35 Burst results for "Afford"

NYC mayor considering virtual learning plan for schools

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 3 d ago

NYC mayor considering virtual learning plan for schools

"The the new new mayor mayor in in New New York York is is considering considering a a virtual virtual learning learning plan plan for for schools schools Eric Eric Adams Adams says says he he still still believes believes the the safest safest place place is is in in school school Adams Adams has has repeatedly repeatedly said said the the city city cannot cannot afford afford more more shutdowns shutdowns but but we we do do have have to to be be on on is is that that there there is is a a substantial substantial number number of of children children for for whatever whatever reasons reasons parents parents are are not not bringing bringing them them to to school school anywhere anywhere from from one one quarter quarter to to one one third third of of students students in in New New York York are are not not showing showing up up to to classes classes most most days days Adam Adam says says he he would would like like to to work work out out a a quality quality option option for for temporary temporary remote remote learning learning the the fallout fallout is is unbelievable unbelievable math math in in English English English English is is not not as as bad bad as as math math with with the the numbers numbers with with math math the the office office right right now now the the teachers teachers union union in in New New York York have have asked asked the the mayor mayor to to postpone postpone in in person person learning learning I'm I'm a a Donahue Donahue

New New York York Eric Eric Adams Adams Adams Adams Adam Adam Donahue Donahue
US consumer prices soared 7% in past year, most since 1982

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 4 d ago

US consumer prices soared 7% in past year, most since 1982

"Inflation inflation keeps keeps soaring soaring with with American American consumers consumers seeing seeing big big jumps jumps in in prices prices consumer consumer prices prices were were up up seven seven percent percent last last month month from from a a year year earlier earlier the the highest highest inflation inflation rate rate in in forty forty years years wiping wiping out out pay pay raises raises many many Americans Americans have have been been getting getting during during the the economy's economy's pandemic pandemic recovery recovery and and making making it it harder harder for for some some households households to to afford afford even even basic basic expenses expenses like like food food housing housing and and transportation transportation federal federal reserve reserve chair chair Jerome Jerome Powell Powell said said yesterday yesterday the the central central bank bank mistakenly mistakenly thought thought supply supply chain chain issues issues that that have have helped helped drive drive oil oil prices prices would would not not last last nearly nearly this this long long and and the the fed fed will will act act as as needed needed to to curb curb high high inflation inflation if if we we have have to to raise raise interest interest rates rates more more over over time time we we will will poll poll show show inflation inflation started started displacing displacing even even the the pandemic pandemic as as a a public public concern concern posing posing a a political political threat threat to to the the by by the the administration administration and and congressional congressional Democrats Democrats Sager Sager mag mag ani ani Washington Washington

Food Food Housing Housing And Jerome Jerome Powell Powell Central Central Bank Bank FED Administration Administration Sager Sager Ani Ani Washington Washington
The Current American Economy Is a Weird Phenomenon

The Trish Regan Show

01:01 min | 6 d ago

The Current American Economy Is a Weird Phenomenon

"I mean, what a weird phenomenon to have 3.9% unemployment. One 4 million people walking off the jobs again in November and yet everybody really terrified about inflation. In fact, 68% of Americans say the economy is their biggest worry right now far exceeding more than double. The number of people that say, Omni krone. Inflation is here inflation is real inflation is getting worse, I know the fed is scrambling to try and do something about it, but whether or not they can do something in time, I think is really really debatable not to mention our long-term overhang of a problem. I mean, massive amounts of debt, massive amounts of spending that we can not afford. I don't know where the endgame is, but I can tell you this. The value of your U.S. dollar is going to continue declining in this kind of environment this year and for years to come, which is one of the reasons why I keep saying diversify your portfolio diversify your holdings and when you're diversifying take a good hard look at

Omni Krone FED U.S.
August 2020 Reuters Report: FBI Has No Evidence Jan. 6 Was a Coordinated Attack

Mark Levin

01:16 min | Last week

August 2020 Reuters Report: FBI Has No Evidence Jan. 6 Was a Coordinated Attack

"I read you part of an article by Reuters of all News outlets written by Mark hosenball and Sarah and lynch That's right What was this article about Was an exclusive and here is the title FBI finds scant evidence U.S. capitol attack was coordinated Sources The FBI's found scan evidence that the January 6th attack on the U.S. capitol was the result of an organized plot to overturn the presidential election result Could it afford current and form a law enforcement officials And by the way if it was why hasn't this committee leaked that information yet since they're leaking everything else Because it wasn't Though federal officials have arrested more than 570 alleged participants they want to allow they want to arrest a thousand people The FBI at this point believes the violence was not centrally coordinated by far right groups or prominent supporters of then president Donald Trump According to the sources who have been either directly involved in or briefed regularly on the wide ranging investigations See this was a good enough for Pelosi and her goons

Mark Hosenball FBI U.S. Reuters Lynch Sarah Donald Trump Pelosi
How Rep. Gary Palmer Is Ramping up the Policy Team

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:37 min | Last week

How Rep. Gary Palmer Is Ramping up the Policy Team

"How are you ramping up the policy team and the committee for the next cycle of elections and just really in general, educating our members more on policy than just a speech in a bumper sticker kind of answer? As you know, I brought back, I brought something into the policy committee. We hadn't had before. And that was the guide to the issues so that every member regardless of what committee thereon can speak intelligently on key issues. But I think the thing that we got to do. And you didn't say it this way, but the bottom line is when we get back in the majority we have to govern and we have to do the hard things. And I think our members genuinely want to do the right thing, I don't know that they fully understand that if we do what needs to be done, it's going to cost us something. You don't achieve greatness doing easy things. And I think it's going to come really around three things and it's one thing though. And that security. We've got to address national security and that includes securing the border and dealing with China and Russia. The other, though, is community security. People need to feel like that they can drive down the street or walk down a sidewalk and be safe that they're safe in their homes that their kids are safe in their schools that they can shop and stores that don't have to board up their windows to keep from being rated by looters. Community security is a huge thing. And then you really touched on this a good bit at the beginning. And that's individual security. People need to feel secure in the fact that they can have good healthcare that they can afford. And that successful that they're in charge of decision making for their own children, that their jobs are not going to be threatened by some government mandate. That they could walk into work on a Monday morning and said, well, you haven't done this government mandate whether it's vaccination or anything else. So you're fired. So it's really going to come down to security. And then last thing on the personal security is is we've got to address some of the long-term issues related to our debt. We're on pace by 2050 when your kids your grandkids will be out in the workforce of having our debt to twice as big as our entire economy. That's not workable.

Committee For The Next Cycle O Russia China
Nursing home workers are urged to get boosters as cases soar

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 weeks ago

Nursing home workers are urged to get boosters as cases soar

"Federal federal health health officials officials are are urging urging nursing nursing home home workers workers to to get get their their booster booster shots shots with with the the latest latest spike spike included included nineteen nineteen cases cases already already taking taking a a toll toll health health and and Human Human Services Services secretary secretary have have your your Becerra Becerra told told workers workers via via video video the the Omicron Omicron variant variant is is lightning lightning fast fast and and we we can't can't afford afford another another Kobe Kobe nineteen nineteen surge surge in in nursing nursing homes homes cobit cobit infections infections among among nursing nursing home home staffers staffers spiked spiked eighty eighty percent percent compared compared to to last last week week with with more more than than ten ten thousand thousand new new cases cases and and nearly nearly sixty sixty workers workers have have died died but but only only about about half half of of nursing nursing home home residents residents have have received received booster booster shots shots and and only only about about twenty twenty five five percent percent of of staff staff the the by by Nick Nick ministration ministration tried tried to to require require vaccines vaccines for for workers workers but but the the mandate mandate is is held held up up in in the the courts courts I'm I'm Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn

Federal Federal Health Health Human Human Services Services Becerra Becerra Nick Nick Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn
It's Critical That You Invest in the Market

The Trish Regan Show

02:33 min | 2 weeks ago

It's Critical That You Invest in the Market

"More. But what I wanted to talk to you about today is you. It's too easy, I think, in light of everything that's going on in terms of our frustration, perhaps at times with our federal government, and in many cases, hey, if you live in California, you probably with your local government as well. But when we get frustrated with our federal government, it's too easy to kind of throw in the towel and say, you know what, I don't want to be invested. I don't want to be invested in this market because I don't believe in what's happening. And this is sort of what I want to talk to you about today is reminder that it's critical, especially in light of some of the mistakes that our federal government is making. As it pertains to inflation, it's critical that you are invested and you are looking out for your future and you're looking out for number one and your family. And it's very easy to say, okay, well, you know, because there's so messed up, I don't want any part of that, but if you don't take part in the system, then the system can actually work against you. And by that, you know, I mean, even inflation, we look at all the data that's coming in. And it's really and truly it's your everyday Americans, the very people, by the way, the federal government keeps claiming to want to help. It says everyday Americans that get hurt most by inflation because when gas prices go up, when food prices go up when housing costs go up, these are the people everyday Americans poor Americans that are most affected. So how do you, how do you make sure that even if you're earning a very modest living that you don't get trapped in that? And for me, it goes back to really being thoughtful about your planning for your future about retirement planning about making sure that you're putting your money. If you work for a company and you have a full-time job into that 401k oftentimes, of course, they have a company match, so it's like free money. It grows tax free. I mean, these are sort of no brainers. Personal finance one on one that you should be doing. And I hope you're doing, but also beyond that, what can you afford personally? What can you put away for yourself and your family? And I think that you need to go back to basics. I always say, I mean, look at companies that you like companies that you use, companies you're interested in and start doing research on those. Or, if you don't really want to even get in that far, you can invest in index funds. Just make sure everything's diversified. Do me that favor. I like to be able to sleep at night for you. So make sure you have a diversified

California Federal Government
Dan Rooney and Folds of Honor Give the Gift of Opportunity

The Dan Bongino Show

01:46 min | 3 weeks ago

Dan Rooney and Folds of Honor Give the Gift of Opportunity

"Dan we're talking to Dan Rooney He runs my opinion one of the finest charities in the world falls of honor They provide scholarships to the sons and daughters of the fallen heroes who have given up their lives and their livelihoods and giving up everything for us in the military And Dan it folds of honor and the website folks is FOH short for folds of honor FOH dot org dot org slash Dan FOH dot org slash Dan go there If you'd make a donation I would sincerely from the bottom of my heart appreciate it Dan you give the gift of opportunity I mean there are great charities out there You and I have a lot of friends who do wonderful things They give people all kinds of things But I think what's special about yours and you know when I ran for office school choice to me was a big issue because it's the only reason I'm speaking to you and coherent English sentences now I'm not kidding it's because the local Catholic school took me and my brothers on as a charity case We couldn't always afford the tuition And we went and they really sister Jane to carry and they gave us such a great education What folds of honor does to these here or the families of these heroes Is it gives them the gift of opportunity And that's not me being dramatic That's just a fact That is a fact some of them are not going to be able to afford some of these colleges They'll be burdened with student loans They get to go to a great educational institution They don't have to worry about the bills and now maybe it takes some of that pain away We know education is the ultimate force multiplier It is what separates America It is where opportunities are born And I'll tell you these military families they're heroic bunch to begin with And when you arm them with the gift of an education it's

