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30 Burst results for "Aerospace Engineer"

NASA names Washington DC HQ after 'Hidden Figure' Mary Jackson, its first Black female engineer

WGN Nightside

00:41 sec | Last week

NASA names Washington DC HQ after 'Hidden Figure' Mary Jackson, its first Black female engineer

"NASA will honor its first African American female engineer by naming its Washington DC headquarters after her Mary W. Jackson was a mathematician and aerospace engineer he was part of a group of women who helped put astronauts in space their story was told in the movie hidden figures Jackson was played by Janelle Monet in the twenty sixteen filmon postures posthumously awarded the congressional gold medal in twenty nineteen she died in twenty oh five at the age of eighty three today NASA says Jackson was a woman who called who helped break barriers and open opportunities for African Americans and women in the field of engineering and

Nasa Engineer Mary W. Jackson Janelle Monet Gold Medal Washington
SHIIVER: Changing the way NASA keeps its cool

Innovation Now

01:14 min | Last month

SHIIVER: Changing the way NASA keeps its cool

"We really want to go somewhere in space. If we really want to go to the moon we have got to figure out a way to keep propellants cold long enough. This is innovation now bringing you. Stories of revolutionary ideas emerging technologies and the people behind the concepts that shaped the future. Cryogenics is the study of things at very low temperatures. Here's Monica Kuzyk. An Aerospace Engineer at NASA Glenn Research Center to explain why NASA is changing the way they keep their cool so we want to store things like oxygen or hydrogen. If we make them really really cold they turn into a liquid and as we all know. Liquids are denser than gases so they're way more efficient to store when Artemis missions launched to the moon or Mars they will carry liquids with them for fuel and life support but ask. The extreme environment of space warms spacecraft. The fuels begin to or boil off. That's where cry. Oh coolers like shiver the largest cryogenic tank NASA has ever built come into play. Credit is really are in enabling technology to get to where we need to go when we improve cryogenic technologies here for space applications. It always a trickle down effect to the Earth for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer Paulie

Nasa Nasa Glenn Research Center Jennifer Paulie Artemis Missions Aerospace Engineer Monica Kuzyk
Understanding the COVID-19 Data Quality Problem with Sherri Rose

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

10:10 min | Last month

Understanding the COVID-19 Data Quality Problem with Sherri Rose

"Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you for having me. It is great to have a chance to chat with you. I'm looking forward to digging into your background and your research and The things you're doing related to cove it to help out there you know. Let's start at the beginning. How did you become interested in machine learning and in the intersection of that and Healthcare I always was very interested in science and mathematics and physics and I didn't really have a good sense of how you could use that to solve problems when I was going to college and it was during college that I was exposed to this summer. Program called the Summer Institute for training in biostatistics and it really sounded like what I was interested in which was bringing quantitative reasoning thinking to problems in health and public health and I realized very quickly that I needed more than my bachelor's degree in statistics in order to really solve a lot of those problems and I didn't actually get any training in machine. Learning in my bachelor's degree I graduated in two thousand five and the curriculum definitely did not include it at that point and so when I went to graduate school at UC Berkeley in biostatistics. That's where I saw. The the benefit of having really general frameworks in which solve problems. And that's when I started working on non parametric machine learning and having these kind of big picture ways to attack big problems in population health and that was for me. That's been both machine learning in non parametric models for prediction but also causal inference and the driver for me was really the ability to use these flexible tools to solve problems in in healthcare in medicine it must have been helpful having that. Undergrad in stats. It's it's been very helpful. Actually I actually started as a mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Major. And I did not feel very invigorated by the coursework there and I very room and I also was a little frustrated that I was often the only woman in the classes and it just it. There was a lot of reasons why didn't feel like the right fit for me. I ended up taking my second semester in college. Statistics course and I immediately saw how statistics could be used for solving lots of different problems and Engineering Ken as well but for me. The statistics was really how I saw bringing all my interests together. You mentioned non parametric machine learning. What is that? And how does that relate to Both the broader field as well as the healthcare field. If somebody talk about non parametric I mean it. In the very broad statistical sense a non parametric model is a larger model space. Where we're making many fewer assumptions and whereas with parametric models more standard parametric models. We might be making strict assumptions about the functional form the underlying unknown functional form of the data with non parametric. I WanNa really have a large model space. I have a much better opportunity to uncover the truth with my machine learning estimator so many like you're not assuming a normal distribution which has a couple of parameters and a standard deviation it could be anything definitely not definitely not that would be a limiting gumption in your work. Yeah absolutely and most of the data that I work with does not conform to those types of strict assumptions. Talk a little bit more about the scope of your research interests and where you apply machine learning. It sounds like you are interested. Both in the of the systematic issues the healthcare system with the relationships between the providers and the payers as well as clinical issues absolutely so in health services research were really interested in the whole broad scope of the healthcare system that includes cost quality access to providers and services and also health outcomes following care so that clinical piece comes into the health outcomes following care and some of the major areas that I've worked in intersect with the health spending aspects the financing aspects like mental health and Telemedicine and cardiovascular treatments. All of these things intersect within the system that relies on you know the the cost the quality the access to providers. So it's a really having a research program that encompasses both pieces of that can allow you to ask and answer questions in more integrated ways. It's difficult but I find that you if you understand those underlying systems and try and bring them into your work when you're looking at clinical work It can help you inform better answers and when you are looking at those kinds of questions are you primarily trying to understand or influence great questions so a lot of the work that I do. We're trying to understand some kind of phenomena in the system but influence yes in the sense that we're trying to inform policy so understanding the comparative effectiveness of multiple. Different types of treatments. I I would like to understand which treatments have better health outcomes but if we find a particular treatment has a very bad outcomes we want to inform policy to the FDA or to the relevant stakeholder in order to potentially have that treatment removed from market and we're talking towards the end of April Many of us have been some form of another of locked down due to co VID. Did you mentioned that? Your dog may start barking. He may He may my neighbor. Just I think my neighbor is finished cutting the grass. Now you know this. Is You know the Times but it sounds. Like your work intersects with Cova. Did as well. Can you talk about that intersection a little bit? Absolutely a large focus of my work because I'm so integrated in starting with the substantive problem in bringing either existing machine learning tools or developing new machine learning tools to answer those questions. It really there has to be the strong grounding data and the virus pandemic has really eliminated for a lot of people how much we need to care about data. And I I I mean we have misclassification. We have Missing nece in the types of data that we're collecting for Virus both for cases and mortality counts. And these are things that are very very common and most of the electronic health data that we use in the healthcare system where a lot of my work has focused on dealing with some of these types of issues. I mean we use billing claims we use Clinical Records Registry data an on and on and these data types were not designed for research. And so we need to be really aware of the issues in these types of of data and some of the newer forms of data like wearable implantable technology. That people have been very excited about measuring physical activity were now using the current virus pandemic of smartphone location data to try and understand how people are Social distancing with potentially with contact tracing and then digital types of data like Google search trends and twitter data which has been used for different types of research questions in the past now. Google is developing and has released this location. History website. Where they're showing out. Know how we can understand social distancing and so a lot of the data related work that. I've been focused on very relevant to the pandemic understanding our data sources and trying to bring rigorous flexible methods to them specifically. I had been working the last two years with my now former post-doctoral fellow an infectious disease expert myemma gender. Who's now faculty at Boston? Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School. We had been looking at news media data. Cdc Data Electronic Health data. To understand the generalize ability of these data sources for both infectious disease and chronic disease. And now this become a very relevant the virus pandemic we had one of the conditions we've been studying was was flu like illnesses and understanding what electronic health data sources like billing claims an electronic health records what we can really understand from these data sources and we've seen people many people now start modeling making projections about cases and a death. Count's what we're going to start seeing next. Once people start. Having access to different types of electronic health resources is trying to use this data understand. You know to predict outcomes maybe to predict clinical courses were trying to causal inference which is even more difficult And it's very important that people understand the limitations of these data sources and so that's one of the things that we're working on and hopefully the the first paper from that work will be able to release in the next coming weeks but this is this is something that's relevant for the virus pandemic but has been a problem going back. Decades is using data. That people don't understand and that's been a at the forefront of my work is really making sure especially with the theme of one of the themes of this podcast machine learning a lot of people get very excited about machine learning and they throw a tool at data without understanding the data. And we're now in the midst of something where it's really crucial. That people do not do

Data Electronic Health Google Uc Berkeley Summer Institute Aerospace Engineering Major KEN Times Boston Cova FDA Twitter Children's Hospital Harvard Medical School
NASA Finds Life Drowned On Mars

The Topical

01:57 min | 3 months ago

NASA Finds Life Drowned On Mars

"APP. God you people are useless. I was going to make this fun but it's too late now. I guess we'll just sit here in silence what we think about. How if you download cash today you get ten dollars when you sign up using Promo Code Topical. There you happy. It's the number one finance happened. The APP store. Let's just move on. Let's quickly jump to the story. Opr has been following all day. Nasa has announced that they've found life drowned on Mars. The monumental discovery came earlier this morning when an orbiters telescope zeroed in on a bloated specimen in a shallow pool of liquid substance on the planet's northern lowlands. Here's aerospace engineer. Janet starks talking to the press earlier today at NASA headquarters the moment we saw that life forms frozen faced in twisted agony. We knew that we had a definitive indicator of life on the Red Planet. Seeing those images come in of its eyes bulging out of its head and its body decomposing. It's something that we will never forget here. At NASA frankly it moved many of us to tears of joy joining us now from NASA headquarters as opr science reporter. Rebecca Neal Rebecca. This is an outstanding discovering shares. Leslie the details of these groundbreaking images are truly breathtaking. It's rigor mortis limbs and skeletal structure bursting out of its swollen lungs. Most in the science community have only dreamed of a day like this. These stunning images are able to provide critical clues to how this drowned life came to be for example. The images of the claw marks around the banks of the watery pool tells us that the life form struggled. Additionally the splash marks around the banks. Leads us to believe life form could not swim so that can only mean that it drown desperately and most likely over a long period of time. The discoveries we are making here are just beautiful listening to her talk. I can't help it agree. I mean I'm looking at the images right now and I am

