35 Burst results for "Aerospace Company"

NASA's Revolutionary Collaboration

Innovation Now

00:58 sec | Last week

NASA's Revolutionary Collaboration

"Masses commercial crew program is a unique collaboration enabling nasa to work side by side with american aerospace companies the commercial companies chosen to carry crews to and from the international space station own and operate their own hardware and infrastructure nasa engineers and aerospace specialists will work closely with the companies to ensure the successful launch of spacecraft from american soil commercial crew astronauts will train like other nasa astronauts astronauts will prepare to live and work in space for up to six months at a time that these astronauts will also work closely with boeing and spacex to understand the new spacecraft launch systems and space suits they will be using the successful launch of crew won the first nasa certified commercial flight marked the move of this revolutionary collaboration from development into regular flights

Nasa International Space Station Spacex Boeing
Stock Futures Down More Than 600 Points, As Boeing, Microsoft Report Earnings

The KFBK Morning News

00:34 sec | Last month

Stock Futures Down More Than 600 Points, As Boeing, Microsoft Report Earnings

"Microsoft's first quarter revenue rose a better than expected 12% thanks to a boost, among other things in cloud computing, which helps people work from home shares a Boeing hire in pre market trade, the aerospace company swung to a narrower than expected third quarter laws. Boeing is also deepening job cuts. As the pandemic continues. Microsoft's first quarter revenue was higher stock futures right now are lower. Dow futures Down 618 points SNP futures down 65 the NASDAQ indicator down 180 points

Boeing Microsoft
"aerospace company" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

01:54 min | 2 months ago

"aerospace company" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"In the episode <Speech_Female> in our show notes <Speech_Female> at the new school <Speech_Female> podcast <Speech_Female> episode <Speech_Female> Stick Around to the end to <Speech_Female> hear a sneak peek <Speech_Female> of next week's episode <Speech_Female> to say Upstate <Speech_Female> on content. Make <Speech_Female> sure to follow us on Instagram <Speech_Female> at the new <Speech_Female> school podcast and <Speech_Female> on Twitter at the new <Speech_Female> school pod. Be sure <Speech_Female> to subscribe wherever you get <Speech_Female> your podcast. If you <Speech_Female> rate and review us on <Speech_Female> Apple podcast, you could <Speech_Female> find your view on <Speech_Female> a feature the new school <Speech_Female> episode. Do you feel <Speech_Female> like you are so announced <Speech_Female> would be an amazing <Speech_Female> guest on our show. If <Speech_Female> yes, please contact <Speech_Female> us on our website <Speech_Female> the new school podcast <Speech_Female> off. Slash contact <Speech_Female> while your ultimate guide <Speech_Female> on how to turn your <Speech_Female> passions into meaningful <Speech_Female> career subscribe to our Weekly <Speech_Female> Newsletter at the new <Speech_Female> school podcast.com. <Speech_Female> The new school <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> with Christine Hong is <Speech_Female> produced by Jennie Snyder <Speech_Female> clear Wiley <Speech_Female> and Alexia mersad <Speech_Female> editing by Sydney. <Speech_Female> Sulk. John Simpson <Speech_Female> and Joseph <Speech_Female> Cho special thanks to our <Speech_Female> marketing team who help us <Speech_Female> spread our mission and put <Speech_Female> the new school name out <Speech_Female> there. <Speech_Female> KO sakee, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Lena chaye, Marissa <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Westheimer and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Giovanni Cortez. <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> Next week. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> We're talking to the amazing <Speech_Female> Caroline shown <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> who works in an industry <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> where all familiar with <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> yet don't know <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> well hotel <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> management <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Carolyn discovered her <Speech_Female> passion for her tells <Speech_Female> at the age of Sixteen <Speech_Female> and went on to study <Speech_Female> at home top Hospitality <Speech_Female> Management program <Speech_Female> at Cornell after <Speech_Female> which she became one <Speech_Female> of the youngest housekeeping <Speech_Female> managers at the Four Seasons. <Speech_Female> She's now <Speech_Female> the guest experienced <Speech_Female> manager at Auberge <Speech_Female> Resorts and Big <Speech_Female> Island, Hawaii. Oh <Speech_Female> and fun fact <Speech_Female> packed friend is <Speech_Female> Joey Roth from <Speech_Female> season 1 episode <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> 3. <Speech_Female> If you let people <Speech_Female> be the color and room <Speech_Female> and you give these <Speech_Female> compelling characters <Speech_Female> the space to <Speech_Female> let their colors come to <Speech_Female> life and really understand <Speech_Female> what excites them <Speech_Female> personalities <Speech_Female> are. Why are they traveling? <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> What are the kids <Speech_Female> like all these <Speech_Music_Female> little details <Speech_Female> you'll be able <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> to create <Speech_Female> this experience <Speech_Female> and to stay <Speech_Female> that is going to completely <Speech_Female> blow them <Speech_Female> out of the water. And <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> that is what excites <Speech_Female> me come back next <Speech_Female> Monday to find out from <Speech_Female> Caroline how she broke <Speech_Female> into hotel management <Speech_Female> while working in different <Speech_Female> luxury resort locations <Speech_Female> across the <Speech_Female> world is like and what <Speech_Female> her current indu day is <Speech_Female> like, all right guys. Have a great day. Try some. the new day

"aerospace company" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

05:42 min | 2 months ago

"aerospace company" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"So do you feel like there's a big mistake you made during your career? Yeah, not trusting enough because they were opportunities would act could have taken advantage of I got to go to certain places and meet with certain people. But because I didn't think that I deserved to be there. I didn't take advantage of those opportunities. I didn't trust my faster syndrome. Yeah, I didn't take myself. So maybe seriously enough I wasn't kind enough to myself. And so I looked like I did I say something why didn't I or whatever the case might be but in the midst of that I think I'm also being rewarded. You know, I've got to meet some really impressive people and all of us that we continue to do that. So I do not think have any regrets regarding that but if I were to look back not feeling confident enough to speak up in a room, which would have took a whole lot of good for me would probably be my biggest regret if you like so well on the other side, what do you think is the best thing you did for your career just going for it, right, I just go for it. It's like someone's gotta do it. It matters world to me. That's the attitude right and Aspera Ad Astra with great pain to the Stars. I knew that it was going to be a difficult journey and I went for it whatever happens whatever the outcome is off when I turn 70 or 80 and I'm talking to my kids or grandkids. I'll tell them that that actually did this or Grandpa actually did this and so I am incredibly proud of myself for that month. I'm humbled by it and I'm grateful to God and all the people that have helped me dude. I think that would be the best decision that I have made just going forward and not looking back. Well for others who are looking to get into Aerospace. Do you have any advice for them or how they could break in? Yeah, just dream of the stars and watch a lot of Star Wars and I'm just kidding or you could do that that's that's fun. I'm a Star Trek fan and then Star Wars fan. I would say Develop skills problem-solving skills and go forward what most people might consider the most difficult problems and try to solve them from a very early stage it trains your mind to deal with some of the things you're going to have to encounter a good reason for that. This is important. There's something called a whack-a-mole problem in aerospace engineering where as you try to walk One Moment One pops out and you just keep walking on different models and then you know, you never convert you never get to a solution and aerospace engineering. Is that what you solve one problem you create fifty others you optimize the system to perform efficiently in one way you ruin everything else on the other end. It's really no way around it it trains your mind and put the way I live. My life in many ways is just a continuation of the thought processes that I brought in from, you know, aerospace engineering doesn't mean I'm boring but it's a Carry On from there. So my biggest advice would be Go after difficult problems try to solve them be bold be confident most aerospace engineers up until after they graduate have no idea what the heck they're doing. So you're not going to know what you're doing for good portion of Korea, but at least of your studies and time in school or whatever aspirational years if that's the path you take off which obviously is in the past that I joke, but go after the difficult problems try to solve them have fun while doing that and you make a brilliant engineer. I think I love that poem the use of much set anniversary show. We give guests sexy seconds to pitch anything they want. Is there anything you want to pitch? Sure. I wasn't expecting that. Thank you. Arc is not going to revolutionize space travel. It's going to revolutionize high-speed point-to-point civil aviation. And is the revolution in high school? Sonic's that we have been working towards over the past forty fifty years, there's been a lot of development in aerospace engineering and Aviation, and for the first time we have gone to a place where a whole lot of the things that we dreamt of as kids thought it might be possible because of the Improvement in material Technologies, and in our understanding of every Dynamic and propulsion technologies that we are able to do all those things and so we have a unique combination in Ark which is the ace system which is capable of operating as a loan vehicle as a Hypersonic system for many different applications, and we're going to be doing a lot of exciting things. Feel free to reach out us on our website at everything. Space breathing not space you can log Out of forum or you could email us directly at info at everything that space and yeah, I'm looking forward to going into the future and doing that exciting thing with everyone that we get to work with and interact with them very excited for that. Thank you guys so much for listening to our chat with off-and-on below. He has so many awesome stories of persistence and dedication and I just love how he sees a great challenge as a problem to be solved and I just persisting he he's really achieved his dreams. It's so awesome. You can find links to anything mentioned in the episode in our show notes at the new school podcast episode Stick Around to the end to hear a sneak peek of next week's episode to say Upstate on content. Make sure to follow us on Instagram.