Dan Rooney DAN Catholic School Jane America
Update on the latest sports

AP News Radio

01:59 min | 3 weeks ago

Update on the latest sports

"AP AP sports sports I'm I'm John John with with a a rare rare Tuesday Tuesday night night of of the the NFL NFL to to end end week week number number fifteen fifteen visual visual games games due due to to cope cope with with protocols protocols in in Philadelphia Philadelphia Jalen Jalen hurts hurts returned returned at at quarterback quarterback to to lead lead the the eagles eagles to to a a twenty twenty seven seven seventeen seventeen win win over over Washington Washington more more from from the the AP AP rodeos rodeos Dave Dave Emory Emory Jaylin Jaylin hertz hertz was was terrific terrific in in his his first first game game back back from from an an ankle ankle injury injury completing completing twenty twenty of of twenty twenty six six passes passes for for two two hundred hundred ninety ninety six six yards yards and and a a touchdown touchdown the the U. U. is is very very fundamental fundamental to to been been back back on on the the field field in in the the winter winter which which we we need need it it you you know know first first division division went went on on for for this this football football team team this this year year can can come come at at a a better better time time in in LA LA Matthew Matthew Stafford Stafford had had a a pair pair of of second second half half touchdowns touchdowns to to Cooper Cooper Kupp Kupp if if the the rams rams twenty twenty ten ten win win over over the the Seahawks Seahawks their their plan plan really really really really deep deep short short on on us us as as a a as as an an offense offense trying trying to to make make us us check check it it down down to to go go you you know know ten ten fifteen fifteen play play drives drives we're we're able able to to get get over over the the top top a a couple couple times times but but you you know know it's it's just just one one of of those those you you can can have have a a slug slug out out and and those those winds winds are are big big fish fish in in December December to to the the NBA NBA have have afforded afforded with with twenty twenty two two points points Julius Julius Randle Randle Kemba Kemba Walker Walker with with twenty twenty one one each each but but next next one one at at home home for for the the first first time time in in almost almost a a month month beating beating the the pistons pistons one one oh oh five five ninety ninety one one the the heat heat playing playing without without five five regulars regulars including including Jimmy Jimmy Butler Butler and and bam bam Adebayo Adebayo right right with with the the Pacers Pacers one one twenty twenty five five ninety ninety six six Tom Tom Barrett Barrett has has more more he he trailed trailed by by a a point point midway midway through through the the first first quarter quarter then then went went on on a a thirty thirty five five fourteen fourteen once once we we have have a a twenty twenty point point lead lead midway midway through through the the second second quarter quarter that that was was never never threatened threatened as as the the Miami Miami lead lead grew grew to to as as high high as as thirty thirty three three points points Duncan Duncan Robinson Robinson scored scored twenty twenty six six points points including including six six of of ten ten three three point point shots shots to to lead lead the the heat heat who who tied tied a a team team record record with with twenty twenty two two three three pointers pointers NBA NBA commissioner commissioner Adam Adam silver silver says says there's there's no no plans plans to to pause pause the the season season even even as as numbers numbers of of players players entering entering the the league league health health and and safety safety protocols protocols related related to to the the coronavirus coronavirus continue continue to to rise rise NHL NHL players players will will not not take take part part in in the the winter winter Olympics Olympics after after all all a a person person with with direct direct knowledge knowledge of of the the decision decision telling telling the the Associated Associated Press Press the the league's league's going going to to withdraw withdraw from from the the Beijing Beijing games games after after its its regular regular season season schedule schedule was was disrupted disrupted by by coronavirus coronavirus of of bricks bricks I'm I'm John John other other B. B. A. A. B. B. sports sports

Ap Ap Jalen Jalen Dave Dave Emory Emory Jaylin J Eagles Matthew Matthew Stafford Staff NFL Cooper Cooper Kupp Kupp Philadelphia Seahawks Rams John John NBA Washington Julius Julius Randle Randle Ke Football Pistons Jimmy Jimmy Butler Butler Pacers
WSJ: Hispanic Voters Evenly Split Among Parties, Poll Finds

Mark Levin

01:42 min | Last month

WSJ: Hispanic Voters Evenly Split Among Parties, Poll Finds

"I'm looking at this poll here Wall Street Journal came out earlier this week And since the left would describe me as Brown I thought man this is pretty interesting Headline Wall Street Journal Hispanic voters now evenly split between parties according to The Wall Street Journal poll Look at that And it goes on and basically it's 37% of Hispanics say they will vote for Donald Trump again Compared to 37% of Democrats Hispanics are split 37 37 Democrat Republican I find that to be remarkable Because forever and a day it's always been in the 60s And it's remarkable that we've gone that way Now I think again it's just like side for sounds joke Some of them are they just hate Biden so much that they're like man I can't afford this guy You know nice as he is with his aviator glasses and his little jokes and he's always where do I go What do I say Who do I call on You know Joe el Barbosa Biden being the bubble so that he is but people just legitimately can't afford to keep Biden in office He's costing us a lot of money They're spending trillions of dollars where even the parliamentarians telling him you can't do it Then he also gets word that you know what The good old $450,000 per person that could be up to a million Yeah guess what Can't do that one either We're gonna have to litigate those one by one and let the chips fall where they may No pre approved settlement So Joe Biden can't give out the money I guess Christmas has come early for America And thank God that we're going to curtail some of our spending But that doesn't stop anything When they can't do build back better they just hit you with the vaccine and what the mandates and with COVID and all of that

Wall Street Journal Joe El Barbosa Biden Biden Donald Trump Brown Joe Biden America Covid
Kira Davis: Education Is Such a Battle Space

The Dan Bongino Show

01:50 min | Last month

Kira Davis: Education Is Such a Battle Space

"It's really important to keep in mind what's going on in our schools This is where all of this starts There's a reason why education is such a battle space Because it's so influential for our children And I don't want to shame anybody for going to public school My kids went to public school If I had had the opportunity to send them to private school I would have but I didn't have that opportunity because I like a lot of other parents in this country can't afford private school here in California private school costs about what college costs I mean some private schools are about 30,000 a year It's not realistic for me That's why I am an advocate for school choice So I'm not saying that get out of public school or homeschool I realize that the reality of the situation is a lot more complicated on the ground where you are But if you can get out of public school get out Because these people have designs on your kids And what they want to do is tell you you don't matter What they want to do is tell you parents Tell us parents That we're the problem That's what happened in Virginia right With McAuliffe And young Ken McAuliffe was set to win that race And then he told pace slipped It was a slip of the tongue And he reminded parents what the agenda of the progressive left is which is to make you worthless They think that they know better for your child than you do I think we have to stand around and make them admit that They don't want to admit that because that sounds a shameful position to take but that is a position We are watching the incursion of progressive chaos in our public schools and it is infecting our children and we should all be

Ken Mcauliffe California Mcauliffe Virginia
Vishal Mangalwadi on Martin Luther and the Second Education Revolution

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:55 min | Last month

Vishal Mangalwadi on Martin Luther and the Second Education Revolution

"The second education revolution began in 1520 with Martin Luther. Well, he sought the support of the princes to enable the reform priest to educate every child. And that revolution was grounded in the doctrine of priesthood and kingship of all believers. So the phrase we the people came from that context that every child of God is a royal priest, a king. Now the education has been separated from priesthood and kingship of all believers. It has become for the state is still educating for free, private institutions have become education for rich believers. Priesthood of rich believers, only those who can afford to get into debt or who have wealthy parents and grandparents, they can send their children to Christian managed university and colleges. So. In 1832, in Europe, the church handed over education to the state. In America, it began in 1880s, but particularly after World War I, the church handed over education to the state. Churchill started all the universities, colleges, Ivy League colleges, initially, most of them. But the judge handed it over to the state. State is not an institution baptized with the spirit of truth. Churches meant with the cycling nations marinating them in truth. And it is not states shop to cultivate character

Martin Luther Europe Churchill Ivy League America
Small Business Owners Can't Afford Biden's COVID Mandates

The Larry Elder Show

00:34 sec | Last month

Small Business Owners Can't Afford Biden's COVID Mandates

"This Louisiana business owner says he can't afford Biden's mandate. We're already understaffed as it is. Brandon trust klair owns 16 supermarkets in Louisiana and employs 500 people. His suit over the business mandate helped halt the order across the country. And he told us he can't afford to fire workers right now. We're understaffed right now across the board, understaffed in my meat department, my daily stockers, you name it. We're probably every bit of 5 to ten employees short at every location that we have right now. So our challenge is to get labor, not laying labor off by all means.

Klair Owns Louisiana Biden Brandon
Josh Mandel: Ohio Is Not Buying What J.D. Vance Is Selling

Mark Levin

01:28 min | Last month

Josh Mandel: Ohio Is Not Buying What J.D. Vance Is Selling

"JD Vance has been promoted a lot On Fox and some other places quite frankly It's my understanding that he voted against Trump twice for president of the United States I'm not even talking about in the primary where you're duking it out maybe support somebody else but that would mean that you either voted for Hillary Clinton or Joe Biden or something that if I'm wrong I want a very desperately be corrected Am I right or wrong You're right Everything I know and everything I've heard him say out of his own mouth is that even when president Trump was running against Hillary Clinton JD Vance refused to vote for president Trump And for all your listeners listening to this think about that for a second This is a guy running for U.S. Senate in Ohio as a Republican who refused to vote for president Trump when Trump was up against Hillary Clinton And we can not afford to have people like that in the U.S. Senate or frankly anywhere in the Republican Party of the conservative Listen Mark if the election were held today in California New York or Washington D.C. JD Vance would have run away with it But if the election were held today here in Ohio he'd get smoked and probably come in fourth or 5th place And the reality on the ground here in Ohio is that people are not buying what JD Vance is

Jd Vance President Trump Hillary Clinton Donald Trump Joe Biden U.S. Senate FOX Republican Party Of The Conser United States Ohio Washington D.C. California New York
Manchin Casts Doubt on Biden’s Social Policy Bill

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:06 min | Last month

Manchin Casts Doubt on Biden’s Social Policy Bill

"Headline White House scrambles to salvage build back better Bill by Christmas. Now the Financial Times described as a 1.75 trillion, it's not. According to the congressional budget office, it's a $5 trillion bill. If you do what all Congress is doing, which is extend their one year programs and blow through their deadlines unless they have sunsets in them. So it's not 1.75. It's trip 5 trillion, and that's backed up by the Penn Wharton school analysis. Again, if you say, oh, this is a one year Bill. And we're going to end all these programs. We start, yeah, it's 2 trillion them, but it's not. It's 5 trillion and Joe Manchin stopped in the hallway. And according to The New York Times, he said that they need to pause for peace. He said that anything is possible here, and he's still engaged in conversations with The White House, but listen for yourself. Joe Manchin talking to CNN's Manu Raju yesterday cut number ten. But whatever we're considering doing or whatever Congress is considering to only should do it within the limits of what we can afford. And that means having a tax plan that's fair and equitable and keeps us competitive, but also makes everyone pay especially the wealthy pay their fair share too. See what that spins off and that's one 7 range then we should be spending whatever in that range as far as I'm concerned if it's whatever planet would be pre-K, child care and what you want in home care, then it should be ten years. It shouldn't just be one year three years or 5 years. And that would be, I think it would be very transparent for the puppy to see exactly what they'd be getting for what we're spending for ten years. So you won't support it if it needs programs or temporary. No, we're going to talk. We're still talking. I'm listening to everybody, but I'm just telling you you ask me about inflation is not transitory. It's alarming. It's going up and not down. And I think that should be something concerned about. Inflation is real. It's not transitory. It's going up, not down, that something we should be concerned about. And senator

Joe Manchin Penn Wharton School White House Manu Raju Congressional Budget Office Congress Financial Times The New York Times CNN Bill
Nearly 4 Dozen January 6 Defendants Have Been Locked Away For Months With No Bail

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:24 min | Last month

Nearly 4 Dozen January 6 Defendants Have Been Locked Away For Months With No Bail

"Now, there's about four dozen defendants from January 6th. Who have been locked up without bail. In the D.C. jail. I want to repeat that to you. The roughly four dozen January 6th defendants. Have been locked up for months without bail in the D.C. jail while awaiting trial. No bail afforded them. They had no opportunity to bail out. They have reported threats from the guards, a lack of food and water, delayed medical treatment. Now, when it comes to the rioters in the streets after George Floyd, do you think any of those people are rotting away in jail without the opportunity to even bail out? Do you think any of those people who burn down stores and looted and rioted are suffering the same fate as January 6, 6 honest to goodness. Whatever you think of Trump, whatever you think of the people who acted violently on January 6th, do you think this is normal?