Nasa Rebecca Neal Rebecca Janet Starks Engineer Leslie Reporter
NASA is changing the way they keep their cool

Innovation Now

00:59 sec | 3 months ago

NASA is changing the way they keep their cool

"Is the study of things at very low temperatures. Here's Monica Kuzyk. An Aerospace Engineer at NASA Glenn Research Center to explain why NASA is changing the way they keep their cool so we want to store oxygen or hydrogen. If we make them really really cold they turn into a liquid and as we all know liquids and gases so they're way more efficient to store. When Artemis missions launched to the Moon or Mars they will carry liquids with them for fuel and life support but ask the extreme environment of space warms spacecraft. The fuels begin to or boil off. That's where cry. Oh coolers like shiver the largest cryogenic tank NASA has ever built come into play. Credit is really our enabling technology to get to where we need to go when we improve cryogenic technologies here for space applications. It always a trickle down effect to the Earth for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer Paulie

Nasa Nasa Glenn Research Center Jennifer Paulie Monica Kuzyk Aerospace Engineer Artemis
A Tiny Satellite Revolution Is Afoot In Space

Short Wave

08:38 min | 5 months ago

A Tiny Satellite Revolution Is Afoot In Space

"Okay Joe we're talking. cubesats where shall we start. Well let me start by introducing you to Hannah Goldberg. She's a systems engineer at a company that makes cube sets but in nineteen ninety nine. She was an undergraduate at the University of Michigan Majoring in engineering. And she. She saw this flyer on a bus stop. That said want to build a satellite and so I joined a group that ended up making small satellite as part of a larger NASA program. Capanna says that This class that she took was a way for students to build a simple kind of satellite. Now this was pre cube set but clearly it would be valuable. We'll have young. Aerospace engineers have a chance to build something that was really intended to go into space and that hunger lead to something called the Cube set which was an idea idea from two engineers one at cal poly San Luis Obispo and the other at Stanford University to build this standardized platform for building space hardware. Okay Joe so. Let's get into this a little more. We've got this standardized platform now for cubesats. What makes cubesats cubes that well there's a manual and it just spells out all the details? I mean how big it'll be ten centimeters or four inches on aside at has to have this kind of screws of this kind of Wade has to have all kinds of specific things and then there are different form factors so it turns out at the Basic Cube. Said is called a one you but there's also a to you and at three U and six U is the one. That's the cereal box size. And what can you put inside Well a ham sandwich or no. You could put anything you like. But that's the brilliant part you can put any kind of scientific Communications technology kind of hardware in them. And you know these exactly GonNa fit and it's going to go into space that way. Okay so when I think of cubesats. They're like the legos of Satellite Adelaide. They're modular there customizable. They're small on smallest really key here because one of the things that makes the queue set program work is the people who build cube sense. Don't actually worry about how they're going to get into space. They hitch a ride with somebody else. WHO's already going into space? That's the real money saver because it's getting into spaces expensive all right. So how did the aerospace field respond to all these low-cost cubesats hitching a ride into space and embarking on this research. I think at first. They were kind of dismissive in the beginning. In the early days of cubesats they kind of had a bad reputation and more of the the classical aerospace. So people didn't think you could do much science or much much engineering benefit with them. So how'd cubes. That technology evolved to the point where it earned respect among scientists. Well there's an example of the technology that made made it possible probably in your pocket right now gum wrappers yes no actually gum purchase a great idea but no. I was thinking more of cell cellphone mobile phone. This is the evolution of the ability to miniature is electronics down to very small footprints. Very little wait and suddenly when when you had an impossibly small space to squeeze all your stuff into well it was possible now. So that's why people started paying attention to what you could put into a cube set. Gotcha Yeah I've I've read. There are hundreds of cubesats that have been launched over the years and I wanNA know about a few missions. That have caught your attention. Well we're really got me started on this story. Was the two thousand. Eighteen Cube set known as Marco. Actually Asari gone okay. You'll be a lot of fun in space ace Actually the word two of them. So you remember insight that was the mission. That's currently sitting on the surface of Mars. Well somebody had this idea that maybe they could could build cubesats that would act as really stations that would send signals back as insight was landing on Mars. It didn't have a strong enough Radio Antenna to send the single all the way back to Earth. So it send it back to these Marco satellites which sent it back to Earth and so for the first time ever there was real time telemetry ask has inside came the ground. It was all possible because this little tiny satellite was sent into deep space. So suddenly you're not just thinking about cubesats in Earth orbit you're thinking about cubes cubes heads in deep space. And so I think that's really cool very me. And when you say relaying Telemetry Marco was playing a role in telling people down on earth. What was happening on Mars with the insight mission? Is that what it is right inside saying. Hey I've just deployed my parachute or I've just got my Rye Retro Rockets on or I'm this far above the ground and all that information was coming back to Earth through Marco through this cube set very neat so the world of space exploration is clearly seeing these. cubesats keeps US useful yes a cube set can be very handy. It's a miniature spacecraft. That's actually the way we think about it. That was Barbara Cohen. She's a planetary scientist at NASA has Goddard Space Flight Center. She's part of a team. That's using one of these six you cubesats about the size of a cereal box that is for emission called lunar flashlight. I'm assuming this mission has something to do with the Moon. No it has to do with Luna Moth. No you're right. Is the moon lunar one. Yup that's true. Lunar flashlight is designed to look for exposed. Water Frost in the permanently shadowed regions of the moon so once lunar flashlight is in orbit around on the moon the spacecraft will shine a laser into those regions which are the South Pole of deep craters. That never see the sun so those are the places that that never see the sun so those are very very cold regions. They are as low as thirty five. Kelvin that's colder than the surface of Pluto. They want to know what what kind of stuff is down there. Maybe there's water or methane or mercury and they wanna know how it got. There and lunar flashlight is going to help. Tell them but to do. Its work once. It's deployed deployed. It actually has to adjust its orbit. Yeah how does something the size of a cereal box change orbit in space. Well again. This is the problem you have to news. Almost a third of the mass of this cube set for fuel so changing direction is the really expensive part of flying around in space in terms of weight because the fuel is very heavy. But there's one more cubes at mission. I want to tell you about. That has a really cool. Lightweight propulsion system called a solar sail. Deal oh I already loved the sound of this mission. Tell me about it okay instead. It tiffany Russell Lockett explain. This is actually her first coop set mission. She's an engineer. as-as Marshall Space Flight Center. A solar sail is a large thin-film reflective surface. Think of Like a sailboat route or a large kite but instead of using wind to propel itself is uses sunlight of. That's pretty brilliant. And that's how they're able to get the cube sat to change directions. I mean but how to sunlight propel cubes at well the Sun is always pushing out photons and that causes solar radiation pressure and that pressure is constantly constantly pushing against anything that happens to get in its way in this case. The lightweight material the solar sail and it acts like a sale. And that's how you get thrust and the sale by the way his square in shape and about each side of this sale is about the length of a school bus. And if you want to see a really amazing video go watch as this thing. They've they've unfurled at a couple of times and oh my goodness it's huge because it packs into this tiny little space and unfurled to this huge thing about the size of a tennis court actually more properly half a tennis court. This whole solar sail is packed inside. This cube sat amazing. And what's the mission for this. Solar sailed cubes. Well this one. What is going to head to a near Earth asteroid and take pictures and they want to learn more about this asteroid shape it size it how it rotates? What colored is what it's made of and to do that? We're planning on getting to within a kilometer of the asteroid for our closest Fly By and then we'll just keep going after that so this cube sat will fly off into the sunset on the power of the Sun. Well metaphorically I don't think we have sunsets in space. There's nothing I think for the sun to set over but I take your point. Joe Win. Are these missions likely to happen. Well that's an interesting question because the two last last ones I mentioned this lunar flashlight and the asteroid one are supposed to go on this project called artists one which is a rocket that's going to carry area capsule that's going to go around the moon and come back and that's been delayed and delayed and delayed so the cool thing. Is You get a free ride into space. If you're a cube set the bad thing thing is you've got to wait till your driver's ready to go

Cubesats Marco Joe Win Nasa Basic Cube University Of Michigan San Luis Obispo Goddard Space Flight Center Hannah Goldberg Systems Engineer Marshall Space Flight Center Stanford University Capanna Tennis Scientific Communications Wade
"aerospace engineer" Discussed on The Wolf's Den

The Wolf's Den

02:17 min | 5 months ago

"aerospace engineer" Discussed on The Wolf's Den

"Email before I Came over here From a twenty two year old recently graduated from University of Washington Aerospace Engineer. He did his first deal. One point five million bucks. It closed yesterday evening. I had dinner or a drink with him the night before and I said you gotTa do the takeaway close. I said time to fuck off and walk through the door and close news pro- Cross my fingers. That if he does it right he's GonNa blow up in his face okay and email. He says I did the hard close Mr Pena and it worked. He melted at the table or tell them. Don't let the door hit you in the ASS on the way out asshole and so I mean I often often that saddle. We just did that last week with someone that was like saying. No no no no Mike Technical. Fuck off thirty seconds later okay. Final do correct unbelievable. Yeah but today And my kids my I call everybody kid because I'm old enough to be grandfather. Father my kids that have used yourself. Say It's good I I've never used it. I'm a hammer closer. I'm not a finance closer. I either beat you to death at the table. I've seen the sun go down and come up at a coffee table. Use It because it's not magic. It's just it's the truth about persuasion so I find the greatest salesman in the world. You'd have stated but if you say Oh shit fuck it exactly. That's why I'm so good at what I do is basic truths about selling for that matter running business basic core truth that just run through it. Let me Gosh. I don't WANNA I don't Wanna you're beyond like steps for success but just if you can really break it down like if you're the average kid out that kid but what was keeping give me a cappella. What's the plan? I mean I laser. The laser beam focus. They focus one focused on the few not many focus on the menu meaning Most of the kids that are most adults have got four or five projects none of which are worth a shit okay and so. They're trying to make them all work because they're afraid to walk away away because they spent too much time develop in it. The great thing about the Internet is the results are instantaneous. Yet kids work on APPS and programs And enright code not for an hour a week a month but years and they get no results..