Stars Aspera Ad Astra Korea engineer Sonic
"aerospace company" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

07:54 min | 2 months ago

"aerospace company" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"2% which in Aerospace is a big deal. I might not want to invest as much money or an investor might not see enough value to invest money there. It might be too risky, but if I'm offering dead A 40% Improvement in performance, then that's a big thing. And so an investor might look into them. We're doing this by focusing on critical systems very few critical systems, not the entirety of the rocket and we are confident that if we improve performance in those areas, the combination of the performance gains would lead to home twenty times Improvement in overall performance of our rocket system. And these are not just you know claims we have raw data computer simulations and all of that stuff to prove that very much within reason. So if we fall short by 10% or 20% that is still a very huge performance increase compared to any of the systems that are operational so we cannot go wrong with this as long we build our systems right the result that we've gotten so far says that we are going to make a huge mark on the market and I'm really excited wage. For the future of humanity frankly. I just for what I have achieved or I could achieve but for what that means for the human race. Yeah, what are your main short-term and long-term goals right. Now off for Ark the short-term goal would be to bring in all the money that we are currently talking to all of these guys about and you know, all the interests of generated trying to make sure we maximize that and do our job properly so that we are able to bring in all the value that we could and in the long-term man has to become a space-faring species. We have to not we want as long as it's fancy or we can afford to I think it's imperative that we have a colony residents on the moon for mining purposes, but also for habitation purposes because it'll teach us how to survive beyond our planet in the case that something were to happen to our home planet. I don't believe in going to Thursday. Space so as to abandon Earth or this is our new home has always been our home but I think diversifying and finding other ways to do things and learning about world and about and about our universe is the most human thing about humans more than almost anything else except maybe food and procreation and spirituality obviously, but I think that's a very central part about being and we cannot neglect that we cannot ignore that and I think our will be a central part of key part making that happen in life. And that's where we going with this. Yeah. One thing I'm actually very curious about is how you set lines for Ark cuz this is such Uncharted Territory people can't get jobs as good estimate on when things will complete I have issues project managing my company. It's a software app so I can only imagine the issues you run into. Yeah you bring in really smart people to help you with some of that page. And learning I'm a very versatile person. I think hopefully and and I continue to be as I learn could be better but I bring in really smart people to help with all the things that I couldn't do well to advise on all the things that I'm not skilled at and so as far as managing our timelines and project planning and knowing what the next and most important thing to do wage might be we do have some Incredible Minds that are working with us, I think in back, you know, I think yesterday or the day before yesterday. I was thinking about some of the talent that we have we have some top Executives, you know is working from some of the biggest companies in the world on my staff and Advisory board right now and to think about the kid who had no idea what was going to happen him the next day. I had to survive and live too religious riots in had to live through just insane hunger incredible circumstances and not just me a whole lot of kids who grew up in Africa have to deal with that. So I'm by no means dead. A hero and I don't say that to be humble. I don't think am it's just life and things happen. But to think that I had been able to get a place where I have all these incredible people I couldn't tell you how I feel about that. I'm incredibly blessed for that. So I'm grateful. Yeah, and now several people have called you the next Elon Musk. How does that feel? I actually have a bit of an existence that because I don't want to be the next Elon Musk. I don't think he Lamaze was the next whoever or anything else they used to call me and Nigeria should say he is the he's going to be next Bill Gates. I was like, well who Bill Gates the next to I think understand the kindness and the thought that goes into that sentiment but I think Elon Musk do not have to deal with some of the challenges that I had to deal with. He is not a person of color eyes. He's a great achiever incredibly smart man, but I want to be defined for me. I think the weight of my work and my personality would be able to carry it Grateful Dead. Decided to get meet with mister mask, but I don't want to be the next him. I want to be me. I totally get that. What's your favorite and least favorite thing about your job right now favorite thing about my job right now, as long as the feeling of knowing that I know this is a part of me. I don't know how people react to it. But you know, it's the weird rocket scientist, but knowing stuff that the feeling that I know most of the whole lot people do not know it's that thing. It's like I'm not a joke on the Playfield like I'm not the cool guy. I'm not Chris Hemsworth, right, but I know stuff that these are the people don't know and there's a bit of insecurity in dead. But that's my favorite part of my job just being able to work on really cool stuff. And then the least favorite part would be sitting in on meetings long meetings. Yeah. Hey, I don't like it one bit and it's going to happen more and more. So as we Advanced there's going to be all this, you know, invest in meetings and you're gonna have to sit there for an hour and but yeah, I can't imagine you're pitching constantly song. My desire to be funded. Yeah, do you feel like quarantine has affected your career at all. No, as a matter of fact when it came around weirdly enough. I did not freak out as much as I woke up. I knew exactly how much I could have freaked out. I measured it in my head. I was like, oh my gosh, this is what the reaction to Industry would be and this is exactly what you should do how you should feel about it. But one of the things you learn as a team leader, especially for start up in a company as my you cannot show that to the people who have believed in you have to stay strong. You have to stay hopeful long tail the whole ship sinks and everything goes south then at that point. It's like, well it's obvious and so I think maybe that thought of having to stay strong be the strong person help me and somehow they met somewhere in the middle where I just didn't Feel anything about it and just let it go and actually we've made a whole lot of progress since the quarantine started then we had a few months before that like thieves accelerated actually during this period of time and that's the irony of it and there's a report that Aerospace is actually not shrunk as most people thought it would I mean obviously commercial Aviation has been off hit but you know Aerospace will then launch vehicles and Military Aviation and Military systems have actually not shrunk by any I don't think significant as well at least as much as the projected were so we are sitting pretty good. I'm pretty excited about times and I hope things would return back to normal economy would return back to normal..

Elon Musk Aerospace Bill Gates Africa Nigeria Chris Hemsworth Advisory board team leader Military Aviation scientist
"aerospace company" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

06:09 min | 2 months ago

"aerospace company" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"Me when they had problems and that was how I was able to pay for my day-to-day, you know living and all of that stuff off. And the reason I liked that was it allowed for me to do this, you know in those moments because I didn't have a bus or fixed schedule and I interacted with tech which I love to do in life. And so that's how I paid for this. I moved to the us obviously things change when I moved to the US I to put it simply I didn't know how to get on a bus right? I didn't know anybody I had to learn everything and figure everything out myself we could talk about this later, but I was homeless for a little while slept on the street and I think I had about five or six hundred dollars went to the first best offer. I got a computer because I told myself as long as I have the tools that I need to work. I'm going to survive and so I ended up with maybe a hundred bucks. So but yeah, it's been a fascinating Journey wage. Think I lost myself there for a little bit. But hopefully I answer that question. Well, so you're doing these day jobs maintain basically Aerospace at night. How did you make it to America? Do you just show them your package? And you're like, hey, like I'm Legit and then that man basically no, I don't want to get into that whole debate, you know Taco with whatever but move into the United States wage process is quite rigorous, right? And so I had a few TV interviews appearances in Nigeria and I think a few newspaper articles on myself. I went to a TV station. I woke up one day. This is kind of who I was and I think to a large extent I still am but obviously as you get older you sort of modulate that I woke up one morning and I said, I'm going to go to a TV station. I'm doing all this cool stuff and I want them to know I want the world to know and I didn't know what a TV station is. I just asked around in the city. I go to XYZ Hale. I took literally lived. Probably all the money that I had in the world got on in a taxicab went to the first location and they told me oh the TV stations not here I got on another time. I said, okay. Am I going to turn around and go home? I still have enough money to take me home. But if I go to the next location, which I'm not even sure anyone would be there. I might feel like I failed the first time so I decided to get in the taxi cab and you know what I did, of course, I went to the next location to see if there was a TV station there I arrived and yes, there was a TV station there I went to I just walked in the office all the security and everything that you respect. I said, I want to be on T. I've been doing all the stuff you guys going to give me airtime. You're lucky actually expensive though. I was like know what you share me, you know going to charge anything so they said okay take XYZ. This number go home will call you next year. This was in December and in January I get a call. They told me they were sending people to my house to interview me do all of that stuff this summer. Cruise my neighbors were like, oh, wow. What did he do that? What's happening and all of that stuff right in the ghetto in the middle of nowhere. I did that interview and then they invited me in studio for a actual interview. I actually got paid after I do that interview. I didn't realize they pay you for interview so you don't but I did so good. They invited me a few more times and they paid me actually I was supposed to pay off a lot of money and end up making some money so that felt really good. That was actually my first bank account. I was able to open my first bank account with that money, but see to the question the US Embassy in a few people took notice of what I was doing and so I got a recommendation letter to the Embassy. I got interviewed and I told them give me 2 weeks. I'll change the world just that's all I need soon. As I am. I'm going to run into Elon Musk and I'll be like this is all the cool stuff I've done and it's going to be like yay. Awesome. Yeah, obviously we know that didn't happen. So but that was a determination the US Embassy song. What I was doing was pretty cool and they said yeah, you can go to the US and go figure stuff out and see where that goes. So interesting actually, I'm very curious. What did you pitch that news station? She made them want to come to you. I told them that I am working on a propulsion system. That's better than anything that's currently operational cuz I know this for certain jobs at the time like a hundred percent. No, but did I have a hunch and that I have the boldness audacity whatever to say that? Yes, absolutely. And I think the intention was not to be deceptive. Like I wasn't sure that I could a hundred percent defend my numbers, but I knew that I had put in all my heart and all my work and have done the work enough to appear on National T. Junkie when I went on that TV show I'm glad this didn't happen. That would have become a meme way before it might be a good thing, but my family was so not well to do that. I couldn't afford to buy a home. Belt to wear around my waist for my pants and so my pants were loose fit in and it could have dropped while I was on national TV off and I was the only one who knew about that is just when I look back and laugh at it, but it's all them that I had this amazing tag. And by the way, someone had to pay for me to go back home because I couldn't afford to go back cuz I spent all the money at yeah, it's crazy. I can't imagine how nerve-wracking that was. Yeah, very do you find it easy to explain your value prop two people cuz it's very hard to show people what you're doing like a software app. You're like, here's here's how many users we have and I feel like there's so many misconceptions about space. So is it easy to explain to people your value prop? It is very difficult. And also even for people who are not novices it comes in two flavors for people who are novices to space and space exploration Technologies and trying to pitch those people with the aim of raising money. It could be difficult because they have no idea what the heck you're talking about. I have four people who are experts you want to be able to keep your intellectual property safe and secure and so you have to learn the art in both instances.