D.C. George Floyd
Only 19 of Obama's 186 Clients in an Old Lawsuit Against Citibank We're Able to Keep Their Homes

The Larry Elder Show

01:27 min | Last month

Only 19 of Obama's 186 Clients in an Old Lawsuit Against Citibank We're Able to Keep Their Homes

"That when Obama was a private lawyer, he worked for a civil rights law firm. And there were some 186 clients who claimed that Citigroup was not giving them loans even though they were creditworthy. And Obama was one of several lawyers who joined a class action lawsuit against Citigroup, suing on behalf of these 186. Black people who claimed that they were denied mortgages just because of their race. Now, there was an article in the daily caller also won in Business Insider that followed up all these people that got these loans because the group settled by giving them the loans. Okay, well, we'll give you the loans. We're not going to fight the lawsuit anymore. Probably not like the negative publicity, probably felt it was less expensive to just give them the loans in the fight it. And only 19 of the 186 people who got the loans still had their homes. Many of them lost the homes, and they also had poor ratings as a result of having gotten something they couldn't afford. And two of them even said this. Quote, if you see some people don't make enough money to afford the mortgage, why would you give them alone? There should be some type of regulation against giving people loans, they can't afford. I kid you not. This is one of the clients who got along. Another one said the same thing. So they weren't being discriminated against. It was BS.

Citigroup Barack Obama
Joy Reid: If You Don't Support the Democrat Agenda, You're Racist

Mark Levin

01:51 min | Last month

Joy Reid: If You Don't Support the Democrat Agenda, You're Racist

"If they did care about children After they're born They would be supporting universal healthcare So in other words if you're not a Marxist or even something less than if you don't embrace the Democrat agenda then you don't care about people who are not like you You get the argument there is no argument It's an attack Go ahead So services food for kids those families can't afford it Fully funding education and gun reform So kids don't have to do mass shooter drills at school They would support you You got it folks If you don't embrace this agenda you're racist And you don't care about babies either If they're not white So why is she on the air That's got to cut a go But pro life really The more appropriate slogan In my humble opinion is anti choice As the same party passes regressive policies at harm women children and families by taking choices away from that Or maybe it's pro death As this party does nothing about kids getting massacred in classrooms while siding with a virus that mutates and has killed nearly 800,000 Americans They didn't have children What kind of a mentality What kind of a stupid low IQ mentality is that So you people who support vaccines at a post tyranny You're siding with the virus You're siding with the virus Unbelievable And you're not pro life anyway your anti choice So where's the science in that What is in the womb exactly A chocolate chip cookie What is

"afford" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

08:02 min | Last month

"afford" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

"Doesn't mean you can afford it. Our first House was a nice house. We couldn't afford. But ultimately happens at four closed. Because we didn't make the payments. My husband and I would often buy things that we couldn't afford or take trips that we couldn't afford. When my oldest was three years old and my youngest was one, we got them a $350 electric Jeep to just drive around on the concrete. My mom's 50th birthday party. We flew in her friends from around the country. Put them up in hotels, and we had a DJ there and the whole party probably cost us close to $7000 and it was all in our credit cards. That was never a question in my mind that we couldn't live that way. It never occurred to me to budget or to say, you know, how much does that cost? I decided one day that the boys needed to learn how to play piano. We couldn't afford a piano. But we bought one. And nobody ever took music lessons. And I sold it about a year later for $50. When you're not having fun in your marriage, let's go out and buy something really nice and will make you feel better. We went out and least a 94 Honda accord. A $17,000 car that we couldn't afford. There are several ways that I've sort of cleaned up my money act. I was able to talk to financial planner. You have to look this in the face and you have to say, this is what I'm taking in. This is what's going out. And this is what I have left over. Right now, I'm completely on top of my bills. I don't get racked up with late payments. When I'm in the negative, I actually write in red pen, so it glares at me and says, you can not write any more checks. I think that things are better now that I've had an honest discussion with my kids about what our money situation is. Pay, we can't afford a $150 pair of sneakers. They understood that. I was being dishonest with myself about the money. So how are they to know? Money had always been such a scary thing. I didn't want to deal with it. And what are your kids do when they're scared? They don't want to deal with. They want to hide under the covers. Basically that's what I had been doing with money for a long time. But now I've thrown the curtains open and put some light on it. I will never be afraid to look at my checkbook again. It gives me a sense of well-being. Now, when we saw Tracey stories, she said, now she's more honest with her children about what they can and can not afford. And how did that happen? I think it's not just after you went to some counseling, correct? Right. I went to a financial planner and sort of tried to get a budget together and figured out that my present really was horrible, but my future looked okay. So I think just in talking to the boys, just, you know, kind of reminding them that we are always on a budget that we can't afford things. That's sort of seeped into their head now that, you know, we can't afford those $150 sneakers that they'll actually look for the sale prices on sneakers and or other things that they need. Or they'll just say no mom. I don't need that right now. We can wait. All right, these people all want to, they bought a home. They want to buy a home. That's one of their dreams. How do you feel now differently renting when you owned and you couldn't afford it? You know, when you rent, if something goes wrong, you can call the landlord and say, you know, this is broken or something like that. I don't have to worry about the homeowners association that would affect what I would pay out every month and because you know what I loved about watching you as you were watching the piece. And what I was doing is every time the piece was playing, I was watching you, watch the pieces. You looked so light. You looked so happy. And you look happy having lost it all because sometimes by lucid it all you find yourself. When you tell your kids, you can't afford it. That's also not a right message to put toward them. Because that makes them afraid and they're hearing the word I can't, I can't. I'd rather hear you say we are choosing not to buy this now because this is not a wise use of the money we have. And that is the truth, but when you tell them they can't, they end up thinking they never ever will. And that they're being restricted rather than it's a choice. So you never want to feel like you or others are being controlled because you can't you want to be in control because you want to, and you can. Well, and I've developed savings accounts for them and they have to put money away every month and that whole thing. And when I talk to them about what they want, that I say, can you afford that now? Can we go to the bank right now and pull it out? And then what would you have left over if we did? So I think they've in getting them that bank account. I think that's helped them understand the dynamics of money and not just go to the machine and get it out because the machine will give you money. Yes. According to Time Magazine nearly half of all families did not save one penny last year. Not one. Okay, you were saying we were saying doing commercial break. We're gonna always have this problem. I'm afraid we're going to because here is the mentality that seems to happen. You're always going to be able to work for a job and a paycheck. You're never going to have to retire. You'll always have enough money to pay for whatever you want. And that nothing could ever happen to you, May that be so may that be so may that be so, but if it's not so, what have you done today truthfully to protect your tomorrows? Do you have at least 8 months of a savings account put aside emergency fund? Most of you don't do you have your cars owned outright basis priceless. You just went 8. What are sweetheart? Used to be three months. Now, and now it's 8 because of the economy. What you see happening is to be 20,000 down now. It's 40. Yeah. It's just a fact that you should know this year, 1.3 million people who were retired are now going back to work. I never thought they were going to have to. 1.3 million people have had to go back to work because they didn't have enough money to last them. Now, when you look at the age span, you will spend more years actually speaking. Out of retirement, then you ever did working since your lifespan goes to about 90 years of age. So your money has to last longer than it ever did before and Harris the fact that you need to know, you know, when social security first came about. The average life expectancy was 62. They never expected you to live long enough to collect social security at 65. Do you understand that? And now you're living 20 and 30 years past that and your money isn't going to last you if you don't make your money work really hard for you. So I know you want all these things and you feel you've worked hard, you have, but the goal is here to get your money to work harder for you when you can't work for it anymore. So when you think about having this little thing when you think about having that, I want you to think about what it's really costing you. If you took your $25,000 and you did nothing more but put it in an account and let's say over the next 20 years, you can manage to get it to earn 8%. You'd have a $115,000 in 40 years you'd have 555 thousand dollars. So that is what it will really cost you in future money to do what you want to do today. Monday. For one day. For one day. I want to thank Susie again, and thanks to all my guests for sharing your stories. Tracy and Paul, Jennifer and mason, lavina, and Tracy, thank you so much. Why are we in such.

Honda Tracey House Time Magazine Harris Susie Tracy lavina Jennifer mason Paul
"afford" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

08:06 min | Last month

"afford" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

"That we looked at. But we figured we were worth it so we bought it. This is our living room. As you can see, there's no pressure just yet. We actually placed an order. We spent a little more than we were planning to around $3000. We like to vacation. That's where a lot of our money goes. If we had the money I would love to just go out and buy beautiful furnishings, but I can't do that right now. I'm very bad when it comes to a checkbook. As far as balancing, I don't do it. I think right now we're probably living on two months. Paul's a physician, and he makes about $90,000. I make $70,000. So together we're doing great. It just seems to me, the more money that I make more money we spend. We have short term goals that we're saving for. But I'm afraid that eventually it's going to catch up to us because we don't have a long-term plan. And it will catch up with them. Yes, money always catches up with you because money is really just you. It really is you. There is no difference between you and your money. You've heard me say it before. Money is a physical manifestation of you. You earn it. You work for it. You invest it. You save it, and you spend it. Money alone can't do anything. You control your money. Or in this case, your money eventually will start to control you. So here is the key. Sometimes it's about figuring out how much money do you have. Can you afford it? Can you not? That's not where you have to start in my opinion. And you're no different than anybody else really, nobody balances their checkbook. Nobody wants to check their credit card statements to see if they got double charged on something. Nobody wants to see that if they're charging you double on your ATM withdrawals, which they probably are. But you don't want to check that. You have got to spend the time seeing how much money do you have coming in, how much do you have going out? Balancing your checkbooks and seeing where you stand. Susie recommends you should not buy anything that'll take you longer than a year to pay off. That's right, so we're in the house. It's true when you're putting this furniture on your credit card or with the store because so many of you walk into the store and they say to you, you can have this for the next 6 months interest free. So Thanksgiving. Knowing very well that by Thanksgiving, you're not going to have the money to pay it off and then they get to charge you 21% interest for the next 5 years. So when you look at something, especially furniture, something that I know you think you need. I do that for carpet ads all the time. Yeah. But for everywhere, isn't that how they get you? Come in. And you're there. You do it and come the date of payment. You don't have the money. And they know that their banking on that. So how you're working on you not having the money? Absolutely. Absolutely. What are you supposed to do? Then what happens is they go to a finance plan at 21% interest and now they hit the jackpot. Gotcha. We're good. We are good. We try to make sure that we have money that we're going to apply towards that payment right off front pay that credit card. Now you said you try. Well, we do. And how long will it take you to do that? Next, credit card payment will pay off. They don't have monthly day. But part of the problem is all of our earnings now are going straight to month month living because we're spending so much. So here is the savings. So there's two ways you tackle that. You either have to make more, or you have to spend less. Or do a combination of both, and where that's really important for you is that doesn't mean you cut out a vacation. It means you cut out $200 off of this vacation $20 a month here, $20 a month here. You cut little things all over you spend less. So you have more. You make more and you keep more. You said the more you make, the more you spend. Put it away, the more money you make, take whatever your paycheck was, before you got a pay raise, live on that and take the difference and put it sock it away right into an account, so nobody can touch it, and then you have more money. Don't finance anything unless we can pay it off within a year. And she stuck on that. She went. So when it comes to not a car or not a home, those are major purchases, but something like furniture, something that's a smaller item. It's all right. To finance something, but in my opinion, after one year, it should be gone. Is it okay if we finance something that they say you don't have to pay on for the first year? That's what I'm telling you. They're hoping you're going to do that that you don't have to pay on for the first year so that after one year comes that you then have to pay. And in many case you haven't don't have the money to pay them, in many cases, if you haven't paid them in full, interest accumulates back all the way to the first day. Oh, do you see? So that's trick. That's that trick. This is Kari, and she says their family income is $70,000 a year and that they have about $50,000 of debt. $30,000 of that is a student loan. Kari wants to know how much they can afford to spend now on a house. So here we go again. It's not so much how much can you afford to spend before we know if you even have enough money to put down as a down payment on a home number one? And here's a new don't know. So here's the question, also the 20,000 going to get these houses with no down payment. Yeah. It's the $20,000 of credit card debt. Student loan debt is a whole other thing. But the $20,000 of credit card debt has it been going down, same question or maintaining exactly where it is. You know, it goes down minutely, but it doesn't go down in a nice arc. So here's what I want you to realize when you already have credit card debt credit card debt is a sign of red flashing sign that says you are spending more money than you have and you're putting it where on your credit cards. And if you are already spending more money than you have, why do you want to add to your life additional money like buying a house? You know, I know it looks fabulous to own a home. It's nice. It's not the looks fabulous. It's really for us a space issue. We have three small children in a two bedroom apartment, and we feel like we missed our window for the starter home. When we were newly married, there was no way we were getting a house at 50,000 or $300,000. And now it's like, well, can we back into it some way now that we absolutely need more space or is that just totally unrealistic? It's nothing is unrealistic, and there isn't a dream that you can't have. I believe that. One at a time if you intelligently go after it. I want you to be to understand this. You haven't missed anything. If you continue to live your life that you're missing the real estate market that it's going up that you're not ever going to be able to afford a house, it's outpacing you, I want you to remember back to 1999 and the year 2000 when everybody thought that about technology as well. Everybody thought that they were missing the stock market and everybody was making rich and making it rich there and you didn't have the money. And then when you did, you went in it, and now you wish you had it. Don't think that that can't happen when you have the money to afford something. That's been respectful to who you are. It will be there for you when the time is right. Don't back into it. When you drive backwards in a car, you are apt to get in an accident if that is the only direction that you know how to go, you want to drive forward and pull up in that car and park it in that house and have a good life there, but you need money to do it. So the question is, why do you have credit card debt? What's going on? And you don't even have to answer that here. You have to answer it in yourself and especially increasing credit card debt if you have credit card debt that you continue to see increase that means that you continue to spend more money than you have and please I beg you that is the first sign that says you can not afford a home. Okay. Tracy learned that just because you qualify for a house,.