Mr Pena Mike Technical University of Washington Aeros salesman
Site Reliability at DEV with Molly Struve

Ruby on Rails Podcast

07:57 min | 6 months ago

Site Reliability at DEV with Molly Struve

"Bali street is lead site reliability engineer at Dev the company company that runs the blogging website. Dev Dot to during her time working in the software industry. She's had the opportunity to work on some challenging problems. These include scaling elastic elastic search. Starting my sequel databases in creating an infrastructure that can grow as fast as a boomerang business when not making systems run faster. She can be found fulfilling her need for speed by riding and jumping her show horses. Welcome to the PODCAST. Molly thank you so much for having me. I'm excited to be here. Azam I- Somali. What is your developer Alfred Origin Story? So I kind of have a little bit of a roundabout story I started coating when I was in high school and then ended up going to college and when I got to college I actually thought you know what I'm going to be a software engineer. My Dad was an electrical engineer. And it kind of felt if not right so white enrolled in the software engineering one. Oh one class basically and has. I'm taking this class. I have a neighbor and he's taking the intruder the aerospace class and every day. He comes running over. He goes. Guess what we get to build. We built a racket or we get to build a parachute shoot and I got myself. Wow that sounds way more exciting than typing on the keyboard so I ended up switching into to the aerospace glass. I got a degree in aerospace engineering. Which I would not trade for anything? It was so much fun But then from there you're I actually went into the family business of trading options on stock market. So I did that for two years and as I was doing that Hall of that exciting stuff was going on in Silicon Valley. FACEBOOK was starting instagram twitter. All those companies were really just getting going and and I looked at my side. Wow they're really building stuff that's changing how we interact with each other and that sounds way more exciting then betting which way the stock market's going to move so I quit my job which was a pretty bold move considering it was the family business. I was Biz. Basically guarantee not jobs the rest of my life and I spent three months Teaching Myself Web development with the Michael hurdle to`real and basically that's kind kind of what got it all going. I got an internship after that at a small startup and kind of the rest is history. That is an incredible story and so exciting that you got started. With the hurdles who to`real I think a lot of listeners are going to relate to that story a lot so molly you're I site reliability engineer on the show which is really exciting can can you actually unpack without role entails definitely so a site reliability engineer which you may also here as referred to Sr e in my opinion my definition. Because there's a lot of different definitions and it really kind of depends on what company you're at. My definition of a site. Reliability engineer is a developer whose primary focus is on the reliability stability and scale ability of a website. It's also developer. That kind of has the ability to really step back and take a look at the big picture like the overall architecture. Sure of a website so a lot of times as a software engineer. You're just kind of your in there and you're getting a future build and you might be an controller. You might be a model. You're you're in a little piece of code and you're just focused on that piece of code as a site reliability engineer. My job is to step back and look it out. All all the code pieces fit together and how they interact with all the other pieces of the infrastructure databases servers things like that. And so oh you kind of have to have that ability to really get that that big picture in order to help you do your job. Another thing that I think is also super. Were helpful to anyone in the field is a lot of us. Have some sort of additional knowledge pass just web development or pass jus- this coating for example semes- horry's are really good with certain databases. I happen to be really good with elastic. Search and rescue those are kind of my strengths. other SRA's might be have strengths on the operation side working with Lenox or some other rob rating system. So I think kind of that overall the site reliability and jeers a developer but with just a little bit of extra kind of knowledge college and perspective on top. Do you find yourself in the code base. A lot or there are other tools that you're utilizing ordered to know whether or not the code is you you know really able to take load handle performance. What is the day in the life? Look for you. Yeah so that's a great question I am in the code base a lot Especially at my new job at Dev were really just kind of getting going with site reliability and so a lot of that means making the code reliable reliable and stable Once you get kind of past that point again that code in our reliable stable you know place then you kind of you look at things like the databases infrastructure etc But in terms of determining whether something's reliable whether it scale walk Cetera you definitely have to set up a good moderate infrastructure around it and so that's honestly one of the big products I'm working on a death is is setting up a monitoring infrastructure. So I can get a clear picture of what the application is doing. What happens when we get a big surge of traffic? What happens ends when we run this job and it kicks off a ton of other jobs? How does that affect the database? So if you don't have those monitoring tools than as an essary it's it's it's really hard to do your job because you can make a guess at what you think is going to add to the performance or improve performance but unless you really close that feedback loop and get that feedback that says okay. This is improving performance. It's it makes very hard to do your job. So monitoring is definitely a big part of of my day to day the and one in currently setting up at at debt. which is it's pretty exciting? Once you get it all set together. The insights you can get for Mitt are in my opinion very exciting to see see already offers some excellent advice where you said that a lot of SRA's have specialization whether it be elastic search. Res- like yourself. Maybe it's hosting devops anything like that. If any of our listeners would be interested in a career path into site reliability. What do you recommend they take the first step so what I like to tell? People who are interested in Missouri is become a developer. I spend a couple of years years really honing your coding skills your software development skills and getting familiar with different databases. Like I said My. My definition of a necessary is a developer. Who's got a little bit more up the big perspective the you know possible specialization database this etc.? So because of that the way I view in `sorry I think you really have to have the solid foundation of coating before you can move into necessary focus role so I think it's good for people who wanted to start as a back end. Death and religious get familiar with the technology is get familiar with codeine and then after a couple years of that really laying that solid foundation then shift towards you know something more. SRA

Reliability Engineer Developer Software Engineer DEV Molly Engineer SRA Silicon Valley Facebook Codeine Semes- Horry Missouri Michael Instagram Mitt Lenox
"aerospace engineer" Discussed on WWL

WWL

04:59 min | 8 months ago

"aerospace engineer" Discussed on WWL

"Aerospace engineers are rushing to develop a nationwide air traffic control system for drones to bring order to the chaotic skies above the nation's airports in military installations with more than one point four million registered drones and an unknown number of on register devices in use close calls between unmanned aerial vehicles and commercial aircraft continue to rise putting the nation's air transportation network at risk it's a story by Dan Boylan national correspondent at The Washington Times stand water sources telling you Gordon occurred the skies over America are starting to fill up with drones and the Federal Aviation Administration nafta and in the streets so thanks oh my god what are we doing here we need to set up something like the air traffic control system for airplanes that we're getting to that point with ground in this guy's United States there are some rules in place right for drones right now there are rules in place the FAA has them in the bottom line on that is that what you can't fly a drone within five miles of an airport but this seems to be happening somewhat anyway and part of it is by hobby year I don't quite understand what they're doing with their groans yes a vendor says well we got that we will be good figure something out because the number of drones is just much coming so we really need to start to move a little faster these things are developing so fast from a technology standpoint it seems like there's something new weekly well that that's exactly right in fact though the FAA earlier this month and its national grown safety awareness month what they did events in all fifty states part of that was still too crazy industry for doing things like using drones for emergency services law enforcement aerial shipments of blood and prescription drugs in organs and all the great things that are actually happening with drones at the same time people keep flying them higher and higher and you know pilots are having reporting problems what was the the thing I think they came out of the conference somebody said how bout it of a deadline of twenty twenty eight for something that's nine years away that was amazing that was the NASA administrator Jim Breitenstein that was just a couple weeks back there was is the same con and they are out there in Los Vegas is the biggest grown show that occurs in the country basically laid down a challenge the one St instead I hope that there's at least one city in this country by twenty twenty eight they can have thousands of drones in this guide that underlying that and he said that will be the FAA and now they're going to have some money for aviation for airport for the industry to start to think together more about well if that's the case you really do need something like air traffic class together traffic control at an airport speak with Dan Boylan national correspondent at The Washington Times has written a piece entitled bringing order to chaos air traffic control regulators rush to catch up to rise of drones Bob so explain what some of these engineering partnerships are doing right now for more participants thing one it's a company called fair amount actually working with Raytheon but you know the massive there checked defense corporation and Raytheon actually runs the air traffic control system for the roughly forty thousand civilian flights in military flight airport flight airline flights the girl in the country every day so it's about forty thousand flight they're running it your map is working with family trying to a back and that would allow air traffic controllers up there in the towers at airports to actually see drones and the reason for that is that they can quickly figure out is is grown doing something that looks dodgy looks weird that's that's dangerous because the second piece and is that you've got corporations and companies out in California that is through the set up perimeters around airports to actually knock drones down make that radar and if they think that some the drone is doing something really odd they'll knock it out of the sky in the FAA says you're not supposed to shoot down grounds right but they know that if you got a weird grown for instance flying over the Superbowl it's gonna get zapped out of the sky what about recreational drone owners of maybe having to register these vehicles with that matter or help here are the things that that that to help it's a bit like one of the guys from the industry said that that their map he said that you know the thing about the drone industries is a little bit like cars a hundred years ago you know was mostly pedestrians and still lot of horses and buggies on the streets and then suddenly you had car starting the zip around everywhere and it was causing chaos with the horses buggies in the pedestrians thanks Dan Dan Boylan national correspondent at The Washington Times twenty.

