan Joe Biden Kane Trump Administration
Afghan and Taliban Negotiators Agree on Peace Talks’ Procedures

The Dan Proft Show

00:35 sec | Last month

Afghan and Taliban Negotiators Agree on Peace Talks’ Procedures

"Representatives of the Afghan government of the Taliban say they've reached a preliminary deal to proceed with their peace talks. Latest deal on rules and pay We for the Afghan and Taliban negotiators to advance to the next stage of the talks are con Media reports say that 21 Point agenda on procedures will include Islamic prayers at the beginning and at the end of every session. Mutual respect for delegates and a ban on inappropriate language. The U. S envoy on Afghanistan tell My parents aren't said that three page agreement was a significant milestone in the negotiations on a political road map on a

Afghan Government Taliban U. Afghanistan
How to move forward with China

Between The Lines

09:16 min | Last month

How to move forward with China

"To fourteen point list of grievances via the australian media. Second wine joined beef. Bali timber lobster call among our exports that the chinese communist party has imposed tariffs on. And then that tweet. This is the tweet of the posting of a digitally altered of an australian soldier about to slit the throat of an afghan child. The chinese embassy issuing a bellicose statement the rage in roar of some ustralian politicians and media was misreading and reaction. It said to deflect public attention from the horrible atrocities by sickness soldiers and to blame china for the worsening of bilateral ties. So what's going on. He and asha camera respond. Jeff rabi is a former australian ambassador to the people's republic of china and he's author of china's grand strategy and australia's feature in the new global order. That's just been published and it's available in all good bookstores jeff. Welcome back to the show so some great to be back now. I your thoughts about beijing's response to australia in recent weeks so we have that list of the foreign complaints the wind terrace and of course that tweet while a say i up disappointing to see the slights that have been made After the two quite constructive comments at the triumph prime minister a last week quite clearly. The prime minister was Diplomatically signaling That there was a strong wish to start a process of getting back to some sort of more normal relationship between the two countries the product make though it sounds dramatic when you run those three things together the way you have done that certainly not the same thing. And i'm not sure that they're all necessarily coordinated. I mean the fourteen points clearly seems to be freelancing by the embassy on matters that well known and in the public record in any case at a very odd way of putting something out if you leak it to a channel nine television crew that seems to be pretty casual behavior by the embassy then the tariff spo there has been a processing trained for months on the wind tariffs and i do understand that that was the normal process and the strain companies were busily making written submissions as part of that process. And then the tweet The present time it sounds like it's been contrived by the chinese foreign ministry as individual action. it was a tweet that was particularly widely on social media by a now nationalist artist and twitter and the foreign ministry spokesperson on his private twitter account. Pinder to name and so it's philippine. Middle level action doesn't really look to millions of any of these really coordinated broad cross section of the australian people just looking at the y. People who've responded this week is there is outrage and surely win china. does things like. This doesn't make it harder for people like you because you've been an eminent company on this issue for several years now. Hugh watt a bobcar. Pass gas on this program. Of course the former prime minister paul keating. Doesn't it make it hot. A all of you to make the case that al leaders should try to rebuild trust with such a regime yet. I can understand the public outrage especially the media is going into overdrive steer and just as you have said running all these things together as a coordinated action from the state It does make it harder to get sensible constructive discussion going a story about how we deal with these things. I like to find myself in such august company as you outlined. And you might add gareth evans. Many others that to the group as well but it certainly history doesn't help and it's difficult context in which to conduct foreign policy. What we're seeing is what is like to live in the situation with china relationships In a very poor state now. Other people in camera that i see welcome this their peopling camera who have the view that bad relations with china are inevitable. This is the new normal. We should get used to it and lupus it while the questioning myself. And the august company you've being linking me with. Is this the best interest of australia. And it also basic question. Your what has australia down to bring on china's in this way why you think china is picking on again. Picking on is quite pejorative. They're not doing this to other states. Our other key point. And i would phrase that differently tom i would say how is it that astray amongst like minded friends and allies other liberal democracies in the world in the region why's at the trial has become an outlaw and i think that really needs to be part of the public discussion. Isn't the reason. The australia is so over exposed to chinese pressure in beijing. Nosy so the chinese leaders going to inflict pain on australia whenever they can't australia. And not the other like minded way boy more. In other countries we ought to forty percent of our exports to china. No other country has that kind of exposure. I prefer countries in the region. China is by far the largest trading power. I mean that exposure would be the same for korea south korea which is liberal democracy in the region. it would be near that level. For nearly all the countries in the east asian region china is the dominant economic patna of all of the countries in the region and that is just a fact at its reflects. The extent to which china has grown as the dominant economic power in east asia. Alexander downer. The former. Foreign minister says that now's the time to reduce our exposure to china. But what everyone is saying. There's nothing new novel in that. And obviously when people start to realize that we are going to have for a long time a difficult and challenging relationship with china's manage. That's a fairly obvious. Point to make interesting from In addition to being former minister former director of the board of while clay. And very active Proponent in boosting. Australia china trade relations phrase time as soon as minister and i work very closely with him in that and i think we achieved a lot. So why wouldn't you wanna diversify every sensible business. Every sensible company diversifies the port made over and over again on this aspect is that it's going to be very hard. Because of the absolute scale and growth and prosperity of china. You are a foreign policy realist. All gripe house ruthless and that includes chana hardball at every turn and the stronger. China gets the more likely to throw its wide around now to the extent. These realist analysis is correct. How on earth do we solve. this problem. absolutely correct agree with all those points. Another point that needs to be made. And you don't make it much tom. And your pride yourself as being a realist and that is the relationship is asymmetrical that is effect. We need china. More than china needs us. This is not a comfortable place for us to be but it's a place we are. It's a place where we're stack and will remain and so We need to work out how to manage that relationship and we haven't done a particularly good job of a judging by the state rewritten today. So although you express yourself in a different way you essentially gray with the foreign policy realists professor join me shauna regular guest on this program and he argues that his china's power increases its definition of its national interests will grow and then beijing will seek a survey influence in areas on which its future security and prosperity dependent in response. The us will go to great lengths to stop china's rises. It essentially. your argument is well up a poet. I'm a great Admire of joint mish as well. I differ with him on a couple of points but his analysis and arguments have been hugely influential in helping me shape my thinking about these But i put on sphere of influence is. I think that's already happened. I think china is the dominant paranagua this at length in my book in eurasia from the east china sea to also china is the dominant parent. That's happened largely because sanctions against russia poor economic performance by russia Pushback from from europe against russia has meant that brushes had to cede to china's ascendancy in eurasia and so very part of the world. And i think we now live in a world of michigan talks about a world of two great powers with boundary orders and in the question then becomes is some equilibrium at stable between the two. And i believe there is.