Kari Susie Paul Tracy
"afford" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

08:07 min | Last month

"afford" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

"Can afford. There's so nice. This is too much money. I believe that we can afford a home anywhere between 700 to 800,000. I feel more secure about buying something around $300,000. The apartment that we live in right now is definitely too small. We have the living room doubling as a music room. We have a tight kitchen that we can barely cook dinner in. We have two boys. Eventually they will need their own. And as you can see, it's not much of a plane area. Same in today. You don't have enough room. As you can see, we've outgrown it. So this is why we're looking for a new home. I don't believe there and when he tells me things like that we can't afford a house like this. I think she does mean a little bit unrealistic. I know she wants it, you know, I wanted to, but I want to wait till I can get it. I think we should be looking into expensive houses like this because I think it's a good investment. I want to be able to eat and do the normal things. Normal people do. I want my children to have the neighborhood that this kind of house offers. You know, when we make more, and we can get more. Not bad at it. So I want these things. I just don't think we can afford them right now. Well, to help couples determine how much they can afford to spend on a home. Susie recommends that they play house for 6 months. That's right. So for instance, I know all these banks will qualify you for a loan. And they want to qualify you for loan because that's how they make their living. However, I want you to think about this 100% of all the people who bought a house now they can't afford it, and they are now in foreclosure, are all people who qualified for a bank loan. So it's not. That's good, Susie. Everybody nodded on that. That was good. I got that. Because it's the truth. So it's not how much is somebody willing to lend you. It's how much can you afford to pay for the money that you are borrowing? So rather than borrow money and then find that you're in a situation that you can't afford it and now that dings your credit and everything starts to go down, let's play house. Do you have any idea how much a house at $800,000 will cost you per month to have? No, not really. Do you want me to tell you? Yeah. How much are you putting down first of all? I was trying to put the least amount down. The least amount down will be $40,000. Do you have that? No. All right, let's say all you put down is $40,000. Which is the minimum. It's the minimum 5%. It's already over because she didn't have that. That's right. Go ahead. Oh man. It's like the very first time it my best friend Gil and I've been friends since she was 21. I was 22, and she was 23 and went to buy her first House, and they wanted $7000 down and she comes in. She goes, do you know they expected me to have the money? She said, I thought that's what I was there to ask them for the money. They expected me to have the money. Okay. All right, ready? For this? Yeah. When you put $40,000 down, that magic 40,000, it will cost you with everything property taxes, insurance. PMI costs, which is private mortgage insurance, which you are going to have to pay if you put less than 20% down. It is mandatory, approximately 62 to $6300 every month. Okay. Okay. Now, here is the question. That's close to 70 to $80,000 a year alone. That is not with a car payment, insurance for your car, medicals, food, entertainment, can you afford that? Let's see. Rather than doing it, and then missing and then foreclosing on you for the next 6 months. This is how you're going to play house. I want you to put $6000 every month into a money market fund. Okay. And I want you to see what your lifestyle feels like as if you were paid in the mortgage. Okay. Can you make it? Can you afford it? Do you have to give up breathing to be able to do that? You might have been said he wants to eat and do other things that normal people do. Now, if you can go at least 6 or 7 months having done that, you didn't skip one month in a payment. You lived a lifestyle that you wanted. Now you know truthfully that you can afford this house living the lifestyle that you want. And here's the kicker. This is the good part. If you do this for the next 6 or 7 months, remember you said you didn't know where you were going to have the down payment. You now have the down payment in this money market fund to put towards this home. You now have your cake and you are eating it too. If you miss one payment here, you know you can't afford it, but you haven't heard anybody because you haven't hurt your credit report. It's not they're not gonna get their house from you. Okay. Do you see and now you're living in the real world rather than the fantasy financial land that you have created in your mind. How long have you wanted this home? About two years. And so what has prevented you from making a plan and putting this money aside? So you have 20 to $25,000 to put down. I can't even begin to dream about it because my husband is going no. Oh no, no, no. You are not putting this on your husband. I can't. What your husband is telling you is realistic. He is saying I want to eat. I don't want to pay for something until I have the money. You are saying to him, oh, it doesn't matter. I don't believe you. I want you to start believing your husband. Okay. Here is a rule of thumb for every $100,000 of a mortgage that you want to take out in today's interest rates at about 6% of 30 year mortgage. It will cost you about $600. Okay. Now that's just the mortgage. But please remember homes don't consist of just mortgages. Right. They consist of insurance, property tax PMI costs if you don't have 20% to put down and maintenance. Upkeep, yep. So you have to add approximately 30 to 45% above the mortgage for you to get a realistic feel of what it's going to cost for you to own a home. Okay. All right? Thank you. That's how you know. Do you still want this $800,000 home? Oh, I think I'm going to talk to my husband first. All right, there we go. Just to suggest family spend no more than 25% of their take home pay each month on mortgage. That's right. Right. That's a role, but that's not what the banks are going to tell you. They're going to now allow you to spend 35 40% because they want to lend you the money, my friends don't let them. I think a lot of people feel that if they can get the loan, then that means they're okay, because why would the bank give me the money if they didn't think I was okay? Same thing with credit card debt. They're giving you the money so you can hang yourself, be careful only you. Are in control of your money. What happens to your money directly affects the quality of your life? This is Tracy and Paul, and they just splurged by their dream home for $300,000. Now they're trying to figure out if they can afford the lifestyle of their dreams. When we initially started looking for a house, we set a budget for ourselves of about approximately 200,000. We ended up paying $300,000 for this home. And he's like, can we afford it? I said, I don't know. Now that we're in the house, we don't know where we stand as far as what we can afford. We got to furnish the house, which is another hobby in itself. One of the first things that we wanted to furnish was the bedroom. We spent $5000 a little more than we were planning to spend for it, but I think it looks great in the house. It was probably the most expensive set.

Susie Gil Tracy
"afford" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

07:57 min | Last month

"afford" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

"These events and that's not something I was really prepared for. Okay, we've switched places so that you can talk to them directly. Jen, you say you want a dream wedding, correct? I want for the both of you to have a dream marriage. And it is possible. If you go ahead and spend this kind of money on this wedding, it will affect you in such a way that it will last for many, many years. Now, you say you don't mind putting this on your credit card. Did you really total up everything of what it's going to come to? Not until that point, no. I did for you. We aren't talking about 20 or 25,000. We are now talking about 40 thousand dollars. When you look at that face freeze frame, that face, okay. Now you keep saying you're gonna put this on your credit card. Have you even tried to apply for credit cards when you already have how much debt you already have? Myself. 30,000? You already have 30,000. How much money do you make right now? A little less than 30,000 fear. Jase, how much money do you make right now? I make a little more than 35,000. And on $35,000, you said you have about $16,000 of debt. Can you afford right now on your 35,000 to watch that 16,000, go to 15 to go to 14? Or you just maintaining? It seems like I'm maintaining now, but that's not what I want to be doing. So if we add another 40, let's even go back to your original budget. Not yours. You're 15,000. Gotta have anything. We go back to your original 25,000 and we add that to your combined debt right now. Do you know that both of you after you are going to get married? Well, O more than you make. How does that make you feel for that one night? Scared, but but what? But I still want the wedding. Why? Because you spend a lot of money on just one night, but it's the one night that you'll always remember. I get thousands of emails every single month from people just like you who said, I thought I could afford it. The credit card companies want you to think that it's easy to put it on there. Let me put this in perspective. If you put $40,000, sorry, 25. $1000. On your credit card, at 14% interest, which is the average interest rate. And all you can pay is the minimum. How long do you think it will take you to pay that $25,000 off? Just guess. Ten years? Double that. Money? Please be seated, which you already are. 100 years. With a minimum payment of $375 per month. If that is the minimum you are going to have to pay on 25,000 if you put $40,000 on this credit card, it will take you again about a hundred years, minimum payment will be $600 a month for the rest of your life. If that is all you can afford to pay. Now, here's the question to you, is that worth it? Still, no, it's not, but what about your money? I want to know what's the butt still. What's the butt? I definitely want our marriage to last more than the wedding ever will. Absolutely. And if, you know, if it's going to put us in debt that much, as you say, well, then I say the numbers will. I think her she also assumes that, you know, within the next few years, we'll be making a lot more and, you know, since we've just, we've sort of just entered the job market recently, so we're probably on the lower end of the scale. So let's answer that question. A few years ago, were you making less than you are making now? Yes. Yes. So you are now making more than you were a few years ago. Do you have more debt now than a few years ago? Definitely. What's that sense is the more money you make, the more money you spend, the more debt you have, I wish it could be the more money you make you take that money and you use it to pay off your past debt, but no, no, no, no. What you already see that you've done. Just look in the past, who cares about the future? Let's look at your past. The more money you have made, you haven't used it to pay down your debt. You have actually used it to create more debt. And that is exactly what you are about to do now. If you had one wish for this wedding that's about to happen, what would it be? Tell her what you really want to see happen. My one wish is to keep it within our original budget, if not, maybe even possibly lower than what that original budget was of 15,000. It would greatly help us in the future. And I think we could still have a great wedding for ten or $15,000. And at the same time, I don't think we would be paying for it for the next hundred years. And how does that make you feel when he says that to you? I absolutely respect his wishes and feelings. But I just think that. Okay. I'll lower my original budget, but 10,000. What can you give for $10,000? Him. Okay. If he wants him. Susie says that Jennifer and Jason can't afford the wedding they want by saving $2000 a month for the next year. Correct? That's right. You decide, you want to spend that much, save for it. So every month, see, can you put aside, even if you want to spend 10,000 can you spend or put aside 800 a month right now? Because if you can't save it, you can't spend it. And the credit cards are not the answer to you can't save it, then you're not gonna be able to have it to then pay off the debt. That's right. Right. And so I don't want you really, I'm looking at you right now and telling you, I don't want for you and you don't want for you to add another $10,000 on to the debt that you already have because this is something I'm going to say now that it's going to be hard for you to take. But economically, this is how it works. When you owe more than what you make financially speaking, you already are technically bankrupt. And that is why you aren't able to get anywhere. This whole role goes, that's good. You've proved of Susie's analogy. Oh, that's good. And number two thinks that's very good. But this isn't Susie's analogy. This is the analogy of numbers. And numbers depending on who's doing the accounting, don't lie. They just don't lie. Save what you can, whatever you can save, do that in pay for it in cash and then you will take this marriage to the bank forever. That's what I think. Thank you. Now, she wants a 700 $1000 house. And he wants to spend $250,000. Wow. This is what I'm talking about. This is wonderful. Look at the fireplace. This is the island that I was talking to about. It was really nice. I've been taking there and around to homes that I would like to buy. Look at the bathroom. Cabinet space. This is really nice. Is this a Romeo want Barron? This is more than enough space. What's your friend? This is really nice. The biggest problem is that we can't agree on what we both.