us US Embassy Elon Musk America Nigeria
"aerospace company" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

05:27 min | 2 months ago

"aerospace company" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"Guys, I'm your host Christine home and welcome to the first episode of our third season. We are so excited to be back and I cannot wait for you to hear the incredible guess we have for you today wage guy is seriously impressive. I feel like when we were growing up so many voice said when I grew up I want to work in space travel, but it just ended up being a pipe dream for most of them that is not the case for our guests today. I feel mabolo grew up in Bureau Nigeria where he had access to literally five hundred megabytes of Internet a week at a local internet cafe. It's somehow he went from reading up on rockets on Thursday or Nokia phone in Nigeria to launching his own Aerospace company at age twenty-eight in Los Angeles that aims to revolutionize space travel in this episode. I speak too often you about how he made his first Aerospace package at age sixteen, but then couldn't afford to publish it how he was able to use the press in Nigeria to get the US Embassy to notice him and get him a visa to the USA to achieve his Aerospace streams and wage. We got millions in funding for his current Aerospace company Advanced Rockets Corporation. Okay. Thank you so much for being on our show. It's really nice to meet you. I was kind of curious like kind of what your child was like like, what did you think you're going to be when you grew up? Yeah. Sure. Thanks for having me on your show. I'm pretty excited about this and getting to talk you audience and yourself about you know, smoke my experiences growing up in Nigeria. So my childhood was pretty pretty interesting that say, you know, just like almost every other kid. I had all of these goals and dreams and what I thought the world was like am I always wanted to travel I was always fascinated by everything that I saw on T. The occasional time that I did get to see a TV and that shaped my growing years from when I was three and so it's just a progression of all the different things that which is normal for developing children the uniqueness in that is I grew up. In a mix of sort of a slum mixed with modern city life. And so you were living in a slum, but the city was just nearby so that kind of that sort of interaction. I've seen what a good life could be like looks like feels like and then returning home to not having much and knowing that that was your reality and also feeling trapped by faith that I think that fight that balance was what created the thought process is that led up to me doing everything that is I'm doing today and so I'm pretty grateful for that because it opened up a whole lot of banks made a whole lot of things apparent to me as much as I didn't enjoy a whole lot of it. Yeah. So how did you even start an interest in Aerospace while you're growing up? So as a part of that the beautiful side of not having everything you ever wanted most parts of the slum didn't have electricity and depend on how far away from the city you were with them. Have a lot of light pollution. And so we actually live at least an hour away from the the slum that I grew up in at least an hour away from the city. And so I had the full night sky view I could see the stars. I could see details that since I moved to Los Angeles quite frankly. I haven't seen except when I go spend a few weeks in the woods or whatever but it's that fascination with what is out there. I think from a very early age and how big a star is I remember asking my dad questions. Like can I bring a star back down to earth and would it be possible for me to go to space is there like a door that you have to open when you go really high and never go to fly in an airplane. So I really didn't have a good concept for what that felt like home and so my fascination with space and space exploration and all of that stuff started at a very early age of just looking up and wanted to go out there. I think one of the things that I from a very early age Always wanted to do for some reason is when I turned 80 or 90. I wanted to get on the spaceship say and then just fly out into space and go as far as I can and be human who has traveled the farthest away from Earth and probably died in that ship but just be remembered for that. And so as a child, imagine think in having a thought process of such and so I have always thought to explore I loved and cherished family, but for me exploration and doing that thing the next big thing has always been my primary driving force. Maybe also that's so funny that you were ready right to be a martyr as child. You're like if I die in space at age Thirty, it's fine. So, I mean a lot of people I think they're kind of dream job when they're young kid is like it to be astronaut. Honestly. I feel like especially a lot of boys are that way, but they end up being like, okay. Well God do something realistic or I don't even know how to become an astronaut even like if you're growing up in, New Jersey. Succeeding in America. So how did you start making this dream a reality and ruin Nigeria? So yeah, we all want to be last year. It's the thing that when you go to Korea day and you act a little bunch of kids. I want to be a doctor I want to be this and want to be an astronaut a Spaceman and go to space and honestly, there was all very long period of time there was a little bit of that it wasn't obviously as a developing mind off wasn't always clear to me that I was going to do that..

Nigeria Los Angeles Bureau Nigeria Christine Nokia New Jersey Advanced Rockets Corporation US Embassy USA America Korea
"aerospace company" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

05:26 min | 2 months ago

"aerospace company" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"Guys, I'm your host Christine home and welcome to the first episode of our third season. We are so excited to be back and I cannot wait for you to hear the incredible guess we have for you today wage guy is seriously impressive. I feel like when we were growing up so many voice said when I grew up I want to work in space travel, but it just ended up being a pipe dream for most of them that is not the case for our guests today. I feel mabolo grew up in Bureau Nigeria where he had access to literally five hundred megabytes of Internet a week at a local internet cafe. It's somehow he went from reading up on rockets on Thursday or Nokia phone in Nigeria to launching his own Aerospace company at age twenty-eight in Los Angeles that aims to revolutionize space travel in this episode. I speak too often you about how he made his first Aerospace package at age sixteen, but then couldn't afford to publish it how he was able to use the press in Nigeria to get the US Embassy to notice him and get him a visa to the USA to achieve his Aerospace streams and wage. We got millions in funding for his current Aerospace company Advanced Rockets Corporation. Okay. Thank you so much for being on our show. It's really nice to meet you. I was kind of curious like kind of what your child was like like, what did you think you're going to be when you grew up? Yeah. Sure. Thanks for having me on your show. I'm pretty excited about this and getting to talk to you audience and yourself about you know, smoke my experiences growing up in Nigeria. So my childhood was pretty pretty interesting that say, you know, just like almost every other kid. I had all of these goals and dreams and what I thought the world was like am I always wanted to travel I was always fascinated by everything that I saw on T. The occasional time that I did get to see a TV and that shaped my growing years from when I was three and so it's just a progression of all the different things that which is normal for developing children the uniqueness in that is I grew up. In a mix of sort of a slum mixed with modern city life. And so you were living in a slum, but the city was just nearby so that kind of that sort of interaction. I've seen what a good life could be like looks like feels like and then returning home to not having much and knowing that that was your reality and also feeling trapped by faith that I think that fight that balance was what created the thought process is that led up to me doing everything that is I'm doing today and so I'm pretty grateful for that because it opened up a whole lot of banks made a whole lot of things apparent to me as much as I didn't enjoy a whole lot of it. Yeah. So how did you even start an interest in Aerospace while you're growing up? So as a part of that the beautiful side of not having everything you ever wanted most parts of the slum didn't have electricity and depend on how far away from the city you were with them. Have a lot of light pollution. And so we actually live at least an hour away from the the slum that I grew up in at least an hour away from the city. And so I had the full night sky view I could see the stars. I could see details that since I moved to Los Angeles quite frankly. I haven't seen except when I go spend a few weeks in the woods or whatever but it's that fascination with what is out there. I think from a very early age and how big a star is I remember asking my dad questions. Like can I bring a star back down to earth and would it be possible for me to go to space is there like a door that you have to open when you go really high and never go to fly in an airplane. So I really didn't have a good concept for what that felt like home and so my fascination with space and space exploration and all of that stuff started at a very early age of just looking up and wanted to go out there. I think one of the things that I from a very early age Always wanted to do for some reason is when I turned 80 or 90. I wanted to get on the spaceship say and then just fly out into space and go as far as I can and be human who has traveled the farthest away from Earth and probably died in that ship but just be remembered for that. And so as a child, imagine think in having a thought process of such and so I have always thought to explore I loved and cherished family, but for me exploration and doing that thing the next big thing has always been my primary driving force. Maybe also that's so funny that you were ready right to be a martyr as a child. You're like if I die in space at age Thirty, it's fine. So, I mean a lot of people I think they're kind of dream job when they're young kid is like it to be astronaut. Honestly. I feel like especially a lot of boys are that way, but they end up being like, okay. Well God do something realistic or I don't even know how to become an astronaut even like if you're growing up in, New Jersey. Succeeding in America. So how did you start making this dream a reality and ruin Nigeria? So yeah, we all want to be last year. It's the thing that when you go to Korea day and you act a little bunch of little kids. I want to be a doctor I want to be this and I want to be an astronaut a Spaceman and go to space and honestly, there was all very long period of time there was a little bit of that it wasn't obviously as a developing mind off wasn't always clear to me that I was going to do that..