hundred years nine years
Interviewing Paul Wilson with Bell V-280 Valor

Airplane Geeks Podcast

08:08 min | 8 months ago

Interviewing Paul Wilson with Bell V-280 Valor

"Our guest this episode is Paul Wilson he's chief engineer for the Bell v Two Eighty Valor program the V. Two eighties New Tilt Rotor in Paul leads the the engineering team responsible for the execution of all development efforts on the V. Two eighty joint multi-role tech demonstration and future version goal lift programs before he joined Bell Paul served in the US Air Force as an acquisitions in aerospace engineering officer and at Bell Oh but prior to his current role. Paul led the V. Two eighty vehicle systems team in the development and testing of flight control avionics propulsion in mechanics call systems all of that culminated in the successful first flight in two thousand seventeen and in his time at Bell Paul served in other leadership roles including as project manager for the for seven G X autopilot development and certification program and as the ipt lead for els vehicle management systems and integrated vehicle health management technology. Ira De Paul will come to the airplane Geeks podcast thank you for having me on glad to be with you now we're going to jump right in with appall and we'll come back to the nation news after that breath as I mentioned the Bell v Tweety Valor He's a tilt rotor aircraft it was selected by the US Army for the joint multi-role technology demonstrator phase which is a precursor for future vertical lift that program Paul can you tell us what those programs are in what is the US army looking for here blue it'd be glad to share that so we've been working here a bell on the Jamar Tech Demonstrator multi-role Tech Demonstrator Program for the for the six years and when the army started this effort about six years ago their objective was to support risk reduction technology ration- but really to get at the The key technical development areas I would support informing the art of the possible bowl for future vertical lift so future vertical lift is the future program of record those are the aircraft were trying to field in the future to the war fighter and then the joint multi-role demonstrator program is all the activities that go to reduce risk and informed capabilities and requirements for that future production program so as part of that future vertical lift the is actually composed of multiple classes over craft sizes of aircraft everything from what we call a capability set one aircraft which would be a light scout aircraft to the capability Lee said three which is the program that I'm working on the beach you eighty program we'll talk more about that up to potentially capability set five aircraft would be Think of a C. One thirty size vertical platform so really encompasses a large range of sizes of Eric craft and for the joint multi-role Tek demonstrator program we're focused on an aircraft that would be sized around providing black cock you age sixty like capability so the army wanted a platform like the age sixty from a size standpoint but that could bride longer longer range capability more speed capability improved hover performance in addition to improving things like survivor ability affordability etc and so the program that I've been working on has been focused on that future Blackhawk replacement aircraft from a construction standpoint and so over the past six years we've designed built and have now for the past two years been flying bells under a craft the beach you eighty which is for that Blackhawk replacement type aircraft and then going forward that future vertical lift program of record would again have multiple sizes of aircraft and the army is currently focused as part of their modernisation priority he's the two aircraft saw a platforms of their focused on in the near term are a small scout platform and that program is called the future attack reconnaissance aircraft and then the Blackhawk replacement aircraft which that firm is called the future long range assaults aircraft and so all the work we've been doing here over the past several years has been going towards again in formula requirements and reducing risk for that future long-range assault aircraft or the replacement for for the Black Hawk and there are as I understand it a number of companies that have been working in this area trying to develop things but it has has the army essentially made a down select to to you and in companies that is that where we stand on this now no so we're the program stands right now is a net tech demonstration phase and so as part of that the army a selected four OEM's For four manufacturers two of which were to build a build and fly tests demonstrator craft and then two other companies that were doing a ground based development or testing and so the two aircraft that are currently As part of the flight test program under the tech demonstration phase are bell with rb two eighty platform and Secorski Boeing partnership around the be one which is a different compound co ax type configuration and Adele has the the tote rotor version and then so that is not a competitive fly off at the end of the tech demonstration effort again we're reducing risks informing requirements and capabilities to help define help to find the technologies and read it technip technical readiness of that future platform on the record side so the programmer record which will end up being competitive would be the future long-range assault aircraft platform and so the army's working there acquis in strategy basically to develop continue to develop these capabilities continued inform requirements that would lead towards the record a couple years down the road I see okay the good that that makes a lot of sense and let me just also say at this point for for you listening that we have a number of pretty getting videos that bell has produced that show this aircraft to eighty hour in we'll have those in the show notes with your you know if you're at home or someplace in front of a computer as we're talking is you're listening to this as we're talking you might want to take a look at the show notes it airplane Geeks dot com slash five seven six and take a look at some of those those videos David where are you going to interject something hadn't planned on it but since you're asking I thought I heard you I've been on view to whole time if you're hearing me it's voices in your head could be Whoa Tilt Rotor over standard conventional helicopters and then a little bit more what what aspects of the tilt rotor different some say the V twenty two the current production tilt rotor. Sure Yeah Greg Greg question so the capability that tilt rotor brings is the combination of vertical lift capability with wing borne flight

Ira De Paul Bell Paul Paul Wilson Bell Oh Bell Us Air Force Chief Engineer Greg Greg Officer Project Manager Six Years Eighty Hour Two Years Seven G
An Interview With Lindsey Sheppard of the Center for Strategic & International Studies

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

04:13 min | 10 months ago

An Interview With Lindsey Sheppard of the Center for Strategic & International Studies

"Guest today is lindsay shepherd fellow with the international security program at the center for strategic and international studies cis i._s. We are recording this live so we are thrilled to have you here at cacus. Thank you lindsey wonderful. Thank you so much for having me. Welcome lindsey and thanks for joining us. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background and your current role. Thank you yes so. I am an associate fellow at the center for strategic and international studies and we are a policy research organization here in washington d._c. And my role i focused primarily on emerging technologies and their applications to defense and national security however my background is actually an engineering so i come to see s._a._s. With years of experience your answer defense research and development and education in aerospace engineering so my goal here is to bring the technical detail and richness forward to our policy recommendations mendacious in research so that we can have better informed discussions on technology relevant topics all right so i know that one of the things you've been doing a lot of research on is is on the position of the u._s. Competitively with other countries in the world so china and the european nations and russia and elsewhere so can you give us some insights and maybe some thoughts that you have on how you see the global race for dominance and leadership great so one thing that we think when we look at the global landscape of artificial intelligence is is that each country and their various countries that are pursuing a i apply it and develop it in ways that reflect their national norms and values and institutions so so the way in which the united states seeks to leverage i will look different than the way china or russia seek to leverage and those three are by far not the only players globally we see eh thirteen to fourteen really strong countries that are all pursuing artificial intelligence and digital capability in a way that supports their national values however the narrative is always framed as the race. We're all racing to a i. I'm not really fond of that analogy in that framing because it makes it angers. You thought that it's a one for one application that i can compare with the united states is doing what china's doing and that's a one for one comparison but what we really need to be talking about is what is the united states doing for itself. A how are we leveraging technology to try forward into the future and then secondly. How are we looking at what other countries are doing an artificial intelligence and addressing addressing that but those are really two separate questions so we see activity from china where they're looking at. How do we deploy for social governance. How do we export our remodel abroad and social governance being very polite way to say you know looking at all the population control and the human rights violations their countries like russia and israel that that are focused very heavily on the robotics that kind of autonomous weapon capability and then the united states which is really taking an approach that says how do we have a human machine teaming framework. How do we take what are people are doing and provide them the tools and intelligent apprentices so that they can do their jobs better yeah. That's great you know to think about what each country is doing and how that relates but not necessarily a race type of way. So how do you see countries approaching concepts of a._i. Ethics responsibility and governance so there's countries that will say one thing but i think it's important to look back and actually see what our country's doing so within the lethal autonomous weapons debate there is a you know. We can't drive forward with s._p._f. Thoughtful consideration. Maybe let's put out abandoned the united nations and however when you look at what is it going on particularly within russia and china both countries are racing forward without out necessarily asking questions i china's and dettori is for you know deploy. I ask questions if you ask any questions at all later russia's very much pursuing autonomous miss weapons but they also are recognizing that at the current moment they are behind the curve on a lot of that foundational infrastructure so they are focusing heavily on. How do we build up the knowledge college. How do we build up the institutions. How do we build up that foundation with the intent that they will one day jump up to kind of the big players. The united states is taking a in terms terms of you know what they're thinking about a much more careful and measured approach on you know we're is it appropriate to put artificial intelligence and it extends far beyond the lethal autonomous thomas weapons

United States China Russia Lindsey Lindsay Shepherd Cacus United Nations Washington European Nations Israel One Day
"aerospace engineer" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

13:53 min | 11 months ago

"aerospace engineer" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Their description of the project <hes> <hes> it'll tell you what center is located at and any skills certain skills that they're looking for okay. Why don't you tell us a little bit about the different. Nasa centers cover all of them in the portal. That's right right that's right so there's ten nasa centers as well as field sites <hes> and all of them offer internships and they're all located at that intern dot nasa dot gov <hes> and so yeah yeah we're obviously here in silicon valley california but there is nasa centers down in southern california <hes> armstrong play <hes> research center. There's obviously obviously johnson space center in houston texas. <hes> we have kennedy space center in florida so all sorts of different places some interns day choose to apply to centers. It's close to home <hes> <hes> so whatever's near to them but also each center has kind of their own area of expertise so if you research centers <hes> and kind of find well lines. It's best with your interest. You can kind of tailor applications to that. Yeah makes sense. If you want to do biology. If you wanna do aerospace engineering you can a good center for their shirt for outstanding outstanding all right so what are some of the specific requirements that people are going to face when they want to apply right so we have four eligibility requirements. The first one is that you have to be a u._s. Citizen and then the next one is at least had to be sixteen years of age. The third is that you have to be enrolled in a degree <hes> granting program or institution and the last one is at least had to have three point zero g._p._a. On a four point zero scale okay people can probably find that stuff on the portal is valley. Yes okay and we'll talk more about those as well so another question. We always get on the show. Is what should i study. If i want to work at nasa do a half to do aeronautical article engineering right. You need to be this kind of person specific majors you recommend so we are nasa pretty stem focused. It's a lot of science technology engineering airing in math <hes> those are probably the majority of our internships but we also do have non stem opportunities. <hes> we have interns in the business office. We have interns in the legal office office. The education office <hes> communications office so nasa really does need everyone and they need all kinds of interns and all kinds of perspectives so there's a little well something for everyone. I think that's great. I think it's always a surprise to people that i i'll if i'm in huston being a lawyer. Actually maybe i could work for nasa. Actually can be people like us. The scientists that we get to contribute to the missions just going off of that <hes> we always tell students that you don't know what projects are available so i think part of that is for them to kind of check out internet nasa gov and see. What's out there so what i'd really mentioned earlier. Each center is different and these are different at each center. So just we just encourage everyone to do their research and see what's out there. That sounds exciting. Go explore dig in there and see what's available so when and how exactly should people go about <hes> preparing their application and submitting right great question so <hes> as i mentioned earlier <hes> the application system is interim dot nasa dot gov so it's always important to know the deadlines as i mentioned we have three sessions that we accept insurance so that's fall spring and summer <hes> and it's always great to apply early and plan ahead so for the application deadlines you can visit dot nasa dot gov to see what's ahead now would be.