Jase Jen Susie Jennifer Jason Cabinet
"afford" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

07:36 min | Last month

"afford" Discussed on The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

"Through 25 seasons. Hey. 4561 episodes. I believe The Oprah Winfrey Show was one of the greatest classrooms in the world. A world never thought of it that way. The aha moments, the breakthroughs, the LOLs, the connections, the occasional, ugly cry. I miss him so terribly, I miss it every single minute. The moments that mattered. The eye opening, life lessons. Never allow them to take you somewhere else. I'm bringing them back. It's time to open the vault. I personally chosen these classic episodes to share with you again. Every single person you ever will meet, shares that common desire. They want to know. Do you see me? Do you hear me? That's what I say, mean anything to you. You are listening to The Oprah Winfrey Show. The podcast. So are you thinking that you can afford that new SUV because of 0% financing? Maybe you believe that now is a time to buy a new house because interest rates are at an all time low. Well, you all know Suzy orman, she's the author of three bestselling books, including the road to wealth. She is here to crunch the numbers and help you figure out exactly what you can really afford. Suzie says, most people are living in denial about what they can really afford. And now is not the time to be in denial. Now if there was ever a time it is not now when the economy is not supporting your denial. Right. They're trying to get people in denial about it because it's easier to it's easier. People really feel that they are entitled. And they want they work so hard, don't you, you work so hard. And you just want a little thing here and a little thing there. And the problem is those little things add up to a lot of debt. And then you don't want those things anymore. And then you get depressed and then you go out and how do you solve that depression? By buying more things. So it's really a normal phenomenon that we have to put a stop, too. Okay. A lot of lifelong financial struggles begin with the wedding. This is Jennifer and her fiance Jason. And they are planning a wedding next fall, and they have different ideas about what they can really afford. I have just mountains of debts right now. Credit cards. I owe on a motorcycle I have. I owe on the ring for Jennifer. I'm anticipating spending about three thousand on a dress. $3000, I think it's a good deal. I don't know. I have car payments. I still have my school debt, my tuition, I'm still paying back. The invitations that I saw and that I really loved looking for about $800 for 50. We were planning on inviting about 200 people. That was awesome a little bit. It's 16,000. I usually don't think I have that much. That's not even counting what she's got somewhere around 25,000 with all her bills. The caterer will probably be about a $125 a person. The honeymoon will probably cost about $5000 for Hawaii. I really wanna give Jennifer the wedding of her dreams, but I don't wanna end up in debt. I absolutely don't mind going in a debt for this wedding because I know in a few years Jason, my will probably be able to pay it off. I do not want to put anything on credit card. I will pay for my wedding with credit cards. I will do anything to have the wedding in my dreams. I know my budget is different than what Jennifer's budget is. I tell her 20, but I'm trying to get things more around 15. Our budget as far as I'm concerned is 25,000, but I don't have a problem going over. I'm definitely nervous when you combine both of our debts together. It makes me a lot more nervous about this wedding. And what we're gonna have to come up with to afford it. More of this conversation in just a moment. Start your day in a positive way with the Lisa show. A high energy engaging morning show. Radio personality Richie T joins award winning author comedian and mother Lisa Valentine Clark for fun, entertaining and useful conversations. Lisa's warm personality helps listeners find hope, optimism and life perspective, particularly parents who have kids at home. And Richie's good natured enthusiasm makes the show a bright spot on any playlist. Catch Lisa and Richie interviewing the latest bestselling children's author, or talking tips for improving your family's mental health with experts. Some recent topics featured include staying motivated at work. First day of school traditions, better and faster decision making. Fighting our gifts, and how to have hard conversations with family. One thing's for sure, whatever they're talking about, you'll leave feeling better than you did before. Listen to the Lisa show wherever you get your podcasts. So we tagged along with Jennifer and Jason last Saturday as they took a closer look at what their dream wedding would cost. I'm a bride. Yay. It looks beautiful. I do. If the stress was, you know, 5000. Definitely, I wouldn't care about the price that was 1500. Okay. The veil was one 80. And tiara is two 85. See where we are. It was 19. Oh my God. That's it? That's it. Well, alteration. It's gonna be probably about two 50. So 22 15? Yeah, 22 15. Right. That's good. And then tax, of course. 24 O 8. 24 O 8, not bad. It's under your budget. Yeah, under my bushy, Jason's now, I'm not sure. Oh, I like the dome. Do you like the dome on? That's nice too. I'm getting so excited. Now I know that there was a payment plan for the engagement. Do you have any kind of payment plans for the wedding for winning bands? We certainly do. We have a number of different options. We ask for a 25% deposit. And then when the ring comes in, put it on one of the finance programs. Okay. This album is called the Tiffany. I like that. Jason, bottom line is $2995. Not including tax. That's good. I have no idea how we afford them. But hunt, I mean, these are pictures they're gonna last forever. Something's gonna give that, I don't think we can afford it. The look how nice is this here, so I definitely want those. Well then you're gonna have to cut up something else. We can't afford this drink. I feel like the juhan? I love the view. Now, I'm sure you're wondering about dollars and cents. Yes. Brazilian. Which would be the ideal spot for 200 people. In $6000 on a Saturday night, not including anything, but the space. Is that correct? For the space. What are your price ranges? We are a custom cater. I can begin at a $105 and includes an open bar as well as three courses down meal, including wedding cake and pastor dirt. I think that's a good price. Option 5. Then you still have to think of how many people we want to have here though. Right. There's a 150 to 200 people coming. You think you can afford it? I know she likes the place, but I really worried it's gonna be out of our budget. I'm feeling very overwhelmed. I don't think there's any way we could pay cash for this wedding. You'd be putting bills on credit cards. We don't have very much saved up for something like this. I was thinking we could possibly save the money as we go. And when the event comes, we pay for the majority of it. But now I'm starting to see that they want to be paid well in advance of.

Jennifer Oprah Winfrey Suzy orman Jason Richie T Lisa Valentine Clark Lisa Suzie Richie depression Hawaii
"afford" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

Stansberry Investor Hour

05:26 min | 2 months ago

"afford" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

"And with cryptocurrencies, I really especially Bitcoin, I'd really like to be able to say that because my heart, my wallet, my future Eric, my generations below me, all want to be able to say that, but then you brought up that uncle point of or is a life change point or maybe a when do I become in the phrase we use in crypto is irresponsibly long. And I don't mean ludicrously long or taking leverage risk because the Bitcoin market has a way of finding leverage and snuffing it out from time to time. Not every time, but from time to time, enough so that it's pavlovian almost. But yeah, that uncle point of if I was to approach Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies rationally and say, I think my reasonable amount of exposure is, let's say, 1% 5% 10%. Something like that. And those are the different Strata of how bullish are you? How bearish on the rest of the world, et cetera, right? You hear the Fiat arguments and you've got your gold and you've got your ammo box and you've got your 50 year water and your band aids and you're ready to go on come what May and Bitcoin may hold a piece of that and then you love technology. So you buy some cryptocurrencies, et cetera. And then they go ten X or 20 X or 50 X, right? Because if you're if your goal, if Dan Ferris gold was worth and oh man, there's so many ways to go with this barring hyperinflation. Because everything goes ten X and a hundred X in hyperinflation. But let's say we're not in a hyperinflation world or a dollar Fiat hyperinflation world. And you pick one just right, and now it's worth 70% of your portfolio. I think we talked about this before is on a previous episode. There's a VC who said I have 50% of my money in Bitcoin. Because I started with 5% of my money in Bitcoin. So if you approached him and said, what's rational amount of money put in Bitcoin? He would have never said 50%. And you almost might second guess him. Well, why are you getting your two and 20? Or whatever it is. I guess that's a hedge fund. Why are you charging people if all you're doing is holding 50% of bitcoins? Well, maybe his answer would be because I had the nerve to hold it there. But at some point then don't you think do you feel like scaling that back? If 5% was right, then his 50% still right. And that question and it rolls around in my brain because I've got two hands and one of them is diamond..

Dan Ferris Eric Fiat aids
"afford" Discussed on The Oklahoma Observercast

The Oklahoma Observercast

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"afford" Discussed on The Oklahoma Observercast

"And now i've got you know So many wonderful stories just from ios six years in three general elections at a primary runoff on the doors in house district twenty eight. Well i mean there's the sense that our legislators i mean next to the city council's especi specifically the house. You know here in. Oklahoma are pretty close to their constituents. You know with the senate. It's a little bit different because of districts are larger congress. Definitely especially if frank lucas's district. It's kinda of kind of farther and farther removed from your actual constituents and then you also look at like say voting on voter turnout in specifically oklahoma elections. Where it's in some in some districts it's literally a couple hundred people in also the sensor proximity to voters since the proximity to your district I've always just been really struck at. I feel like legislators are actually very mindful of the needs and concerns of their constituents. So you know. I think that's kind of a i kind of want to go in the direction of with that in mind with the overwhelming success or the i'd not overwhelming with the great success of ballot initiatives in the state of oklahoma Will arnold and i have talked in the past about how that seems to kind of point to a failure of the legislature to really address. The issues that mattered of a human's namely medicaid expansion. You know its passage by a hair but its passage nonetheless You know medical marijuana. I'm of course criminal. Justice reform didn't pass this year. But i just have to wonder you know this. Let this session. We have some legislation up. That would make it harder for those ballot initiatives to qualify in so. I'm just curious where they're getting these ideas..

six years Oklahoma congress three general elections Will arnold this year ios oklahoma couple hundred people eight frank twenty lucas
"afford" Discussed on The Oklahoma Observercast

The Oklahoma Observercast

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"afford" Discussed on The Oklahoma Observercast

"Kelly haney then went on and Two thousand and four ran for the oklahoma house of representatives from house district. Twenty eight which that time was all of seminole county northern potter awarta me county southwest lincoln county western fussy county Served from two thousand and four to two thousand and ten two thousand and ten Decided well i decided well before. Then but two thousand ten ounce that. I had had enough of banging my head against the wall and decided to leave and not long after leaving their worked in a few campaigns and and offer for a bit but landed at an amazing position with it at wonderful opportunity with the aclu of oklahoma and served as the aclu bocom executive director for a little over nine years and step down from that role.

two thousand Kelly haney Twenty eight Two thousand four bocom ten ounce oklahoma ten ten two thousand lincoln over nine years seminole county awarta northern potter western fussy aclu
"afford" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"afford" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Afford to go anywhere, a lot of places people being turned around. Just the amount of time to stick its been in traffic trying to get somewhere. You know, I keep telling everybody is faith overthere. Hurricane Laura is expected to pack a devastating punch to the Texas Louisiana border region. I'm Elizabeth Trove, all in Houston Vice President Mike Pence will deliver his acceptance speech tonight at the Republican National Convention. NPR's Don Gani reports. President Trump is also expected to make another appearance this evening. Vice president, Pence with his button down style provides a contrast to the outsized personality and self promotion of President Trump on the GOP ticket. The Trump campaign's as Pence will speak in quote, optimistic tones about a second term for the Trump Administration is also expected to praise the administration's handling of the Corona virus pandemic that has now claimed the lives of more than 177,000. Americans. Also speaking tonight, presidential adviser Kellyanne Conway, who, citing family pressures, is leaving her White House job at the end of the month. Her husband and her teenage daughter are both vocal Trump critics. Don Gani, a NPR NEWS Washington arrest has been made in a least one of the fatal shootings in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Occured during unrest following the police shooting of a black man. Two people were killed, another seriously injured in the attack from member station W. W. M. LaToya Dennis reports. Police in Antioch, Illinois, arrested 17 year old Kyle Rittenhouse on charges of first degree intentional homicide, Rittenhouse was with an armed group will appear to be protecting private property. The mayor of Kenosha job, Ansari. Mian is calling on people to let police handle things. No, I don't need more guns on the street in the community when we're trying to make sure that we keep people safe. Law enforcement is trained. More National Guard troops and police from surrounding jurisdictions are headed to Kenosha, which is under a 7 p.m. curfew for NPR news. I'm LaToya Dennis in Kenosha continued profits in the tech sector. How pushed the overall market higher is well. Today, the Dow was up 83 points. The NASDAQ gained 198 points the S and P Rose 35 points. This is NPR. And this is WNBC in New York. I'm David. First New York City Public School teachers are continuing to explore a possible strike if their safety concerns are not satisfied by the first day of school. Sent effectively set for September 10th Their union wants Corona virus testing for all teachers and students who will attend classes in person, along with proper ventilation. Gothamist reporter Sophia Chang says the union's leadership has been scheduling calls with chapter leaders. The calls were sort of check in with the membership. About their appetite for a strike, whether they're willing to do so because strikes are illegal in New York state for public sector of plays. Those who strike could face a loss of pay or even jail time. The M T. A is preparing for what it calls horrendous choices. If $12 billion from the federal government doesn't come through empty, a chairman Pat Foy says. Without the federal aid, the transit agency will need to cut subway and bus service by 40%. And commuter train service by half. It will cause a huge disruption in in the empty days, operation, its service in the region and huge lasting damage to the economy of the New York City region. Voice as the deficit comes from the drop in ridership and Corona virus related expenses. Right now, subway ridership is at 25% of what it was prior to the pandemic. New York Senators, Gillibrand and Schumer say they're fighting.