Nigeria Los Angeles Bureau Nigeria Christine Nokia New Jersey Advanced Rockets Corporation US Embassy USA America Korea
Dow finishes up over 800 points as stocks soar on strong jobs report

News, Traffic and Weather

00:37 sec | 6 months ago

Dow finishes up over 800 points as stocks soar on strong jobs report

"In the wake of a surprisingly strong employment report for may stocks posted brought in sharp gains today the Dow Jones industrial average surged eight hundred twenty nine points or three point one percent while the nasdaq composite leapt two point one percent to finish within four points of its all time closing high Boeing is back in the top spot in terms of the Most Valuable aerospace company stock of the jet maker has rallied sharply this week as airlines have been reporting some improvement in demand and the willingness to add more flights Boeing's shares soared another eleven percent today pushing the company's market value above one hundred fifteen billion dollars putting it ahead of both Lockheed Martin and

Boeing Lockheed Martin
SpaceX delays dramatic Crew Dragon abort test

The Fullerton Financial Hour

00:37 sec | 11 months ago

SpaceX delays dramatic Crew Dragon abort test

"One small step for man one giant leap towards a manned mission private aerospace company SpaceX launching another rocket tomorrow A. B. C.'s Michelle France it has more standing down that was the message tweeted Saturday by SpaceX the crew dragon major safety test window now set for Sunday morning the private spaceflight company will simulate a failure on this on manta mission that will test the escape systems in the capsule for astronauts the crew dragon will be used to shuttle astronauts back and forth eventually to the international space station if all goes well with this abort test a manned mission is the next

Spacex Michelle France A. B. C.
SpaceX launches, destroys rocket in astronaut escape test

Atlanta Living

00:35 sec | 11 months ago

SpaceX launches, destroys rocket in astronaut escape test

"Trial and one small step for man one giant leap toward a manned mission private aerospace company SpaceX launches another rocket tomorrow standing down that was the message tweeted Saturday by SpaceX the crew dragon major safety test window now set for Sunday morning the private spaceflight company will simulate a failure on this on manta mission that will test the escape systems in the capsule for astronauts the crew dragon will be used to shuttle astronauts back and forth eventually to the international space station if all goes well with this abort test a manned mission is the

Spacex
"aerospace company" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"aerospace company" Discussed on 600 WREC

"For the aerospace company that included suspending production of it seven thirty seven MAX jetliner stocks and bonds are on track for their biggest gains at the same time in more than twenty years as the major indexes Paul reached record highs again stand still on Capitol Hill the house hasn't forwarded articles of impeachment and the Senate has agreed on rules for the trial and the cities with the worst offenders according to speed cameras a lot more cities are putting a mop they're putting on a rien Nash schools arms but also even farther than that the problem is that east on the laws of the state very states allow the rules for the scammers some of the cities are only allowed to set small fines for and they're not allowed to actually signing the driver they're sending the vehicle wallstreet journal reporter Paul over bird on speed cameras including one that gave one hundred eighty eight tickets last year to the same vehicle Capitol Hill the Senate appears no closer to completing the next step of the impeachment process house speaker Nancy Pelosi has not forwarded the two articles of impeachment against president trump to the Senate and won't until she knows what the rules will be for his trial yesterday Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer outline documents he wants to subpoena for the impeachment trial the Senate should hear testimony under oath from four key witnesses all of whom would have I witnessed direct knowledge of what happened in relation to these charges Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says he wants the trial to unfold much as former president bill Clinton's did in nineteen ninety nine when each side presented opening arguments and then voted on whether to hear from witnesses separately in court filings yesterday attorneys for the house Judiciary Committee so the panel was continuing its impeachment inquiry even following the house vote on the articles of impeachment.

MAX bill Clinton Chuck Schumer president reporter wallstreet journal rien Nash house Judiciary Committee Mitch McConnell Nancy Pelosi Senate Paul
Environmental group plans satellite launch to monitor methane

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 1 year ago

Environmental group plans satellite launch to monitor methane

"Natural gas consists mainly of methane seen a potent global warming pollutant to help hold companies accountable for letting methane pollution escape to the atmosphere. The Environmental Defense Fund is doing more than lobbying. Legislators it's sending a satellite into orbit that will allow us to look at every single major oil and gas facility around the world multiple times per week. EDF President Fred Crop says these facilities often have malfunctioning equipment or pipes that allow methane ethene to leak. Many of these problems can be fixed and the repairs often pay for themselves because they help reduce the amount of gas. That's wasted the International. The National Energy Agency reports that companies can eliminate almost half of their methane pollution at no net cost but Krupp says by and large companies have not taken adequate action. You have to monitor this in. The industry so far has not been monitoring for this portion. So idiot has partnered with an aerospace company to build a satellite that will locate and monitor leaks. He says companies will know where the problems are and the public can hold them responsible

Environmental Defense Fund EDF Fred Crop National Energy Agency Krupp President Trump
"aerospace company" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"aerospace company" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Is worried the aerospace company is rushing the plane back into service he also suggested south why should shop for planes elsewhere in a memo to members of the Southwest Airlines pilots association week says Boeing has shown arrogance and greed that will halt the company forever the union is suing Boeing over lost wages from the continued grounding of the backs Chris summer news radio ten eighty KRLD in Dallas and San Antonio got the top honors in a new report about the health in American cities city health checked out the forty largest cities in the country they were looking at policies that improve our health and our quality of life Dallas and San Antonio among eight in the country getting a gold medal Shelly Hearn heads up city health which did the report it's an initiative of the double mon foundation and Kaiser Permanente a forward and put in place things like earned sick leave so the the people who are least likely did be able to take a day off from being sick are the ones who are taking care of your kids or your parents or sometimes the ones handling your food and those are the people that you really want to make sure are not coming to work when they're six so it's those kinds of investments along with a really strong pre K. program where that they've made isn't good investments in quality and access those are difference makers on you have nine categories you've just mentioned a couple of them talk about the healthy food part of it and that's an interesting thing because it has to do with the the food it's sold and served in city buildings yeah so it's not telling people what to eat but we're in the midst of an obesity epidemic and one of the things that is so critical is to make sure that people have a choice and so often when you go to a vending machine it's that three o'clock in the afternoon your kids are screaming or you are too this year you're hungry and the only choice we have is candy well sometimes that that might be the ticket but other times you know it's actually piece of fruit or some pretzels or something that is a little bit more nutritious and that's what this policy is all about is making sure that the food that city's cell so in their rec centers in the in the city hall that there ARE nutrition standards that a good majority of the foods made all right now complete streets in affordable housing or two of the other categories affordable housing pretty self explanatory but what do you mean by complete streets so complete streets is making sure that the roadways are safe for pedestrians safe for bikers regardless of what your age or ability is this really making sure that as you move through a city that it's safe for everybody our list of their ability and if that's one of the areas that we're actually seeing the greatest uptick in the country and Texas is been putting those policies in place en el Paso no metal this time hoping now I think there's a lot of energy there's a lot of interest in looking at this set of policies and I know that there are discussions with city leaders I just hope that they're great achievements that we've seen in places like San Antonio and Dallas help spur of the rest of the Texas cities to lead the pack if people want to see the full report and see how their city did verses others cities around the country what's the website city health dot org and you can compare one Texas city to another specific laws specific elements city health dot org we'll give you the full story Shelly Hearn at city health in Richardson and grand prairie on seventy five and westbound twenty road work causing problems traffic and weather together on the it's coming up in three minutes styleite lounge.

three minutes
Thousands of 'water bears' crash land on moon. They're practically indestructible

Science Friday

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Thousands of 'water bears' crash land on moon. They're practically indestructible

"Listener supported w n._y._c. studios. This is science friday plato. Perhaps you've heard the news by now. There is life on the moon to so happens to be caused by an accident back in april. The israeli aerospace company space. I l was also the first private spacecraft on the moon but minutes before touchdown around the lunar lander crashed spilling its payload onto the moon's surface which included those very hardy tiny turner grades here to tell us about uh we got there what the first water bears on the moon mean and to give us the rundown of other short subjects in science science journalist. Eleanor cummins welcomes the science friday. Thanks so much for having me. Try to get lunar invasion of tar degrades right so as you said back in april space i l accidentally crash their lander on the moon their main payload and was human knowledge they were bringing things like books and wikipedia pages but they also had this sort of surprise payload these grades so as you may remember <hes> tar degrades these are these really incredible micro animals they have eight legs and segmented bodies and they seem to survive like literally anything. We found them very low pressure a very a high pressure in extreme heat and extreme cold. They've even been to space before and some them lived so they're pretty incredible

Eleanor Cummins W Wikipedia
Are Companies Clear on Cloud Safety?

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:25 min | 1 year ago

Are Companies Clear on Cloud Safety?

