31 Burst results for "Advocation"

Payal Kadakia, Tristan Walker, and Perry Chen on Innovation

How I Built This

01:31 min | 2 months ago

Payal Kadakia, Tristan Walker, and Perry Chen on Innovation

"I wasn't coming from entrepreneurship. And i wasn't working in business at all. I was di jiang working on electronic music. And you know. I had this idea and it wasn't my field. It's just an idea. And so you assume you know there's probably something wrong here and it's a kind of prompt comes up a lot like funding so every project. I'd have i'd be like where. Can i get money for this. And so every time we would come up it would be like. Why doesn't this thing exists. Yeah and i'm usually pretty good with those things like you know. In a couple of days it will come to me. And i'm like of course and that just never happened. And so i just never let go in a way where it never let go of me. I kept feeling like this should exist ethic. That's kind of maybe the best way to say this should exist and maybe trista navy. That's what you were feeling as well with your project at certain point you kind of just feel like well. Maybe i need to make this happen for this to exist. I felt disrespected. And i felt we all deserve to be respected not only as people but also as consumer What should exist. Respect for me was respects in my retail experience when i walked on is respect to have advocation products. That do what you say. They're going to do. It's respect in terms of how we kind of build a company in a brand and the people that are employed within it. As for me you know started as a frustration. I felt disrespected. And the result of those who things may be recognized should and we went right after.

Di Jiang Trista Navy
If You Were on This App, You Saw the Mob Coming

Sway

06:02 min | 9 months ago

If You Were on This App, You Saw the Mob Coming

"So there isn't effective coup attempt happening in our nation's capital of stop that was occurring there. it moved all the legislators. Are you surprised at all by what's happening. Well i don't know how what i would describe it as i guess i'm kind of surprised because it's surreal if that makes sense sure but i'm also not surprised because you know if you put yourself in the shoes of a lot of these people. They feel like an election was stolen once and they feel like an election was stolen again yesterday and so they are left thinking. Well what am i supposed to do. So the here this rhetoric. They don't they don't believe they don't trust the results. They feel like they've been fed a lot of propaganda they feel like they can't trust the media and certainly have but go ahead. I believe that almost everybody is but you know you have to be able to judge that for yourself and make your own decisions. Weigh the pros and cons but that being said a lot of these people feel like they can't trust anything about they do genuinely believe that the election was stolen. So if you put yourself in their shoes. I'm not exactly surprised. They're doing this john. If you feel like you're in a restaurant you know good service. Do you feel like you can break the windows. And and invade people's homes. I'm curious that this just doesn't go home. Yes eh but let me ask you. This is not this fi. First of all feelings aren't facts. And i want to know if you were watching it on on parlay. Which is you run. Which you are the ceo of type. You've been seeing this organizational stuff. I don't necessarily monitor a lot of this stuff. Participate in watch parlor just anybody else. Does you know if people are breaking the law violating our terms of service or doing anything illegal. We would definitely get involved but you know if people are just trying to assemble or they're trying to put together an event which is what a lot of people tried to do with this event today. There's nothing particularly wrong about that. Now i had noticed a long time ago that there were some accounts trying to get people off the private telegram groups and things of that nature were parlor. Couldn't witness what's going on or it wouldn't be public but for the most part i haven't seen a whole lot of illegal activity and if it was it would have been taken down. We've had multiple dachshund attempts that have resulted in some of the people organizing these movements have actually been had their accounts taken down due to dachshund. But i'm organizing an event illegal understandably organizing a peaceful. Protest is also perfectly fine. A lot of the i saw probably was actually organizing bringing guns into the district which is illegal as you know. Carrying guns organizing. Exactly what's happened on the capital. The how did you deal with that. Well the way we work on our platform we put everything to a community jury. Everyone is judged by a jury of their peers and determining whether the action is illegal or against our rules and so if reported it goes to a jury of peers and if it's deemed illegal promptly deleted by the jury of five people. Get to decide. And it's a random jerry so they don't know who each other they don't know what they're voting they just get the independent facts of the situation and they make their own judgment call. We've actually been inviting journalists and other people to join the jury as well so that we have a nice transparent jury system all right. But what. I'm asking seriously. There were specific postings and quite a few of them and we have dozens of them to look at Which is talking about doing just what they did today on the capital. Were these adjudicated. If if that's the right word and and if they they pass muster is that a particularly good jury of these are illegal activities. What's happening right now in the capital violence and advocation of islands. That needs. we're violent specifically. It needs to be clear and imminent threat. And i don't know if. I've been witnessing what happened today a little bit but i'm not really too much in the weeds on this stuff you know. I haven't seen a whole lot of illegal activity. Maybe there has been some but it's a minority of the cases. I do believe having to the capital dozens of times that. If you do anything out of the go does not go through the metal detectors. You don't follow the rules. He break windows. You run through the other people's offices you take pictures of their offices. You sit in their seats. I believe that's all illegal. Yes but you know. I do want to push back a little bit on this here because if you go back six months ago you had a lot of the media putting out full stop including the new york times saying in defense of looting were they came out and said you know it's acceptable to loot in looting and all this stuff needs to be. There is even a book written and promoted but it was during the time when there was a lot of people on the left looting anger near times off not permit. I'm going to push back on. The new york. Times was absolutely not promoting that is untrue. Well my my you can see. I mean this is like this can say it. it's untrue. it's one hundred percent true. It's not true well. I don't know the specifics of the i don't know the specifics. You don't know the specific. I'm telling you it's untrue and if you unless you have a specific you can't make that allegation. I'm talking about the activities today. I do want understand what was happening on your platform and again it was happening on twitter and other places but do you feel any responsibility if people organizing to to protests are very different. And you're absolutely right. Everyone you know gets to run around with whatever flag they wanna fly and whenever coat they wanna wear and whenever chant they wanna have but going into the capitol building to do this. If it was organized on your site what should happen on your site. I if it was illegally organized and against the law and what they were doing they would have gotten a taken down. But i don't feel responsible for any of this and neither should the platform considering we're on neutral town square. That just adheres to the law so if people are organizing something that's more of a problem of are upset. They feel disenfranchise. They need their leaders to stop provoking. This partisan hate they need to come together and have a discussion on a place. Like

John Jerry New York Times New York Twitter
"advocation" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

04:01 min | 10 months ago

"advocation" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"They're gonna say Hey, I fear for my life now, but what happens? What happens if they found out he didn't actually sell marijuana. Then they're in trouble, right? No, The qualified immunity still applies Always. Okay, but he didn't do anything. They don't matter. You you pulled that gun. They had reason to believe that it's your gun. Yeah. That's the problem, and that's where house they broke in. The house tried to nullify today. Do it alone. No knock warrants and no knock warrants. So you know not corn is Hey, I'm gonna come in the difference between a knock warrant and knew not Korean One understand? This is Knock police No knock, bust the door a bit. That's right. The naked bust the door open after staying police, right? Oh, absolutely. That was standard. That's the standard. So we're really talking about is what a split second Just split. Just say police right And it's alive in the morning, so if they come into my house Or your house or our listeners house at five o'clock in the morning. And they blow up a grenade in your living room. And you pull your firearm out of the night stand. If you have one, too many of our listeners probably do. Um, love my Second Amendment folks. And they pull that gun and they come around the corner of their bedroom. And there's a cop there. And that cop shoots them. That compass a okay. He didn't do anything wrong. Cops say OK, the county, the city. They okay, everybody. He probably goes on a paid vacation. Maybe he still goes right back to work. Does you a big fan of the Second Amendment, Mike and you just touched on something? You have a right to defend your home. That's right. Against a perceived threat. You have a right to defend your homes, Doctor in some states, right? They call it the castle doctrine or what have you if I'm pulling my gun out, and I don't hear police officer anything, and I just hear somebody crashed through my door and I pulled my gun out Well, within my constitutional rights, the most people who are listening to this show, Okay, are people who have Not really experienced discrimination until perhaps the cove it pandemic and then their lives, You know discrimination. Is that the wrong word, But they experienced in advocation of their rights. They saw the state take away their rights and they're shocked. Right. So did many of these people who are now woke up right the idea that the police could break down their door and that they could be killed for for defending their home. Not knowing it's the police and that the police couldn't be held accountable. Most people listening to this couldn't fathom that that's true. And you're saying that Not only is that happened today. It's true across the board. Absolutely 100%, and that's why he s listen, folks. And I really am so happy that Mario is here to talk to us about this because this is really, really important. Let me be very, very clear. Okay? You have certain rights. Those rights mean nothing. Because if a police officer can use arguable, probable cause, and he can come into your house with a flash bang grenade, and he can he can kill you, and you can't do anything about it. Anything that's certain. On those tenements and that Constitution the declaration of Independence on any statute that exists is meaningless. That's right. Forget about the civil liability. You're not going to get any any money, but that's not what people want after you've been burned up by a flash bang grenade and shot to death. You don't want some criminal law accountable? Yeah. Don't do that. Because qualified immunity applies in both context. Well, you know it Xray Aly truly sad. But a sad state of affairs in the United States of America, but really, really telling about where we are, folks. We're gonna be right back. Thank you so much for taking the time to join us. We'll see you back there. WLS am Chicago 94 7 wls FM HD to Chicago. Who's his.

officer Mario marijuana Chicago United States advocation America Mike
"advocation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"advocation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But with McConnell total advocation of the Senate's independence and bar challenging any attempt of the house to get documents, the press is the only one stopping us from becoming a completely tyrannical country. Some other people weighing in here, Neil says the Democrat should boycott the hearings and concentrate on winning the elections. That's the way to show that the entire process is illegitimate, and the language wasn't the dam's who invoke the nuclear option. It seems of one rule changes had a dramatic effect on polarizing the Senate. What's the prognosis for that role? You want to comment on that Jacqueline? Yet you know it was Harry Reid to invoke the nuclear option for supposing once and you know, the fact of the matter is that whenever you're the majority party, you'll taken action that will benefit you in that moment. But it may come back to bite you later on down the line, and that is what we are seeing right now. You know, there's now been a lot of conversation about how the rules could change of Democrats win back the Senate, which you know is an F and, you know, do they take on the filibuster? How do they start handling nominations moving forward? And you know, every party like I mentioned when they're in control. They're going to take actions that will benefit themselves. And if they don't, you know, consider the long term effects either. The same thing could be said for packing the court if Democrats in control decide that they want to expand the number of seats on the Supreme Court, nothing would stop you Republican controlled Senate and administration from doing the same thing for years later on. So you know, there's a number of tactics they could consider. But, you know, I really think that we have to Khun see how this nomination process plays out with any Tony Barrett and the way that some Democrats address it then But I think one thing that this predictable if the Democrats win is they will probably move toward having DC in Puerto Rico and the U. S. Virgin Islands turn into States. But what about predictability where abortion and Roe v. Wade is concerned? I'd like to go to you on that. Bruce Kane. I don't necessarily ask you to go in a crystal ball here, but Wei have comments by Ah, Amy Cockney Barrett and she is sort of the the anti RBG here. They're already calling her a city notorious, a CB. But come inside suggested she believes in precedent, and she doesn't want to. Ah, necessarily do away with Roe v. Wade, but just have a chipped away. In fact, it was Scalia, who said there's nothing in the Constitution about abortion. Yeah, I think that's a big big deal, Michael. I mean, if she really is prepared, Onda Court is prepared to overturn Roe v. Wade. That's going to be huge on but I and you're right. I've I've read too And this is where I think we all have to pay attention to What she says in the hearings, and that's why I would prefer the Democrats to be there and ask these questions because I think it matters quite a bit if she's going to chip away. That is not a good thing for people who believe in abortion, right, But it's not. Nearly as drastic as potentially overturning Roe v. Wade completely, and so I think they got to be there. They got to ask those questions. We've got to find out what she says. We have to scrutinize her. Writing's toe really understand where she is on this president. I mean, she was not even though she was looming last time. I think most of us have not really focused very much on her written record, and there is a written record and I think we got a S. So I would like to see the dam's do do their due diligence in these hearings. I think that's important for precisely that reason. And the record also includes some strong language about Judge Roberts decision with respect to pre existing conditions and affordable care act of so called Obama care. She apparently very conspicuously has been opposed to Ah Obama care or the affordable care act, and we'll hear from some more listeners. I just want to hear. Ah, read something from a listener named Michael, who says Congress should pass a law requiring all presidential candidates to release their tax returns. Why haven't they And another listener, says of the Supreme Court nominee were really a good human being is she's being advertised, he would say that her nomination should wait until after the next election. And I want to remind you that this is a fundraising period for public radio. And for more information about how to support committee simply go dot or Gyu listening Forum on any public radio. We're talking with Jacqueline. Hearts and Bruce Kane and Ah Jacqueline Thompson is with the National Law Journal. Bruce Kane is at Stanford. I I'm Connie in San Francisco. I'm no dating to take your Edie because I've been a sustaining member since 1989 and I had to do another gift because I love the reporting that goes on. I left so many of the programs so that's why I'm giving you can She's absolutely right. Thank you, Connie. Wow. Us The Stainer. Since 1989. We are really grateful for such loyal support. And as Connie pointed out, you can step up for us right now. On the last day of this fall fundraiser Hello again. I'm Cynthia Marcucci here with Dave Freeman. We have just a few minutes before we go to the next hour of forum to take advantage of another dollar for dollar challenge on the last day of this fundraiser, So please make your call right now To 1 809 378850 text us the word, Give or donate online at dot org's slash donate $500 dollar for dollar.