Kenosha New York Mike Pence NPR President Trump Don Gani Trump Administration Vice President Trump Kyle Rittenhouse W. W. M. LaToya Dennis Hurricane Laura New York City Public School LaToya Dennis Kellyanne Conway Elizabeth Trove Republican National Convention Texas Louisiana GOP
"afford" Discussed on Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"afford" Discussed on Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

"Four to six years when I started a family also, how do I tell my future wife at the House that I'm buying now is mine and we have to still buy a house together. One day Okay. Is this where pre-nup comes in would love to hear your thoughts. Okay. Wow. Okay. Just listen you. You you didn't maybe have stepped my game up here. All right. So first and foremost, love a that you're young. You're clear. You understand that, hey, I'm wondering to save up by Mon House you got money set aside you've been investing. This money. That's in stocks. I. Don't I cannot. When I read stocks, I think single stocks are I think? Right and makes my heart because it's it's his fluctuates and you've got fifty K. and high at your savings so that to me is must be your emergency fund. So here's what I would do. couple things I would obviously look at liquidating the stock use that as the home down payment by something smart Remember you make your money on the by Justin. So you WANNA buy reasonable be intelligent about that and go you said four to six years at fine Again, boy able to start a family or you gotta meet Mrs Right and all this other stuff. So gives you some time down the road. Now, the second part, how do I tell my future wife at the home that I'm buying now is mine and we still have to buy a home together one day. Okay. This where you go how the Pronoun Problem But the, here's the. Reality you meet Mrs Right you know the reality is a if you haven't paid this else off, you would sell it and then you guys would buy a home together once she remarried so that so then it would become your house together that mindset so that that's the process that you'd go through with it Is there a pre nup that comes in? I, Listen pre-nup I. This is that's a situation where there would have to be some seriously established wealth beginning on the front end and. Then I've had people talk through again I've run into this as I've dealt with athletes, actors, and situations like that which were there was some extreme wealth when this stuff was Kinda talked about But on the front end of this, you know you this is not something you need at all but what you do want to do is to continue to be focused on saving I do love your habit my friend you're investing you're saving at twenty seven years old I, love your mindset to. Keep growing with this money stuff I think you do have an opportunity, become an everyday millionaire being clear and taking the right steps but just being aware of what it is, you do don't run ahead of cash. Okay. Be Intentional slowdown and want you to make to your decisions. That means you make a decision today that you're going to look back on in two years and your Dag on glad you made it. That's the key buddy. Thank you for your email I got pumped email in from Amanda. In Rhode Island Rhode. Island, that's a place I've never been. I, need to go check it out. They say hi Chris. I'm pumped to tell you that my husband and I are now debt free. We paid off my final student loan of twenty nine, thousand, seven, hundred and thirty, six dollars and seventy nine cents. Yes people they wrote it out. So I won't say it out over the past fifteen months and we finally moving on to baby step three. We started this journey five years ago and have paid off over. Seventy thousand dollars in debt. Thank you so much for all that you do and for keeping US focused and never finished well, Amanda and Michael. I am proud of you all congratulations job well, done that you all set this goal and you've been extremely intentional over the last five years I have no doubt that you guys will jump on into baby step three, get that three to six month emergency fund in place, and then you'll start investing to begin that everyday millionaire journey I have no doubt. Wow, et gets me excited. All right. Listen to me. VIP's if you're out there and you're feeling panic, you got something on your brain. You Wanna be able to talk about it and you're of stressed. No, we're here for you. Oh, you have to do is email me ask at Chris Hogan three sixty put panic than the subject line. Therefore, we can see what it is and let's talk about it and if you're pumped same thing, ask at Chris, Hogan Sixty put pumped in the subject line I'd love to be able to hear from you and To be able to share with you and in your joy 'cause there's nothing wrong with winning because we all know that hard work makes results happen listen to me. I want to thank all the callers for taking the time to call in. We appreciate you as always I want to thank the entire Chris show production team for making stuff happen there on the ball and I'm so proud and honored work with them and so VIP's remember I appreciate you.

Chris Hogan Mrs Right US Amanda Mon House Justin Dag Rhode Island Rhode Michael
"afford" Discussed on Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"afford" Discussed on Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

"IRA that one point two in the house it's probably worth. Another one point five and house paid off. Yes You're. Not. going. To. Run out. Of Money. You I can. Talk. I. Yeah. You need to go do some stuff. You. Travel once in awhile often how often do you travel care? Once, a year. For like three days. No I go for a couple of weeks. Home and I keep working. What do you love what you do? It's okay. what what line of work are you in? I sell books you sell books. Okay. My late husband book collections. Okay Big Book Collection. I want you to hear me though listen to me. You are not going to run out of money. You broke the cycle. You broke. It's it's done. From urine now, what you doing his focus on doing things to hand off the baton? Okay, you broken you did it. and. You've been very focused diligent I. Want you to go have some fun now. I want you to give yourself that permission. I want you to travel once a quarter, not once a year. Okay. I. Want you think of some charity? Some charities that you enjoy I want you to go shop go buy some stuff you see. Go, buy some stuff. Do you know rare it is that I'm I'm normally telling people stop buying stuff and I'm telling you get out there and do something. Seriously, you've worked hard, and this is a real thing. People struggle with Carol as much as people struggle to try to get out of debt, they struggled with the permission to enjoy. Feel guilt and I want you to do that you worked. Honey you've worked your tail off to get to here. You have, and so start to look and think about what's this next phase look like for you. You don't have to work anymore if you don't want to so I would want you to do some stuff. You love some stuff you that get you excited but I want you to make that travel list where you're GONNA go next. This is important and Carol I appreciate you reaching out but as far as. The kids you can talk with them about what it is. You see fit age appropriate I would love you to start to bring them in and make them a little bit more aware of the charitable things that you're doing the things you want to see long-term whether there's a school or Scholarship Fund you want to start or whatever it might be, but you need to dream out loud about that. VIP's I spent extra time on that call because this is a real situation we have to be able to have permission to enjoy some stuff to be able to go. You know what? It's okay because see we feel bad about winning. There's this mindset out there right that you should feel guilty for winning and I don't ever I've never seen a team, win the Super Bowl or or win a championship and go I can't take this ring. I can't take this we we wanted all but I just I don't know. I don't know if the scoreboard which know when you win you win and the bottom line is the mindset in the heart set about how you're handling money how you're treating people along the way. All of this is important and Carol, has a great opportunity. Did you hear it? You could hear it in a voice she wanted to break the cycle and I was like young lady. You already have. Now it's a matter of moving forward with confidence. That makes me happy. Wow. Okay. It's now time for did you know this an opportunity for me to give you some information maybe knew it maybe you didn't but get confused on this one a lot. So I'm excited to really kind of make this a little bit more clear for people all the way round. So did you know the difference between the financial coach and investment professional now? This is something we I talk about and I'll hear people that are out there that aren't in the industry I've been in this money stuff over twenty years. So I I it's to me it's I hear it and I'm able to kind of clarify know what they're looking for but there are two broad categories of people that I recommend you got for an annual coaches and you have investment professionals. Now hear me with this your current goals will determine on who you're GONNA meet with a financial coach is kind of like A. Personal trainer for you and your money they're going to help you with budgeting..

Carol investment professional Scholarship Fund
"afford" Discussed on Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"afford" Discussed on Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

"Payment on US twenty, six, sixty, seven Nineteen month, I love that you know your numbers. No I'm serious. You're down to the penny what? What do you do for a living? I'm a teacher of course there it is right there. Okay. So let me ask you this. You live in New York, there's a reality of cost of living based on where people are. Okay. Won't just point blank What you're paying twenty, six hundred, a month seems Kinda low for New York. Really what term do you have this mortgage on? It thirty and. Thirty turn what's your rate? They percent. You got a decent rate How long ago? Did you buy this home? It sixteen years ago. However, I got divorced about ten years ago I got a re modification and so when you look at it, it says thirty years. Phil. Wait a minute you said re modification is it happened I did I didn't think I'd be able to afford it by myself. So I went to the bank and I got a lower payment but of course they put everything on the tail and the added years Didn't think about at that time with you but is this balance of to ninety four, the full balance or is your? Are you sure? I'm positive. Okay. All right. All right. So Today would be done. Okay. How much do you have saved toward retirement? Boy Not enough I feel like a hundred thousand dollars. Okay. All right. Do you have a pension as a teacher I do. Okay. All right. So you got the pinch. Let me ask you this. Are you going to be in? New, York, when you retire. Why been likely? Okay. All right. Unlikely. But I might reconsider by the time I retire not much might be going too fast. New York going to retire. But but looking at this, what other debt do you have outside of the home nine hundred dollars in credit card? That's it. That's it. Yeah Okay what kind of listen is this store card. Marcia? No. Actually actually no it's a kind of car where I get like sky mouth. I know listen I went to the whole financial planning I went to the Financial Planning University. That's what made me read your book and that's how I decided to. Okay. I need to get it together. Let's get together All right. So Financial Peace University got you started on it. Here's a reality unlike him I want you to remember this. In retire inspired I was telling people listening. You don't WanNa bring debt into the situation with you. You have equity in this home of cake. If you decided to sell it, you're going to be able to make money. So the mindset I would tell you is this when you're wanting to retire in fifteen years you okay and so I would if I were you contact you big. Said Work Two seventy if you. Know listen to me I'm not proposing you work longer listen to me I am proposing reach out to this bank and find out what would your loan? What would the payment look like on a fifteen year note? Okay and I just want them to run the numbers. The reason why is a? Can you imagine you're going to pay this home off faster but can you imagine you stroke in the last mortgage payment on the last day you're working? Can you imagine because if fifteen years is your goal and we get you on a fifteen year mortgage young lady, you could be doing that very thing. Now I firmly believe this if you only have nine hundred and credit card debt and you're a part of a book club reading my book retire inspired girl, you are setting dreams you are setting goals. Now, what you have to do is follow it. Okay. So here's what I want you to do I want you to get a quote on a fifteen year. Let's find out what that would look like. Let's set this up pay credit card off today and don't don't do anymore girl talk to me about no sky miles or Scott points. We won't you to have some some Marcia cash as what I won't you have, and you can do this thing I'm proud of you Marsha I'm GonNa send you both of my books. I'M GONNA sign him more Amanda get her address for him. If you would because I like her mindset I, like the fact that marshes dream in HD, and she's looking at stuff ceesay. You read the book and she's thinking about this thing what do I gotTa do for my future? What do I want? What's it look like? What do I need to do right now and see you can coat someone like her you you because you can see she's serious about it and that's the point and I liked that Marcia thank you so much looking at this you know you wanna be intentional. You WanNa make decisions you need a plan VIP. That's what the show's all about helping us get situated for the future. We got stuff to do I like that. All right. Next up I got Carol I get to go to Virginia Carol what's on your mind? Good Morning Chris Hi widow who is an everyday millionare's through mutual funds in my IRA? Yes. Ma'am my children are in their late twenties. They both have roth as contribute every month. So they're on their way. I'm black and I wonder break the family cycle of treating money as a big scary secret. But I. But I don't want them to take their foot off the accelerator for their personal savings just now thinking you know a mom's got a little mistake. The question is should I tell my children? How much money I have? No. Care I like this I'd like to hear, here's the thing you have obviously been teaching these kids about your adult children about money. Correct. They were maybe okay. So you've helped guide you've helped to shape i. think there are ways that you can begin to introduce it but only when you're comfortable okay because I think you're right I'm with you. You don't want them to get lazy going Oh mom's got this big thing that she's going to leave Bob Blah Blah us because they obviously yourself are they're motivated people right? And I don't want them to stop. That's right. That's exactly right. So I think here's the deal for you. It would be a matter of thinking when do you think they're ready to handle that you know I mean here's the reality care. You don't have to tell them I mean it could be a thing that issue set up in your estate plan and. You can find out later I've had people say, Hey, I'm not telling them or I'm going to let them know that. Hey, I'm I'm doing well, I want you to do well. You may have something left to you in an form of an inheritance I've had other people say, Hey, you're going to get the inheritance, but you have to do x Y and Z, and that's through a trust I mean. So there are many ways you can do this but if they're driven people say you know it'd be a matter of their level of maturity but but for you, you don't have to talk about it with them if you don't want to. It's okay. I don't know what I'm not being. Not at all I think it would be a matter you said you've been training them and teaching them about money I think the big thing for you would be is what does Carol want you know How long have you been a widow widow for twenty one years twenty Oh, my goodness. To really focus on this I bet and you did this you really did I'm proud of you What are you doing for you? I thought you hung up on me I was like what? What what are you doing for you? What's your high definition dream? Still Working and Saving Okay because I'm scared I still have this underlying anxiety from my childhood that I will run out of money So what's your network their?.