"Here. The extraordinary secrets of how to thrive in disrupted world, the old rules of management are not ready, correct anymore. So what works making a wise, pivot, pivot to the future, will I am Omar Abba, subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. This is tech news briefing, im Tanya, boosters reporting from the newsroom in New York coming up clearing up the cloud, and more specifically, how safe it is a look at how some companies stumble indie face of cybersecurity risks asking the question. How safe is big data in the cloud. And how are companies staying on the ball? That's after these tech headlines. The Trump administration is examining whether to require the next generation five G cellular equipment, be designed and manufactured outside China. The move could reshape global manufacturing and further fan. Tensions between the countries as part of the review US officials are asking telecom equipment manufacturers, whether they can make and develop US bound hardware, which includes cell tower electronics as well as routers and switches, the conversations are in early and informal stages. These executive order calls for a list of proposed rules and regulations by the one hundred and fifty day deadline in October Stu who has more at wsJcom. Some of the biggest restaurant operators are pushing back against fees, charged by delivery companies. The latest journal reporting says McDonald's Applebee's and cousins, submarines are among the chains negotiating to pay lower commissions and asking their delivery partners to spend more on marketing, and promotional discounts is comes at the right time. According to a recent analysis of credit card data delivery companies are plowing money into their businesses and intensifying the competition since two thousand seventeen for example, grub hubs market share has roughly have while door dash and Uber. Eats have gained businesses. And French, 'electronic aerospace company, Thales is exploring new artificial intelligence tools warns that will eventually separate, and keep track of unmanned aircraft at low altitudes. The journal says the company is convinced such tech offers the best chance to cope with the antiquated growth in commercially operated. Drones, here's the story, existing radars and human traffic, controllers simply won't be able to handle the crush of data and only a applications are likely to have the capacity to react quickly enough to maintain a safe, buffer around individual drones. The trend was evident during the Paris air show last week with several companies disclosing new ideas for opening up additional airspace, for unmanned aircraft coming up putting data into the cloud can make it more secure. But look at how major companies are handling things and whether they're making the right moves to keep the cloud and your data safe. Capital. One knows life doesn't alert you about your credit card. That's why they've created Iino the Capital One assistant that catches things that might lef- wrong with your credit card, you know catches over tipping, duplicate, charges, or potential fraud. And then sends an alert sheer phone and helps you fix it. It's another way capital. One is watching out for your money when we're not Capital One. What's in your wallet? See Capital, One dot com for details. Across every industry. The topic of cyber security continues to dominate the boardroom conversation. That was never more clear than at WSJ pros. Recent cyber security executive forum in London. Theresa Walsh, global, head of intelligence at FSI a c has more. I think a lot of people look at the cloud and think that there's a lot of hackers always going after it. And that's the main cause of concern. However, if you look at a lot of the different issues that people have had over the past few years, it's usually down to human error, and a Miskin figuration a misunderstanding of, maybe what they were dealing with and really work consortium of, of members of, of regulated financial institutions. So they're trying to share formation about how to do this. The lessons learned learning from each other's mistakes, whenever you do see something like this, like a miss. Ration- of, of an AWS S three bucket or something like that. Leave Ruben is council at Pillsbury Winthrop shop Pittman he spoke of how security and the cloud, ultimately become a complicated search, for clarity. The, the wis seeing now between providers if a customer set up that idea AWS instance themselves, something goes wrong. Then the cloud provided content around. So we'll this was your wherever you'll customer ever. You'll use eras Renault responsible, but whether the lawns get muc. Yeah, is with as amendment of collaboration and it might be it's not clear in the contract ultimately who's responsible for what with new European regulations on privacy and network security coming into force? It's a critical time to benchmark company practices. There is more of an expectation. Now from customers say will we need some help you'll the expert. But go the cloud provider. You'll the expert this, you'll technology you need to educate us in good us through this. So if we do something wrong, we don't expect us the private tournaments. I will. That's not all out. That's you will folk moving expectation now from customers saying, well, we, we won't and education training piece around that and really guide it through. So whether that's the providers themselves take on themselves and say, well, his some protocols that we get. For what in this, and we're going to comply with these, we'll get them all for you, try. We're gonna give you a help blowing service that you can just pick up and an all these sort of collaborative polish elements that we see which the provide is all starting to, to play Alton because they realized that it's a competitive marketplace. I've customers not getting the service that I won't that just going to switch, and go elsewhere for more on WSJ pros cyber-security executive forum head to wsJcom that's it for the tech news briefing from the newsroom in New York. I'm Tanya boost does. Thanks for listening.

Cloud Executive Capital One New York WSJ Omar Abba United States Tanya Boost China Alton Theresa Walsh Paris Fraud Mcdonald Thales Renault
United Technologies + Raytheon Creates An Aerospace And Defense Giant

Ron St. Pierre

01:13 min | 1 year ago

United Technologies + Raytheon Creates An Aerospace And Defense Giant

"O'clock. You wonder what the impact is going to be with Raytheon's merger, right? Right beyond the massive US defense contractor best known for manufacturing, the patriot missile defense system as agreed to merge with industrial technology giant United Technologies in an all stock deal. The two companies announced over the weekend Newport daily news reporting the combined company would be the second largest US aerospace company behind Boeing, newly formed Raytheon technologies would be combined with United Collins aerospace, and Prenton Whitney, both leading producers of jet engines, and engine parts. It would not inherit United to carry us air conditioner business or it's Otis elevator company, both of which are being spun off under terms of an earlier deal. So in a phone interview, executives from both companies said the deal was driven by a desire to create a leading aerospace technology company using state of the art hardware from the defense and commercial aviation industries. But what about the people, the combined company when employees more than sixty thousand engineers would have. About thirty eight thousand active patents and whenever the financial firepower to invest as much as eight billion dollars each year in research and development. But as we all know any of us who have been caught in a merger or a sale heads

United States Raytheon United Collins Aerospace United Technologies Raytheon Technologies Prenton Whitney Newport Daily News Boeing Eight Billion Dollars
Raytheon, United Technologies to merge, creating defense giant

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Raytheon, United Technologies to merge, creating defense giant

"One files the corporate news of the day. The all stock transaction merger of equals, it's being called joining the giant defense contractor, Raytheon with the giant, aerospace company, United Technologies forming the more giant, if not, especially imaginatively named Raytheon technologies, one files that transaction under the heading done. Have you seen the defense and aerospace businesses lately? If the deal does make it pass regulators, the one hundred billion dollar result would be the number two company in that space behind Boeing. So marketplace's Kimberly Adams gets going with some market based realities from Washington Raytheon and United Technologies say the mergers important for them to keep their balance in shifting markets. Doug gates is head of aerospace and defense for KPMG. They're looking at it in this. Acquisition to a long term view that this combined company will be able to ride the ups and downs of the markets Raytheon has a big defense contracting business. United Technologies is big in commercial aviation. If commercials slowing down, they've got large military my and vice versa. Another reason behind the merger the idea that bigger is better risen McCormick is a fellow at the center for strategic and international studies. The merger would create a company that would bribe Boeing and Lockheed as largest defense contractor continuing trend of consolidation that's been ongoing since the nineteen ninety s that consolidation worries President Trump. He expressed concern this morning that too much consolidation in the defense industry may raise prices for the US military and by extension taxpayers. But Gerry McGinn executive director of the center for government contracting says this merger is unlikely to face a lot of pushback from federal. Regulators because there's not a tremendous amount of overlap between these two companies in terms of the markets. They operate it, but government regulators do have to approve the final deal among them the combined company's biggest customer, the department of defense in Washington, I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace.

Raytheon United Technologies Kimberly Adams Raytheon Technologies Department Of Defense Boeing Washington Raytheon President Trump Gerry Mcginn Kpmg Doug Gates Executive Director United States Washington Lockheed One Hundred Billion Dollar
United Technologies, Raytheon to create $120 billion aerospace and defense giant

Morning Edition

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

United Technologies, Raytheon to create $120 billion aerospace and defense giant

"To aerospace companies are combining Connecticut-based United Technologies and Massachusetts-based Raytheon will join to form Raytheon technologies corporation, Connecticut public radio's frankly, Garciano has more UT see the parent company of jet engine maker Pratt and Whitney says that most of its nineteen thousand engineering, and manufacturing workers in Connecticut will stay in place, but the combined company's headquarters will now move to the Boston area. Greg Hayes is UT, CEO murders. Bring together to leading companies with unsurpassed technology capabilities over today and into the future as a combined company. We will deliver innovative cost effective balloons. The full spectrum of aerospace and defense

Raytheon Technologies Corporat Raytheon Connecticut Greg Hayes United Technologies Pratt CEO Whitney Boston Garciano
SpaceX will launch dozens of 'Starlink' satellites

KCBS Radio Midday News

01:16 min | 1 year ago

SpaceX will launch dozens of 'Starlink' satellites

"Space x is hoping to launch dozens of tiny satellites into orbit tomorrow satellites which could bring the future of the internet to planet earth KCBS map Bigler with details of the launch. And how the technology is supposed to work. This is not your typical satellite launch over the weekend. Spacex CEO Elon Musk tweeted a picture of the inside of the falcon nine rockets stuffed with dozens of internet satellites packed in. They're just like pancakes in penta rocket failed during it's pretty pretty cool. Looking Eric burgers, senior space editor at ars Technica says wants deployed the satellites will talk to each other broadcasting high speed internet to areas of the planet where broadband is spotty or even non-existent SpaceX isn't the only company interested in this burger says Boeing, Amazon and others have recently announced similar internet. Satellite projects rarely. From the leading tech in aerospace companies out there think that such an opportunity exists. I think maybe one of them are two of most will be successful. But there's certainly people think there's a lot of money to be made from this while tomorrow's launch has only sixty satellite. Spacex is ultimate goal is to put eleven thousand so called Starlink satellites into low earth orbit between now and the mid twenty

Spacex Elon Musk Bigler Eric Burgers Ars Technica CEO Boeing Amazon Editor
 Aerospace company Bombardier to sell UK, Morocco operations

Steve and Ted

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Aerospace company Bombardier to sell UK, Morocco operations