Democrats Roe Senate Wade Jacqueline Thompson Bruce Kane Supreme Court Connie Harry Reid Michael Obama Onda Court McConnell Neil Amy Cockney Barrett Scalia president Khun Cynthia Marcucci Tony Barrett
How Safety Can Hurt Our Children

Legacy-Dads Podcast

07:37 min | 1 year ago

How Safety Can Hurt Our Children

"Guys looking to Lucy. Dad's my name is lance and I'm joined here with my brother in Christ my partner down to its. It's how you doing Ma'am what's going on. I'm doing great could living the dream one Kobe house at a time or absolutely. It's hot down here. I mean we're in the nineties everyday. Zoom call that we had last night on the legacy. Dad's closed facebook group. You know your face looked a little red there. I mean you you you sending a little bit to me. All the pool may all Kovin. I had that delay by the pool. And you know it's tough tough life. Somebody do it you know. I'm glad that you're just take one for the team here. Buddy yeah no for all you guys out there struggling right now. Just let you know. I'm starting struggled by the pool. You're you're suffering. No Hey on on that. I wanted to say it'll no been talking with some guys. Some guys have been sending me messages and stuff. There are some guys out there. Who are you know? People getting laid off Going through financial stuff right now. I want to say you know. We're praying for you guys and hopefully things will get back to normal. You guys go back on your feet soon. Just keep trusting God and gotTa get you through that you know. We joke around a lot but I know there are some guys on some difficulty so Just let us know. We're letting you guys know that you're in our thoughts and prayers and we are praying for you guys and all the families out there have been affected so so Dante. We're going to go before eight. Let me get this weight. What are we doing here? Dad's biblical manhood podcast for men husbands and fathers and apparently ladies. Listen in. They sneak in the back door. And listen to what we're talking about. But this is for those of us in all stages of life promote and advocate proven biblical principles for leaving a lasting legacy. So so don't think this is going to be a continuation. We talked last week. We started getting into three untruths. That are kind of like really affecting our our society and this is all based on the book. The coddling of the American mind. I'd really invites you guys. If you haven't read this book go out and get a copy audio book or whatever you do and listen to this because there's really good stuff in there Dante. Naira just kind of do in broad strokes here but today we're GonNa talk a little bit more depth about this book as well and talking about it from a parenting perspective specifically how safety can actually hurt your children and how trying to to What the authors call safety is and how to try to make this everything completely one hundred percent safe safer our children how that can actually cause harm to our children So don't tell turnover you think of this and then I think we really delved into of the background. This I think in this podcast. We're GONNA talk a little bit more in depth on it. Is that makes sense. I know rise in rates of anxiety. Depression suicide among American adolescents. Over the past decade has been going notably higher You know one of the counselors that we work within our church will probably put that video up. I gotTa send that to you but Her name is dawn downing what you're saying. The amount of calls on a typical call will be a thousand calls are now up to sixty five hundred and so six and a half times. What normal pace rate is of people calling the suicide hotline? This is something not to take lighthearted and this book really delve in to a lot of the cause and effect of some of these different untruths or or or bad thought process or policies and we just wanted to delve more into that. And I think we're GONNA probably get you know were before we were looking at university and individual getting a little bit more to the individual and focusing on that and as far as like as legacy parents how we can navigate through this and and put some biblical Advocation Truth and put on critical thinking leads through that with Atlanta. What he got for us. Yeah I will say that that you know these are things that we have to think about that in in life. We're going to face completely unexpected events. There's GonNa be adversity And I think we've seen this if you have limited or no prior exposure to unexpected events. You're going to have a hard time navigating him. I think we all know that there was a. I know this and I don't know if you have this Dante. But there's no kirsten kids who are sheltered and you know Their parents took on this. This of just fear based fearing the world in trying to protect the children and the children went off to college and the children went completely nuts and some of them left the church and some of them just did somebody destructive things because it was like the first time in their life they were allowed to interact with adversity in a hostile world and they just they had never been prepared and they didn't know what to do and so they chose they. They kind of self. Destructed went down the destructor pattern. But I think we're to need. We're GonNa really talk about this. Is that as parents need to teach our kids not to just run away in fear but to learn and adapt and grow and making it more likely that uncertainty is can be successfully navigated You know in a in a system that does not encounter. Unexpected events on the other hand can become rigid and weak and inefficient. And you know nothing challenges the system to respond vigorously and so I think as parents and teachers we should help our learning grow from facing risks and stressors and not by limiting their exposure to them are trying to create this environment. Where you know. They're never exposed to anything that that's maybe require adverse does that make sense day helicopter parent parent. That is a control freak or is trying to put in like safety bubble. You know I remember way back when when I was a kid you know I'm forty five restore so years ago there was a made for TV movie where a kid had all of these situations of risk to health and it was. I think called the boy in the bubble John Travolta correctly for as much of US would like to have our kids in this bubble that they don't get hurt they don't get a scratch on the they don't face bad or bullies or anything else like that and we're trying to micromanage every step of the way you know you're you're cheating your child. You're you're not preparing them for world that unfortunately as much as we'd like to say this is Unicorn on Rainbow Kinda world you know this is a world that has evil. This is a world that has bullies. This is a world that has people that can be downright dirty and nasty and the idea is in controversy. The idea is in raising the kids that we're trying to do. What is the end goal of what we're doing? What is the purpose that are doing it? Are we just trying to raise kids? That are like model citizens that will get into the most elite college no matter what the cost and will will cheat ethical means by which so parents. If you're helping your child take a test. Because it's so much more important for you to get them to the university or the scholarship for sports that you want them to versus letting them fail on their own because they're not doing the work we've got problems and I mean I don't mean to condemn I don't mean to come down on this but a lot of the things that we're seeing. The fruit of these things is pretty serious. And if we don't take a look at identify and really start to say I gotta take ownership

DAD Dante Facebook Kovin Lance Partner Naira Depression John Travolta United States Destructed Kirsten Atlanta
"advocation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"advocation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The last polls with clothes in the state Kathy Montgomery is a retired social worker she arrived expecting a celebration hi I am very optimistic that Bernie Sanders is going to win the primary here in Michigan Michigan is the working class and Bernie has worked for working class people his whole career seated at a table nearby is Sanders campaign volunteer he's from Brooklyn New York this is his first presidential election actually turned twenty one yesterday I was out here celebrating a campus early returns were popping up on the bar's giant TV screens tuned to CNN as the numbers started rolling in Albert was getting a bad feeling still he was philosophical about it is the people's right the power I have met so many great people here in the past few days and hundreds and hundreds of people volunteering this isn't the end you know we'll see what happens he does want Sanders to stay in the race he said Joe Biden's fortunes turned around in just a week who knows what could happen in the weeks ahead thirty three year old Justin Onwenu is a community organizer from Detroit he jokingly cried into his arm when I asked him about projections showing Biden winning Michigan but he too said the campaign isn't over yet even as he ponders what's next I think the values that Bernie Sanders one fighting for healthcare for all people advocation for all people making sure that the one you know from all of those are values that are going to live on the on this campaign talk will be on this moment there were certainly complaints in this room that the democratic establishment is out to get soon or that there was something odd about how candidates dropped out and endorsed Joe Biden so quickly some saw it as sinister others were just frustrated by it all there was lots of agreement that if Joe Biden is the eventual nominee he'll have to work very hard to win over many of Sanders devoted supporters don Gonyea NPR news Detroit later today on All Things Considered according to Rolling Stone magazine this artist made one of the ten best albums of the nineteen nineties with the down payment a conversation with Stephen Malkmus ask your smart speaker to play and we are sure that story or you can ask for your member station by name this is.

Kathy Montgomery Bernie Sanders Michigan Michigan New York CNN Albert Joe Biden Justin Onwenu Detroit Rolling Stone magazine Stephen Malkmus Brooklyn don Gonyea
"advocation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"advocation" Discussed on KCRW

"Sanders was hoping for a big night in Michigan that didn't happen NPR's don Gonyea watched election returns with Sanders voters in Detroit and he says yes they're disappointed but they're not giving up just yet they started rolling into the back room of the anchor bar downtown an hour before the last polls would close in the state Kathy Montgomery is a retired social worker she arrived expecting a celebration hi I am very optimistic that Bernie Sanders is going to win the primary here in Michigan Michigan is the working class and Bernie has worked for working class people his whole career seated at a table nearby is Sanders campaign volunteer R. ET al he's from Brooklyn New York this is his first presidential election actually turned twenty one yesterday I was out here celebrating it early returns were popping up on the bar's giant TV screens tuned to CNN as the numbers started rolling in Delbert was getting a bad feeling still he was philosophical about it is the people's movement right now with all the power I met so many great people here in the past few days and hundreds and hundreds of people volunteering this isn't the end you know we'll see what happens if he does want Sanders to stay in the race he said Joe Biden's fortunes turned around in just a week who knows what could happen in the weeks ahead thirty three year old Justin Onwenu is a community organizer from Detroit he jokingly cried into his arm when I asked him about projections showing Biden winning Michigan but he too said the campaign isn't over yet even as he ponders what's next I think the values that Bernie Sanders of them fighting for healthcare for all people advocation for all people making sure that the wild dogs or simply American water those are values that are going to live on the on this campaign titled me on this there were certainly complaints in this room that the democratic establishment is out to get sand or that there was something odd about how candidates dropped out and endorsed Joe Biden so quickly some saw it as sinister others were just frustrated by it all there was lots of agreement that if Joe Biden is the eventual nominee he'll have to work very hard to win over many of Sanders devoted supporters don Gonyea NPR news Detroit.

NPR don Gonyea Detroit Kathy Montgomery Bernie Sanders Michigan Michigan New York CNN Delbert Joe Biden Justin Onwenu Brooklyn
Is Your Business a Personal Prison or Financial Freedom?

The Small Business Radio Show

11:05 min | 1 year ago

Is Your Business a Personal Prison or Financial Freedom?

"I always said that I've started three businesses and I said well you know if I knew what I was getting into. I probably wouldn't have done it because sometimes it does feel like instead of building your dream job or your dream advocation. You've really built a personal prison for yourself. How do you identify prevent that well number one? I think that you need to pick something that you love to do. If you if you look at a business like you do a job. would melt and most people go to work in a job with something that they really don't love to do it's really not what's in their heart then everyday. You're showing up to something that you start to build. Resentment around net definitely turns into a personal prison. But if you're picking something that you're really passionate about doing And as you start to build that business you remember what your core competency is one of the things you like to do. The most and you become better at those and then you hire experts to do two things in your business that you're not so good at or maybe you don't even like to do. I think that that breeds freedom within the business keeps people inspired in causes creativity crates fantastic culture within the company and it can really be a lot of fun and I think David. That's really the rub because what happens is people start with a passion doing what they really love. But then they've got to do all the things in the business that they don't really love and kind of like the financial side of the business a lot of people. Hey It really does become their personal prison. I love that phrase you use. Yeah absolutely and and the other thing is how did you start the business I wanNA PEOPLE TODAY? They bootstrap it right there there. They have to earn a certain amount of money right from day one when they opened the doors in order to keep those doors open they don't have investment or investors To be able to finance it until it starts to really get off the ground so when you're bootstrapping and business that's true. You are doing a lot of the things that you don't like to do. You may not even be proficient at doing which then causes more problems. It causes more aggravation and again. You're creating a prison around yourself so I always suggested people I say. Let's look at what you really have here. How much money do we need to earn? How much? How long can you keep the business? Based on the amount of money that you're bringing in and what aren't good at the if the person is willing to invest back the Prophet in the business itself. Take a little bit less for them and put it in the business so that they can actually cause growth. Then you're on your way to more freedom but I always caution someone when I say you know. A business requires everything but she could give it A. I mean it's it's not something to take lightly because it's not for everybody to to be the business and you are the one you're the leader. You're the one that's responsible for. Everything doesn't matter if somebody screwed something up you're responsible for it and you have to be willing to do what it takes in order to change those things so that the big business continues to grow. They stay innovative. And that you stay relevant in whatever industry. You're at also talk about that. People don't spend enough time building infrastructure in their business and I think a lot of small business owners don't realize how much process needs to be there because small business campy or we're just GONNA make it up every single day absolutely you can't you cannot scale without the correct infrastructure. Another problem that is very common for business. Owners is maybe there we call them control freaks they have to control everything and you have to let go of pieces of the business and trust other people to be able to do work that you really shouldn't be doing so that the business could grow and they see a lot of people really struggle with that idea because they feel like nobody else can do as good as they can't or they don't trust people with the money or they don't trust people with trade secrets that are there in the business. So it's a DA- part. There is about personal growth and I think that it needs to be a foundational value ethic of not only the owner but everybody that comes into the company so that people can be empowered to do the work that they need to do that. The owner doesn't have to be in control and the other thing is that you really do need to employees that you have you need to manage that beyond the their core competency what they do these people have lives and they have problems and they don't always show up to work every day with their head completely in the game and it's the responsibility of the owner and they're the people that are managing those individuals to make sure that they're staying at their best and also helps supply numbers what they need so that they can build those structures and they feel free. Come to you and say here's something that's not working. Here's a better way to do this so that everybody can win as a team and the whole business could win as a team and I think that that then creates more freedom not just for the owners but the people that are in there. They really loved to come to work and enjoy what they do. But how do you make that transition David because I think one of the hardest parts for small business owners they do everything themselves? They've set up their organization. So it's a hub and spoke there in the middle. Everybody that works ms around and they feel kind of good that everything's gotTa go through them but it's not leveragable. Where do you start to trust? Other people do parts of the business that maybe you should let go of well true. It's a great question you have to you. Trust but verify. So it's holding people accountable. It's not just blind trust where you give somebody job or task or a set of things that they need to accomplish. And then you walk away from it. You don't check on anything. Trust is built over time but I have found this that the first person you need to learn to trust yourself. The business owner has to ask themselves a very honest question is radical honesty. Can I trust myself to do what I say that I'm going to do if I can build that trust with me? I? It's going to be easier for me to hold other people accountable if I don't have trust in myself. I'm going to overlook trust with other people and that's where I see them. People get into trouble because then people just go and do whatever they WANNA do or you might end up hiring somebody that is not ethical and they're stealing from you But they trust us a couple from the business owner. I need one hundred percent. Come from the ethic. If I say I'm going to do it I'm going to do it no matter what absolutely no excuses. So how do you transfer that trust or other people because so many small bizarre say well? I'd rather do it myself. I don't want to train them and show them how to do it. Because it'll just get done faster if I do it. How do you get them away from that because again a leader leverages other people leader doesn't do it all themselves right? Yeah absolutely so it. It comes back to the goal Like if I was coaching Your Business Owner. I would ask them. What's the goal for your company? And then you have to realize that either. Your practices are going to expand and allow you to achieve that goal. Or they're gonNA keep doing everything yourself so I would I would. I would ask them. Why don't you trust people? What is the problem and then like you said it's all I can get it done faster. I could make sure that it's always gonNA happen the correct way. So the one of the core values in a business owner is the ability to take chances or the ability to risk more than the average person can't and letting them know that and helps them strengthen that ability but also put things in place where there's there's competency and the things are verified that they're being done correctly so so yes it is difficult for them to do it but generally wants to start doing it and they start getting good feedback on it. You find it. They start trusting more and they're able to let go more and generally happier because they're doing what they like to do. They start to see the business to grow. We'RE DAVID NAIL. Is the author of a book called the millions within gotta read something that was in the press kit which? I just loved you. Ask The question. Are you only starting a business to get rich or have more freedom? This detrimental mindset. You're only getting into a business so you don't have to work viz a middle-class mindset. We can date this back. Your Mom and dad working to not work anymore. If you're going to start a business you need to liked to work. It should be the one thing you love. It should be a place you love to express yourself and spire employs and do the same. It will create positive and productive work environment. David I think that is so well said because I think so. Many people don't realize that if you own your own business you gotTa love to work. You have to love the process no question and almost everybody that goes through the traditional school system. Y- whether it's in the United States or around the world are actually Indirectly taught to work for the time that they get off weed out in in school right for grade. School when is recess? One is summer vacation when his Easter Vacation? Wednesday the weekend. When yeah worked worked for the weekend you know we thank God that it's Friday so people are always looking for. When can I stop doing the thing that I don't like to do? And you cannot take that mentality into a company. It has to be that the company comes first. Yes there has to be some kind of work life balance but I also find that when a person's doing what love they don't feel that they need to get away from it other than maybe by recharge their batteries but it's not something that they're looking to escape from And I think that if they don't recognize that they that they are actually working for when they get time off. They don't plan correctly they don't build the business with the idea of. How can I put my resources in this business so that it expands and I'm not worried about when I'm going to retire? I'M NOT WORRIED. About how many weeks vacation that I get. So it's it's a very different mindset that the average person is raised with and most people don't even know that that's kind of the way that they're viewing the world. When do I actually get off from what I'm doing? But whether you own a business or your worked for somebody else. I think the key thing is are you happy? Are you doing something that you love? Life is too short to spend the time doing things that you absolutely don't want to do so. I always encourage people like put that they should be the number one goal by getting rich if you do what you want to do. And you're really willing to work hard and put dedication in you can become rich. And that's a great thing because you can win a better lifestyle. You can help more people. You can become really productive you know in the community overall but happiness should come before wealth

Business Owner David Nail United States
Is Your Business a Personal Prison or Financial Freedom?