China Australia Chinese Embassy Jeff Rabi Chinese Foreign Ministry Foreign Ministry Hugh Watt Prime Minister Paul Keating Beijing Twitter Pinder Bali Gareth Evans South Korea Jeff Philippine Chana Hardball Alexander Downer TOM
US envoy: Afghan, Taliban team ready to set talks agenda

The Inside Story With Marty Griffin

00:22 sec | Last month

US envoy: Afghan, Taliban team ready to set talks agenda

"Taliban have reached a deal for peace talks to continue. CBS is Candy McCormack has more. This is their first written agreement in 19 years of war, The U. S special representative called it a significant milestone. It lays out further talks between the two sides, and those talks could include a cease fire agreement comes after months of discussions in dough Ha cutter. State

Candy Mccormack Taliban CBS
Australian leader calls China's graphic tweet 'repugnant'

BBC World Service

00:58 sec | Last month

Australian leader calls China's graphic tweet 'repugnant'

"Prime Minister, Scott Morrison has demanded an apology from Beijing of what he called a repugnant tweet about Australian troops in Afghanistan. In an escalation of tensions between the two countries. China's Foreign Ministry official posted a fake image of an Australian soldier holding a knife to an Afghan child's throat. It follows a war crimes inquiry the found incredible evidence of unlawful killings by Australian troops. Mr Morrison said he does Twitter to take down the post. It is utterly outrageous. And it cannot be justified on any vices whatsoever. The Chinese government. Should be totally ashamed. Off this post. It diminishes them in the world's eyes. Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman rejected his criticism, She said Australia should be ashamed of its troops behavior.

Foreign Ministry Scott Morrison Mr Morrison Beijing Afghanistan Chinese Government China Chinese Foreign Ministry Twitter Australia
Afghan officials say at least 34 killed in separate suicide bombings

WBZ Afternoon News

00:40 sec | Last month

Afghan officials say at least 34 killed in separate suicide bombings

"34 people have died in Afghanistan today after two separate suicide bombing in eastern Ghazni province. Afghan officials say 31 soldiers were killed and 24 others were wounded today when an attacker drove a military Humvee full of explosives onto an army commando base before detonating a car bomb in southern Afghanistan. A suicide car bomber targeted the convoy of a provincial council chief and sizable, killing at least three people and wounded 21. Others, including Children. The provincial council chief survived the attack with minor injuries, and there's no word yet on who is responsible for those attacks.

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Afghan Leader Digs In on Peace Talks Despite Progress, Officials Say

Frontlines of Freedom

02:25 min | Last month

Afghan Leader Digs In on Peace Talks Despite Progress, Officials Say

"Afghanistan's chief peace envoy, Abdullah Abdullah, said that the U. S decision to begin withdrawing troops from Afghanistan has come too soon as his country is still struggling to attain peace and security amid an ongoing conflict. Abdullah spoken and Kara, where he saw it. Turkey's support for negotiations between the Afghan government and the Taliban that are taking place in cutter to find an end to decades of war. The talks have made little progress so far. Abdullah said of the US's decision to reduce troop levels in Afghanistan from over 4.5 1000 to 2.5 1000 quote. This is the decision of the U. S administration and we respect it. And quote, acting Defense Secretary Christopher Miller announced that we would reduce troop levels in Iraq and Afghanistan by mid January, in line with President Trump's pledge to bring our forces home. Afghan officials have expressed concerns that a rapid reduction in American troops could strengthen the negotiating hand of the Taliban, while the militants are still waging a full fledged insurgency against government forces. Abdullah said it's not like things will go a zwei wish, adding however, that he welcomed to the fact that 2500 troops will remain and NATO will also retain its presence. Abdullah said, quote what form or what shape it will take. That remains to be seen, but they will certainly push for a peaceful settlement and quote Washington signed a deal with the Taliban in February to pave the way for the dough, hot talks and American forces eventual withdrawal. We championed the deal as Afghanistan's best chance at a lasting peace. Folks, This is an endless war. Regardless of what the Taliban agreed to, and negotiations they can and have broken agreements before. Both Turkey and cutter are supporters of Isis and their friends in Afghanistan hasn't built a solid military defense. After all the money and support we've been giving them for years and years and years. Why should we think in a few more years will make a difference. America is not the world's cop. If these nations can't get along, that's an issue for them and their neighbors, not

Afghanistan Abdullah Afghan Government Taliban U. S Administration Defense Secretary Christopher Abdullah Abdullah President Trump Kara U. Turkey Iraq Nato United States Washington America
"afghan" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:43 min | 4 months ago