"Canadian aerospace company bombard, Yay. Says it will sell businesses in Northern Ireland and Morocco as part of a broad restructuring company said it will consolidate its aerospace operations into one unit as a result. It will focus its business on manufacturing plain structures at sites in Montreal Mexico and Texas, Bobby Bumba. Jay said the business will pursue divestiture of the Belfast in Morocco Aerostructures businesses. The Belfast unit alone employs almost four thousand people and it was unclear if any sale would lead to job losses beyond those already announced last

Belfast Morocco Aerostructures Morocco Northern Ireland Montreal Mexico Bobby Bumba JAY Texas
"aerospace company" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"aerospace company" Discussed on KOMO

"Few hits this week. But how will it affect the aerospace company in the long term come? Brian Calvert, found some perspective when you begin talking about hundreds of millions even a billion dollars, some investors tend to panic. I think there's no question that a tragedy. Like, this is it hit in in many ways Richard Appalachia aviation analyst with the teal group. The end of the day. This is a very big company with a lot of resources to put it in scale terms, which you know, even in a tragedy like this. You have to do to understand the health company. The worst case scenario is Canada's in many ways to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars. But you know, this is a commercial unit that generated the better part of six billion last year. So it's not a threat to the company. He believes two crashes in such a short time period is not a reason to divest. Yeah. You know? I mean at the end of the day a lot of investors going because it's safe and they're doing a strangely. Almost overly good job. But converting cash flow into dividends and buybacks. In other words, it's it's just cash that you can get it's like, guaranteed income. And as far as the product goes, no one's going to second guess, the fundamental design of the seven thirty seven not after half a century. And there's nothing about the max. That is the system might need a software patch where there might need to be training procedure changes or any number of possibilities. All of which are manageable. You know, and. The grounding obviously could dig that could take six weeks could take three weeks we really have no way of knowing at this point, and assuming it does take a month or so you're probably gonna see your production hall just because you don't want a graphic in the factory at those kind of high volumes of production. It's not yet clear what that means for the Renton workforce that's building the max aids. Whether it's a short term layoff, costly repairs and adjustments or both Appalachia believes it hurt. What they have to do. But the company itself is Brian Calvert, KOMO news. From ABC. News Tech, Trends, dacas electric scooters are raising questions about safety scooter sharing companies like bird and lime are at the center of an upcoming CDC report focused on accidents and major American cities. The study was conducted in Austin, Texas, and finds that ninety eight percent of writers didn't wear helmets study also found that nearly half the people were above the legal blood alcohol limit, and I think more than half were under the influence of some other kind of substance. That's n gadgets Dana woman. She says that because the scooters are readily available. It makes sense that writers are more flexible with the rules. I'm not terribly surprised to hear that people whose judgment is impaired that they are underestimating the dangers of these scooters doc Lewis scooter companies are active in more than one hundred cities across the country. The full report is expected this spring with Tech Trends, I'm Scott Goldberg, ABC news. Hometown,.

Brian Calvert Richard Appalachia Appalachia Canada Renton ABC doc Lewis CDC analyst Scott Goldberg teal group KOMO Austin Texas ninety eight percent billion dollars three weeks
NASA clears SpaceX test flight to space station

Champions of the People with Bell and Pollock

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

NASA clears SpaceX test flight to space station

"An innocent, man. Private aerospace company. Spacex one step closer to sending humans into space officials gave the green light on Friday to a newly designed dragon capsule engineer to carry a human fight crew to the international space station. It's a test flight. So no one will be aboard the spacecraft when it launches from far Kennedy Space Center scheduled for March second the capsule is set to remain as the orbiting lab for less than a week before heading back to earth surface. If all goes, well, two NASA, astronauts cord strap in for the next

Kennedy Space Center Spacex Nasa Engineer
NASA taps private companies for moon missions

Morning Edition

01:27 min | 2 years ago

NASA taps private companies for moon missions

"But the private sector will have a deeper role. Yes. Nasa announced that nine aerospace companies including Lockheed Martin will develop the space craft and technology to get back to the moon. Marketplace's Mitchell Hartman reports NASA has long contract with major US aerospace companies to help develop and build spacecraft. But in recent years, the business model has shifted in a big way says Alan Boyle at geekwire Lhasa is putting more of the risk on commercial ventures. The commercial partners announced today will develop their own spacecraft to get Nasr's payloads and those of other customers into space. Boyle says it's like Nastase just buying the ride instead of paying to build the airplane to make profit the companies will also depend on private space ventures like satellite, launches resource extraction or space tourism as forgetting humans to the moon or Mars Henry Herzfeld at George Washington University space policy institute says that's for the longer term the season that we want. To put people up there has been made. But can we bring them back alive? Nastas currently researching key challenges to manned spaceflight like access to water and exposure to radiation.

Nasa Alan Boyle George Washington University S Lockheed Martin Mitchell Hartman Geekwire Lhasa Henry Herzfeld Nasr Nastas United States
"aerospace company" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"aerospace company" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"ABC news. I'm Daria Albinger. No White House says President Trump's visit to the Pittsburgh synagogue, where eleven people were murdered in a mass shooting Saturday was very humbling and very sad early. The president of the first lady were moved by what they saw they were with his Jewish son-in-law, Jared Kushner, their daughter, Ivanka who converted to Judaism, they were arm in arm with the rabbi as they walked into the vestibule of the synagogue and the first lady and the president left stones outside for each of the eleven victims to honor in the Jewish tradition of honoring the dead ABC's Cecilia Vega. Thousands of protesters met President Trump, including the Reverend Susan Rothenberg. First of the funerals were held today. The military says even more troops could be heading to the border with Mexico ahead of a migrant caravan making its way, north ABC news is confirmed. The Pentagon has two thousand more forces that could join the more than fifty two hundred already on the way to the US border. If the US uses all seven thousand plus troops. It would be a combined number larger than those now serving in Iraq and Syria ABC's Andy Field. The FAA is investigating two separate crashes and experimental gyro copped slammed into a mobile home park and see bring Florida killing two and in upstate New York. A helicopter came in contact with power lines caught fire and crashed killing two people. The Justice department says Chinese intelligence officers and recruited hackers are facing charges of commercial espionage for allegedly trying to steal aviation and technological data. Prosecutors say they hacked into a French aerospace company. That was developing engines with the US company..

President Trump US ABC Pittsburgh synagogue president Jared Kushner Daria Albinger Susan Rothenberg Cecilia Vega Justice department White House FAA Mexico Pentagon Iraq New York Andy Field Ivanka
Chinese intelligence officers charged in US aviation hacking

Reiter than You

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

Chinese intelligence officers charged in US aviation hacking

"Mexico. Federal prosecutors have charged several Chinese intelligence officers with commercial espionage officers working for the foreign intelligence. Arm of China's ministry of state security have been indicted in San Diego federal court for conspiring to steal sensitive turbofan engine technology used in commercial aviation. Prosecutors say from twenty ten to twenty fifteen they hacked into a French aerospace company that was developing the engine with a US company. A Chinese state owned aerospace company was working at that time to develop a similar

San Diego China United States Mexico.
Who owns genetic testing results?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:25 min | 2 years ago

Who owns genetic testing results?