The Small Business Radio Show

08:15 min | 1 year ago

Is Your Business a Personal Prison or Financial Freedom?

"I always said that I've started three businesses and I said well you know if I knew what I was getting into. I probably wouldn't have done it because sometimes it does feel like instead of building your dream job or your dream advocation. You've really built a personal prison for yourself. How do you identify prevent that well number one? I think that you need to pick something that you love to do. If you if you look at a business like you do a job. would melt and most people go to work in a job with something that they really don't love to do it's really not what's in their heart then everyday. You're showing up to something that you start to build. Resentment around net definitely turns into a personal prison. But if you're picking something that you're really passionate about doing And as you start to build that business you remember what your core competency is one of the things you like to do. The most and you become better at those and then you hire experts to do two things in your business that you're not so good at or maybe you don't even like to do. I think that that breeds freedom within the business keeps people inspired in causes creativity crates fantastic culture within the company and it can really be a lot of fun and I think David. That's really the rub because what happens is people start with a passion doing what they really love. But then they've got to do all the things in the business that they don't really love and kind of like the financial side of the business a lot of people. Hey It really does become their personal prison. I love that phrase you use. Yeah absolutely and and the other thing is how did you start the business I wanNA PEOPLE TODAY? They bootstrap it right there there. They have to earn a certain amount of money right from day one when they opened the doors in order to keep those doors open they don't have investment or investors To be able to finance it until it starts to really get off the ground so when you're bootstrapping and business that's true. You are doing a lot of the things that you don't like to do. You may not even be proficient at doing which then causes more problems. It causes more aggravation and again. You're creating a prison around yourself so I always suggested people I say. Let's look at what you really have here. How much money do we need to earn? How much how long can you keep the business going? Based on the amount of money that you're bringing in and what aren't good at the if the person is willing to invest back the Prophet in the business itself. Take a little bit less for them and put it in the business so that they can actually cause growth. Then you're on your way to more freedom but I always caution someone when I say you know a business requires everything but she could give it and I mean it's it's not something to take lightly because it's not for everybody to to be the business and you are the one you're the leader. You're the one that's responsible for. Everything doesn't matter if somebody screwed something up you're responsible for it and you have to be willing to do what it takes in order to change those things so that the big business continues to grow. They stay innovative. And that you stay relevant in whatever industry. You're at also talk about that. People don't spend enough time building infrastructure in their business and I think a lot of small business owners don't realize how much process needs to be there because small business campy or we're just GONNA make it up every single day absolutely you can't you cannot scale without the correct infrastructure. Another problem that is very common for business. Owners is maybe there we call them control freaks they have to control everything and you have to let go of pieces of the business and trust other people to be able to do work that you really shouldn't be doing so that the business could grow and they see a lot of people really struggle with that idea because they feel like nobody else can do as good as they can't or they don't trust people with the money or they don't trust people with trade secrets that are there in the business. So it's a DA- part. There is about personal growth and I think that it needs to be a foundational value ethic of not only the owner but everybody that comes into the company so that people can be empowered to do the work that they need to do that. The owner doesn't have to be in control and the other thing is that you really do need to employees that you have you need to manage that beyond the their core competency what they do these people have lives and they have problems and they don't always show up to work every day with their head completely in the game and it's the responsibility of the owner and they're the people that are managing those individuals to make sure that they're staying at their best and also helps supply numbers what they need so that they can build those structures and they feel free. Come to you and say here's something that's not working. Here's a better way to do this so that everybody can win as a team and the whole business could win as a team and I think that that then creates more freedom not just for the owners but the people that are in there. They really loved to come to work and enjoy what they do. But how do you make that transition David because I think one of the hardest parts for small business owners they do everything themselves? They've set up their organization. So it's a hub and spoke there in the middle. Everybody that works ms around and they feel kind of good that everything's gotTa go through them but it's not leveragable. Where do you start to trust? Other people do parts of the business that maybe you should let go of well true. It's a great question you have to you. Trust but verify. So it's holding people accountable. It's not just blind trust where you give somebody job or task or a set of things that they need to accomplish. And then you walk away from it. You don't check on anything. Trust is built over time but I have found this that the first person you need to learn to trust yourself. The business owner has to ask themselves a very honest question is radical honesty. Can I trust myself to do what I say that I'm going to do if I can build that trust with me? I? It's going to be easier for me to hold other people accountable if I don't have trust in myself. I'm going to overlook trust with other people and that's where I see them. People get into trouble because then people just go and do whatever they WANNA do or you might end up hiring somebody that is not ethical and they're stealing from you But they trust us a couple from the business owner. I need one hundred percent. Come from the ethic. If I say I'm going to do it I'm going to do it no matter what absolutely no excuses. So how do you transfer that trust or other people because so many small bizarre say well? I'd rather do it myself. I don't want to train them and show them how to do it. Because it'll just get done faster if I do it. How do you get them away from that because again a leader leverages other people leader doesn't do it all themselves right? Yeah absolutely so it. It comes back to the goal Like if I was coaching Your Business Owner. I would ask them. What's the goal for your company? And then you have to realize that either. Your practices are going to expand and allow you to achieve that goal. Or they're gonNA keep doing everything yourself so I would I would. I would ask them. Why don't you trust people? What is the problem and then like you said it's all I can get it done faster. I could make sure that it's always gonNA happen the correct way. So the one of the core values in a business owner is the ability to take chances or the ability to risk more than the average person can't and letting them know that and helps them strengthen that ability but also put things in place where there's there's competency and the things are verified that they're being done correctly so so yes it is difficult for them to do it but generally wants to start doing it and they start getting good feedback on it. You find it. They start trusting more and they're able to let go more and generally happier because they're doing what they like to do. They start to see the business to grow.

Business Owner David
Exploring the Limits of Transfer Learning with a Unified Text-to-Text Transformer

Data Skeptic

09:59 min | 1 year ago

Exploring the Limits of Transfer Learning with a Unified Text-to-Text Transformer

"I asked you to come on the show to discuss the paper. You and your call. Thursday recently published exploring the limits of transfer learning with a unified unified text. Text transformer so maybe to kick things off even though the name kind of is self explanatory. What is a text to text transformer the distinction distinction that we're making mayor? Is that in this paper. We cast every tax problems so every natural language processing problem as text. Text problem problem. And what I mean by that. Is that whether you're doing tax classification sentiment analysis textual entail -ment or whether you're doing machine translation in translating from French English or if you're doing some reservation whatever we catch the problem as a text attacks problem so for example if you want to determine if a sentence is grammatically correct you'd feed the sentence into the model and the model would output something like correct are incorrect like the literal word indicating the correctness of the sentence. If you wanted to translate English to German you would feed in a string to the model something like translate English to German Colon and then the text that you wanted to translate and the model would output the German translation. And the reason we do this is that it provides into this general framework that can be applied to a huge variety of tasks and allow up and it allows us to try out a bunch of different ideas that have been posed in the last couple of years in the NLP space. I like the framework. And it's sort of intuitively appealing and logical. I think to most readers. Perhaps you could could sit here. Scratch my head and say is there some way in which it's not robust enough. What about regression task or predict probability can we cast problems like like that into a text? Text transformer in some elegant way. Yes so the funny thing is that we did actually include a regression task in our suite of tasks extent we evaluated on its called S. T. S. B. and the goal of this benchmark is to predict a floating point value between one and five that indicates how similar two sentences are what we ended up doing in that case is just Kuantan using the ground truth floating point values to the nearest point linked to so for example point three five would become three point four and then we convert that floating point value to a string so literally three period for and the model is trained to predict that string. And so what we've done. Is We basically taking this regression problem at turned it into a roughly twenty one one class classification problem. We're training them. All to predict these floating point values. It turns out that that range of precision is enough to they get state of the art results on this task. You don't have to be so precise if you think about it. If you and I tried to annotate how similar two sentences are and we probably aren't going to be in agreement within zero point two so even having this sort of error of zero point two from quotation is a big deal in in that case while it's a little bit funny that that's how we handle it you know just basically converting votes to strings. It does actually turn out into work while and achieve extremely competitive results on that benchmark. Yeah I think any criticism. There is a fairly leak one if you asked me to score Gore similarity tasks. I don't know that my personal ratings would be more consistent than that on a day to day basis exactly so early on and maybe this'll still exposed some of the bias of my interest in theoretical computer science but when we're talking about machines that output correct and these text text transformers and especially to the word limits in the title. I started to wonder if Kurt girdle and now and turning we're GONNA make an appearance. We don't really go in that direction. So what exactly do you mean by limit. Yeah so oh the limits that were exploring this paper mostly pertained to the limits of how large we can make these models and how much data we can train them on with the current hardware. That's available so we train. The model that had around eleven billion parameters on about seven hundred fifty gigabytes of tax are about trillion tokens bigger and more data than people have considered the past. And this isn't the only thing we did in the paper but that's what we mean by the limits. While I think everyone knew that these approaches were pretty scalable. I and I think many other people were surprised by how the performance just continued to get better and and better and specifically there was a benchmark called superglue. superglue was proposed about seven months ago and it was designed to consistent tasks that were hard for the best text models that we had at the time namely bird but easy for humans for the most part by using our tex detects framework and really not a lot of additional new technology except scale we were able to go from a huge gap in human performance to basically matching human level accuracy accuracy on the superglue benchmark the fact that this benchmark that was designed to be difficult for machines could be loosely speaking solved with by a very similar algorithm that was just made bigger in terms of the number of parameters and the amount of data that it was trained on it is still somewhat surprising to me so that eleven billion number for me personally as a reader. I'm starting to lose perspective almost like when you talk about the richest people in the world. It's it's funny money to me after a certain point. Could you frame the jump forward with your project in the context of was this a twenty percent gain over what other people were doing. Or how extensive of a leap forward in terms of parameters scales taking place here. Yeah so the common model sizes that people have been using for the past. Skier have been on the order of one hundred million parameters. So let's say one hundred million or maybe three hundred billion parameters. It was about a two orders of magnitude increase Jason Model size which loosely speaking represents how big we could make these models and still train them on existing hardware in a reasonable amount of time time. Yeah I guess. One thing that I would want to mention is that scaling is not the most satisfying solutions to these problems. You know it's great that we can get good performance by making the model bigger but currently it's still expensive to run in France on our biggest model can you. Maybe he framed that. I know you may not be in the finance department. No dollars and cents wise but And of course these costs are usually headed downward all the time. So this will not age age well but Perhaps we can frame terms of you know what would buy me a house or a new car or something like that. What sort of price points are the big big models is really costing as you said? It's a little bit hard to estimate for all of our models except the biggest model you can find the model to pretty good good performance on a new task in. Let's say a few hours on a single who had TPU and Co lead gives you the for free. You can also get the team hugh from Google cloud and forget the hourly rate. I'm sorry when it's free. You could do this with no money. Yeah exactly the problem. Is that our eleven billion perimeter model. You can't actually fit on the single cloud teepee you need to get a bigger slice of that accelerator that I mentioned earlier in order to get the bigger slice you have to. You can't do it on the free coal APP. TPU off the top of my head. I'm not one hundred percent. Sure how much it would cost to do this. Fine Tuning on our biggest model but I guess the point gene. Is that no one complains when you make models more efficient and in particular. I can't imagine running inference on one of these models on on a mobile phone at this point for example not to mention you know the free the free APP. TPU In terms of architecture. Obviously there's a lot of inspiration ration- that leads to something like this but there's also some novel components to your paper. Can you contrast a little bit about what's new and different from previous approaches coaches to the encoder decoder architecture. The funny thing about our paper is that a lot of the success in transfer learning for natural language processing past last year have been using models. That look like Bert which people have been calling an encoder only architecture and what that means is that basically. We're feeding text to the model and the model is doing some processing to that text at men at the end. It's out putting a single token that indicates the classification that you WANNA make for example. This was a change from the original transformer architecture which was an encoder decoder architecture in our paper week because we're casting everything. Everything has a text attacks problem and not as a tech advocation problem. which is what I free or excellent at our many of these other models were designed to do because we're actually doing mkx text and tax? We use the original encoder decoder architecture and in fact overall the model architecture is very similar to what was proposed in attention. All you need from the original translator paper our goal actually was not really to introduce new model architectures new free training objectives. Or anything like that we. Instead we're trying to take what was available to us in the field. Do a big systematic exploration of of all of these different ideas and components figure out what works and then eventually scale it up there are some minor differences in our transformer for example will be used relative position batting's which have been introduced a subsequent to the attention is all you need paper but otherwise our model is Very similar to just a vanilla