"afghan" Discussed on Conversations

"He was a lover of planting his own food and growing things in his own garden. And so there were things like thoughts of vegetables like native leaks lots of kind of potatoes turnips that kind of thing I used featured heavily in Afghan food and lots of fruits apple juice. Has all sorts of things and pistachios lots of nuts as well Groves of almond trees apple trees pistachios that kind of thing and you know, those were things that off my grandfather loved and really tended to I heard stories from my mom about how these places were irrigated using, you know, fresh Mountain Water that streams down from off the Hindu Kush mountains. And of course rice Afghanistan was a huge producer of rice and my grandfather had his own rice fields where they would prepare really special types of rice grains. So in this delicious spicing quite beautifully colorful food is slightly prepared and it's brought to the table. Have you serviced your servant individually, or as a community in the middle of table table food is all about coming and preparation and communal eating and one of the glories I think of sitting down for an afternoon meal is that an Afghan meal is not just one dish. It's a spread. Dishes it's hard. You know you would have your rice dishes at the center with their beautiful toppings of like Sultana as carrots and nuts on top of the rice and then all around it. You would have some of the Carrizo a table Curry's the meets the meat dishes the kabobs like the one you prepared and you'll always have nuns and chutneys and things on the side as well to have with the food. So really a meal is is kind of taking lots of portions of different dishes and putting it onto a plate and letting the flavors blend together and sing. There's a fair bit of Persian and Afghan poetry in your book who gave you life love well as it turns out my grandma my mom's mom was a poet. She was born in nineteen eighteen and she passed away relatively young about forty-two years old and a lot of her poetry was about the emancipation of Afghan women. And so she just wrote all this road at all in our native push door and some in Dairy and when she passed away The way she was recognized by the Afghan literary circles as one of the most important poets in Afghanistan and she still kind of has tributes and palm tree printed in kind of annual magazines Afghan literature. And so I was uncovering all of this and I realized how much language literature poetry philosophy is a part of my blood and I realized for me growing up as a migrant in Australia for me that kind of language and access to being able to think in a way that drives past flies over the normal boundaries that are set up by Society. It's really an emancipatory feeling. Yeah as an adult when you realize it connect to talk to your history and to the genetic memory that's formed. You becomes even more powerful. You know, how the ancient Romans so you're part of the world that part of the world back in the day ancient Rome. They thought you're part of a game. Told you just had too much money and luxury and they thought themselves just like robust tough solid serious farmers and there were you over in the Eastern World eating hath me for cheap wine. Where is silk eating all this lovely summer to that poetry does seem to speak of a love essential pleasure of the of the life of sense of enjoying food..

Afghanistan Mountain Water Rome producer Australia
"afghan" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

04:28 min | 7 months ago

"afghan" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Their qualifying match. It was a magnificent moment for a country that was embroiled in a devastating civil war. In an interview broadcast repeatedly across the country, teams Captain Didier. Drogba ask the team to meal and address the nation. Subversion reproved today. All orients can coexist and play together. He said. Please lay down your weapons and hold elections. Fifty. Soon after the warring parties began talks less than two years later, a peace agreement was signed. Couldn't do a new study looking at African countries, the outcomes of important mattress can have a pretty dramatic effect on national unity and on people's trust in their citizens. Can the salmon our Africa, correspondent. This study from the pontifical Catholic University of Chile or at least led by them, and they would look hypothesis of with a sport can have kind of positive impact on national unity and trust, and so they looked at how Africans identify themselves whether they focused Moore, national identity or more on their ethnic identity and looked at this just before and after important matches by the. The national football team, and so, what did they find so found? After the national football team at one people were thirty seven percent less likely to identify primarily with their ethnic group and found kind of greater connection to the national identity, and they found that they were about thirty percent more likely to trust other ethnicities compared to when they are interviewed just before gang. Interestingly that researchers found that this was driven. Basically entirely by national team victories hours defeats didn't seem to reduce people's sense of affiliation with the nation, so there's only upside which was good to see a. why do they recognize one of the possible reasons for this is something of a role model effect where the names of the national football team themselves from diverse corners of the country Mr Drug and the Ivory Coast case in fact, said exactly that he said the teams from the North, south and centre as well as the west of the ivory, coast and the researchers found this diversity actually makes the effect of a victory even stronger when it comes to building trust among the nation. But, is that not part of a broader pattern where everybody in the country feels generally better about everything in the country it's it's politics. It's people. It's team. What have you? Will the study actually also look to that They were curious. This was just some sort of post-match euphoria that that made people excited in general, but they found that incumbent politicians for example didn't get. Get any bounce and approval after win, and they didn't see people being any more optimistic about the state of the economy, but they did I. Think very strikingly fine. The victories in fact lead to less violence in the country, and they look for example at countries that narrowly qualified for the African Cup of Nations and compared them with counters at just missed out on that tournament. and. They found that countries that had just snuck in experienced about ten percent less conflict in the next six months than those that had just missed out quite a significant finding. So do you think there's there's a more general connection there between sports, success, end and conflict? It's possible, but it's notable than this study, which was just on football that the results only held in quite high stakes matches. You know the big of the match, the bigger the boost to national solidarity and trust. But with friendly games between nations. There wasn't any effect found. Of course we need to keep in mind that while these effects were shown to exist for six months when it came to a reduction violence. We don't know if they will continue much longer beyond that. Even in the Ivory Coast civil war restarted in two thousand ten, although com of course did return in two thousand eleven after Mr Button, and of course, many others appealed for peace once again. Kenny thank you very much for joining.