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by wasabi hot cloud storage. If your company is thinking about moving data storage to the cloud, then you have to think about with Sabi. It's less expensive than just the maintenance on your current on premises storage. See yourself with unlimited storage for a month. Go to a dot com. Click free trial and use the offer code was ambi-. Genetic testing is popular and potentially has lots of benefits, but who owns the results from American public media? This is marketplace tech demystifying. The digital economy I'm Ali, would. DNA and genetic testing are big business, but there are real questions about privacy and about what happens to your genetic information after you get tested recently, the DNA testing company. Twenty-three in me, partnered with pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline to develop personalized drugs and research treatment for diseases like lupus and Parkinson's. Jen king is director of consumer privacy at the center for internet and society at Stanford law school. Her research finds that surprisingly, most people who take DNA tests, don't think the data is all that personal. Most of them felt that their genetic data while it was personal at the same time, it didn't reveal who they really were versus one of the things in my study I looked at was search queries. So when people type a search term into Google, for example, did they consider that more personal than genetic data? In some cases they did because it really revealed something more about what. Made them tick what they were concerned about, what they thought about what they care about. Whereas genetic did. It doesn't tell you anything about that, but then you get to, you know, the news that twenty three and me is partnering with a pharmaceutical company to develop drugs based on DNA data that they got from twenty three and me. Do you think that changes the calculation for people? I think it can because one of the things I discovered is while people were motivated by the idea that their data could be doing good. That often wasn't very critical. People hadn't spent time to really dig into what that meant. And so while there's probably an assumption that, well, you know, great. I'm going to help make a drug that could help a disease. I know nothing about and maybe I'll benefit because I have that disease. No one, at least of the people I talked to really sat down thought about, well, wait a second. The company isn't obligated to give that drug away for free. They can charge as much as they want for it. So there was the sense of helping the public, but it wasn't very critical. Really wasn't carefully thought through just exactly how that might happen. It was more of a check the box going, hey, I can do something good. This is a little Sifi I know as we are also exploring gene editing. Is there an argument that we should start to consider patenting gene profiles? You know, should we started having like an ownership conversation about our most basic identity? That's really interesting question. If you look at the customer agreements of these different online genetic testing companies, it's kind of a big open question as to who owns your data and the agreements today, I think are pretty clear that at least with twenty three and me that once they do something with that data, in this case partner with a pharmaceutical company and develop a drug on its basis, you sign an agreement saying you have no rights to it, or you have no property interest in the outcome of its. You can't go to them later and say, hey, you need to compensate me for this blockbuster drug that you developed using my data. That's Jen king of Stanford center for internet and society. Another fun tidbit. New research in the journal science says, you could be identified even if you haven't taken a genetic test. Just by tracing the DNA of distant relatives back to you using social media and other online data about sixty percent of Americans of European descent could be tracked down that way. And now for some related links, even though the future of the international space station is currently sort of in doubt after a Soyuz rocket malfunctioned last week in two astronauts barely survived. NASA is trying to figure out when it can send astronauts to the ISS again and whether the ones who are already there, we'll have to abandon the space station completely for awhile because the Russian rockets are currently the only way to get humans to and from the ISS and they are grounded because of the accident, Jeff Bezos, aerospace company, blue origin, put up a video today, promising to send millions of people to space eventually. Now is the time to open the promise of space all in lay the way for generations to come. When our descendants look to the stars, perhaps more rocky moon or calling his floating and open space. They'll remember this time. And love me. I'm not trying to be down on big ambitions, but we do seem to be doing a lot of fast forwarding to the future. And I'm kind of wondering what is the plan for the now. Tell you one other thing I'm intrigued by today? A new little phone called the palm? Yes. Nostalgia, they bought the rights to the old name. It's meant to be an accessory phone, so you're big everyday, Android smartphone. So you have like a little add on gadget? The does simple stuff like texting and calls and music and doesn't distract you with the whole smartphones situation. Plus it fits in your pocket. Kind of like apple watch, accept a phone that goes with your other phone, and I know you wanna laugh. But like the bird said, when they wrote about it, the idea kind of worms its way into your head. Mainly the idea that maybe what we all really want is just less computer more phone, less future more now, see what I did there. I'm Molly would, and that's marketplace tech. This is APN this marketplace podcast is brought to you by Amazon web services. Do you ever wonder how we're streaming millions of movies on demand, turning homes into hotels, are watching live missions from Mars, smart business minds dreamed, these ideas and Amazon web services is how they built them with the broadest functionality. And the most experience leading enterprises trust the AWS cloud to build the next big idea. Are you ready to build it? Learn more at AWS is how dot com slash podcast.

Jen King Amazon ISS Google Stanford Law School Glaxosmithkline ALI Lupus Apple Jeff Bezos Stanford Center APN
Zimbabwe's president welcomes court challenge

A Public Affair

05:00 min | 2 years ago

Zimbabwe's president welcomes court challenge

"This is the BBC news it's union. McDonald Zimbabwe's newly reelected president Emmerson mnangagwa's insisted the elections were free and fear he says his rival. Nelson Chamisa had a crucial role to play in Zimbabwe's future but he also had the. Right to challenge the outcome Mr.. Jimmy says his party is, prepared to present evidence in court. That vote-rigging. Led to. His loss Mr. mnangagwa's. Defended. The election is open to the world Fiftieth. We went out. You know millions to share or future Yeah it, was British in Zimbabwe democracy First of all of unfettered freedom with is of the world, when us? We, believe what if free fair, election Officials in eastern Afghanistan. At least twenty five people have been killed in a suicide attack. On a mosque used by the Shia community hundreds of people were taking part in Friday prayers inside the mosque in Gardez the capital of Factoria province when two men wearing women's burqas entered into opened fire at least one blew himself up in, Turkey is handed down life sentences to. Nine people over the bombing of a peace rally in two thousand fifteen. Which killed more than one hundred people the attack shortly before elections proved a turning point in the full skill revival. Of Turkey's conflict with his car dish. Minority Virginia Gidley kitchen reports the twin explosions outside Ankara's main railway station targeted a peace rally pro-kurdish labor activists the demonstrators had gathered to call for an end to the growing violence. Between the government and Kurdish PKK militants fury survivors blamed the government for failing to provide security for the rally even though Previous Kurdish peace rally had been attacked. The government itself held these state group responsible for the explosions however ignoring a unilateral ceasefire declared by the PK. The government responded by redoubling its attacks on PKK targets Britain's Prime. Minister Theresa May's meeting president Macron is summer retreat in an apparent attempt to soften French resistance to our plan for leaving the European Union is the latest in a series of British meetings with individual European leaders and officials here's a reporter Adam, Fleming Brexit is just one of the. Subjects on the agenda for this meeting among the vineyards and beaches of. The south of France MRs may will want to explain her white paper on the future relationship with the EU leader. To leader but it's not clear if. President Macron will judge it as enough movement from the UK for the EU to change its long-standing and collectively agreed approach to Brexit and Brussels feels that needs to be more movement, on outstanding Voice issues such as. The, Irish border before serious discussions about the future. BBC news China says it has plans to impose new. Import tariff some sixty billion dollars worth of US goods the commerce ministry said the plans would go ahead if Washington did not back. Down from President Trump's threat to slap import tariffs on two hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese goods. It says its. Plans were rational unrestrained the United States is implemented sanctions against three foreign businesses over their alleged activities with North Korea the measures effect to. Russian Bank and the Chinese and the Korean firm as well as a Moscow-based individual the Justice department said. They were helping North Korea the UN Security Council sanctions NASA has named the nine astronauts who will fly to the international space station on new spacecraft built by Elon Musk's SpaceX corporation and Boeing next April the seven species And to space women are part of. NASA's commercial crew program a new project working. With US aerospace companies to develop the next generation of space craft following the space shuttle's retirement seven years ago Nicole own Apu man a US Marine Lieutenant Colonel will fly aboard. The Boeing star liner spacecraft she said. It was an opportunity of a lifetime debris involved in the test and development and then to. Be there on launch day and to experience the result of all that, hard work it's going to be. A proud moment for the team it's going to. Be a proud moment for America so I'm just grateful to be able to help usher in this new era of American spaceflight and as a test pilot it doesn't get any, better than this The Russian foreign ministry says an American sailor who appears to have wandered, aimlessly in the bearing see for two weeks is safe. And well a spokeswoman said John Martin from Anchorage. In Alaska had been sailing on the Yukon river when he decided to venture into the open sea reports quote him as, saying he was planning to reach China BBC news Wwl RT thanks listener.

Emmerson Mnangagwa United States BBC President Trump PKK European Union President Macron Mcdonald Zimbabwe Nelson Chamisa Turkey John Martin Boeing Zimbabwe North Korea Jimmy Afghanistan Nasa Theresa May Virginia Yukon River
"aerospace company" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"aerospace company" Discussed on KSRO

"For major aerospace companies where he was a card carrying member of the military industrial, complex he's described as a born again conspiracy theorist and a. Regular contributor here on, coast to coast here he is Mike bear. Mike what an inspirational speech that Kennedy speech was wasn't. It yeah it was pretty amazing to hear Georgia I mean it's been you know obviously a. Really, long time but you know our leaders rarely speak like that anymore and were we, rarely have that sort of perfect you know national vision that we're all United behind I mean it was really really an incredible. Moment and of course it manifested itself. About nine years later. On a day that I can Can still remember not that I was even born in nineteen sixteen But, I can still remember the moon landing and it, remains you know I think the most extraordinary event in human history. Certainly most extraordinary event I've ever been aware of it was amazing and even watching that those foggy television pictures that were, coming back from the moon were just so dramatic because you just, you didn't know you thought if he jumps off that lunar module is he going to, sink in the, dust of. The moon or what's going to happen. But the modular it's, okay. It, looks like. It's on sound, footing it. Was really exciting Mike yeah it was and of. Course they, were they were deliberately dirty gross difficult to watch pictures I mean they did that on on purpose for various reasons we've discussed before because they really were, concerned about what we might be able to see in the. Background and that was that was a big concern at the, time so the the. Pictures were, a whole lot worse than. They they needed to be and I I remember, it's very distinct I. Remember my dad was an engineer at Boeing pretty pretty well placed The guy and I. Remember you know saying that why are we only getting this, lousy black and white we have a color TV wise in. Color and, he said you know son I really don't know, and I think actually that was one of the first moments in. My life that I started to become a conspiracy theorists in question thanks storage because I was like this doesn't make any, sense and it turned out we found out years later they they, had a perfectly good color television camera that they were ordered not to take the lunar, surface with them, they were. Specifically ordered do not take this camera. Down there and and, you. Know, that that. Starts a whole, separate thing. What did we find on the moon and you. Know what, would we really after what were the true objectives of Apollo which which does relate to the conversation we're going to have tonight what do you think of, some some people who have said that they have been to. The moon that they've been there of their basis there they've, been the Mars pretty. Wild stories, Mike well they really are. Wild stories and the the thing about them is that they're great story But there's, no substantiation for any of them we we really can't look at? Any of the images we've got from the, moon or for, Mars and, say, that there's anything acted. There you know I have made a little bit of living basically talking about this stuff and talking about what I do see in. Orbital photographs from from Mars and, from the moon and even, some of the Rovers and things on Mars what they've taken images of but everything I've, seen is ruined everything I've seen is in ruins its ancient it's been there. For at least hundreds, of thousands of years if not millions of, years and it's not anything new or recent so these. Stories that we actually have a secret? Base there now, we've got multiple secret bases? I mean their stories they've been around, forever but there's just really nothing to back them up at this. Point other than do you believe the person telling the story is sincere or not are normally you will do my annual JFK assassination shows we. Give close to the November twenty second. Anniversary. Date, but this one's different Tom. Was saying you gotta read this book for Mike ancient aliens JFK and I know at. The contact, of the desert we talked about your latest work is well let's bring in the JFK part of this because the title itself tells you volumes ancient aliens and JFK, what's that mean well it means basically that Kennedy knew, before we ever went to. The moon before he ever declared..