Nasa nasa kennedy space center johnson space center california intern houston texas huston florida sixteen years zero g
Injured gymnast: 'My pain is not your entertainment'

Charlie Parker

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Injured gymnast: 'My pain is not your entertainment'

"A college gymnast whose injury is become the subject of a viral video is now asking people to stop circulating that video. Samantha Syria wants people to stop sharing video of her injury during an NC double A gymnast regional event last month. She was attempting a Handspring double front with a blind landing what she dislocated both knees, and tore multiple, ligaments and it went viral. She has since retired from the sport. But tweeted this week, quote, my pain is not your entertainment and said her family, friends and teammates didn't need to see her getting injured over and over Sarajevo who was an aerospace engineering major is expected to make a complete recovery has a busy future ahead. She's graduating in may, and we'll be working on

Samantha Syria Sarajevo
"aerospace engineer" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"aerospace engineer" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Hey, welcome. This is the Ben Shapiro show. A little bit later on this hour, we're gonna get into Tucker Carlson's response to his detractors and YouTube should they be pushed to censor conservatives. We begin today with a couple of hilarious stories. The president of the United States has some thoughts on aviation. I to get some serious news in a second. But first I have to apprise you of a couple of very important news items just off the hot the wires. So the president of the United States has issued an official proclamation. His official proclamation concerns airplanes to as you know, there's a terrible airplane crash from Ethiopia airlines could like one hundred and fifty people was the second Boeing model. She go down to new models. Second Boeing models. Go down in a matter of last six months. President Trump has some thoughts because President Trump I know you may not have known this President Trump is secretly in aerospace engineer. And so the president tweeted this out today in all of his wisdom, quote, entertains becoming complex pilots are no longer. Needed. But rather computer scientists from an IT I see it all the time in many products leaking one unnecessary step further when often in simpler is far better. Split-second decisions are needed and the complexity creates danger all of this great cost get very little gain. I don't know about you. But I what Einstein to be my pilot great flying professionals that are easily and quickly take control of a plane. Thank you, Mr President for that announcement on the engineering of airplane. Not unprecedented. The fact is that Brahim Lincoln had some really deep thoughts about the mechanics of trains actually back in like eighteen sixty two. So I guess this is not unusual for the president of the United States to tweet at-bat airplanes. It is worth noting that last year did tweet out that thanks to him. There had been no commercial airline fatalities that year. So I'm not sure what that means that the president is this important. No, it's not important. It's silly. But that's the boy is the president of the United States. Should he stop tweeting about why by planes are better than fixed-wing aircraft? Probably stop tweeting about Albert Einstein being the pilot of his plane like somewhere, Elon Musk is sitting there nodding and smoking joints. So solid stuff. Trump. Meanwhile in other stupid news because the news is serious lately. And honestly, I would rather just cover stupid news for a moment. So in other stupid news, Felicity Huffman, and Laurie Laughlin are among after CEO's charging alleged at college admission scam. So this is a mad lib headline from an alternative reality. Felicity Huffman, who you'll remember from desperate housewives, Laurie Laughlin from full house have now been charged for utilizing service that basically bribed people to get you into college. According to ABC news actresses and chief executives are among fifty people arrested in a nationwide college admissions cheating scam..

president President Trump United States Felicity Huffman Boeing Albert Einstein Ben Shapiro Tucker Carlson Laurie Laughlin YouTube Brahim Lincoln Elon Musk ABC Ethiopia official CEO engineer six months
As Payments Go Social With Venmo, They're Changing Personal Relationships

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:49 min | 1 year ago

As Payments Go Social With Venmo, They're Changing Personal Relationships

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Comcast business having the nation's largest gig speed network was just the start. Now, they're providing gig fueled apps and solutions that exceed expectations and help businesses perform Comcast business beyond fast. We've been looking at what's beyond cash crypto currency digital payments and more in this month's Altech considering. Today. There are more mobile payment apps than ever Zell Apple Pay square cash, but just one doubles as a social network NPR's. Danielle Czeslaw explains how VIN MO has changed relationships when copywriter Kelly Johnson moved to Los Angeles. She didn't tell her parents she'd be living with her boyfriend Johnson grew up in Bakersfield a couple hours drive north very conservative, very religious, my parents as well in LA. She pays the rent and her boyfriend chips in his half on ven mo- when he did it. He put it in the memo line the month, plus like the little house emoji. And that's how my mom saw her. Mom, uses Motoo Johnson was busted I shared that story with Richard krone a payments expert. That reinforces our findings the number one use case is paying rent. He estimates about thirty nine million people use then MO which is owned by PayPal. The company didn't confirm. Here's how it works. You use motive pay request money from other people on the app. It's usually linked to your Bank account every transaction has a memo line, and there are emoji for things you pay for like pizza or wine or rent, but these memos and emojis are public by default. So you can see how your friends spend money, and what they're asking others to pay for krone says that visibility can be a perk. You wanna pay it socially? So everybody knows that you're not a deadbeat and you've met your obligation pay pal. Ceo, Dan, Schulman's has been mo- is the app for generation that grew up on social media. And he says the public feed is the essence of the app here. He is on CNBC. It's really social experience. Like, you do a payment you tag it? You put it emoji next to it. And you share it with. Your friends nineteen billion dollars changed hands over the app just between October and December of last year. That's up eighty percent from the previous year. Not everyone knows others are seeing their payments. The Federal Trade Commission last year demanded that Venema make it clear to customers that these transactions are public. Then MO says, it never posts the amount of the transaction and anyone can make their payments, private private or not the app has made it easy to give cash instantly. We heard from a woman in Baltimore. She picked up a three hundred fifty dollars grocery Bill for a friend who forgot her wallet. But then mode the money immediately. A man in San Francisco told us he then MOS birthday money to his friends for round of drinks. But others notice when it's so easy to split a Bill, it becomes an expectation of definitely less generous. When I go out with my friends. Matthew, Masud studies aerospace engineering at the university of Cincinnati. He says via Skype that he went out to dinner at a restaurant that wouldn't split the check. So he just paid for. For everyone. And then he sent out Venema requests. One of my friends ordered pasta dish, I believe and that one was like thirteen dollars before van MO Masud said he would have just taken care of the whole Bill and next time someone else would if Ben mo- has changed Masud's habits. It doesn't seem to have changed. Kelly johnson. Even after her mom discovered. The live in boyfriend Johnson says she didn't change her privacy settings. No. Are you kidding? I have nothing to hide. Danielle Chaz low NPR news, Washington.

CEO Kelly Johnson Zell Apple Pay Richard Krone Comcast Matthew Van Mo Masud Danielle Czeslaw MO Altech Los Angeles Schulman Paypal NPR Danielle Chaz Ben Mo Federal Trade Commission Venema
Branson's Virgin Galactic takes another step toward space tourism

Richard Eeds

03:20 min | 1 year ago

Branson's Virgin Galactic takes another step toward space tourism

"I call news. Out of the Mojave. Desert California, virgin, galactic did another powered up test flight today of unity, which is their spaceship. VS S virgin spaceship unity rocket powered airplane climbed to a record altitude. Nearly fifty six miles today. Marking the second time that they've reached space to pilots and for the first time an additional crew member were on board. Beth Moses galactic chief astronaut trainer in an aerospace engineer Beth wrote along with the two pilots the company announced in a tweet shortly after a unity took off this morning. Gave her a look at what galactic customers could one day experience. Unity took off from runway in the Mojave. Just after eight AM Pacific time, crews do about forty five thousand feet attached to the mothership. Instead. Bye bye. Mommy broke off fired. His rockets went straight up. Have you ever seen it happen? I mean on it's just amazing to watch the video just drops off. They hit the hit the go button. And they just go straight up. Swooped into the upper reaches of the atmosphere. Two hundred ninety five thousand feet high. Top speed was mocked three. At the peak of its flight path unity, experienced a few minutes. Weightlessness looked out into the black skies of the cosmos, then return to land in the Mojave about an hour after they took off. Virgin tweeted, take a look at the flight path a really cool flight path graph. Ted flight allowed galactic historic first mission to space in December fall that back to back successes indicate the galactic could be on track to start flying tourists. Space tourists this year. From New Mexico. Richard Branson said he wants to be on the first unity flight by July. Not clear how many more test runs galactic will fly before they are comfortable pudding paying customers and the CEO the chairman on board. They say that they still have a ways to go and testing to make factors to test the mini factors that can affect a fight about six hundred people have signed up now, they're neck and neck. Jeep by JAL race with blue origin bazo. Space company. By the way, their craft. There was a CNN one hour special or no, I think it was MSNBC one hour special on on base us recently, mostly around Amazon and. National Enquirer and all that. But they spend they spend about a minute on blue origin. They showed his pace grabbed. It is really cool. Looking not versions isn't. But they're both Kulikov. They spent more than a decade trying to develop space tourism there. We are not too bad.