football Africa Drogba Captain Didier Moore pontifical Catholic University African Cup of Nations Mr Button Kenny Mr Drug
"afghan" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:30 min | 7 months ago

"afghan" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"In Afghanistan there are some signs of progress towards longed for an elusive peace. The Afghan government and Taliban militants are set to begin peace talks in Qatar as early as this month. The way negotiations was paved in February when America and the Taliban signed a peace agreement with the goal of a near total withdrawal of American troops. Speaking at the Aspen Security Forum earlier this month. American General Kenneth F Mackenzie expressed cautious optimism. So I think the governor. Afghanistan is poised to begin those inter-afghan negotiations. That is going to be a key event. That's days in the future, and that's going to be a hinge moment. I think in the future of Afghanistan. But the agreement had some conditions that are still proving tricky. The difficulties of arisen really because the details of those conditions were vague, the original US steel. Ben Farmer writes about Afghanistan for the Economist. The first one was a prisoner swap, and the idea was the five Taliban prisoners who are currently held by the Afghan government would be released. In return the Taliban would free one thousand. Afghan government prisoners, those largely soldiers and policemen who held by the militants they have come. Governments have been very reluctant to release all of these prisoners and see some very big bargaining chip, and it doesn't see why it should give them all up in advance of the talks, and indeed from the original text of the Dale it wasn't clear that they did have to give them all up at once, but the Taliban of being unwilling to move on this and they've said the talks will not start until five. Thousand of them have been freed taken months months to resolve that. We quite close to that now i. think there's a few hundred left. I'm told to the difficulty is the deploy. A couple of hundred of those are really quite. Jehad has they've been convicted of some terrible crimes? An Afghan government really doesn't want to release them. Indeed, international community doesn't want them to be freed either. So that's the last stumbling points on those prisoners, but thanks necessarily a showstopper. and has been the only sticking point in the agreement. The other thing that's been difficult to get these talks underway is the Afghan government wanted a reduction in violence. They want the Taliban to show that they're serious. They're committed to talking rather than fighting. Taliban have not been that keen on doing that. Violence is their biggest leverage in this whole system. The Taliban were only at the negotiating table because they've conducted a very ruthless very bloody insurgency campaign, which has gone on for more than fifteen years now, but there was a breakthrough at the end of Ramadan one hundred ended last month, the number of attacks go down enough for the Afghan government to knowledge that adapted in made. So once we get these prisoners swapped. It looks like talks may well be able to begin. And how does all of this intersect with the the withdrawal of American troops? What's what has to happen? with the talks before US troops actually get out when America's signed the deal in Doha back in February. They said that they would. Out over the next fourteen months they've gone from about fourteen thousand troops to about eight and a half thousand. So really they've got nine and a half months to complete the rest of their withdrawal, but what the conditions are on what's in the deal a very very vague, so we don't know for example what the Americans will do. If talks break down, or if violence escalates, will a hold fan. Withdrawal will as needs being. We'll send more troops back. The presumption seems to be that if these talks go badly, Rome, or very very slowly than America will probably stop its troop withdrawal. But I think probably beyond the text of the deal, the biggest factor which will decide what the Americans do will be what happens in the American election. MR TRUMP is very very keen to get out of Afghanistan Tom. He's talked about getting out of these endless walls, and so if the Afghan withdrawal becomes an election issue and couldn't boil me say he's very keen to get out come once. May so I think the electoral calculus will have a huge effect mess? So, what is the the long term picture here? What does each side of this one in a long run? Well, we've been talking about an Afghan peace process for so long that you'd think that we knew what both sides wanted, but it's far from clear. Now gain to the Taliban I. They've let very loud about what they actually want. Our the country will be run. What vision for people's rights they They see and so on, and that's really a big worry for a lot of people who have terrible memories of how the Taliban governments and the nine hundred ninety s you recall is very strict Islamic government women were denied rights. They were denied education. They were denied a chance to work. A men were made to grow beards television. Television music things like that were outlawed so any since there's going to be a return to that would horrify lots of Afghans and lots of people in the international community. All the Taliban have said is they want to have a government which is founded on Islamic principles and they say that also people's rights will be protected, but under Islam and what about on the Afghan government side again? They've been very vague Ashraf Ghani the president. He gave a talk in Washington earlier this month. And he said that they Afghanistan is going to be a sovereign democratic united republic, but what that means in terms of the system of government is not clear, and both these things are going to be have to be hammered out over what I suspect will be months and months and months, and what is the relationship between the Afghan government and the Taliban and besides trying to play of hardball the relationship? Relationship is very very difficult. These archenemies deadly enemies. They are talking the moments, and they're both saying that they wished to talk, but then with the other hand they'll killing each other in very large numbers the even with reduction violence. We're still talking about potentially to hundreds of people dying every week. Even I mean you really are talking about a negotiation which is going on in the teeth of a pulling bloodshed. And the peace process itself. Is it likely to your mind to to to be aimed at real results, or do you think it's just kind of been hastily arranged to cover the fact that the the the Americans want out I think probably the answer is both I think that there is no doubt Mr. trump wants to leave is sort of railed against Barack. Obama's endless wars is complained that America has become the world's policeman and. And he really told his support base to one of his pledges that he will bring troops home from these endless wars, but at the same time I don't know anyone who thinks that there is a sensible alternative to the the Afghan situation which is not based on some kind of talks, so he may want to get out, but that doesn't mean the talks on genuine on on really seen as the only way to get outs. Ben Thank you very much for joining us? For a lot more analysis like this.