Mike bear Kennedy engineer JFK Georgia Rovers Tom Boeing twenty second nine years
"aerospace company" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"aerospace company" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"And they work today's an insurance company and then they spent three days studying and they're going to get their college degree from that studying not only the there too many calls you're going to get it's called concurrent enrollment fidel eventually get college credit for that work but they're studying their curriculum it's gonna make them more successful at that insurance company that where they're working they're working aerospace company another one or a healthcare company that the training is is really closely defined colorado governor john hickenlooper democrat and today stem solutions conference was held by the by us news and world war in washington dc he mentioned governor fallon on the panel was oklahoma governor mary fallon i republican and you can find this discussion as well as he span dot org our video library also today the us postal service issued a set of four forever stamps that recognizes stem education one each for science technology engineering and math turning to foreign policy the us military says it has carried out an air strike in somalia against al qaeda linked al shabaab extremists and three of them have been killed you was military's carried out about a dozen airstrikes in somalia so far this year following more than thirty last year targeting not only shabaab but also small isis group the us ambassador to somalia stephen schwartz and he was asked today about the effectiveness of the strikes us military i'm not privy to to the to the last few months i mean the the purpose of the the drone strikes is to support smelly national forces to support amazon to against shabaab and i believe the overwhelming majority have been against shabaab if not all of them and i think that they can be effective in weakening shabaab leadership in putting them on the back foot and removing particularly important leaders but at the same time we've seen elsewhere in the world it's not an end in itself i mean it's it's a if that's all you're gonna do you're wasting your time it needs to be coupled with development program to build capacity state capacity to provide services we are fighting for is really the allegiance of the population and who can do more for them and the somali authorities are going to need to do that we're just trying to help them us ambassador to.

fidel governor fallon us somalia shabaab stephen schwartz amazon colorado governor john hickenlooper washington oklahoma three days
"aerospace company" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"aerospace company" Discussed on Mixergy

"And i said is in in a great exploded asia's walk out said how how nervous were you guys at the time we laugh about it in retrospect because things worked out but you gave up a good amount of money you also gave up security you gave up on this identity how how scary was it it's it's the great thing about i think humans which is on it was scary at the time but if i think about it now did should have been much scarier so i think the things that i didn't narrow and the fact that i was younger helped alah how young more surprised just diverted at ito dastgeer to ship vague and that's the weight of the is an entrepreneur how young were you not bad yacht knows probably 33 of england the ad council because you had good experience behind you all right at the same time though you did have some outside money you applied for a grant did you get it yes is somebody adult hair gone down to the mit enterprise forum i think they still run it where people talk about the different opportunities than somebody had mentioned the small business innovation research grant as the ir so i wrote a contract for one of those got it and that was the first fifty thousand dollars that got us off the ground and you just apply for grant and get hit from the government i never would thing to do that i know i was i was really surprised that a do and more people should give it a shot so with this programme basically the idea was that some you know actual in our gaze good in enterprising congress people of got the idea that all the big companies like my dad's old aerospace company were getting so much research and development money that essentially underwrote their entire businesses that may be small businesses should get some two so every government agency has to allocate assert percent.

ito dastgeer aerospace company fifty thousand dollars
"aerospace company" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"aerospace company" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Yeah i'm i'm again i'm fascinated on this one on a different topic via the whole idea that theaters these companies that have come out of nowhere space x blue origin that are going to get us into space at are putting us into space in such a short amount of time i worked for an aerospace company for thirty five years and the amount of rules and regulations in process and drag veteran you i mean i indeed you know to install a news computer server takes a year you know i mean the idea of building spaceships in such a short amount of time is is phenomenal to me and i mean it i think it's fantastic that this is breaking out in this way but i still don't understand how they can do it how they don't have the regulations in i mean they must not have the process stuff that we had to deal with that's for sure well yeah i mean if you're if you you've got thirty five years of experience in in in this sort of company capacity that a lot of other people don't you know how slowly things can move to wouldn't do chocolate up to will the technology is just better now or there's something about this privatize sense of the aerospace industry where things are able to move without regulation that perhaps they need more of what's your sign i don't know if i would say need more of necessarily it might just be the build up over time in any company that has been around for a long time is a it to to add a new processes really easy to get rid of an old one is hard so it just kind of it just kinda keeps keeps adding up in these aren't military based the rockets and stuff so it's a little bit different than the stuff than a my company and to deal with.

aerospace company aerospace industry thirty five years
"aerospace company" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"aerospace company" Discussed on KOIL

"To forty okay making good money what are you guys do for a living i'm a piece officer and i'm in community relations for an aerospace company great well done you two very cool so what kind of debt as two hundred twenty thousand that's gone our house yes you're looking at weird people weird people fighting warehouse that you ever imagine you have your house paid off or as young as you are how old are you too i'm 46 ingesson's forty seven paidfor house boom just like that and all because you i didn't pay any of it inspired us i just made you think you could do it so he went did it why how that's cool will tell you the story two and a half years ago what happened all dave about two and a half years i started listening to your show i listen to their podcasts on the radio at home and became very obsessed with it actually i talked to everybody friends relativity shaking her head yes act that i did become a little upset cents think dave accede the term i coined at some point in this process leads hunting i think you need to get a dave ramsey rehab detox i love it well there's worse things to get addicted to i guess proud of laugh so he got a little bit overboard and sarah's like okay just jia come on but how quickly did you get involved sarah very early on i didn't really have a choice you your voices on i'm getting ready every day so it was that you know i was in fall bar n i am test destin was the driving force but it was really easy to get on board so you guys looked at it and together in all seriousness other than the overdoing the dave ramsey part you looked at it together and said hey if we really role firstly we can pelvis now that's it had a moment huh yep and we're we're a good team we balance ideas off each other and we always came to the same conclusion as to what we were going to do and here we are now you don't have a payment in the world map and.

officer aerospace company sarah destin dave ramsey
"aerospace company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"aerospace company" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Case she's accused of negligence in a rice subsidy scheme she introduced one in office the government was ousted in a coup in 2014 if found guilty she faces ten years in prison the us commerce department has ruled against the canadian aerospace company bombardier in a trade dispute with his american rival boeing bombarded by his cool the decision absurd and is likely to appeal chris page reports from belfast boeing clear cbs that financial help from the canadian and british governments has given bombarda an unfair advantage last year bharti a bought an order for the year satellite delta for up to one hundred and twentyfive of its cseries jets but the us department of commerce has ruled that importers must pay preliminary tariffs of almost two hundred twenty percent on the the plans but bordia has said the decision as absurd and divorced from the reality of financing aircraft programmes reports from ukraine say launch fine has broken out to the military arms depot in the central the next year region a local television channels has two people have been injured and munitions are continuing to explode more than a thousand and militry and rescue personnel are dealing with ablaze and local residents have been evacuated cuba has strongly denied involvement in sonic attacks against the us embassy staff in havana during the highest level meeting between the two sides since the trump administration took office the keep and foreign minister bruno rodriguez who's in washington urged his us counterpart rex tillerson not to jump to conclusions about the attacks before an investigation has been completed more than twenty diplomats of being diagnosed with permanent hearing loss and other conditions as a result of the incidents bbc news.

us bombardier boeing cbs bordia ukraine cuba havana foreign minister bruno rodriguez washington rex tillerson aerospace company belfast department of commerce two hundred twenty percent ten years
"aerospace company" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"aerospace company" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"Thank you very mikey subtlety minutes past seven let's pick up on the those questions about bombarded because the the canadian aerospace company bombardier they employ four thousand people in northern ireland but term those jobs is michelle i was just gesturing of being threatened by a decision taken in the united states that means the firm would have to pay enormous tariffs on aircraft they're planning to sell to an american airline will debut thompson's the regional coordinator for you unite the union in northern ireland morning to you could model not good news last night no very disappointing news arm concert boing phone for tara were ninety percent overall department or put on three hundred twenty it makes no sense whatsoever i'll if it carries if if if it holds them the chances of bombardier being able to sell those aircraft to delta are pretty much nil or i think total on that quarter similar actually going too quickly aircraft on away but but there's burger issues in terms of all our careers of new year's the mayor queen on kristen the plan in order that has proven its capacity within the oregon margaret the monarch on the recall under threat on a short oak future orders were searched shorter can of action that could could all and that could hit an awful lot of people it could help must repercussions always they were design and manufacture counted in northern ireland cseries will be sixty percent of the work in our own careers time so domino's is that market baram called on the viability of balfaas but see series with arizona republican buffoon on they were in the word on our we are urging the british government that they should push british courage to be usual well push british carriers to be using it how would they do that that they called ordered them to obviously well let the comptroller longterm what i think on looks at sea series and exit at some karamarko up our efforts to the house oromia work off in that clause which economic output let us far far butter in terms of its its efficiencies and the regions their conflicts for a smaller a plan michler very attractive proposition for also that support getting.

ireland united states thompson coordinator bombardier domino british government comptroller michelle i kristen oregon arizona the house ninety percent sixty percent