Kuantan Kurt France Gore Google Bert S. T. S. B. Hugh
How to Repair Your Image: An Online Makeover

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:35 min | 1 year ago

How to Repair Your Image: An Online Makeover

"When there's news about a person or company good batter ugly? It usually ends up online but new reporting from the Wall Street Journal shows that some of the wealthiest Americans have found a way to scrubbed their images online getting rid of the bad stuff and replacing it with more flattering coverage reporter. Rachel Levy of the Wall Street Journal joins us to explain. First of. We'll ritual how did you come across the story so I cover hedge funds for the Wall Street Journal and I had been researching one of the subjects. It's actually in the story and started noticing some websites that drew my interest out. I was looking on Google. And that's sort of how this began this lead you to an Austin in Texas based company called Status Labs. What exactly is the service that they're offering their clients to status labs is online reputation management company? Their external lawyer. We are sent us a letter indicating more about what they do and what they told us in what they were we have in we put in. Our story is a single false. Accusation can cause permanent damage damage to a person or a company's hard earned reputation. This imbalance of power has made the first page of Google. I and oftentimes the last impression for individuals and companies The where continued attended on to tell us that fifty five satisfied employee's US quote variety of proprietary methods which are always evolving to help clients disseminate positive and truthful information about themselves themselves online. The first part of your story deals with Jacob Gottlieb who was a hedge fund manager is used the services of status labs to scrub his image Jacob Gottlieb. The league ran a large hedge. Fund called Victim Asset Management. A few years ago. It had several issues that came up one of its money. Managers was accused of insider insider trading and died by suicide a few days after he was charged Mister Gottlieb's former brother-in-law go into legal troubles as well and his on effectively leap was forced to shut down about a year ago or a little more than a year ago he was considering raising money again for Hedge Fund and and my understanding is that last year he also hired this reputation company status laps any paid thousands of dollars to do this cracked. Did it work. As far as GOTTLIEB's attempt to rehabilitate his reputation several websites featured Mister Gottlieb. After he hired status ops so he would search for his name on Google. You would come across these websites that appeared like news outlets but we're not actual news outlets google news in particular was featuring several of these of these websites until I called and asked about them and Google news took them down. They said that several of these websites didn't meet at standards over Transparency and he also tried to rehabilitate his image in the form of highlighting his donations. His philanthropy correct so several of these articles. When you read through them the the bulk of them there are overwhelmingly positive and fathering they would tout his investment acumen his charity and in one case found on a website called Medical Daily Times? It said that he had donated to initiative. Nyu when I called NYU. They said That he actually hadn't donated to that initiative Though he had donated to other initiatives that at the school though. Interestingly when you call that website pizzeria entire onto was Was the the number that picked up. That's funny Pizzeria Rian Toronto. Yeah and then. The author of that particular article had a photo that was actually A Canadian theatre actor and then when I tried to meets the candidate theater actor has publicist told me that I had no idea. has his photo was being used. In this way Rachel talk about wikipedia. which was started by status labs co-founders because that figures into this as well so i? The CO founders of satisfieds pre ran a company called wikipedia which was banned effectively by Wikipedia by the organization that is overseeing wikipedia Several years ago and going forward and to today's status labs one of the services that they apparently have provided to some their clients. Is wikipedia edits. Now that's not a problematic history on its own But you can't go in there without their permission Kenya well. They could use a free encyclopedia so I could create an account. And and and and and edit it but I have to disclose wants me to disclose if I am working on behalf of somebody if I if somebody's paying me to edit their page I am I am supposed to under wikipedia is rules to disclose that what were some other more notable clients of. There's some fairly familiar names here. According to my reporting status ops provided added services to several notable people or companies one of them is now education. Secretary Betsy Devos. There's another large Hedge Fund Citadel L. Massive Hedge Fund On Wall Street received wikipedia edits and And also the owner of thoroughness of the defunct company. Well Theranos the company. Leave Rachel. Have you had any responses from the people that you report it on in your story namely Jacob Gottlieb Betsy Devos or theranos else so Jacob Gottlieb when I asked him about status labs. He said that he hired them to help him. Watch his new venture and then in relation to generally speaking but also to The website that featured information about him about NYU donation. That wasn't accurate. He told me nobody would make an investment based on a no-name online online blog. Although he did say that it's helped his reception on tinder the dating APP. Betsy Devos I didn't get to speak with her but her spokesperson at Advocation Department said that it doesn't sound like the Department or the secretary of a relationship with status labs and didn't respond other questions that I sent an S. for Theranos I tried reaching Elizabeth homes as attorney As well as other attorneys and I could not reach them. What's the bigger picture here? Rachel in the age of disinformation. You know this story about manipulating Google's Algorithms and wikipedia entries and essentially getting away with it despite regulatory scrutiny. What's what's your biggest takeaway from this story? My biggest takeaway is. Is that despite many efforts to make it easier for us to find information online regular information online there are still ways for websites they can masquerade as news outlets to appear online. Avoid Google's detection even appear on Google news which is a source of information for many Americans and I think I think think it raises a lot of questions Wall Street Journal reporter Rachel Levy. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me.

Google Status Labs Mister Gottlieb Wall Street Journal Rachel Levy Wikipedia Jacob Gottlieb Betsy Devos Rachel NYU Betsy Devos Hedge Fund Reporter Secretary Austin United States Texas Kenya Fund Manager Rian Toronto
Operating manual for Xinjiang's massive re-education camps allegedly revealed in leaked Chinese documents

Morning Edition

07:14 min | 2 years ago

Operating manual for Xinjiang's massive re-education camps allegedly revealed in leaked Chinese documents

"Morning leaked documents offer an inside look at China's detention of Uighurs Uighurs are members of a minority ethnic group mainly in western China they are predominantly Muslim and have been held with other Muslims as a security threat Chinese authorities of ident have denied the authenticity of the so called China cables but let's talk about them with Adrian sands who is study the weaker camps he is a China researcher with the victims of communism memorial foundation he's also been working with the international consortium of investigative journalist to review these leaked documents he joins us via Skype walking the program good morning what are these documents exactly these documents are classified cables that are internal to the government issued by deputy party secretary to highland they are marked as confidential and extremely urgent these documents really speak to what's how to manage the so called suppose advocation a training centers managing more they're more like presence are there so many words that I think we need to define your first when you talk about cables that's it that's kind of a term of art from the days of telegraphs right this is official communications from one part of a government to another and when you said vocational training centers that's something with defining as well this is what China says it is putting very large numbers of Uighurs into right yes supposedly in order to train them in a vocational skill and give them a job so that they don't fall prey to I'm radical extremist Islamic ideas arm and there's been a lot of reporting about these things and also a lot of outside descriptions of them we had NPR have interviewed people have been in the camps and left them and left the country our correspondent rob Schmitz has even been taken by Chinese authorities to some of them highly controlled circumstances of course but there's a certain reality that's difficult to hide their people are being detained in large numbers one of the cables add to that description the cable say that these are highly guarded facilities that must have dedicated police stations dedicated police units twenty four Aug are it's an extensive anti escape measures so that the quote unquote students cannot escape cannot get out before they graduate which is off at least one year of intensive brainwashing and that's what's actually happening is brainwashing yes what hours of Chinese study hours of self confessions confessing even the slightest involvement in your Islamic religion am confessing having practiced your culture confessing not speaking Chinese well enough and having to learn Chinese flowers you can just imagine that for the seventy five year old who they put in these camps that's a very hard task this when you say self confession I mean this is what police all over the world do it's what intelligence agencies all over the world do and there's also a special Chinese tradition of self criticism of forcing people to bring the hammer down upon themselves that's what's happening here yes it's just like on the mountains cultural revolution where people have to extensively confessed the sins which basically was not following the ideology is there any doubt in your mind that what these really are are are prisons and no it is not in fact I knew that and I have extensive other sources of information a bunch of data that proved that the local counties where point twice as many police forces as teachers to got these camps other government documents that extensively spoke about these camps performing brain washing washing clean the brains and washing the hearts of evil why do you think it matters to Chinese authorities whether Uighurs are able to speak Chinese very well or not it's a matter of cultural assimilation they want these minorities to be much more similar to the Han so they did don't do their own thing don't have to own identity to on religion their own language on customs they want him to be more or less just like the Hon when you say the Han I guess we should define that for people that's the ethnic group that is the vast bulk of China's population right correct over ninety percent of Han Chinese we should also mention that when Chinese authorities talk about these camps they talk of Uighurs or of Muslims as a security threat they talk of concern of terrorism and there actually have been violent incidents of various kinds in western China over the years do the cables offer any justification for that point of view the cable simply state that the week is must be re educated that they must be put in these facilities and how these facilities must be wrong they do not discuss the details however the details we have seen in the speech us especially off Mr xi Jinping which were leaked by the New York times last week in addition to the cables I have also been able to obtain another cash of local files which is not not delete when I was able to obtain it in these files our local government spreadsheets is spreadsheets lists thousands tens of thousands of Uighurs in their families and their children in a mock who is in detention who is in prison who is in a re education camp often times you see families both parents are taking no you have left is elderly grandparents oftentimes ill or unable to work in very young children to cancel that is dramatic news you're giving us because of the specificity in our reporting we've encountered a lot of people who have some family member that they think is in a camp a family member who has disappeared do you have information there that might help some people to find their missing relations and loved ones I do find it state names addresses ID numbers age us every conceivable detail they also proof that this is absolutely not a companion trying to educate and give jobs to young people because by far the target group of disinterment campaign I did the heads of households it trying to take out the authority figures does that influence over families in some villages fifty percent of household heads have been detained the most likely demographic group to be in an internment camp our men between the ages of thirty and fifty nine he briefly does the leakage of these documents suggest some kind of internal concern or dissent about this policy that is entirely possible we've already seen from The New York Times Xinjiang pay posted released last week that there is this content I have been arrested government officials have been arrested for not detaining in

China Seventy Five Year Ninety Percent Fifty Percent One Year
The Care and Feeding of Data Scientists

Linear Digressions

07:47 min | 2 years ago

The Care and Feeding of Data Scientists

"Talking about data signs management. This is something we've been China about for a while leading wrote and a Riley report together on this very topic a few months ago and and thought it would be worthwhile to get in and talking through. So that's what we're doing today talking about once. You have a data science team in place. How do you keep those learning? How do you keep them growing? How do you think about moving along in their careers? All that good stuff. So you're listening to the year diversions in our last couple of episodes which listen to strongly recommend that you go back and pick goes up by a little bit of recap here so we talked a little bit about getting into data science and the different types of data scientists. How you assemble a team and why it's so important to get the right blood in your team once you have? The team assembled or you. How kind of critical mass us most of your time? These days is not your managerial time by not beyond hiring. But it's instead on growing your not making sure that they're learning and they're sticking around. They're happy hair progressing in their careers. You say yes yes yes sorry you can't you can't you can't hear me now so and this was something that we it's your three chapters to talk about if I recall correctly because it's really important and it's a for me this the the stuff. That's not always obvious because sometimes if you're a good manager you're working super hard and but people don't see the things that you're you know fighting for the process of the you're putting in place two two happy I don't know maybe maybe it's a little bit cynical but sometimes given the only time you hear about is when people are unhappy with their happy sounds about right. Yeah I I think that's just as of nature of the beast so but when we were together we together for a couple of years. I remember even when I started at that job. There was a lot of. There's a lot of stuff that was in place when I write the action that you were part of starting some of this certainly part of of continuing the things that have been started before your time of that created a really nice learning environment and so I think that now upon on reflection I realized how important that was for me as a younger data scientist as a way of learning and and stay happy so if as you can get a little bit of detail about what was the you put in place out of things April so yeah it's funny. I actually don't know that I can take credit for having put in place a lot of the good things that we had But I can't take credit for stealing them and putting them in place in my current company actually But there's actually I think one of my favorite topics at least one of my favorite topics from the book and the way the way we talk about it in the book is kind of this idea of like foam. Oh like fear of missing out that like data scientists really have this feeling that like if they're not using cool new techniques learning things that they're like falling behind and just again anecdotally like I think a Lotta people quit jobs or go from company to company because they feel like they're getting stagnant or they're not learning anything anything or doing anything interesting at their company so some of these things that we had in place to help combat that that feeling that people can have so. What kinds of things are we talking about so we're big fans of of just a simple idea of having a journal Club where folks get together? Read a paper of blog posts. It's like something like that. Maybe they've ideally they've read the paper of the blog post but that's not necessarily mandatory and get together and discuss it Someone who has like selected the paper could maybe give the short presentation but really you can just do it over lunch and spend an hour talking about a paper blog post like learning something new dirty secret. You never read the paper. I know what I was GONNA say. Everyone has been very often but every once in a while I'll realized that Journal Club is on a topic that I wanted to do on podcast anyway and then I'll make sure gotta check. Oh all your listeners. Know the secret purchase but and we have like A. I think we find that a great way for people to keep learning stuff but it's also a good opportunity for the company because a lot of interested engineers or analytics people. Oh Com people who are a little bit Interested in getting into the field and it's just a good rates like socialized data science. Like around your your company One thing we've done a few times he's like when we forgot to select paper is to have like a cold. Like Davis is movie night where we will find a talk from an interesting conference. Like Pie de puts video video online a lot of conferences. But there'd be online and we'll just like sit for the hour and like watch talk a conference talk together and I think people often accumulate these lists of things they wanNA watch and they don't have the time for it and that's just another way to get people like watching something Learning something so journal Club thing. That were a big fan of the second one I think is like some sort of dedicated halftime and I definitely did not start this at our previous job and I definitely didn't even come up with the best iteration that I think that we've landed John so I've never three companies that have done halftime we've and seeing many flavors like one flavors like that we at a previous company was like half of every he Friday. You got to do whatever you wanted. Essentially another one has been like what is like a full day full day once a month. I think that's where we're doing a full day once a week at some point either way like that in those like short increments I find. They often don't work very well for two reasons. One people don't aren't able to at the time Apart like it was just half a day every week like you just get pulled in a meeting. So you'd get normal work like you can't actually. You can't actually do it even if it's like a day every other very hard at at the time aside so then we've tried whole team accolades and spending two days like working on something a team. We did cagle competition as a team wants. It's an and that has been fun has advantages but I think the the downside of that is that people can't work on the particular thing that they're interested or they want to learn about. Yeah Yeah So. That's a problem so I think both what we did at Civis and what we do now. Here is the idea of of individual hack weeks. And how often you do them depends is on your company. And what you what you can do. We do them quarterly. But you can. You can even do them once or twice a year but the idea is basically that each person gets to spend a dedicated week on like a hack project and because it's a whole week retire them to treat it like it's a vacation and plan for it like way out in advance and you know people can take a week advocation and get out of meetings and projects so do the same thing with this hack week actually set time aside a week as long enough to make meaningful progress on projects. It's like to actually get end to end on a prototype or try a new software package or open source somethin- and then the last bit is like some kind of bit of accountability to make sure people are actually doing something so Having a slight plan in place ahead of time that people can look at and then doing a presentation to the rest of the team at the end is super important so We do it on Friday as well help like a forty five minute presentation where the person that was on Hack Week. We'll walk the rest the team through what what they've done and so the rest of the team also gets to learn something new and cool but then that person realizes actually have to do something. Because I'm going to get off in embarrassments off. I have nothing to show for my