Taliban Afghan government Afghanistan America US Mr. trump General Kenneth F Mackenzie Aspen Security Forum Barack Qatar Ben Farmer Ashraf Ghani Jehad Doha Rome Washington president united republic
"afghan" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:30 min | 7 months ago

"afghan" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"In Afghanistan there are some signs of progress towards longed for an elusive peace. The Afghan government and Taliban militants are set to begin peace talks in Qatar as early as this month. The way negotiations was paved in February when America and the Taliban signed a peace agreement with the goal of a near total withdrawal of American troops. Speaking at the Aspen Security Forum earlier this month. American General Kenneth F Mackenzie expressed cautious optimism. So I think the governor. Afghanistan is poised to begin those inter-afghan negotiations. That is going to be a key event. That's days in the future, and that's going to be a hinge moment. I think in the future of Afghanistan. But the agreement had some conditions that are still proving tricky. The difficulties of arisen really because the details of those conditions were vague, the original US steel. Ben Farmer writes about Afghanistan for the Economist. The first one was a prisoner swap, and the idea was the five Taliban prisoners who are currently held by the Afghan government would be released. In return the Taliban would free one thousand. Afghan government prisoners, those largely soldiers and policemen who held by the militants they have come. Governments have been very reluctant to release all of these prisoners and see some very big bargaining chip, and it doesn't see why it should give them all up in advance of the talks, and indeed from the original text of the Dale it wasn't clear that they did have to give them all up at once, but the Taliban of being unwilling to move on this and they've said the talks will not start until five. Thousand of them have been freed taken months months to resolve that. We quite close to that now i. think there's a few hundred left. I'm told to the difficulty is the deploy. A couple of hundred of those are really quite. Jehad has they've been convicted of some terrible crimes? An Afghan government really doesn't want to release them. Indeed, international community doesn't want them to be freed either. So that's the last stumbling points on those prisoners, but thanks necessarily a showstopper. and has been the only sticking point in the agreement. The other thing that's been difficult to get these talks underway is the Afghan government wanted a reduction in violence. They want the Taliban to show that they're serious. They're committed to talking rather than fighting. Taliban have not been that keen on doing that. Violence is their biggest leverage in this whole system. The Taliban were only at the negotiating table because they've conducted a very ruthless very bloody insurgency campaign, which has gone on for more than fifteen years now, but there was a breakthrough at the end of Ramadan one hundred ended last month, the number of attacks go down enough for the Afghan government to knowledge that adapted in made. So once we get these prisoners swapped. It looks like talks may well be able to begin. And how does all of this intersect with the the withdrawal of American troops? What's what has to happen? with the talks before US troops actually get out when America's signed the deal in Doha back in February. They said that they would. Out over the next fourteen months they've gone from about fourteen thousand troops to about eight and a half thousand. So really they've got nine and a half months to complete the rest of their withdrawal, but what the conditions are on what's in the deal a very very vague, so we don't know for example what the Americans will do. If talks break down, or if violence escalates, will a hold fan. Withdrawal will as needs being. We'll send more troops back. The presumption seems to be that if these talks go badly, Rome, or very very slowly than America will probably stop its troop withdrawal. But I think probably beyond the text of the deal, the biggest factor which will decide what the Americans do will be what happens in the American election. MR TRUMP is very very keen to get out of Afghanistan Tom. He's talked about getting out of these endless walls, and so if the Afghan withdrawal becomes an election issue and couldn't boil me say he's very keen to get out come once. May so I think the electoral calculus will have a huge effect mess? So, what is the the long term picture here? What does each side of this one in a long run? Well, we've been talking about an Afghan peace process for so long that you'd think that we knew what both sides wanted, but it's far from clear. Now gain to the Taliban I. They've let very loud about what they actually want. Our the country will be run. What vision for people's rights they They see and so on, and that's really a big worry for a lot of people who have terrible memories of how the Taliban governments and the nine hundred ninety s you recall is very strict Islamic government women were denied rights. They were denied education. They were denied a chance to work. A men were made to grow beards television. Television music things like that were outlawed so any since there's going to be a return to that would horrify lots of Afghans and lots of people in the international community. All the Taliban have said is they want to have a government which is founded on Islamic principles and they say that also people's rights will be protected, but under Islam and what about on the Afghan government side again? They've been very vague Ashraf Ghani the president. He gave a talk in Washington earlier this month. And he said that they Afghanistan is going to be a sovereign democratic united republic, but what that means in terms of the system of government is not clear, and both these things are going to be have to be hammered out over what I suspect will be months and months and months, and what is the relationship between the Afghan government and the Taliban and besides trying to play of hardball the relationship? Relationship is very very difficult. These archenemies deadly enemies. They are talking the moments, and they're both saying that they wished to talk, but then with the other hand they'll killing each other in very large numbers the even with reduction violence. We're still talking about potentially to hundreds of people dying every week. Even I mean you really are talking about a negotiation which is going on in the teeth of a pulling bloodshed. And the peace process itself. Is it likely to your mind to to to be aimed at real results, or do you think it's just kind of been hastily arranged to cover the fact that the the the Americans want out I think probably the answer is both I think that there is no doubt Mr. trump wants to leave is sort of railed against Barack. Obama's endless wars is complained that America has become the world's policeman and. And he really told his support base to one of his pledges that he will bring troops home from these endless wars, but at the same time I don't know anyone who thinks that there is a sensible alternative to the the Afghan situation which is not based on some kind of talks, so he may want to get out, but that doesn't mean the talks on genuine on on really seen as the only way to get outs. Ben Thank you very much for joining us? For a lot more analysis like this.