Mojave Virgin Ted Flight Beth Moses Richard Branson Desert California National Enquirer Msnbc CNN New Mexico Jeep Engineer Amazon CEO JAL Chairman One Hour Two Hundred Ninety Five Thousa Forty Five Thousand Feet
"aerospace engineer" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"aerospace engineer" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"We're talking about the big bang theory of sick named after the origin of the universe itself. An actor Simon Helberg plays an aerospace engineer on the show. But in realize can't a question for me about the real big bay. Let's check it out. Okay. I this is I can answer this really quickly. But and I know there are theories about the the moments before the the big bang, not the pilot moments before the big bang theory pilot. I was on a show called studio sixty I'll answer that question. No moments before the actual big bang. What can I is there a way to intellectually wrap my mind around what was going on before the big thing? We've tried. Okay. And the best discussions today which have Kojin arguments for why we should think this is that our universe is part of a multi verse. Yes. And if you're part of a multi verse you can step back in a higher dimension. And sale. Here's the universe that that Simon Helberg and Neil Tyson around and that just expanded it just began right there. That's it's big bang. Right. And then it expands and then comes the TV show big bang theory. And that's that universe. Here's another university began a little later another one began a little earlier, some universities don't expand forever. They might collapse. Some have slightly different laws of physics life. Does not begin in those might have even better was a physics for a more interesting form of life than perhaps web forms and hours. And so maybe the multi complex is what's he turn? All okay. And that doesn't have a beginning. Or may have a beginning. Maybe it does. But it is what spawned our universe. Let's the beginning. A very beginning doesn't that just when you think about it don't is just cross and you just go to sleep. It's a it's a it's a philosophical, intellectual and scientist. Frontier. Yeah. And plus the universe never makes anything in. Once. We thought earth was special into one eight planets the sun the sun, especially one of one hundred billion Suns the galaxy one of one hundred billion galaxies these discoveries over the centuries. Right. But we have universe. Right. Why? Would it only be one right? Let it be many. And that would be just the next in the sequence of learning rules of three in comedy. I guess the university is the funniest of the mall like you said sense of humor, but any more than three universes. It's not funny up be sure to listen place. Joining us now to help us get into the science of the actual big bang is theoretical physicists channel eleven Janelle. Professor Barnard college Columbia University. So how would you describe the big bang? Well, I think what how would you grade my answer? I thought you answer is excellent. Actually, the idea of a scientific notion of the origin of the universe. We know dates back not to Einstein himself, actually, but to people who are trying to solve his equations and realized that it was the universe was really unstable to expanding stable to expanding. Meaning you wanna That do that? all myself. Yeah. It just it's really hard to stop it. And if you run the movie backwards, there's this inevitable implication that everything was closer together. The entire universe was closer together. And as you imagine going further back in that movie. There must have been this catastrophically high-energy event..

Simon Helberg Einstein engineer Barnard college Columbia Unive Neil Tyson scientist Janelle Professor
"aerospace engineer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"aerospace engineer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"I'm Barry ritholtz. You're listening to masters in business on Bloomberg radio. My special guest this week is Jason Schwartz. He is the president of we'll show your funds management. Let's talk a little bit about the product. You're probably best known for The Wilshire five thousand which contains these days about thirty five hundred stocks. Is that right? Why doesn't The Wilshire five thousand have five thousand stocks? Right. So you're you're correct. That there's just under thirty five hundred stocks today in The Wilshire five thousand The Wilshire five thousand was. Created in nineteen seventy four and at the time, it was the first really broadbased measurement of the US equity market and still today when people refer to the total US stock market, they're often referencing The Wilshire five thousand. So know it was a really important innovation for us dating back to the to the seventies. And the reason there was roughly five thousand securities when The Wilshire five thousand was launched the peak was as you probably know about seventy five hundred securities in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight right? So that was in an environment. Where companies were racing to go public right to say, the least to say the least. And so, you know, post dotcom crash there were a number of delistings there were companies that clearly went out of business. So that dramatically lowered the count right delistings a lot of listed stocks ended up going pink. Sheets and bulletin boards. And especially the micro. I think there was some thousand or two thousand microcapsule attract fell off fell off the radar. So the really aren't five thousand investable companies to put in the in the five thousand even if you wanted to write, and, and I think the other the other key theme in today's environment really is around private capital. Right. So companies are staying private for longer. Anor- able to do so without needing to go to the public equity markets to raise capital. So so there is, you know, the the IPO environment has not been what it was in the nineties. And so therefore there are roughly thirty five hundred publicly traded securities that look look at companies like Uber, and we works and giant multi-billion dollar firms years ago, they never would have been able to get that large try to say, so let's talk a little bit about what your assets looked like and what the company actually does. So you have about one hundred and eighty billion dollars in assets under management. How does that break down? Is that stocks bonds non-public assets, what's the mix? So. We we have about one hundred and eighty billion dollars in assets that we advise on for what we call financial intermediaries, and these organizations financial institutions that ultimately serve individual investors. And so this this really for us for for our organization stems from the work that we've done in the institutional space, so. You know, we talked about The Wilshire five thousand Wilshire's first decade in the nineteen. Seventies was really as a as one of the early pioneers in applying technology to solve investment management problems. And so The Wilshire five interrupt, you this point and point out that your founder is literally a rocket scientist who was at JPL before forming Wilshire in seventy two is right, right? Yeah. That's right. So that's that is a really important. It's a great story. But it's also really important part of our heritage. So Dennis Tito Wilshire's founder, currently, our our chairman NCO's still active in the business. Was it JPL and was aerospace engineer, and this was at a time where the most powerful computer technology was resident NASA JPL where they were trying to figure out how to how to program the trajectory of of unmanned spacecraft and show as the space race was winding down. And that was really Dennis is calling. He was called to participate in that too late sixties early seventies. Dennis was was thinking about how to transition, and ultimately how to make some money, and and really recognize an early point that intersection of of investment, technology, information, technology, and and finance. And so the first product that will show launched in nineteen seventy-two was was one of the first commercially viable ways to calculate an equity beta. And so that was nineteen seventy to take it for granted you could do the log onto a Bloomberg or even use a website and generate half the data points. We just take for granted that didn't exist. And this was the stuff of. I mean this predates me. This was the stuff of slide rules, and and and you know, really sort of hard computational math and show applying really strong math to solve investment challenges. So the first commercially viable way to measure inequity beta which became our kind of multi factor risk attribution model which exists today, by the way, multi factor attribution risk model. Right. So you're trying to figure out what is it? It is that's actually driving a markets gains. How do you attribute that to what specific elements in fact? That's exactly right. So if you are able to decompose a managers were turned into its component pieces and isolate all sorts of different factors. You can basically separate was this manager good at picking stocks or was this manager benefiting from an overweight to energy or technology or momentum or certain were they? As is leveraging up and taking a lot of risk or a lot at right. So so it's it's for us the essence of ultimately of investment management. We talk about how we got.

Dennis Tito Wilshire The Wilshire JPL Bloomberg US Barry ritholtz founder Jason Schwartz president Anor NASA aerospace engineer NCO scientist chairman eighty billion dollars billion dollar
"aerospace engineer" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"aerospace engineer" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"Oh, and he studied to be a rocket scientist before that our conversation covers marks path to AS and the principles of luck risk and uncertainty on that path we discussed the IAS portfolio when that's catered to achieve a low risk profile and how he stayed. The course when that structure hasn't been rewarded by markets. We talk about identifying managers that fit into his approach and different metrics of defining risk at both the manager and portfolio levels. Please enjoy my conversation. With Mark bound Gardner. Thanks for joining me pleasure to be here. We always start talking about people's backgrounds. So why don't you just walk through kind of how you got to the CIO seat? It's a strange path. That's for sure I grew up in Florida and watched a lot of rocket launches and always close to Cape Canaveral and the space shuttle. I I remember drawing pictures of the space shuttle when I was thirteen fourteen years old. I actually saw the first launch really need experience. So always had that desire, and so I pursued that in school, I studied aerospace, engineering and undergrad, and then when I got out of undergraduate hundred ninety one the country was in recession, and I said, well, you know, why don't I just go for some more schooling and pursued graduate studies. The theme in my life has been luck and goes lucky that there was a recession in nineteen Ninety-one to push me to go get some more schooling. I went to Princeton for graduate school and. At princeton. It was a very different experience than undergrad undergrad at university of Florida. And I always like I said when I was at Florida, I had a calculator in my hand, and I was always solving problems at Princeton through the calculator out and exchange it for a piece of chalk. And we did a lot of fear there. And the other thing that Princeton had was it had a school political science, and I had a great adviser there who encouraged me to branch out. And so I took classes in the Polly side department. They are got a minor in public policy, and that shifted me off of engineering and aerospace to public policy and application of quantitative methods to areas that were more qualitative more sociology, psychology oriented and folks in qualitative disciplines or face. With no less uncertainty than folks in engineering disciplines, perhaps some more uncertainty. And so that's where I found my home. It was a departure from engineering, but I enjoy that blend of addressing uncertainty quantitatively and qualitatively. And so what was the first step FU, academia, so it was into management consulting. Yeah. I was fortunate to find someone who's actually been a mentor to me my whole career Hamilton Helmer. So Hamilton was a Abane consultant actually worked with Bill Bain in the early days, and I had moved out to the west coast to start his practice there and Silicon Valley doing strategy work for on the west coast, and he saw some kind of potential and me and hired a kid. I always joke. I said when Hamilton hired me, I didn't know the difference between revenue and profits just money, but how can saw some rob potential there. And brought me out to join his. Strategy firm, and I learned about business strategy with Bain level partner working close with them incredibly again luck incredibly fortunate and how long did you stay up? I was there for three years, and we had fantastic case casework this was Silicon Valley in the late nineties. So just amazing, right? If I knew then what I know. Now, I probably should have stayed there and should have been involved somehow in the venture industry. There was so much fun to what do, you know? Now that you didn't then how to create companies and all of the value creation potential that exists in that area. And how it's done, right. I was a kid it's twenty years ago now, but I enjoyed consulting a lot. And I said this has been so great here one I take a look at one of the branded shops, and I ended up going to g three years later and spent four years there being a generalist and just looking at all sorts of different industries. Airlines healthcare energy just a lot of fun. Consulting was wonderful. And along the way I started to learn a little bit more about investing and seeing how value creation was rewarded by the markets. And I ended up after four years going back to join how Wilton at his firm strategy capital..