China Riley Civis Scientist Journal Club Davis Cagle John Forty Five Minute Two Days
How This Little-Known Law Can Help Build Legal Tiny House Villages with Dan Armstrong

Tiny House Lifestyle Podcast

08:23 min | 2 years ago

How This Little-Known Law Can Help Build Legal Tiny House Villages with Dan Armstrong

"Across the United States are looking at legalizing tiny houses in a lot only heard from a listener who is my guest today Dan Armstrong about something called off it's using this law to push through the building of tiny house used for the building of tiny house villages I hope you stick around our pastor who is working with the Minnesota chapter of the Ha or American advocation teacher who suffered a stroke in two thousand sixteen which left him with two disabilities in society and he believes that religious organizations have untapped potential to do the recording you've got this this listening audience of fifteen thousand yeah you gave me an extra year but you're doing it whether it is hardly any therefore from what I understand and so I think that speaks your journey's speak so you know I'll set this up and just say that you know I received an email from you from Dan eight to tiny house villages and I thought I'd just you know send it along to you it might be of interest was it was absolutely floored because it's does that it's it's my heart is a is a former pastor I believe that that church ought and that you know is tiny tiny house villages there's a civil it's abbreviated Lupu stands for the religious land use institutionalized a church gain do any house one of them was in my home state of Minnesota going to be it's in a national Tennessee and that's in length cliff couple a little bit and just define what Ra- Lupu is a little bit right well back in two thousand and I'm more of the site not right it's a civil rights law that Congress passed in two thousand and the reason why came up he didn't land that is consistent that they need for their theological requirements in in this individualized In discretionary prime process weekly kind of acknowledging that a religious organization needs a place in a discriminatory way yes now was happening and but these it was a civil rights civil rights law yes okay so able to to share with with our listeners sure you know how how's villages thank you and in a sense in the sense that it actually governments from discriminating against religion so if Hindu discriminate against them that would be a definite definite case author case was that could be proven that the reason the reason why in have a relief up but in the two specific cases both in wants to treat houses of worship is with equal treatment I'm on a religious exercise lizard the for protection

United States Dan Armstrong Minnesota Tennessee Ra- Lupu Congress
Strategies for Eating Healthier

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

10:50 min | 2 years ago

Strategies for Eating Healthier

"Hello and welcome to the nutrition diva podcast. I'm your host Monica Rheingau and week I'm reviewing some brand new research on the types of strategies that are most effective in changing people's behavior for the better so if you've ever struggled to change the each season of knowing host Christie West Guard will take you for an inside look at an iconic entertainer the first season is all about Robin Williams in this short eight episode autobiography you'll hear never before heard interviews from people who worked with Robin and knew him best and you'll hear from comedians like Gilbert Gottfried and Chris get hard about how Robin inspired them to push the boundaries of comedy listen for a moving portrait of an unforgettable icon just search for knowing colon robin Liam's on your favorite podcast APP could your eating habits be a little better well you're in good company despite decades of haranguing by parents health professionals government agencies and podcasters the average American is still taking in too much sugar too many highly processed foods and too few fruits and vegetables we're taking in too many calories and too few nutrients as a result we tend to be both overweight and undernourished the causes of these dietary indiscretions are well documented the proliferation of cheap high-calorie Hyper Palatable Food and beverages as well as the normalization of huge portion sizes and constant snacking have created an environment and culture in which it takes superhuman hurt and willpower to not overeat the question is how do we change all this put calories on restaurant menus hide the ice cream in the the freezer served dinner on smaller dinner plates post healthy eating messages and cafeterias break rooms and on our refrigerators at home you name it someone has tried it and many of these strategies work at least a little but are any of them really making a dent what are the most effective ways to encourage healthy behaviors that will ultimately result in improved health a pair of French researchers Roman KC and Pierre Shangdong set out to find out the identified ninety six different research studies that employed various strategies for nudging people toward healthy choices and they compared there else to determine which seemed to be the most effective for this particular study the researchers calculated how each nudge impacted total calorie intake. now. Admittedly reducing calories is not the only way that a nudge might improve your nutrition but with obesity being such a primary concern it's certainly relevant and this metric does allow us to compare the effects of a lot of different types of interventions a nudge in this case was defined as any that altered people's behaviors without outright forbidding something or using economic incentives for example if an employer wanted to incur urge their employees to drink less soda and more water they could remove all the soda from the vending machines or double the price of the soda so that the bottled water it was much cheaper but neither one of those would be nudges a nudge is something that influences the choices that you make or in the language of the researchers alters the choice architecture without removing your ability to make or afford a different choice and the researchers found that none She's divided themselves into three categories cognitive strategies try to affect what you know they aim to make you think a bit more before making yourself election or taking a bite cognitive nudges include things like adding calorie counts to restaurant menus or in the case of our employer who wants their employees to drink less soda a cognitive nudge might be to hang a poster next to the soda machine showing how much sugar is in a twenty ounce bottle of soda and other type of cognitive nudge is using logos or icons to identify healthier choices so putting a heart icon on high fiber cereals or a little Broccoli icon next to lower calorie menu items would both be examples of this type of nudge over the past tanner twenty years a lot of energy and money has been invested in cognitive dodges like adding calorie counts two menus and changing the way calories are displayed unpackaged foods unfortunately of all the three types of ages. Cognitive strategies are the least impactful in terms of average impact on calorie intake cognitive nudges reduced typical intake by about six fifty four calories per day the second category of nudges our affective strategies these try to change the way you feel about food or behavior without necessarily changing what you know affect of nudges include applying appealing words and images to healthy choices instead of offering you aside of carrots I might offer you citrus infused glazed spring carrots on a menu I might include beautiful photographs of the Salads but not the fried foods another type of affect of nudge is known as the healthy eating call this is when a sign or a server suggests that a certain choice is more desirable would you like to split a desert with the table or we can substitute a salad for the fries if you prefer or are pasta also comes in half portions instead of trying to inform you about the nutritional attributes of a food affect of strategies focused on making certain foods more desirable or influencing how you feel about a certain choice these appeals to the senses the emotions are somewhat more effective than appeals to reason in terms of reducing calorie intake affect nudges are almost twice as impactful as cognitive ones reducing energy intake by about one hundred thirty calories a day or about seven point five percent as you may have guessed by now the third category of nudges turned out to be the most effective of all and tell you all about what that was right after this break to thank our sponsors support for today's show comes from bare minerals creators of clean beauty bare minimum else believes in pure formulation and uncompromising performance they believe that make up and skin care should make your skin better not just better looking bare minerals damn the clean beauty revolution in nineteen ninety-five with their best selling original foundation it offers creamy lightweight coverage that's naturally luminous the clean formula things only five ingredients all minerals including non-chemical SPF protection it's makeup so pure you can sleep in it the bare mineral formula those are clean without compromise and they're all one hundred percent cruelty free so upgrade to clean beauty products use the foundation finder at bare minerals dot com to find perfect match and first time customers get fifteen percent off with the Promo Code diva that's bare minerals dot com Promo code diva for fifteen percent off your first just bare minerals the power of good today's episode was also supported by molecule molecule is re imagining the future of clean air starting with the air purifier molecule destroys indoor air pollutants at a molecular level removing them from the air that you breathe the technology has been verified by science but most importantly it's been tested by real people molecule has offered asthma and allergy sufferers around the country and all new experience one moore even said she was able to breathe through her nose for the first time in fifteen years and now molecule offers their breakthrough pico technology across a wide range of advocation solutions for your entire home for ten percent off your first order of an air purifier visit molecule dot com and enter diva ten checkout that's M. O. L. E. K. U. L. E. Dot Com and your code is diva ten the third category of nudges our behavioral strategies these try to change what you do without necessarily affecting what you know or what you feel in fact behavioral nudges can function without you even being aware of them one popular category of behavioral nudge is making the healthy choice the easy choice for example placing green salads in convenient grab and go containers at the center of the store but having the fried chicken in the back of the store we have to wait in line line for a Deli worker to quit it in a container for you another example of this type of behavioral nudge is to put the vegetables and the grilled salmon and other healthy items beginning of a buffet line and the less nutritious items like biscuits or macaroni and cheese at the end when you have less room on your plate third category of behavioral nudges is to use smaller plates and containers for calorie dense foods like pasta chips or soda and larger plates and containers healthier lower calorie dishes like salads vegetables water and cut fruit as you've probably anticipated the behavioral nudges were the most effective of all overall they reduced calorie intake by more than two hundred calories or twelve percent and in particular changing the size of the portions and the Oh now have been where we've been investing most of our resources it turns out that when it comes to making healthier choices knowing more doesn't always translate into doing better but we are powerfully impacted by ease and convenience

Robin Liam Obesity Monica Rheingau Robin Williams Gilbert Gottfried Christie West Pierre Shangdong Chris Fifteen Percent One Hundred Thirty Calories Six Fifty Four Calories Two Hundred Calories One Hundred Percent Twelve Percent Fifteen Years Five Percent Twenty Ounce Twenty Years Ten Percent
Overcoming the Barriers to Deep Learning in Production with Andrew Ng

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

09:00 min | 2 years ago

Overcoming the Barriers to Deep Learning in Production with Andrew Ng

"Great to see all of you. Here is great to have you here so my first question is i. I don't know if you saw it on the document that had your autograph but I lost four point eight five points on homework assignments in your course. What was that all about perfect. It must have been the Bogan office awesome awesome so you also also launched your most important learning machine Nova back in February House fatherhood treating you yes so novus now seven months but you know the the story about how we chose her name. we want to hurt to have the initials near. Netra sticking also want their initials B N so oh Nova but one deeper than that neuro thinking all right have new baby. I think every person on the planet as a unique person is unique human beings so people off aw you know one. That's a number so we gave her. The Middle Name Athena so full name is Nova. Does initials are any en that does it birthday Chevy carrier for Whole Life Nice Nice. You are prolific. You are up up to so many things. Can you give us an overview of what you're working on. Nowadays yeah the team's derisive. AIDS machine learning means a lot of pieces need it for it to reach US full potential potential so right now the team's swimming most time with them leading our than being a I which is helping companies jumps not a adoption deep lining da ah which is our educational arm produces content a lot of his uncle. Sarah also our weekly newsletter called the batch of vision subscribe to get weekly eighteen us about machine learning and also a funds which is a startup studio that bills. Ai powered startups from scratch the rise machine learning opportunities so building building these three teams which work together in ecosystem trying to build the pieces that allows fill the ipod future. Let's dig into landing. Ai Obit. I associate that with doing work in the manufacturing space. You've US an overview of the company and what is up to is that is that the case so I think I saw my own is how an injection objection at modern. Ai Can make a company much more effective and valuable. I think you're building Google brain leading at by. Do I saw what my own is. Couple Greek companies become modern. Ai Companies have become much more effective than valuable along the way but if you look at what we've done the machine or any world I think with transformed the software Internet sector so many of the companies represented your at this conference many companies in Silicon Valley in Beijing even outside the top small handful you kind of have given a lot of traction in the I I think the next step is to transform all of the other industries as well. I'll site software internet and so- landing works of many companies from manufacturing agriculture to healthcare to others and we can actors a partners outsource chief officer to help upon function team develop and all those we help harness. We woke up for you but also teach you how to cook so after a couple of years you can insourcing function and be enable business in your vertical which we think can help a lot of people in hell of companies become more effective and more valuable and frankly we go. There's more to life than your financials but right but I think our impact we hope as she has a material impact on the market cap of at least work with. Can you give us an example of some of the types of problems that you're we're helping customers solve the C. One of our engagements has been with a large agricultural machinery company and I think if you can help a company not you know reposition from traditional agriculture company to being a enable Agriculture Machinery Company then you can build smart machinery. We're GONNA have the same saint farmer same foam but with automation suggestions the how to control the machine better you get crop from the same pharmacy and farm so this direct impact on the farmer was not surprising on the company building these types of things I think I was just in a Latin America lost weaken Columbia visiting companies in different industries as well from the sticks to manufacturing and what I'm seeing. Is that there's very strong. CEO level interest to hope companies also have induced you sectors become enable and it's not that is not that if you are manufacturing company you want to become any companies. Let someone else do that but but I think in the future enable manufacturing company can be much more effective have been valuable than than one doesn't maybe one last disruptive technology was the rise of the Internet and we saw that if if you have a shopping mall plus website yes everyone has built a website but that doesn't turn you into Amazon or if your taxi company and you build a website the internet company instead Uber Live Grab. DD are true Internet companies. Arguably is is as disruptive as the Internet and so there will and the changes the core of how different companies would compete. What are the things that help you build the defense business one of the things they generate value whether you play within our play was the new strategy and I think companies able to figure that out won't become near. What will survive and thrive on? I'm one of the town Silicon Valley which is not true. Is that whenever this disruptive technology is always a solid set win. That's just not true with the Internet some software to do okay well include Google facebook and Amazon but some incumbents that it will include Microsoft and apple which were not Internet companies but became create Internet companies so so what the rise of modern machine learning and exciting where that many of you in this community doing to land these technologies up to bring them to fruition. I think this is is very racist again where degrade options of startups but incumbents also have a lot of advantages and if they played it 'cause right they can become come very valuable very effective enable businesses verticals so what's involved in Plano cartwright one of the hardest things the companies companies to embrace a it's a scope the right set of projects and so we spend a lot of time. I think we'll eventually become very good at work have companies at least figure out what you should and should not use machinery to. I'd think you know some pieces of is a good one to start small. Maybe actually historian when one of the biggest most glamorous project has probably number one is usually a mistake at Lisa failure that then causes you lose faith. He says the company back back because you need to regain the faith one story early days. Google brain people who were still certainly didn't know how deep there were you in skeptical about it so my first internal customer was speech. Team wasn't the most it's not web search advertising right speech recognitions. Nice the project is not web search advertising but by making Google speech more accurate other teams have been google gained faith in our ability to deliver results it. It also taught the company how to use deep learning. I remember when I first. GPO server service sitting under some guys deaths with wires but but that told us important lessons about how the train models GPU's after the first successes secondly turner customers Google maps where we use OCR photo ought to beat house numbers to more accurately place houses on Google maps improve quality map data zone after those two successes that ident- started it more serious composition with the advertising ising team so so one lesson from it is is I think small is more important than your first project something like speech recognition back today to help the company what it feels like to use that to build momentum and then I think is important to form cross functional teams with machine senior experts and business advocation expense to brainstorm projects together one tip. I offer please can approach hip often the number one project did see okay so excited about this actually not project. You should work on so recommended companies to brainstorm dominic these half a dozen projects as spent a few weeks deeply evaluating technically feasible is valuable and do that before investing several few months where for resources sources to do that