New York Marcia Carol US Financial Peace University Phil York Financial Planning University Bob Virginia Marsha Amanda Scott roth IRA
"afford" Discussed on Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"afford" Discussed on Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

"You to take charge of your money. Don't let your money just sit around while you do all the hard work, make your money work for you with an online. Fund savings account with fairwinds credit union. I'm a huge fan of fair winds online banking. It allows you to bank anytime anywhere. You don't even have to live in the state with the branch to be an online member and with your fairwinds mobile APPs, you can transfer money or make a deposit using your smartphone or tablet. So move your money over to fairwinds dot org slash. Chris Today. That's fair. Winds dot org slash. Chris fairwinds is federally insured by the NCUA All right. If you're out there, you've gotta question I want to hear from you the number to call eight, four, four, two, eight, three, nine, three, eight, three, again that's eight, four, four, two, eight, three, nine, three, three, call leave me a voicemail. Let me know what's going on If you prefer, you can email me ask Chris Hogan three sixty either way I want to get your question. All right Oh I get to go to New York right out of the Bat I love going to the Big Apple Marsha, how are you? I, am willing to south. How're you Chris I am focused not finish what's on your mind today. Okay. Where do I start? Okay. I am fifty years old. I would like to retire in fifteen years. I currently owe two, hundred, ninety, four, thousand, six, hundred, twenty, seven, thousand, forty, three cents on my mortgage I'm concerned that I won't be able to pay that off in the next fifteen years according to your book we should not plan to go into retirement with the mortgage. So I was wondering should I sell my house? All Right Marcia how much is this homework right now? Twenty nine. Okay. And how.

"afford" Discussed on Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"afford" Discussed on Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

"Be. Ip. You don't WanNa Miss the upcoming episode I've got a caller. She's a part of a book club. They just retire inspired she wants to retire without debt. She's not sure what to do with this mortgage. She needs some guidance. I'm going to walk through it and I got an everyday millionaire on the line but her kids adults twenty, five and thirty they don't know it. So she wants to know, should she tell them or should she not stay to? Welcome to the Chris Hogan show home of everyday millionaires I am Chris Hogan, your host VIP's this is your show where your life and your money take center stage. Never forget that it is your life and we've got to take charge while I'm glad to be back with you. I'm excited for this show all the segments make me happy I've got some articles I got some things we're going to dive into but more importantly, it's taken your calls I love hearing from you. This is a caller driven show. So without calls or don't have a show which means then Bob's. GonNa put me to work doing other stuff and Amanda I don't want that. So I want you to call me call call call call the number to call is eight, four, four, eight, three, nine, three, eight, three, call leave a voicemail with your questions keep doing it. If you don't call in, then I have to do meetings I don't like meetings I'd much rather talk to you. So call me eight, four, four, two, eight, three, nine, three, eight, three or if you prefer, you can send an email ask Chris. Hogan three sixty DOT COM. All right. So listen to me. Someone said how do you keep your energy up Hogan They WanNa know how what do I do? Well, here it is. You all heard me say this and I'M GONNA SAY IT But it's hard to be hateful when you're grateful. And I am so grateful for so many people. I'm so grateful for the opportunity to do what it is that I do and I get excited about what people can become is the as a coach I, push that's my job I to push people to become better I want to encourage people to become better but at the same time, I'm also having to do that for myself, and so I think we all have an opportunity to get better. We all have an opportunity to encourage into push others and so looking for those opportunities I think are. Crucial. Doesn't mean that life doesn't get hard. It just means that we don't have to take a hard look at our own situation with your reaching out to grab and hold in God someone else. So I want to encourage you to do that today find three people for you to encourage today I want you to tell them what they mean to you or what they've done for you, and you can text them or call them. But I, want you to do that. Let's find three people to encourage uplifted was what happens it's A. Ripple effect and I think that's a good ripple. All right bump into this article. This is from business insider and this is an interesting one because obviously it's title that'll grab you and here's the title three savings mistakes I see over and over as a financial planner. Now, this one is is interesting because you know financial planner these people are bumping and they're talking to people day in and day out about what's going on. But when you get someone that says, Hey, I'm seeing this thing over and over that's what's called a trend. Okay and trends. I think are can be good things or it can be negatives This guy has been helping people with retirement savings goals, but he shares the three most common savings mistakes. He seen with clients number one not making savings up top priority. People often try to save whatever's left over after they spend. So he said instead we should have I. believe a say I spend second mentality I think this is absolutely crucial. Mistake number two not having a balance between emergency cash money for specific goals and retirement accounts. Oh, we're getting into it. Now, he says when you're juggling various goals, it can be tough to know how much to put in each bucket, which is why you need to be intentional to set a specific dollar amount for each of these emergency fund specific goals as well as retirement. Now hear me with this because people will get riled up with me. and. They'll say Chris you don't want anybody to have no stuff. That's just not true. Okay. I don't want to have you all right and so if it's attached the debt, it's got you so I don't nothing wrong with you saving toward a goal whether it's a boat or motorcycle or something like that. That's fine. But we gotta do it and categories and be aware of what it is. We're striving for mistake number three not saving enough. guy says regardless of income levels, all sorts of people have trouble being disciplined and saving enough. ooh I mean he have to go jabs like Being disciplined, you know and lesson. No one likes discipline but everyone loves improvement. Are I think about that? No one likes change but everyone loves improvement and so what do we have to do I think it's our mindset. It's a matter of being intentional about what it is. We want to make happen but more importantly why what's the thing that comes from that and so I've been getting healthier. Okay. I have I am doing stuff eating a lot of. Salad okay without listen to me, salad is not the food I'm going to talk about this for a minute. You know what? Salad Salad is a promissory note that's what it is. It is salad means you eat the salad you say you know what something better is coming after this it's the thing that happens the Niche Alie, right?.

Chris Hogan Amanda Bob
"afford" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"afford" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Afford so don't let rising steel prices put your project out of reach can stop you from making your company eight hundred nine six five one through nine five eight hundred nine six five one two nine five eight hundred nine six five one two nine five that's eight hundred nine six five twelve ninety five Washington to Wall Street the Americans with all of the yeah good Monday morning America's first news continues on this twenty first day of October thirty four minutes past the hour in Disney's Maleficent mistress of evil knocking off joker at the out of the number one spot at the box office but just barely studio estimates on Sunday as say the film starring Angelina Jolie grossed thirty six million here at home in its first weekend in theaters here at home joker landed in second place at in its third weekend in the years with twenty nine point two million I saw joker over the weekend I was not happy with that didn't like it a lot of people are calling me I names for that in our regular guest Rhonda Martin joins us each Monday here to talk news in the intersection of psychology you can find out more expert news analyst dot com Rhonda good Monday morning good Monday morning.