Hamilton Helmer Princeton Bill Bain Florida Gardner Silicon Valley scientist IAS Cape Canaveral university of Florida CIO Mark Polly side department Wilton Abane partner consultant three years four years thirteen fourteen years
"aerospace engineer" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

The IVY Podcast

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"aerospace engineer" Discussed on The IVY Podcast

"More customers, more locations, more Erol more products more and more more right. If all the sudden you know, Kevin mentioned convenes growth, right? So adding another venue in order to help manage that can be, he's got all these lessons learned from all the things they're doing before they've got a modus operandi, they've got a playbook, they can apply. I'm assuming all these great things about your visit could be chaos underneath the Kevin. I know you guys can be so messed up, who knows. Right. It's hard to tell from here because it's an amazing venue, you know right of that, but right, you can handle it. Whereas challenges of sophistication are not more of the same stuff, but more different stuff. And that's a little bit like the dark side of the moon. Trying to bring up here. During, can you help me out with the fat finger there. Everything. And the reason the reason we use this analogy is because these kind of things are not more of the same. They're different. So go back to the CFO. The CFO just has to have more stuff to manage that she knew how to manage when they were private company was totally different things to manage that required, totally different skills and her success in that is much more subtle things upon which she'll be judged by whether she doesn't warrant otter subtle. Okay. It's not a matter of submitting a report, it's matter winning the confidence of investors. It's not a matter of getting the right data and the right analysis on the return on investment calculation on a new product. As a matter of having the analysts who cover your company on the street, trust your business plan until their investors, what they think, you know, normal. She wants to get norm Augustine in the forward to the book said he was trained as an aerospace engineer, which is really useful. If you're running the world's biggest aerospace engineer. And company when he became CEO, he spent all his time with bankers, lawyers, politicians, regulators, and so on. He didn't do any engineering and he was totally untrained. For that case, we had to learn a whole new set of skills. And that's what we mean by challenges. Asian. Clicking. We're like, all right, and what we found in the research in our own research in the book when these things get confused, that's what creates stall. So let me go through the stalls. Talk about some of the warning signs and challenges on them. You clicked me Jordan bell. And I want you to keep these minds. We go through my talk a little bit about the warning signs and I'll come back a little bit and talk about the. Some of the tools we give people to use in there. So the first stall we call stall the purpose stall, okay. This is a very subtle stall. We tell the story in the book of a guy named Mike Barnett. He runs a very successful software company that does event management software and actually for big trade shows as part of their life. Go to big trade shows, you know, like ten thousand people in that kind of thing. I mean, it's just a mad house, right? Well, Mike software, it's company called Ingo. It replaces in a very systematic analytically driven way. Well, we used to call great word of mouth and you come back to this trade show and you say that was a great trade show is ten thousand people there, but I met and had really meaningful contact with the fifty people that I really needed to meet new. The fifty out of the ten thousand when my software helps figured out based upon relationships linked in and just scrapes all the social media, everything is pretty cool. So it's pretty complex. And as Mike was growing the company, he realized. As new employees were coming on board new customer. Kobe. He couldn't explain his company anybody and he started it right. He couldn't explain it to his mom. It couldn't explain to his customers. In fact, once he was with his best customer who just loved you to death sang praises, and they ran into someone, he wanted to be a customer and the best customer said, shut up, Mike, I got this. I'll tell your story. The best.

Kevin Mike Barnett CFO Kobe norm Augustine engineer otter Jordan bell
Juno Becomes World's First Graphene Skinned Plane

Your Weekly Tech Update

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Juno Becomes World's First Graphene Skinned Plane

"The recent Farnborough airshow 2018, aerospace engineers from Britain's university of central land casher presented what they stayed is the world's first graphene skinned aircraft known as the Juneau the three point five meter wide unmanned plane could be a sign of things to come developed in partnership with the Sheffield, advanced manufacturing research centre, the university of Manchester's national graphing institute. And hi, Dale graphing industries, judo additionally, features graphing based batteries and three d. printed components. It's skin, though is where the real action is consisting of one atom thick layers of linked carbon atoms. Graphene is not only the world's strongest man made material, but it also is high. Highly conductive both thermally and electrically because it's so strong. An outer covering of it adds strength to conventional fuselage material, which then allows for less of those materials to be used leading to significant wheat reductions. And as a result aircraft, incorporating such skins could carry heavier payloads without using more fuel or fly for longer distances on a given amount of fuel. Additionally, because graphing thermal conductivity allows heat to spread throughout the material. It's not prone to ice build up. And finally, the electrical conductivity of graphene causes the energy of lightning strikes to be dispersed throughout the surface of the fuselage as opposed to causing damage throughout localized heating in one area. Not much else is known at this time except engineers planned to conduct tests flights of Juneau over the next two months. And of course keep you updated. As soon as I hear

Phillip Island Victoria Australia
"aerospace engineer" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"aerospace engineer" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"And one of the guys who visited served under one of the astronauts is this just goes on and on and then matthew with former nasa aerospace engineer so people who were professionals in independent and applied the procedures of scientific methodology analysis of evidence means motive and opportunity and here was one thing that joe said he said you tell skeptics to look at this idea let's just say say you hit a crime someone was murder a terrible thing and at the scene there's a weapon there's a wallet was the guy's name in it and there's an eyewitness and the gun belongs to the guy who's walling there it seems like a slam dunk except that there's a videotape of the man who supposedly would be the assassin at that time one thousand miles away at a wedding he says one piece of verifiable evidence trump's other circumstantial evidence that then you can realize well he's got there perhaps this way pretty much that way he said billy meyer is the most honest man i have ever evaluated i've watched every video of him and his evidence is impeccable and he said i will take on skeptics on your behalf if you want and here's the shoe he did i will not name one of the famous ufo researchers that he personally called up and another guy in india also a skeptic and he kind of put them into a another friend of mine let's just put it that way informing them of how ill prepared they were to to call themselves investigators they didn't understand compared to billy of course right well compared just two investigators because they had really very inappropriately inaccurately been criticizing evidence with theories that they had no evidence for and that is what happened with the skeptics that what happened with other people in the ufo field who've protect the meyer case because it threatens let's say their beliefs or their position or whatever this is too important it isn't my billy meier case if this is real this is the greatest most important true story in history it belongs to humankind and i think george is you know 'cause when we met in colorado your ago and we went over prophecies billy's prophecies that now date back to nineteen forty eight when his i e teacher gave him specific information about events unfolding right now and that because they were way ahead of the time josh marthers well here's the depressing part year ago when i was in switzerland after billy i published the nineteen forty eight letter which is in my blog which we've gotta get back up so people can read it i i looked at all these things and i went over and i said to billy billy did that your teachers this guy did he get this through some kind of consciousness or spiritual power oh no no no no he did it through time travel that was the most depressing thing i could hear why i'm travel it meant again nobody indeed believe this we will know soon enough about a lot of this stuff but here's the thing when he said that it meant that those are not prophesied events that people come up within their consciousness he went and saw these events some of them are underweight right now he told meyer that there was a woman who would appear in germany who would open the floodgates to the destruction of much of europe because she would be so indiscriminate and uncaring about protecting the nations and all and she would open the floodgates that would in the midst of many people who could be legitimate refugees or immigrants would be many criminals and terrorists this is nineteen forty eight and he said to meyer watch in the in the future they will be a series of earthquakes and disturbances in central italy and then the eruption of the following volcanoes will occur suva's stromboli aetna there is something called mount marsin did he see kellaway in hawaii no nobody i talked to billy about that when i was just over there.

"aerospace engineer" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"aerospace engineer" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"And one of the guys who did that served under one of the astronauts is this just goes on and on and then matthew whisk with former nasa aerospace engineer so people who were professionals and independent and applied the procedures of scientific methodology analysis of evidence means motive in and here was one thing that joe said he said you tell skeptics to look at this idea let's just say you had a crime someone was there was a murder a terrible thing and at the scene there's a weapon there's a wallet the guy's name it and there's an eyewitness and in the gun belongs to the guy who's wallet is there seems like a slam dunk except that there's a videotape of the man who supposedly would be the assassin at that time one thousand miles away at a wedding he says one piece of verifiable evidence trump's other circumstantial evidence that then you can realize well it got there perhaps this way perhaps that way he said billy meyer is the most honest man i have ever evaluated i've watched every video of him and his evidence is impeccable and he said i will take on skeptics on your behalf if you want and here's the other shoe he did i will not name one is the same as you of lovie searchers that he personally called up and another guy in india also was a skeptic and he kind of put them into a another frame of mind let's just put it that way informing them of how ill prepared they were to to call themselves investigators they didn't understand compared to billy of course right well compared just two investigators because they had really very inappropriately and inaccurately been criticizing evidence with theories that they had no evidence for and that is what happens with the skeptics that's what happened with other people in the us field who've attacked in your case because it threatens let's say their beliefs or their position or whatever this is too important it isn't my billy meier case if this is real this is the greatest most important true story in history it belongs to humankind and i think george is you know 'cause when we met in colorado your to go and we went over prophecies billy's prophecies that now date back to nineteen forty eight when his i e teacher gave him specific information about events unfolding right now and that because they were way ahead of the of the times cashmore thing well here's the depressing part year ago when i was in switzerland after billy i published the nineteen forty eight letter which is in my blog which we've gotta get back up so people can read it i i looked at all these things and i went over and i said to billy billy did did your teacher should this guy did he get this through some kind of you know consciousness or spiritual power oh no no no no he did it through time travel that was the most depressing thing i could hear why i'm travel it meant again and nobody indeed believe this we will know soon enough about a lot of this stuff but here's the thing when he said that it meant that those are not prophesied events that people come up within their consciousness he went and saw these events some of them are underweight right now he told meyer that there was a woman who would appear in germany who would open the floodgates to the destruction of much of europe because she would be so indiscriminate and uncaring about protecting the nation's and all and she would open the floodgates that would in the midst of many people who could be legitimate refugees or immigrants would be many criminals and terrorists this is nineteen forty eight and he said to meyer watch in the the future they will be series of earthquakes and disturbances in central italy and then the eruption of the following volcanoes will occur the suva's stromboli aetna there is something called mount marsin did he see kellaway in hawaii nobody i talked to billy about that when i was just over there and i didn't bring it up i was talking to billy and he brought it up and i'll say for anybody who's skeptical look at this point with killer way of going on with billy told me it's not dramatic i mean it's dramatic but it's not proof of any foreknowledge let's but there was something else he did tell me i'll tell you in sequence here he simply out of.