Taliban Afghan government Afghanistan America US Mr. trump General Kenneth F Mackenzie Aspen Security Forum Barack Qatar Ben Farmer Ashraf Ghani Jehad Doha Rome Washington president united republic
"afghan" Discussed on The Current

The Current

03:27 min | 8 months ago

"afghan" Discussed on The Current

"That is less well-known. It's when the Mujahedeen who were fighting against the Communist fighting against the Soviet Union actually took Kabul after the fall of the Soviet Union and they ended up tearing the city apart and I really terrible power struggle. One filmmaker was really able to document that and it's a real truth to power documentary. It took me a really long time to find out where DOT director lives, but it turned out in the end that he lived in Montreal where I live, so that was an incredible discovery. The story of these films is one thing the story of the film surviving the Taliban is something completely different. As I mentioned in the introduction, the Taliban made it its business to go and destroy culture to eliminate things that had found blasphemous. You would assume that these films would've been incinerated as part of that effort. How did they survive? Well fascinating story in. It's a theme that we see recurring history. That, even though there's different ideologies, people from different sides were able to cooperate over things that were essential to them. So what you see is that during the Taliban period, and it's right around the time when the put his hand were destroyed that same band of kind of radical radical brand of the Taliban came to the film archive to destroy the film. The archivists you were there actually hit the snow. And the reason that they knew to do that was because an Afghan Taliban official whose name is Alka? Nivea me let them know kind of tip them off that that the Taliban were coming until they were able to hide the films and what they did as an act of subterfuge with actually offered them films that were less valuable, and they burn those films and thought that they had destroyed Afghanistan film heritage, but which of course with was kept safe you you interview the Taliban official. Who decided to save these films? What did he tell you? What was it like to speak with him knowing? The risk that he took because he was told essentially bring it the films, and if you don't you know, you'll pay with your life. That's right. This is an ex. Taliban official now living in Kabul in relative obscurity, and he came forward to talk about this story, and the fascinating thing was that you offered to come to the archives. That's where he felt comfortable to come and talk, and when he arrived the archivist of today, and and all of the people working under the current government. They welcomed him with really open arms I mean he was embraced and really welcomed, and you can see that culturally you know. This is a man who is waiting a different aspect of being very conservative, very religious. And yet you know all of these film filmmakers architects, we're able to really really really give him a hero's welcome. And then he sat down and told his story on what he said among other things is that? It wasn't an official Taliban policy to burn the films. In fact, there was a band of radical who were doing this kind of i. kind of classic behavior of destroying anything that they considered to be idolatry right? I mean included the film's not. but because at the time had power, he was an official. He was able to to about early on what would be in it for him as an Afghan man to risk his life. Sure it might have been not official policy, but we know how severe the consequences would.

Taliban official Kabul Soviet Union Montreal DOT director Afghanistan Alka
"afghan" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"afghan" Discussed on KGO 810

"Afghan power brokers in a misguided quest for stability a senior diplomat told government interview was quote we have partnerships with all the wrong players the U. S. is still standing shoulder to shoulder with these people even through all these years it's a case of security trumping everything else let's see they analyzed the another official one on the record helped analyze three thousand defense department contracts worth a hundred and six billion dollars to see was benefiting the conclusion about forty percent of the money which is about forty five billion dollars ended up in the pockets of insurgents criminal syndicates or corrupt Afghan officials and it was often a higher percentage well then that amount of money is everybody that's listening right now and all the taxes you'll ever pay in your life right yeah got completely wasted and and and worse than wasted given the horrible people so they can do horrible things with it yeah here's a USA official we use the bad guys to get it the batter guys we thought we could circle back and get the bad guys later only we never did print yeah and just in rich them and then meanwhile the batter guys are running the country you know and that's complicated and I can see people making an argument for that the money that was just plain pissed away and just graft like us talk about the soybean than you know all that happened I like the force camouflage person yeah that's a good one yeah you know that happen though and nobody will ever get nailed for that somebody got that money and it was just a sweetheart deal we'll we'll Trina Monado we'll we'll training on how to grow soybeans you know bunch Afghan farmers were told they need to shop in given cash to show up some American shows up and he just wanna go sorry bones nobody's paying any attention but they got a giant check can you go back home with that the United States in your rich guy now because you got taxpayer money for for something this just faith same with paper bunch arose how many roads got paid with everybody knowing that the nobody's ever gonna drive on this road to Gail get blown up the second we leave here what's the matter people got the money right right yeah and you know all this have been in pursuit of a coherent goal with a coherent strategy you could almost over look it but the fact that they're at the top and then on down everybody scratching their heads saying what are we doing what what's our purpose why are we doing any of this and nobody knew it's just it's galling Marsha Philip says the new poll on impeachment or understand yes indeed yeah it's not so it's not going the right direction if you want trump booted out will tell you that so while they're arguing impeachment now a new poll it's coming up on the Armstrong get issue Armstrong and getting on KGO eight hi I'm Jay Farner CEO of quicken loans thirty percent of Americans who are planning home improvements of five thousand dollars or more will pay for.