Google Nova United States Ai Companies Silicon Valley Amazon Agriculture Machinery Company February House Chevy Columbia Sarah Beijing Latin America Officer Dominic
How Sage Revitalizes Agriculture Near Cities

Edible-Alphaâ„¢ Podcast

14:49 min | 2 years ago

How Sage Revitalizes Agriculture Near Cities

"Name is sabella. Krause and i am the the president and founder of an organization called sage sustainable agriculture education and really there's another e. on the end enterprise because what what how we describe ourselves as an entrepreneurial nonprofit we work both on our own projects that we developed and we work in <hes> as saba to other farms but a basic mission is to revitalize agricultural places new cities and foster vital dole food systems that connect urban and rural communities and we work in a number of scales we work at the regional scale fru frameworks that we develop and and are invited to partner on and then we also work on the ground on specific projects exit the level of developing agricultural parks helping to develop wholesale food centers and that kind of thing and we work sort of inbetween sub-regional scales gales and basic approach developed what we say big vision ideas and implement them on the ground to collaboration with lots of different kinds of stakeholders yeah and you and i we were we were this. I met you when we were both wallace. <hes> sandra fellows and and <hes> last year and one of the things that just was so impressive to me about you and your work is your ability to look at this very large scale i think i i think there aren't a lot of people i run into. Who have that ability. I think there are a lot of people thinking about food systems on a bigger scale sale. I find what happens is that sometimes that focus can be on two wins of the food supply chain it can be on issues around agricultural of farmland protection <hes> access for new farmers and beginning farmers all the way to the other side where there are issues of food security thirty and food access both hugely important issues but what sometimes gets much less attention paid to it is the business of food food which is the whole supply chain which i know you worked very closely on <hes> <hes> in between <hes> the production part and then the end-consumer part and <hes> i think you know i think the basic idea is food certainly even in the bay area the foodie conscious area food gets really taken for granted the whole food agricultural system. I should say get sort of taken for granted so one way to try to draw greater attention to it is to say well. Some of our issues and approaches could solve other problems or help help implement other objectives <hes> now just give you a couple of examples in the city of san jose where we work closely they <hes> you know have major goals have diverse economic development and authenticity and that sort of thing <hes> but you you know there is a sense sometimes that in the rush for everyone to make such a focus on technology they've kind of gotten about some of the routes as being one of the major age of fruit production regions in the country and so that feels part of the past but in fact do reports we do such as the san jose food works we point out that their food system or food sectors actually make huge contributions visions economically to a lot of different goals to the diverse economic development goals cost of authencity mean santa's as the city which is the sticks most diverse i in the country <hes> but again that's sort of hidden in place plain sight so we try to elevate <hes> what both those assets are what they what the needs are so the city in this instance that the city scale looks at more closely what kind of investments a needed in across the food sectors to help realise other broader city goals and doing the same thing regionally as we're looking at <hes> regional resilience <hes> in the face of both natural disaster other a longer time impacts as we're looking at a long term land on usa transportation plan. We're saying not just where food and agriculture should be. She should fit in but how they too can be part of the solution the other things. The region is grappling with right so if i if i. I don't know if i'm correct in saying this but it it it seems to me like you you when when you say elevate you do you look at data and help people understand the landscape as it exists right now using the data and then you're making helping people will make the connections back to as you said economic development activities writes that it is injustice data about local food systems. It has connections to economic activity in the community absolutely <hes> i mean you know you one. <hes> one little example is is talking. We simply to a produce wholesaler <hes> in again in the city of san jose essay and <hes> they were saying you know the city doesn't really care about us. We just service hundreds of food trucks and of course in san jose like in many cities. The whole idea of the food truck culture is hugely important in defining public spaces and who people are and kind of diversity of culinary choices but again those food trucks depend on having a commissary places to get where they can get do. They're cleaning and places. This is where they can get their food supplies. So in the you need to help sometimes draw the attention of cities to the fact that the food truck doc doesn't materialize in the plaza at eleven thirty a m but it also is part of a set of infrastructure <hes> need need that that attention is needed for i mean and especially i would think in in places like san jose where <hes> real estate. I'm assuming is super. Expensive and lease rates would be expensive and so it's gonna take a bit of effort on the part of the city to make sure that add some of these infrastructure you know like like a distribution harbor something can can happen right to support things like food trucks it is it is really a challenge because there is definitely a kind of a a practice i would say the highest and best use scher <hes> across across the board and and obviously food as far less elastic are for less much more in the last crisis and a a lot of other tech kind of manufacturing and that sort of thing <hes> yeah so. It's a bit tough because <hes> you know where is the intervention. Come i mean the developers are need incentives or they need programs to try to to even begin to entertain. I mean this sort of idea and i'll give you another example. <hes> the city recently sort of put up for an exploratory exploratory are f._p._u. Request for qualifications advocation is really a site but one of the one of the requirements of the program for this one hundred and sixty acre site in an industrial part of san jose was a that housing was not to be part of the development and be that the jobs needed to be geared to people who didn't necessarily have college applic- <hes> <hes> college degrees and so that right away by putting out a program like that that against narrowed the scope and in fact some of the proposals is that were developed for that absolutely included a wide range of agricultural production the focus on indo farming and that sort of thing and agricultural processing agricultural <hes>. I mean food processing food distribution and also room due to look about this in a new way room room for agricultural r._n._d. Food are he. <hes> you know i was at a little at a meeting earlier this week. It kind of a food hack affonso valet always there are i mean dozens and dozens of firms popping up every i don't know quarter i should say looking at some new innovation in supply chain or new food production new vegan or new plant based proteins and new robotics and but you know a different kind of <hes> i and different platforms and so <hes> you know that that is a whole cluster of businesses so <hes> the attention needs to be paid to you know the idea that you could couple that future looking <hes> food development around. Maybe what's more traditional food distribution. I think is really exciting notion. It is and i think it's ah i love the food hack thon. I love that idea like food hack thing <hes> just because i think i in fact i was on a a phone. Call this morning with somebody who called in. I do these virtual office. Hours may called in who is in iowa. Who's who's doing a really interesting technology that applies to indoor agriculture and we were talking about the fact that there's like no where <hes> logically for that kind of tech company to go right now because tech it's not a software app like they still have to their software involved but they still have to grow plants right and plants grow as fast as they grow grow and and they need infrastructure for that and so that that just the way from a financial perspective in every other perspective how that tech company is gonna and grow is different and we don't have a natural place. Where is there an accelerator where somebody would actually understand this and the answer is no so what an opportunity to have that kind of a physical place. That could could be a home for this kind of innovation. Absolutely there are a few accelerators propping up. I'm one that comes to mind is food systems six. You may of <hes> but they they have. I think they are now. Maybe third cohort and <hes> some of the businesses that they have helped to incubate a really. I'm doing well so nice. <hes> i think <hes> you're you're right on it. There's definitely a need for these kinds of accelerator right right. Well and you know in attack. The the there's developed this infrastructure for helping groom growing businesses right so accelerators and and and pitch events and all that kind of stuff and just don't haven't really actively applied that to agan food yet ag tech and food so so is this this. This is a pretty big acreage in california is that is this city involved in the purchase of that or who owns out right now about the one that the one that i mentioned in san jose city owned land. It is okay to figure out what the program should it'd be four before. They put out a full fledged r. p. p. right. I got it and you know it adjoins burrowing wing al habitat so there's no sir <hes> it's probably about any feet above sea level twenty by thirty thirty feet above sea level nominations. <hes> nothing seems simple out here and oh my goodness i mean the congestion here is really <hes> gotten getting more intense by the month <hes> they've been as part of plan bay area there have been some future scenario planning and <hes> you know one some projections have the population slated to grow by almost one hundred percent to close to thirteen eighteen fourteen million in the next whatever it is twenty five years so my partner magin how does that work has infrastructure work and of course along with those comp kind of projections are ideas to invest billions more in transportation billions more in housing and <hes> we keep putting our hand up and saying oh but wait a second you know let's really think about food and agriculture as part of this. We kind of look at quarter are globally globally as a public responsibility to look deliver those things and food. They're still kind of sense if the market takes care of that that's right and we've come up with a couple of ideas to going back to the thing i said earlier about <hes> trying to present a solution that solves problem in in another arena <hes> so there's a lot of attention being paid played both in the bayer and really across california to the need for more affordable. Oh housing because you have these companies that are booming but it's displacing a lot of people who work at low and even medium wage jobs in any event <hes> <hes> so there we are looking at how can we build more affordable housing <hes> and often that housing is located. You know transit oriented kid in dense urban areas. It's oftens what's called mixed use housing village style housing and i say well could we also think about including adding healthy food outlets in those kind of places. Could there be insent. Could there be <hes> we wanted to look at policies which could or the aligned in but i should say between affordable housing policies and investments and healthy food access policies and investments and so you know could we bring those things together so rather than looking at separate problems with separate solutions so that's one of the things we're excited to be <hes> looking into with trying to find funding in fact right now to <hes> begin to take a look at some possibilities there

San Jose Partner San Jose City Sandra Fellows California Krause Saba President And Founder Scher
"advocation" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"advocation" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Respond. Kind of direct advocation that we've seen now from the Iranian particular over the last several weeks could could. In fact, the very serious mistake, President Trump says he is not looking for a war, and he warns that any conflict in the US in Iran would be, quote, obliteration. You've never seen before. But he did say that. He is open to talking to Iran without preconditions Paula Reid reporting from the White House. This week's deadly fiery crash. Your Wisconsin on I ninety four lead to some heroic moments as several people helped rescue others. From the wreckage Paul Sullivan was one of them, and he tells today's TM J four another person named Justice deserves more credit for going into flames to save two people. So brave for going up there. He was right in the flames. Seconds away from life zone. Life. You down here, man, you save a lot of people's life, say just by doing what you did one of the survivors wrote on Facebook, that they in their family would like to meet all of those who helped rescue them sometime in the future. A part of one of Milwaukee's busiest roads will be used today to recreate a deadly accident to stress the need not to drive distracted as being put on by the group love from afar. Founders. Cynthia Williams tells today's TM J four, she wanted to do something after her own son Christopher was killed in an accident, and Atlanta thirteen years ago, so many people dying from car crashes, and we have to do something about the reenacted see will be outside Washington high school, Milwaukee. Police offering more details into a fatal officer involved shooting back on seven homicide division, captain Tom. Casper says three officers were undercover inside a vehicle near seventh and win lake conducting surveillance for homicide suspect. Victor cintron they citizen called nine one one to report a sighting of a homicide suspect near salt, seven street. In west maple street while they're people approach the vehicle. One of them showing a weapon, two of the officers inside of the vehicle fired their duty weapons at the male subject. The male subject was struck multiple times that person passed away while the second suspect was taken into custody. An outside investigation by Waukesha police on the shooting continues. Rusty Mellberg WTMJ news in Racine. The reward money to find the person responsible for the shooting death of police officer. John Hetland has now topped sixty thousand.

Iran President Trump Milwaukee officer Justice Paul Sullivan Cynthia Williams Facebook Victor cintron Wisconsin John Hetland Rusty Mellberg Paula Reid US Waukesha White House Casper Racine captain Tom Washington high school
Not good for the price. Good period.

Android Central Podcast

09:34 min | 2 years ago

Not good for the price. Good period.