engineer nasa
"aerospace engineer" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"aerospace engineer" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"A chemist and not an aerospace engineer that you can still do this stuff you know that you can do anything and so you know it wasn't until my friend so working at nasa now my friend says hey nassar's hiring you know to be astronauts you should be you'd be a great astronaut handed me the application am i right and i threw it down and that that same year another friend of mine charlie kamara he got the astronaut program and i looked at him and i said they let that knucklehead he got in if he can get in i can get in you know and so the next and then he flew back to mass elaine lee and hampton virginia with john young in a nasa t thirty eight these blue sleek motte one point three jets they flew from houston to nasa and i see him land and then i'm like he's finding that thing and i gave this presentation then charlie and john young to presentation you know john young watching the moon the pilot of the shuttle columbia ns and then when i went to do the interview he was on the selection board and he said lee them made them out he's doing these great things optical fibers down and lane man he's playing football nfl and he knows good guy yells let's say now it was like wow john young to said that you know and so it was just like one thing after another let me turn this so what what were you doing with optical fibers get some swag free by the way.

engineer nassar charlie kamara john young nasa elaine lee hampton virginia houston
"aerospace engineer" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

WHYR 96.9 FM

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"aerospace engineer" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

"Well i'm afraid that said for the first part of exploration and the second part of exploration we're going to bring on the dean of martian studies and that is dr robert subaru he's an aerospace engineer one of the founders of the mars society and he's perhaps the most vocal proponent for going on to mars so we're going to talk about the promise the dangers the costs and the benefits of one day one day setting foot on the red planet and it may come sooner than most people realize because already is part of our national space strategy i the moan then on to the red planet mars welcome once again this is dr michio kaku professor of theoretical physics at the city college and the graduate center of the city university of new york and this is the second half of exploration in this segment of exploration we're gonna talk about the planet mars now of course the planet mars has been like a magnet for science fiction writers and visionaries ever since the eighteen hundreds when scientists begin to take a good look at the red lion in fact he was in the last century the edgar rice burroughs began to fantasize about heroes and and princesses on mars with john carter of mars series along of course with his earlier tarzan series and it turns out that a an astronomer percival lowell started this stampede to look at the planet mars by claiming that they were there was evidence of life on mars that canals on mars represented the last ditch effort of a dying civilization to irrigate the planet that was gradually becoming a desert well now we have detailed photographs of the planet mars in fact we know more about the surface of mars than we do about the surface of the planet earth because most of the earth services covered in water first of all there are no canals we know that because we have detailed photographs of mars no canals no sign of intelligent life in fact no sign of life at all on the planet mars so if mars is a desolate frozen desert with no evidence of life at all then why even bother to think about trying to colonize mars.

martian studies dr robert subaru professor john carter dr michio kaku city university of new york percival lowell one day
"aerospace engineer" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

WHYR 96.9 FM

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"aerospace engineer" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

"Goal go back into the sun the bible says from dusted thus ashes to ashes scientists say from start as became and to start this we will go back and it means that at some point we will have to either leave the earth or die that's a law of physics and so some people say well let's begin the process of now other people say well what's the big rush well one possibility to go to mars is real because of the fact that the cost of going to mars has dropped drastically down in the last several decades i remember when george bush the first talked about going to mars by 2020 that was his target to go to mars but the estimates word too hundred to five hundred billion dollars and that's back then you can imagine what that would be cost would it would cost today when those dollars perhaps a trillion dollars to go to mars while since then we've learned a few tricks since then spacex is pioneering things like the reusable rocket to bring down the cost and now instead of two hundred billion people are saying well maybe ten billion dollars we can begin the process of a man piloted mission to the red planet well with us here today is someone who's done the math someone who's done the pioneering work a founder the mars society dr robert zuber him a former aerospace engineer and we're going to ask him what his opinion is about going to mars and what we're gonna do once we get there emme.

spacex founder dr robert zuber engineer george bush five hundred billion dollars ten billion dollars trillion dollars
"aerospace engineer" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"aerospace engineer" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"College and high schools non functional body type or not not type nonfunctional body structure is a fair nor would i wanted to do what you want you do yeah and then take us earlier into what it was like growing up and wherever you'd wanna start m yet tickets tickets there it was very yo typical a i thanked us for is a middleclass family although you're looking back on a maybe we were a little below that just because you know if we go out to eat some word there was understood that you do not order milk when you go out to eat because let's go to get expensive in what you pay for way glasses what you can buy a gallon a milk for whatever all those things that my doubted say so now we would love that do he was eighty aerospace engineer okay an mom a housewife and how many brothers and sisters i had the three brothers no sisters and your placement is oldest brother okay what was that like middleclass dad airspace engineer so i'm guessing smart thoughtful uh was more linear thinking or more vertical in his thinking approaches a whom i would say linear there was a thing were there is a thing where he kinda wanted to be in charge of his domain and so was a thing where you know being the oldest brother i was usually the one that fell in line and then kind of as it went down the line up with.

engineer milk
"aerospace engineer" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"aerospace engineer" Discussed on WLOB

"The biggest labor theft cases in a decade cases involved unions representing noises aerospace engineers firefighters teachers film and tv artist airtraffic controllers musicians bus inspectors bakery workers roofers and so on so full individual cases compiled by the office of labormanagement standards last year site theft and fraud ranging from two thousand fifty one dollars to nearly six point five million peter henning he's a former federal prosecutor teaches law and ways wayne state university he says unions are not unique another group hit hard by embezzlement our churches you can't train people to be ethical it's just access the money yeah i don't think i try to equate the unions were the church but ups undergoing tell you it's unbelievable you always have been doing a lot of research on the khamis i'm and i'm talking about early communist of unknown ah amulet that project now they've been only was when the we we were intercepting soviet uh signals and we had deciphered some of them first for several years and then they got they got on to was in figured me of were found that the we knew would they knew i know would you know would we note and so they started doing using one time pans and things like this and and they been made it harder but we have since then in the 1960s wind up deciphering a lot of the early messages that we're from the 1930's forties and fifties that are now in the archives and of course with the fall of the soviet union you can start matching things up and seeing you if we were right or wrong and during vanoni we were.

embezzlement group federal prosecutor fraud theft wayne state university peter henning soviet union labor ups access time church the office people
"aerospace engineer" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"aerospace engineer" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"He said he had some technical issues foot later that show they the police set typically they were sunk deliberately well and it was the submarine that he built himself so why would you sings rise submarine that you bill you saw another big question and they didn't found the swedish curling their journalist so the police haven't said very much but that won't be a problem they don't have a body and might never find no sign of her for now though i'm looking at a piece of your reuters copy and in describes peter madsen as an entrepreneur artist submarine builder and aerospace engineer hanoi here who is is sky he is known for fee ferry courage mighty a bit tempered you know never any evidence of in being violent anything but that but you certainly had a ten burn it would argue and fight with people he's had his um cream for many years to go into space bills rockets and feel submarines and you know whatever fever impossible unrealistic he makes it happen you said this earlier that he changed his story and we don't know whitens and his story but the court yeah knows why he changed his story is that right he had wanted the preliminary hearing to be ah an open to the public for some reason they decided to keep behind closed doors but i think it's important to say that you know east josh would involuntary manslaughter involuntary manslaughter the so so they think is responsible for an hour responsible there but but his lawyer it's also important to point out his lawyer says that he's not guilty and kind of attention is a story getting uh is is all over i mean not our unusual submarine men the famous gone missing sweetest gentleness it's all over not just the top lord of the uh establish media and the fate broadcast i suppose people have a lot of theories.

reuters aerospace engineer hanoi whitens josh peter madsen involuntary manslaughter
"aerospace engineer" Discussed on The Future According to Now

The Future According to Now

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"aerospace engineer" Discussed on The Future According to Now

"The first time i saw spatial launch a little kid and it was from like my front yard by lived across the entire state of florida from cape canaveral and it really just at from that distance looks like a little star as a kid jason dan dreamed of becoming an aerospace engineer but as he started a coveted internship at the kennedy space center nassau retired the space shuttle program still jason clung to his dream there'll be a point where we go to mars and people live there and they'll have a basis on the moon in people live on the moon so jason started made in space what we're focus on right now made in space is building technology that allows us to manufacture in space and eventually using the resources of space to do the main factoring so that nothing comes from planet earth three d printing is vital to his plan so we started working with nasa to design three d printer that would work in space in two thousand fourteen we launched the first three d printer one of the highlights was one of the astronauts had misplaced tool and when we heard that we designed a new one had it certified by nasa and three d printed all within a fiveday period what we did was we proved that there's literally no faster way to send things in the space then this this technique that we called digital launch wrenches are one thing but when it comes to building things in space jason is ultimately interested in much bigger things if a current program when nasa called arcana it's like architecture astronaut and it's of robotic spacecraft than when it's in space will build those things it just gets in space and builds giant antennas so imagine it builds an antenna dish the size of a football stadium so maybe like one hundred yards across.

front yard florida engineer kennedy space center nassau nasa cape canaveral jason dan football one hundred yards fiveday