"afghan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"afghan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"As America the Afghan government and the Taliban all scramble for stronger positions in any future peace negotiations violence has intensified making Afghanistan the deadliest conflict on earth right now according to the U. N. with civilian casualties in record numbers caught between the US backed Afghan military and the Taliban on the ground are Taliban escorts are fearful of attracting attention from above they're telling us now that we need to keep moving we can spend too long or and he has two kids these areas are being constantly survey by drones and any kind of gathering of people for any period of time contracts in the next village even more gun battles can be heard in the distance sheer has son came out to speak with us he can barely get the words out last winter he tells us and Afghan special forces team arrived here and came to his house for him was almost the walls with your damn was I told them we are not Taliban don't do this to us a son says the soldiers took his two nephews away one of them a teenage boy started each of us being here after some minutes I heard the sound of bullets fired their father here asked why did you kill my children one of them was so small another neighbor an elderly man was also executed we're told most call tool one American was standing here at the door I saw him myself I don't know if the American shot them or the others did there were a lot of them when the shooting happened at my brother shouted they killed my little children hi son says hello the Taliban control these areas no one from the village as a member of the insurgency and when he went to the local governor to complain he was told the killings were a mistake and nothing could be done the CIA responded to a request for comment by the news hour on alleged abuses stating we neither condone nor would knowingly participate in illegal activities and we continually work with our foreign partners to promote appearance to the law the US government routinely reviews such serious allegations to determine their validity although Human Rights Watch did not provide the CI a time to study the particular allegations in this report without confirming or denying any particular role in government of Afghanistan counterterrorism operations we can say with some confidence that many if not all of the claims levelled against Afghan forces are likely false or exaggerated January to July of this year marked the first time in this long conflict the US and Afghan government forces have killed and injured more civilians than the Taliban according to the U. N. yet because of their brutal tactics the Taliban are still killing and maiming thousands like in the September attack in Kabul when a Taliban member detonated a car bomb killing both an American and a Romanian soldiers and eight Afghan civilians in the street we challenge their commander on this why does the Taliban target areas where civilians are in the neighborhood you know the code in the marsh trying to hit their targets and not harm civilians but it happens there's a clear order from our senior leaders not harm any civilians the people living in these villages have nothing but mud walls between them and the war outside we do still labels like a Taliban supporters or pro government those in Afghanistan's hidden battlegrounds.

America Afghan government
"afghan" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"afghan" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"And Afghan war veteran. Among a dozen plus Democrats in the twenty twenty presidential race wins. News time to nine traffic Accu weather next five hour teen with caffeine from green tea leads. It's delicious energizing incomes and three amazing flavors with zero sugar and four calories. It fits your life with its contact size import ability. It goes where you go to the campsite, the hiking trail the beach without weighing down by our teen caffeine from green tea, leaps. Release your natural site from the neighbors of five hour energy. For more information. Visit five hour energy dot com. When Cleveland Clinic the number one heart hospital in the nation with searching for a single partner in New Jersey. They chose valley health system in Ridgewood. They found that valley was providing high quality heart care like no other that by the latest research and paired with the personalized patient experience. Cleveland Clinic was impressed by the team of valley doctors who specialize in treating heart failure and structural heart disease. Dr Who offer the latest medical non-surgical and minimally invasive solutions to assist patients in living healthier lives when making choice for your heart care to the health system that Cleveland Clinic chose for care like no other choose valley health system in Ridgewood, New Jersey for an initial consultation or a second opinion with valley heart team called one eight hundred valley one option one that's one eight hundred.

afghan
"afghan" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"afghan" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Yeah i mean the afghan conflict is in increasingly complex the taliban on any group we've seen a number of significant attacks this year in particular the attack we had on the lamer which was launched by so even in even with a ceasefire between the taliban and the afghan government we might see violent we would hope to see violence levels drop considerably but it doesn't mean an end to all violence there are many other groups operating within the country do you think there's any danger that the ceasefire won't happen there are always dangers i think that you know there are spoilers on all sides of this conflict there are concerns among the taliban that they are sort of on the on the front their on the offensive and they don't want to lose the gist masih of the foot soldiers so we need to be really cautious leading up to it i think any breach on either side in terms of over excessive use of force even on the pretext of maybe targeting either a foreign force or isis could could disrupt the balance and could meet the ceasefire might not be implemented and any other thing to take into account is that the taliban even though there is a chain of command they do send out instructions to that various factions on the ground it's not monolithic and so we shouldn't rule out the option that one particular strands of the taliban the particular area may not actually up hold the ceasefire emily just very quickly before we go might this lead to a more permanent suspension of hostilities i mean i think that's what everyone's hoping and i always say i i like to be proved wrong on these things i don't expect that this is going to lead at this stage to a more prolonged ceasefire all or indeed a peace process but it's definitely part of some early confidencebuilding measures which are a fundamental part of any any potential peace process in the future.

taliban afghan government emily
"afghan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"afghan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To the bbc's sh zia sharia who joins us live now from kabul just outlined forests in a bit more detail what president ghani is proposing a more he's doing it now russia this is the air probably most unprecedented a peace offer by the afghan government a to the taleban eight the i would say the most ambitious plan and the it includes the air offer to recognize taliban as a political group to give them office in kabul to release their prisoners to give them complete amnesty and a two uh even a new air uh agree on changing the constitution uh through the process so it is it's very very ad unprecedented and the the afghan president believes that this is the right time for peace because obtained from sources that a bike talk to uh from the afghan provincial office they believe that pakistan is under pressure on the the us is putting a lot of pressure in pakistan as well as the other international community members and the taliban are under huge pressure by the uh uh the escalating air strikes off the us and the afghan security forces operation going on across the country and on your own yet of course we know that the taliban despite the pressure that they're coming on that have been able to inflict meaty rather terrible damage to the country and its people and not least by recently had been any reaction from the taliban the taliban had has not reacted to the arab peace plan by kabul government as so far they at released a statement yesterday offering direct peace talks with washington saying that uh they believed that it's washington who is in charge everything and they will be ready to talk to a to the us government but that the afghan government is saying that that is a sign of of progress and they believe that the us will convince the taleban to talk to cobble government that true that the taleban are a a have been inflicting a lot of attacks on kabul and many other parts of the country bbc's zia sharia joining us live from kabul just before we came on average cots who tune shukry at baruch side nnp and afghanistan's ambassador to norway and a woman who lived in afghanistan under taliban rule given the bloodshed.