"Hey, everyone. Welcome to the Android central podcast. This is episode four one T three, and we are all sitting at the end of airy long day for the Thursday of IOT twenty nineteen. I am Russell Holly. I'm joined by aurea. I've joined by Michael Fisher. And I am joined by Neurath. So gentlemen, it's been a day long attempt. Yeah. Even up some six nursing copy Bailey's. The dream. I just woke up from a safe thing. Still kind of hang overload. He's upright. Chances of this guess staying on the rails or relatively low. But we've got some new go I owed its we do have Google on and talk about so tons of stuff happened today. But as out to me by several developer, folks, that I talked to a lot of it was kind of under the covers not not exciting, you know, user facing feature so much as kind of prominent things that are going to mean a whole lot later. No, one of the big things that they started. The keynote with was was Sudar saying that that Google was trans transitioning from a company where you searched for answers to a company that helped you do stuff do things of all sorts. Yeah. Not not just on your phone. Just in the browser helped you with life. Yeah. And proactively does think so switching from the you ask for things it gives you things right to proactively in ongoing conversations offering you things which is kind of the the pinnacle of what they've talked about for last few Google. Oh, yeah. So I unfortunately was not able to watch the keynote even though sitting not far away from you guys because I was editing video the entire time. So I'm going to serve as the surrogate for the audience and this guest. Oh, that's interesting. Because all of that is so what what are they? We're gonna talk about what they rolled out that will achieve these new goals or what? Yes. I mean, the the big thing where a lot of things kind of wrapped around it. I guess started with a system tons of stuff with with a system going to Google maps being able to use it in kind of a car road, which you know, we gosh people been saying for years, why Google system better integrated in when you're driving and now it's a proper carte mode. You know, the it's got, you know, being able to access music being able to return to podcasts when you are in the middle of them and driving. You know, having a things are kind of show at the bottom of your navigate is taking up the entire screen. So that when you're driving you're still focusing on the things you're supposed to focus on that was kind of a big deal. But it was really just the start of a ton of things going around Google assistant. That is a huge update though because having spent in. Often driving with all of that really frustrating where you can do somethings and then not do them, and it's like really just effects hold experience in the ability to do everything you expect to be able to do and have it work and not go. Okay. Great. Now, it's taking ultimately taking people away from ever in directing with that phone, which is a great thing when you're driving when you drive. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Advocation at the same time. They're also bringing Google assistant to ways. Yeah. In there. Also, just generally theme was the barrier to accessing assistant is lower it. It's also just in more places in more conversational in more places. Yeah. And also this kind of been the ongoing thing in the problem with Google assistant as a brand is that Gula sisters just becoming the undercurrent of all smarts happening across Goupil properties. You're talking about being in Google maps ways. Google search Google lens is also kind of just the visual version of Google assisted and so on and so on the system itself is not. Not a one entity. It's just kind of the Smurfs behind Google overall your interactions with Google as a person. Yeah. We're starting to see the concept of assisted being the platform. Yes. And that is is kind of an important thing. But it's also important that they're not talking about it like that like they're not trying to reduce it as its own thing there. They're they're, you know, we did that with will now which never really panned out or assistant originally. Right. Where we're that was where it was its own thing. It had its own feature set and things like that. So so that did not work, and so now just being integrated into everything in kind of increasingly subtle ways. Which I think is pretty good one of these. We're gonna talk about later is is a piece of hardware that reminds me in a lot of ways of the nexus five and as a result. I was watching some old nexus five coverage yesterday in the process in reminded me just how long ago the seeds for Google system where. Oh, yeah. Google now stuff goes all the way back to I think what nexus four running and the Moto the Moto X actions before the motive oyster. I mean, this has been germinating for a very long time. So it's cool to see it finally reach a point of maturity where you've not only Google assistant sort of uniform now across devices for mobile devices home. But now you're going to be able to do more things with which I would like to talk. It's one thing. I looked up in time to see divorce Samson Bixby like local device interaction. Right. This isn't to open apps, and what you do that what it was the new thing like, you can ask assistance, it take a selfie or. So the big thing that enables all of this at the lowest level in this kind of the next iteration of Sistan has a service that it's they figured out. How to do all of this processing and handling of specific queries about things that are happening on your device fully on the device without? A network connection without any connection whatsoever. And so we've had a small portion of this with something that you would like to do Michael which is voiced attacks. Yes. Which as the exclamation point. Is continue here where? They have this weird disconnect between you could tell when you have the voice of taxed that was just happening locally, which kind of trash versus what was going up to the server in back. Just to do voice, Texas, Senator simple thing they've gone several rations past that. Now, they're doing all of these actions on the phone, and as we we'll talk about later on a home devices, even as well. Even though they do have an active internet connection to speed up dual assistant responses up to ten times. Right. Because look even when you have a good network connection. You're talking about what fifty milliseconds latency each way. Yeah. It was you know, whatever next steps that takes to get to their server and get back to the server all of that stuff is kind of imperceptible each step of the way. But when you go to make a query likes only like shook they showed a good example of show me my. Photos from Yellowstone that doesn't need to be something that goes all the way to Google servers and comes back to parse that information. And then get you to open the app. So now, they're showing demonstrations of this all happening on the device. So what they showed was very Bixby like because it was all about controlling things on your phone. So the examples were like. Notification comes in. And you say you're really that text, you know, read that to me than say reply might trip was great. And then you just seamlessly transition to show me my photos for a while. Oh, I don't know. What that is. That's how that is home if irate, and that's way off the vets in then, you know, you're talking about a trip with this person. And you say show me mining for us from Yellowstone? And then you say show me them with the show me photos with AMI. He's not even say that say the ones without show the ones with animal, right? And then you tap on one. You say send this to Michael and sends it which is exactly what was promised like keep comeback to Bixby. That's was galaxy S eight or nine speed premier was a and they said anything you do on your phone with tap right now, you're going to be able to do with your voice that was Royal. But it felt Bixby in that it felt so far short of it that I feel like I've seen demos like this at so many I os specifically now watch you can have a conversation with the machine, and like we go back and forth with this. I I'm I'm heavily mitigating my expectations for. Absolutely. And then how much do you devil's advocacy expand on this to continue? What Michael say we've

Google Michael Fisher Samson Bixby Yellowstone Russell Holly Bixby Bailey Developer Sudar Texas Gula Goupil Senator
"advocation" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"advocation" Discussed on KOMO

"About fifty four then southbound one six seven crowded from highway eighteen to Ellington, you're next. Komo traffic at three or four showers make comeback tonight and into tomorrow, the next several days showers, and or rain kind of breezy tomorrow to highs each day in the upper fifties to low sixties Seattle right now sixty seven with clouds above at two fifty five new era set to begin in Japan in may leader selected the nation's two hundred forty eight era name part of a tradition. Dating back to the seventh century Japan is preparing to usher. And a new imperial era. A tradition marking the beginning of a new rain the government's announced its chosen name for the next era. Right, symbolizing, beauty order and harmony and rooted in the oldest existing anthology of Japanese poetry. The ri- wa era begins may first when soon to be emperor Naruhito takes thrown. He's the eldest son of the current Emperor Akihito who is stepping down due to health issues. It's the first Royal advocation in two hundred years in February the Japanese government hosted a ceremony celebrating the emperor's thirtieth anniversary. The name will be printed on calendars and official statements for those using the imperial system ABC's. Michelle Franzen NASA, narrowing down at search for the best design for homes in outer space. Scientists have been named for the latest phase of the space agency's three D printed habitat challenge where teams compete to design shelters that are suitable for the moon Mars, and maybe other planetary settlements for this phase of the competition. Eleven teams each created full-scale. Designs. First place went.

Japan Naruhito Michelle Franzen NASA Ellington Seattle Royal advocation ABC official two hundred years
"advocation" Discussed on The 45th

The 45th

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"advocation" Discussed on The 45th

"Now watch. Did you watch that Whitaker press conference yesterday, those painful, you knows one of those things when you feel bad when someone is struggling and failing you get like a visceral reaction you start cringing those all the time. I didn't feel it here. I'm the worst. I can't watch TV shows. Sometimes I can't handle it this guy. I was like fascinated by how clearly in distress and bizarre. He was acting. It was likely incompetent version of kingpin. And I'm thinking I just kind of reminded me of kingpin because I'm watching daredevil season three right now. But it's like it's go really weak incompetent confused dumb version of kingpin. He was sweating profusely. He was a mumbling. This was kind of his first big. If you kinda think about his first big conference not impressive at all didn't inspire any confidence. And I'm trying not to be parsing about this. But you you look at a person you're like, okay, I might disagree with them. But at least they have some poise they speak. Well, the have a confidence. This was terrible. Like, he he was sweating you want to throw in the towel. Generally early stage form abandon. When a career balls in the band, and that's how it looked but back up a bit this. So this is about Muller. But would it conference was actually thinking too with Muller nothing to do with special counsel? It was to announce charges being brought against a Chinese corporation while way, which I promise right? And it was basically a financial crimes a lot of like white collar stuff. A lot of like avoiding sanctions, I ran that kind of stuff. It's interesting complicated will fast for that for now and has to do with also the executive that was arrested in Canada. And the US is now extradition for and the response. China has been like grabbing Chinese citizens and holding them. It's a cluster. Fuck. It's especially big. I mean, maybe we can revisit. And especially with Trump kind of openly allegedly saying that he thought that maybe like the arrest will actually help him gain leverage me now, I know this is this is definitely worthy much deeper treatments. The big deal own but with fast forward that for now. Because definitely this is not an over subject and has serious advocation for us foreign policy long after Trump. But here's what would occur centers question towards the press conference. I've been fully briefed on the investigation. And I look forward to direct molar delivering the final report, and I really gonna talk about opening ongoing investigation, otherwise, but you know, sort of the statements that I made a private citizen only with publicly available information. You know, I'm I'm comfortable that the decisions that were made are going to be reviewed, you know, either through the various means we have. But right now, you don't investigation is. I think. Close to being completed, and I hope that we can get the report from director more Muller soon as we as possible. So okay now, if you're just hearing that have not seen the video picture this guy standing there like doughy white do just sweating buckets down his face. And looking extremely physically uncomfortable the whole time just to give you the bitch very apt description nights. Reagan took me back. It's like, it's in my mind. Painted the scene beautiful. It was a very beautiful in. Yes. It was it was disturbing. But so why was he so to stress like on the one hand like this is a party lines come out of Trump people for a while. Now, remember like twenty seventeen they're like, yeah. The Muller stations gonna end by thanksgiving Scher. So it could just be that it could just be more more of this continual pressure that like every sometimes it happens. Muller muller? Never actually just shop anything like that. So could be more of that. Like what occurs. Trying to pressure Muller indirectly ineffectively on the other..

Muller muller Trump Whitaker press Reagan financial crimes US thanksgiving Scher Canada China executive special counsel director one hand
"advocation" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

Black Men Can't Jump

03:46 min | 3 years ago

"advocation" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

"I love it. Honestly when he does. Every now, and then he's just like, I'm just go over the top. In this movie. I think. Doesn't matter. My man would occur sometimes gets a script. And the man must get the script reader and go this boy. I got I got this. I'm over the top. And then he comes in and he must act thing. And the director has to go. This is this is what you're gonna do. Yeah. Are you are you? Sure. Yeah. Okay. No man was so articulate he was so perfect. That was like this is the character choice, and you know, what? Because as you. I loved it who coup them the Reverend even know his name. He was cob something this must not my would not would not be the bucket. Not be a pickpocket. We've like who? Are you got my town res alrady don't like I read coming out the shadows. Yes. And the other guys are just. Great terrorists getting this. When when when when he stood up and went to stand to like meet him before even could get fully up tires already him through back out and sat down next them. Tell you. I was like like that's dude who like has you like just complete owned. Do you like you don't even have a chain? I love love tire crushed. Exchange was like, you know, that that motion was so fast. So quick to me about it. And then he goes still while I like, all right? He's got a little bit. That's a good joke. But then we get the Angela Bassett at the house. I like honestly, the director of rogue one. Like, what did they do when he was just like? Who? What do they reveled in the awesome? This is for its Whitaker's losing will say. The first of like. But how? In. Is there a com- forest Whittaker? Is there ever a subtle Whitaker? No, right. He's always he's always doing something on eleven can graduate. And you mentioned being like we get like famous like, you just do whatever you want. This says quiet, doctor, I know. My dream. My dream is a moment. I can do literally one ever I want. Oh, they'll be no stopping me. So then we get to Angela Bassett. He takes them home. Advocation chose him watch with. He did in thing about this. Which is something that has always. I've always worried about what's in astronomy or someone else did. But like this came out of like a pastor in one of those megachurches and like Atlanta. So yeah. Coming down. He's coming down the thing. And like, I went to a you know, what this is what is it? So this is like. Video of a pastor who's like one of those. What do you harness harnesses that takes you from like the Steelers? So he's going from the balcony to pony up in this mega harness, very extravagant. Okay. The reason not questions because..

Angela Bassett Whitaker director Advocation Steelers Atlanta
"advocation" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

05:11 min | 3 years ago

"advocation" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"I have seen a wide variety of ways that people manage the front end of their applications. It seems to be more of a wild west than perhaps back in development there seems to be more standardization around how projects are managed the different roles in those projects. The interactions between front end engineers, the -mongst themselves, I think is less standardized than perhaps the interactions between back into engine ears you broadly speaking, maybe not at Google. Do you think that's the case? Do you think that accurate? I actually think it's not at cred where I have. Have seen big problems in the past is when the communication between front engineers is not good. So that is very real problem. I think that from within those disciplines, it's always just that you know, the other one might look more or less organized, but I think that's more of a myth. What's very real is that often these disciplines don't talk too much. I think that's kind of where the notion of the full stack engineer can came in who at least the hope is capable of kind of navigating the disconnect and building solutions that were end to end a that was necessarily all the successful in this gap of communication is absolutely real. Anna problem. You can organize entire teams of Fronton engineers working on the UI layer or the middleware layer. You could also organiz engineers where a front end engineer works within a product team in the front. Engineer works with back end engineers and you're just trying to ship a product it Google. Is there a standard model for how front end engineers are organized? Google is a very big company, so we definitely do it all of the possible ways, I guess. But there is strong buys. I think the by far most common way is to have a protein in which people just take on different roles with they all work together. We also very much use of a multi layer architecture famously every layer, basically a bunch of protocol buffers, pumping to the next level protocol buffers. And I think that stage is just such that you know effectively, everyone. Google is a front engineer, right? Because they're always Becan, but you're talking to whether it's you're working on spanner and you're just a front table or you're working on an application at your front into spanner. You working on a UI and you're a front end to that. Advocation, this pattern repeats itself quite dramatically in because the the teams are so big. It definitely happens that you do have. Positional split that is the classic front Becan, but you very much often have what we would call more infrastructure teams that work on kind of the fundamental problems that don't necessarily are very low level, but definitely disconnected from the product itself it the level that you spend most of your time. I think it is the frontispiece end because it is the layer that gets rendered to the user the front end rendering engine and the Java script that's being executed in the user's browser. Is that correct? Or is there also some layers of middleware and back end programming that you spend your time? And so I think my favorite anecdote is that, for example, that as beckon team that that team is the blink team that works in the rendering engine, right? Because the rendering engine that makes the pixel is a beckoned to chrome, which is the the actual Eli. Again, this this matter for scales very much to every level my work on that currently do on 'em dust span between different layers with possibly not as much. Definitely not in the form of doing. However, my previous workum jobs to infrastructure very much spans the the whole stack. And we were mostly actually thinking about these things in a end to end fashion where what happens on the client site is just a small part, but everything has to fit together end. How does the tooling for a Java script developer inside of Google differ from what developers outside of Google have available? I think there's a few key differences. So one of them is that Google has a standardized built system. It's open source as basil, basil over your Browns it. And this system is just used for building everything Google from. Java to those plus probably some Haskell on there as well. Go and Java scrip-. So you know, you never have to wonder like how do built this project? There's always, you know exactly one command to do it in a dust the whole thing. That's a fundamental level. That's the biggest difference than going up a little bit..