"afford" Discussed on Note To Future Me

Note To Future Me

13:38 min | 2 years ago

"afford" Discussed on Note To Future Me

"Payments in most cases. You're not going anywhere with that. It's just not going to happen. You know i actually i came on board with calls liftoff. I also have a background. I have a real estate license so <hes> i was working as realtor and <hes> just just time and time again i i was helping clients that were you know mid thirties had kids like trying really hard to buy their first house you know with breath with a government backed loan like trying to scrape together all their savings and get approved for a loan and <hes> it was because they still had so much student didn't loan debt that they were not able to get better loan rate have more savings and i just thought like this you know parents are are sending their kids to college because because they want their kids to be successful happy get a good job be able to raise their own families and <hes> and do well and that's just not happening this this day and age so <hes> i came home from work one day and i was like i gotta join you. We have to make this a thing. You know we have to make this thing that people understand. You don't have to do college in the way that it's being done. There is a better way <hes> because it's not working for people and so you you know the headlines that you see one point five trillion dollars student loan debt you you know people out there. They see the headline. They think it's just that you know and then they they think it's just as big nebulous thing that doesn't apply to them but but it really does <hes> you know because if you're sending your kid to school and he or she's taking on all this debt it's going into effect them into their thirties. Forties fifties page here is just saying that she paid off her student loans this past weekend ray. We've pushed the button together on the phone. Send that final payment. It was awesome right sad because it will. It doesn't go away it. You can't make it go away so <hes> you know but even if it's not your kids going to school you know like i said. I have a background in real estate so oh you know i <hes> you know would help <hes> you know. People were trying to downsize their kids already gone and now they're trying to downsize and they're complaining about why the millennials you know by our house for their families. Everybody's putting off marriage putting off house you know and i ah nobody can afford to you know because because the younger generation isn't thinking now about you know having kids at a younger age because they you can't afford to they can't afford to buy a house with four bedrooms or stole renting from their friends like aaron. This isn't a choice. This is a reality polity for <unk> like it. Just it's just set up for that right. So you see you see the the problem that exists in st access so you have all you have all these marketing opportunities and different ways to try to educate and let everyone know yeah. You see these big numbers in his how it affects you <hes> you you go the route of podcasting. Let's talk about that decision. How did it come about that. You wanted to do a podcast. Well really just felt like it was a really great way to. You'd get that message out to help people <hes> i mean we can't be everywhere <hes> every time talking about with a megaphone. This is a problem. This is a problem <hes> we try to do as as many <hes> presentations at at libraries and schools as we can and we have <hes> a good facebook presence but <hes> having this form ormc being able to do a podcast we can we can just state problems answer questions directly for parents wherever you are whether you're in columbus ohio or you know across the country anywhere really <hes> so. We just really wanted to this podcast to be a megaphone for us to to answer you. You know parents questions. There's so many out there colleges become so crazy and <hes> we just really want to help people awareness. Awareness is such a a part of where we are at this point. Is we deal with a very big problem. I mean a very very big societal problem. That is really just not really all that recognized talk about it loosely here and there we see the things that can happen <hes> but one point five trillion dollars in debt as country in this thing is second mortgage that there's there's nothing else close to either of those two things. <hes> and college costs are going anywhere. People think that they're going to get cheaper. They're not like that's not things. Don't go backwards and costs they stagnate egg nate but they don't go backwards so middle america trying to buy college in this day and age is heart probably the hardest thing that they're doing and they don't realize it <hes> so we have to as alex at create a megaphone or whatever we can just talk and say like looked. Don't just do this thing. That's just assists. You see everybody else doing big air quotes. You've got to think through this more logically or else your retirement gone or your kids aren't buying a home for the next twenty years like those are the things you're sacrificing at this point. If you don't do this right right so i liken <hes> you know to creating any kind of content whether a content or call it assets. That's got to have some kind of r._o._i. Return on investment or even return on influence so you had the border line and i think with what you're doing and again <hes> full disclosure. I work with you. You work with us regards putting the podcast together and i ask these questions kind of in the vein. I don't know what you're doing but i do the same time and we work with your kids right exactly yeah so it's kind of full circle so you have a vested interest in making sure that this does work <hes> but at the same time i cognizant of what you do with the episodes of you're very well versed in regards to what you do. How do you know where that tipping point is of too much information in a podcast that you're not giving away the secret sauce and and i think i i know what you do with it and and but i want to get your perspective on how are you go while you're recording because against unscripted you i know where you're going with these episodes but i think this is this is a problem with some businesses that do the consultative work your your consultants uh-huh with these parents and these these families of helping them get through where they need to do on a lot of proprietary ideas and your heads how you do this but at the same time you're giving away a lot of information. How do you dress how do you how do you go with each episode and know that okay. We'll get a stop here on one hand. We want to give away a lot of information because we're the intent of this podcast is really to help people and to start the conversation answer questions you know when when parents or or students or you know perspective parents you know anybody that's listening you know is thinking. Oh my gosh you know one day. I'm going to have a kid and they're going to go to college or advocate and i you. Are they going to go to college. You know we really wanna like you know. We really feel for parents out there that don't have anybody advocating for them so we want to give away information that will help with them be able to make better decisions. <hes> that will understand the process. <hes> you know so on that hand you know we're not terrified of giving giving away too much information but i think where it where it stops is it. You know there's only so much that we can say without than actually actually having to work with you. So we do a lot of work. We <hes> we have you know a whole entire writing center. <hes> at college will often it's spectacular. <hes> we have <hes> writing camps. <hes> we have one on one essay writing advisors <hes> so we talk about it and talk about you know some components of a great essay but that's not gonna help that will help somebody only enough. It's not a it's doesn't take the place of actually sitting down with an adviser working on your college essay going through the pure editing process and pages is in charge of our writing center so she can talk more about that. It's my favorite part of what i no. It's true like even you know we. We have a great workshop that we provide for oliver juniors. We sit down and we talk about these things. You need need to include your essay. These are some things you should exclude and we could share all of that here and i would feel totally fine with not you know not giving away our secret sauce because inevitably at some point you as the sooner gonna need to sit down figure out. Which do you want to answer. Develop your thesis do your pre writing which we fight to fewer students <hes> and then right right right right right and inevitably every kid who comes through goes wow six hundred fifty dollars. That's a lot and then the first draft the handover as like nine hundred words because six hundred fifty words is new words at all when when you try to convey who you are as a person to a group of people deciding whether or not to let you into college but i'm gonna make sure that the six hundred fifty words that you have on your paper are the right ones that really tell your best story and are the most precise verbs and really give a sense of who you are as human n- without relying on generalities i want specific details and i want to make sure that we're we're sticking to you know a relevant time period in your life the the last couple of years not what happened when you were six those sorts of things but again like we talk about all of that here and we have but i can't do the editing of your your first draft unless we sit down together. We don't fear information. Information is an awareness and that's the thing we actually leap need to get more out of as awareness of the topic the the as were all saying it's the work that's actually needed to be done in order to make that information actually usable right <hes> so i talked about this a lot in our podcast of what college planning is today and what it should look like when it should feel like going to try to use basis of comparison of other things we do in life in order to signify that so i talk a lot about it being very similar to buying a house where you say like okay. There's four thousand two hundred universities each one or two hundred majors. It's a plethora almost a google alaska problem of choice <hes> so when you look at it like in comparison to how many houses on them in or on the market any given time in an area eh you don't go visit three thousand houses. You visit like maybe ten and then you you may bid on like. Are you a actually tried to apply apply. You initially tried to get one two or three bids for them same thing here but you use a realtor to do it. There's work and steps that go into that as a process use a realtor use a banker to get your mortgage. They're all the things they're you know what the process looks like that doesn't mean doing physical was the smartest thing do or the easiest. It's traditionally the hardest so so. How do you actually do this. Most effective most cost effective way and most time effective way. That's where good college planning should take the place of that all right. I think you do a good job of that. Within the episodes that you give enough information you set yourself up as the experts and realize that and then again it's listeners choice whether they're join contact. You're not you can do this on your own but i think you set the episodes up so well with each topic that i could do this alone. Thank you for for the information but boy. I can't do this alone and i think once you realize the timetable that you're a part of. I think this is with any you know the again a podcast or that has ah information to give out. I don't and i guess my point being. Don't be afraid to give out information absolutely 'cause you're setting yourself up as the expert anyway. It's a branding tool for you. You till now that yeah college liftoff or x._y._z. company. They know what they're talking about. When i'm ready i can listen to a few episodes and i'm gonna pull the trigger. I can trust. I have heard them through five ten twenty episodes yeah and i'll tell you as a real sir <hes> it honestly i personally think and i hope it don't get in trouble for this. I i personally think it is easier to do with his bow on your house than it is to go through the college planning process by yourself honestly from sitting in both seizure. It's it's it's really hard to do college right because there is nobody there are very few people out there advocating for families <hes> so that's what we do you eh. I think you've got a great. You get a unique in a in a different situation because again you're you're branding your your company getting information about college planning earning college liftoff as well as educating how difficult it has become because you're dealing with almost a you know parents that our generation removed from going through this process process it is changed from day <hes> and i think you're utilizing the tools that are available to you on a point <hes> an example being when we first started the series it was just you erin <hes> doing these well. Let's talk about the evolution of this podcast started and and where it is today and maybe where you want it together as well too well. It's it's it's grown along with our company as we've grown which has been really awesome to just he part of c._m._s. started this thing. We're getting ready to go into our ten year anniversary this september and there's gonna be a lot of great new things that we're going to be doing in that a lot of very big things that are going to change change even our position in the market and how we we've we're going to be approaching this <hes> but the one great thing in the lasts especially three years i would. Let's say <hes> with well..

younger age facebook columbus america ohio google aaron oliver alaska alex five trillion dollars one day six hundred fifty dollars twenty years three years one hand ten year
"afford" Discussed on Affording College with Aaron Greene

Affording College with Aaron Greene

08:25 min | 2 years ago

"afford" Discussed on Affording College with Aaron Greene

"Welcome to affording college with Aaron green founder and president of college liftoff. Thirty. Affording college. I'm Erin greenhouse of affording college and found of college left off college, DAV college planning firm. I started to provide solutions for anybody in everybody that's going through college planning, our has college planning needs. Our mission is to secure teens brightest future and save them and their families thousands of dollars in the process we work with teens throughout the entire college planning process starting with personalized one on one critic element work from there. We find the best schools to match our students chosen career paths and interest then offer support throughout the entire mentions process next, we work with families budgets to find the price that makes the most sense for their kids education all while insuring. It's the right fit today. We are hios premier college planning firm. I'm happy to say that where shooting for the world, by the way, and we strive to save time stress and money when it comes to your child's higher education. So that's a little background on myself and college liftoff, I do this podcast. I really want to offer families from solid vice when it comes to planning for college and higher education because there's. So much misinformation out there. The purpose of this podcast is to dispel the Mets and misinformation and really help families. So one of the most important, and yet overlooked aspects of how to do proper effective and successful college planning is really through creative element work. We talk about it all the time in this podcast. And no one knows that better than my coast today. Sarah. Hey, how's it going? Good. Good. Good and page. What's going on? How you guys doing today? So starting with Sarah your rockstar here. College liftoff you've been in visor here with us for about six months. You really are working with families and every step in this process, but you really have a heart for early teens and actually have a background in teaching. She's been working really closely with page college liftoffs manager client planning page has an undergraduate degree in psychology and a graduate degree in education teaching night. Page. You want said in terms of critic element, you're passionate about helping students recognize trained some passions. They didn't recognize fully in themselves leading to careers that they never mentioned or didn't really understand or know about at the time. That is that. Right. Absolutely smart. You should give me a raise. No. It's totally true. It's just amazing when we have students come in even the students who have kind of an idea what they think they want to do so often at something that somebody else's told them, or maybe it's a Crear that someone, you know, has like, I know for instance, I was going to get a degree psychology. I thought that with the guidance counselor did at my element school was really interesting, and it wasn't like from a deeper need to help people or anything. I just thought her job was cool. And that sadly, like no one really talked to me about what I could do with the degree with interested in in some of their area. Like, I just went to school thinking that is what I'll do. I mean hearing today in college planning. So yes, I'm helping people. Yes. I'm guiding them and my counselor in elementary school. I am not. So I think about how if somebody had sat down with me talk to me a little bit about what about psychology. What about guidance counselor work was interesting? I might have moved into a dip. Direction. I'm super super passionate about public health. And since this is the me show will just keep talking about my stuff. We see the same thing in our students. They come in. They might have an inkling or they've been told. Hey, you're really good at this. And so that's sort of informs their idea of potential careers, or at least a potential major and they come in. They sit down with us. And we do this great board exercise with them where we help them identify strings, help them identify even more importantly things they know they don't want to do. And then we look at their strengths and we look at their interests. And then we sort of paired together in Aaron what I like to think of his Aaron's magical formula and health that come up with this enormous list of careers that are potentially viable option for them. And then as we do the work that we do we sit down, and we we continue to research, and as time goes on we get rid of a lot of those careers because they aren't the best fit. But when it clicks with a kid is just so awesome. When they come in to the office. They're like, I love this thing. This is what I wanna do. This is what I love this. This is where I wanna go. What I wanna do? I'm. So happy, and we see it over and over again. I think if at once I'd be like, let's do it again, but pretty much with every student we work with they come in. And they're like, yes, this is that thing that I am born to do if there's a magic pill that we have. And it's not a magic pill per se it, it's it's just a good understanding of the fact that jobs aren't one thing. And I think we hunt suddenly try to put jobs and people and interest in a box and say, here's your one thing. You do this one thing you like psychology, go work and the school, but like you have to put in public health like these other aspects, and when we dissect not just programs at schools, but when we start talking about I setting jobs, and if you ask anybody shoot audience member ask yourself, what does your job really pertain? What are you really doing? And you're gonna come up with a list of probably ten twenty thirty things not two or three. And I think that's where the. Translation is really wrong in this is that at a earlier age. We think off we boil it down to these very boilerplate things that that's the best method in order to get them into. No, it's not it's about talking to students as an adult and having them expand the concept of who they are. And what the jobs are look that look like them and the magic pill to this isn't continuously adding more things to the list. It's about vetting through those things and taking the time to really see what it is. And that's where we get to those points where the kid can walk in and say, you know, what I've sift through all these things we started with it wasn't two hundred at four thousand five hundred universities worth of things. It was about ten to twelve and these are my interest in how they correlate to those. And you know, what this one's for me because I've researched have seen it. I've studied it. I've gotten job exposure to it. Now, I know that this is from me. And that's exactly right. And we have so many students come in and express that oh, they wanna go be an elementary school counselor like you said page, but the. Reality is they only see it from an external position as a student. They don't see the background that goes in and -cation that teacher counselor. How to do and the things that you normally don't think about that accounts are house to do. Right. And so those might be dealbreakers for a student if they actually understood those things so figuring that stuff out now before they even go into it. That's what we're all about idealism. His ideal perspectives of jobs, especially that's what we kinda give our students when their kids when they think about jobs, I say this to every kid walks to the door and every family because it's true most kids know, Dr teacher nurse. My parents who ex that's the extent of the world and truth be told they probably have one or two word terms for each one of those jobs, and they're so vitally in vastly different. But this is how and why we've developed L plus over the past year and trooper toll it takes time to do the stuff, and we've really seen that we really need to start at at at at an early age earlier age early high school, ninth and tenth grade is an fit for one student should be thinking about this on when our students are coming in asking these types of questions and are willing to spend time to do that career development at an earlier age so often I think what we talked to parents. But they're still young. They don't really they have no idea. What they wanna do. We say. Yes, that's. Exactly what you should. I don't want her to come in. And be like. Yep. On fourteen. I'm going to be a lawyer. Yeah. I get it that they're probably some kids out there who already have that in mind. But in general we wanted to help explore and really help just pare down a list. That's it's infinitesimal really tiny include it. So it's infinite. But

founder and president Aaron green Sarah Mets school counselor six months