bbc kabul president ghani afghan government taliban president us pakistan washington baruch side nnp afghanistan russia afghan norway
"afghan" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"afghan" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

"Any i think laid out a very logical argument and again you when you said he's not nationbuilding were fighting terrorist that that was another nod to another president in lessons learned i eat george w bush who tried to grand experiment in iraq which didn't go so well at the beginning i see i see your eyes raising paul no no no i take your point of i think that's true uh but i would say this he's not being entirely candid when he says we are not nationbuilding because it is he certainly part of the mission here's to keep training the afghan defence forces uh they have a very effective special forces units in afghanistan but the army and the police force lethal ought to be desired the need to upgrade vat if the afghan government is going to be able defend itself against the taliban in the longterm that's a form of nationbuilding sure sure it is and and i also didn't like the quote about were were killing terrorists because as we learn from vietnam you don't want the measure of success to be the number of dead on the battlefield or the number of bombs dropped right you want the measure of success to be the amount of territory that is governed out of kabul and supported by the local population and local security forces i wish he had spoken a little bit more about that but there's only so much confidence well but that is precisely related to the fact that i think he feels a lot of his political base that's what they wanna hear right were killing terror so yeah the language think it listen to these verbs attacking obliterating crushing stopping i in this is a resolute trump and and that's not exactly nuance link and it's crucial him to to to to to to to to link.

president army afghan government taliban kabul george w bush iraq paul afghan afghanistan
"afghan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"afghan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The afghan government has support specifically in this case the international community and in and around the government facilities near the green zone that's what they're targeting their targeting the afghan government and they're targeting government to support the legitimate government of afghanistan yoenis how you sit but clearly the people who are responsible for these attacks and the and the communities that stand behind the believed that the government is propped up by foreign occupying forces well i got an absolutely false narratives that is held in the part the simple fact of the matter is that there are thirteen thousand foreign forces here whose only goal is to train advise and assist the afghan security forces so they can be professionalised and they can be an enduring institution we are here at the invitation of the afghan government and president ghani himself has said the afghans owned the war we are here supporting the legitimate government of afghanistan can i ask you like this is as i said to be going on for fifteen sixteen years and it's it's come up in the british election to some extent this question is the war on terror working is it being one we believe we are seeing steady incremental progress among the security forces specifically among the afghan special forces and the afghan airforce unfortunately an attack like today does tend to come on without warning and people can read a number of things into an attack like this as you said yourself these types of attacks have happened in this area for a long time but this type of attack doesn't negate the improvement and professionalisation that we've seen among the afghan security forces lost just thing i'd be interested in it is just what are the plans now because there was talk of more troops going to afghanistan so how many more what's the time period do you think it'll take before the foreign forces leave it's certainly difficult to say what when foreign forces would leave the request is for a few thousand additional troops in order to provide more advisors and more trainers to the afghan forces essentially we want to be able to advise and train below the court level which is where were advising now and we believe.

afghan government president ghani afghanistan fifteen sixteen years
"afghan" Discussed on FT Investigations

FT Investigations

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"afghan" Discussed on FT Investigations

"The cadets drive and ambition is impressive as unmanned delays on cuba roman the fm long the reformer organization the select human resources i just want to bring a change in i just want to prove to the people that woman can also work as hard as men do if the woman trend properly and make themselves with officers they will play a very important role in the future of lab women serving in the afghan army is a relatively recent development this means job opportunities for female cadets on graduation unlimited they're all openings in the ministry of defense and intelligence as well as in such operations where female personnel uneeded for cultural reasons but as yet there is no establish career path for women graduates this is one of the things major hutchinson has been working on with brigadier written and she is optimistic the pressure females is moving very quickly i think chief the line a very short time i think that as long as there are females coming forward to volunteer to join the afghan security forces across the police the airforce and the army i think that the attitudes of people change that females will actually be able to prove themselves credible and capable alongside their male counterparts back in kabul on meet the youngest member of the afghan parliament and heat for reid who represents herot province in addition to our parliamentary she's she has electra at the american university of kabul and a regular speaker at conferences and in television debates when not in herat she keeps in touch with her constituents fire her facebook page that has over three hundred fifty thousand likes.

afghan army hutchinson kabul afghan parliament reid herat cuba american university of kabul facebook
"afghan" Discussed on FT Investigations

FT Investigations

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"afghan" Discussed on FT Investigations

"Major sarah hutchinson runs the mentoring team for the female cadets i have an incredible amount of respect for these girls who despite the difficulties that they face are willing to step outside the norm and join the ana to try and increase the profile of women in afghanistan because of the culture in afghanistan at the moment it would be very rare from one of the female officer cadets to come to the academy if they haven't been given permission by the head of the family when they come down and each of them are interviewed and they pass the selection the concept of the academy the training of what the goals will do all the here is explained to them on their family members so that they understand it and then when the girls comes start training in general sharief sharifi who's the commander of the academy mexico and t to the farm lay the the females will will look after the owner and integrity will be kept intact while they're going through trading academy so it's quite a bit guarantee that he makes for cultural purposes with the help of brigadier britain's interpreter i asked two couple of the female cadets why they joined the afghan army and how their families reacted that kabila knew the reason that i joined the army is that i like it my family code me allowed to join the french army and an important reason also is to open the way for the afghan woman so you can also join the army my family really support me there incurred me to become a pilot.

sarah hutchinson commander mexico brigadier britain afghan army kabila french army afghanistan officer