Google engineer Becan Browns Advocation developer
"advocation" Discussed on The Kinda Sleepy Podcast

The Kinda Sleepy Podcast

04:32 min | 3 years ago

"advocation" Discussed on The Kinda Sleepy Podcast

"Right? Frac fat cracker Francis. Yes. So so as she proceeded to say, I'm gonna call the cops, say it will I really wanna make sure I give you a good reason. So then I late, you know, the. Hundred. The hundred round. Yes, so hundred round. And then I say, well, you know, just call them. He go, they move out the way, please. We let it go. But it's one of those moments where I don't like win us as black people change up our behavior just because someone threatens to call the police like, no, even though I do know that you have tried to weaponize the police police against me. But at the same time we have to be firm in our belief in, no. When you write you write ram, not willing, and I'm not willing to back down on that. Now you wanna talk about your situation that you that you witness where somebody didn't didn't defend like it wasn't a, they time to stand up and be right. For what I was talking about early, is about. Yeah. Yeah. Despite lay. Now this would situation now welcome to storytime with natty gather around here. No, I had a friend of mine didn't know she was out with a couple of gentlemen, and she got into altercation where it was a. All out to cases on prompt too. But anyway, you got to catch one young lady where young lady was constantly spilling drinks on her. So she politely moved removed. Young ladies drink, put it on the table. So now another young lady comes up, which is why young who white lady comes out, hey, give her a backer drink and swings off on them. So my homegirl being being my homegirl and being a black queens, she goes, she defended herself. She went ahead and served up to peace extra spicy, get the biscuit. The biscuit was on the way. We'll see in number three came this three. Now these three young white ladies and my homegirl by herself. Now she was saying that she was with a few homeboys. So when when she was telling me the story where would homeboys it, she was like one of them right here. So when I say no, I'm like, oh, where were you doing? I mean, what are you doing this whole situation? What was what would you? What did you have going on? He was like, well, number one already know that she can handle herself. Fuck all that s three people to handle yourself. Right anyway s. three people get s. three people just wanting visual sound like, okay, cool. He was like, well, you know, in the bounces right there and you are in this what killed me right here. When he said you already knew you already know where they are due to me as a black man. If I put my hands on the white one. Now me personally, I don't about none of that. If I mean touch any Br. System, mama cousin, whoever, especially in a situation to where we outnumber. I'm not gonna let the fear of prosecution throw. My people are a person that I hold near deer in the midst of any home for situation. A lot of fight. Right. I have. We've been, we've been arrived, whatever the situation may Malcolm mic, say black women are the most disrespected unprotected demographic in this country. His in the in the world, Craig. 'Situation man, individual, you know, we kinda got into verb. Advocation, when I got, I got kind of tired of talking, but due to the simple fact that she had love for this individual look, bro. I look let it ride, but I don't understand how somebody can let the fear of prosecution by quote, unquote, white America, police aware of it may be that let them put somebody that they care about home is say, former file, no. No, we ain't built like the and I'm sorry, I'm just from a different cloth. You can't. You can't see a woman that you care about coming to arms way and you say you love and watch your having. That's Oxy more. I don't care who it is, who you are apple like this nonsense that if I'm somewhat with a woman, I know right if it's one on one, I'm pretty sure whoever I'm with. Go, go put that working and be like, I'm so proud of you now let's get outta here. I got. I'm gone. But the thing is if it's three or new right in wanna meet..

Advocation apple Malcolm mic America Craig
"advocation" Discussed on The Pat McAfee Show

The Pat McAfee Show

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"advocation" Discussed on The Pat McAfee Show

"So you're doing it. I'm living vicariously through us sometimes. Well, just know that I live vicariously through you every single day. The NFL is living in. Very interesting time right now with the Instagram. Advocation, it seems like knee jerk. Reactions seem to happen with everything, whether it's new rules being made stances being taken, everything like that. This lowering the helmet rule is going to change the game. I think so much by the time. This interview airs on Thursday. There's already an NFL is meeting about it on Wednesday. What are the? Oh, jeez. In the league yourself and other people, I assume you're communicating around the league with people thinking about this new rule in how we fix the game and everything like that for the sake of the the game and for the NFL. The same thing is, you know, we're trying to, we're trying to clean up some of the hits from the game, and there's those ones that are obviously shouldn't be part of the game. You know, you got a guy in a compromise position and you're drilling, I'm with your helmet. This is obviously an overreaction to that. I think the worry is is twofold. First that is going to greatly impact a game on the highest level, whether it's a game to get into the playoffs or win a division or two in the divisional playoffs or while around or NFC Shamsher. Even that Super Bowl where you know there's a sack or certain play, and there's gonna be a fifteen billion. They continue swing the entire game guys worried about that. And the other part is the the, the officials because the officials have to be the ones making these calls. And when you make so many make a call. Truly subjective right now. I'm taking out the objective ones where guys lineup guy on necessarily hit leading spearing. Those are obvious, but the other ones are mostly I would say subjective. That's tough because receiver ducks his head strike zone, you know guy trying to do it the right way. Can't get his head out of it. You know, head up football. We're trying to, you know, take away the concussions and do some things that are important, especially if we wanna keep getting kids involved in playing football. But we also have to remember this is people at the highest level doing it at high rates of speed. And I think it's it's gonna be interesting. I, I don't know what the is going to be, but it's definitely going to change the game. If it stays the way it is..

NFL football NFC Advocation Shamsher
"advocation" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

04:34 min | 3 years ago

"advocation" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"Back with madari house with me under melissa with me carol walker and geoffrey howard us president donald trump has announced his second nomination to the us supreme court opportunity presented to him by the retirement of justice anthony kennedy the new guy is brett kavanagh fifty three years old district of columbia appeals court judge and generally viewed as conservative there is depending on inclination widespread concern or rejoicing kavanagh's appointment could tilt the bench rightwards kennedy having been widely seen as a balancing swing voter carol first of all there is a there's a kind of trump advocation i think of most workaday political developments now people get much more excited about things that might have happened anyway if trump did the mizzen isn't cavern of just the kind of judge you might have expected a a president mitt romney or president john mccain to have nominated well certainly in the united states it has become the norm for american presidents to try to appoint the judges they want to fit their political views to the supreme court barack obama did it and as a whole string of american presidents beforehand of course it's an idea that some rather strange here in the uk where the judiciary is very separate from the political class and people would be absolutely amazed if judges were political appointees things happen very differently here but yes what you're looking at here is a very right wing judge with very conservative views on issues like abortion and president trump has made it very clear that this is part of his whole agenda to ensure that these issues are dealt with in it by judges who are sympathetic to his viewpoint and i think part of the reason that there is particular concern about this is that until quite recently that were that would to the supreme court was pretty finely balanced there were a couple of swing judges who were seen as broadly holding the middle ground to could go one way or another a now it seems that president trump wants to entrench the republican views on that supreme court and given that this judge is relatively young that is something that's going to be a lasting legacy jeffrey what do you think is does does brad kavanagh represent anything especially untoward leah lamin no he's extremely orthodox and he's exactly the kind of candidate that george w bush would have nominated her that president markelle rumi or written it romney would have nominated there was even an oped by kiel mar the former dean of yale law school giving a a liberal argument for brett cavanaugh it basically came down to the thought that brett cavanaugh was just a really smart guy who interpreted the constitution as any orthodox conservative might but in a way that that law professors are bound to find very very pleasing and interesting because he clearly is a very smart man he's a quite young man as kara was putting out fifty three years old is pretty young given that people stay in the supreme court into their eighties or even their ninety so he's going to exert a pretty lasting influence on the court it'll be interesting to see whether he's like justice kennedy the justice he's replacing who is really a libertarian so he sided with the right on issues like business in the role of money in politics than a tory is campaign finance decision in the us but he always sided with the liberals and social issues like abortion like same sex marriage he was the author of a famous opinion striking down a texas statute that banned sodomy so it'd be interesting to see whether brad kavanagh who clerked for kennedy will be in that same kind of libertarian mold or whether he'll be more socially conservative he hasn't said anything especially indicative that he would try to reverse roe v wade which is the supreme court case that upholds the legal right to abortion in the united states he said he supports the principle of what's called starry to sizes the idea that you should uphold precedent so it's totally possible that he wouldn't be part of a conservative majority to strike down roe v wade but he he might and i think it's very clear in this case that we just don't know what is the court justice is going to be like until they actually start writing decisions george hw bush appointed david suitor to the court thought he'd be a good solid conservative and he turned out to be a raving liberal carl doesn't strike you donald trump for whatever reason seems to take these supreme court nominations somewhat more seriously than cabinet appointees he has appointed extrordinary range.

donald trump carol walker geoffrey howard president fifty three years
"advocation" Discussed on What the Tech

What the Tech

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"advocation" Discussed on What the Tech

"Yeah that's sitting outside funding planets and sky also in niche usage for sure we're not going to do that every day but it's an interesting example of how it's it's a nice visual way to find something out in this case and i okay maybe it's maybe just kind of comes it kind of filters into the experience the other thing that they announce which didn't get a lot apple carplay will let you use google maps ways and other third party mapping huge which is that i mean that's actually a really big really big thing if you have car play i don't have a car i'm actually buying a car with carplay i'm getting a volvo apple maps usage in cars drop to near zero when this happens because everybody almost tells me that their navigation is terrible and they opt to use the oem's navigation i don't i don't even have an opinion about it i i have no doubt that they've improved dramatically over the years but you should never hurt yourself by not using google maps that's silly it's just a silly i don't care what you think of privacy or your data or e hate gogel not using google maps is done what do you what do you use the car ways or google apps so we don't well we use google maps on a phone we don't have a car that has a built in advocate well i'm sorry that's not true my wife's car has built in advocation but it's the startling nabbed eker and something something we actually never thought that this was ever up to date in you may recall over the winter we had those crazy snowstorms who got trapped and everything and on google shows like a red line when it's really bad traffic and i suddenly realized looking at our incarnation system which is not at partly connected to anything that we can tell it had will triangles on the road and i pointed out to stephanie my wife and i said that thinks showing traffic.

advocation eker apple volvo google
"advocation" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"advocation" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"Three cities to college hoops experts one range rover sport espn's davis first round of the turnament to get the juices go jay bilas bake mind mark on this game of the ultimate tournament road trip with assists along the way from christian later and paul peers setting the stage for never been done before shellings they're big bovina wigs watch at espn dot com slash range rover sport land rover above and beyond this is best best of the paul finebaum show podcast join us covers the gators noted writer and talk show host pat welcome to the program good afternoon this punch him in and he's gone i've never done this before this is my first rodeo well there's there's a button there yet push for the con yeah well you get to this level you expect people to do that for you pat laura do it for you when she's in there she's she actually is compared to the rest of this crowd she's she's pretty helpful well it take university of florida advocation it really is anyway so okay here we are new coach new spring same old question so what's the spring mun likes far in which we expect well i'm looking forward to tomorrow a rarity we get to actually watch scrimmage the media's invited to watch them scrimmage tomorrow three hours i don't know if they're gonna turn like a scrimmage at all but and so i'll i'll deal to at least get an idea i mean i'm not as smart as coaches are football life but you wanna watch the quarterbacks i still think it's so clicheish but let's face it paul i mean it's been a while florida's had a good quarterback and and we don't know that they're going to have one this year they've got a guy who was just was not very good last year and then three guys who've never played college football so it it's a real question mark i think that things around them the tool that he has better than they were your go i think they're being coached way better wide receiver talking to see furry about it yesterday and he he's thrill without the the positive things are doing that position and.

espn davis writer florida football paul university of florida three hours
"advocation" Discussed on Intersections

Intersections

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"advocation" Discussed on Intersections

"This is a very different kettle of fish if you look at the security problems in these oceans today what should dealing with yes there are some common factors freedom of advocation of the high seas and some of the world's greatest maritime pause and the biggest trading pas are all involved in this so it makes sense to talk of freedom of navigation in this area to deal with these issues but if you actually want to address security i think you need to break it down into smaller manageable and realistic chunks now it's a good goal to set your set for free and open indo pacific is it reasonable will it happen you know that's something that you need to think about rather seriously so i'm very happy a discussion of these ideas i don't mind what label us you can call it indopacific polish pacific whatever it is india's part of it and it is in reality and has been for a long time and i think this was first evident with saddam two thousand four when the indian navy the us navy cooperated and bringing relief to people across this whole belt so for me it's an idea which is useful but i'd like to see actually much more concrete work done on what we mean by free and open indo pacific whether it's done in the quad whether it's done by laterally whether it's done separately but in parallel frankly that's something that is choice of means but the ends i think are well worth pursuing over free and open indo pacific which also reflects i think the dependence at all of us have on this body of water from the western pacific all the way through the indian ocean.

indo pacific india saddam indian navy us
"advocation" Discussed on The RV Podcast

The RV Podcast

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"advocation" Discussed on The RV Podcast

"Mapping systems and advocation systems that are designed for buses and and truckers and we we highly recommend that you use those because you know people strike bridges and and caused major accidents they don't use if they're just using google or apple to to navigate with their trucks and it's it's it's been a real problem so we're we're trying to i i don't know exactly where rv's fallen you know in terms of the that it had a gore's vehicles but i would imagine that they they're vulnerable with the same attention to channel to find it in i'll put a link to it here where it just shows are via after rv and truck after truck going under these overpasses that are much shorter than they are tall and it's an ugly what about in terms of data being updated is that a factor that we should look at when we're selecting gps system because maps change new data becomes available things move how frequently is all that data updated in in general right so there's different i would say there's at least two major categories of of these napping services one is the kind of is basically static and you have to download like manually or i guess automatically but you have to go through a process where you basically download the home app every x number of months or weeks to get the latest and greatest information and you have to go to a website or something like that or subscribe to the service.

rv gore google apple
"advocation" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"advocation" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Public schools they have used charter schools and community school into bamboos apparently into agreeing to allow their kids to go to reset schools right um naturally they allow uh some of the most academically as the situation only uh i guess uh working parents house okay into charter schools yes though the people with the best academics instituations tips to the charter schools but that's driving to create a twotier educational experience and communities color which results in a defector's other a defectors creation of the frederick douglass advocation of the town to 10th education so yes you end up with a small percentage of black is puerto quote unquote place out of public school in a end up going to mostly white charter schools and he had this deluge of black people that now have less resources and a half before and have a more e s you'll have like this this less diversity and they got okay now get odyssey's with what fucking resources right we taken out of the quote unquote smart wins the good wins away now it a these gays um regarding governor andrew cuomo uh out kumo the house okay andrew kumo uh he has long via writers glasses the antiworker check his history when he was a charter her he's only advocated for the right things now because he's trying to position himself to be a democratic presidential candidate and he knows he can't make eros bob pain into races whites this guy would probably plant races trees as how bad years eighty way as you can see avalanche say a lot crap going on in new york late you guys and i can't wait to hear your view of black panther thank you thank you um we got uh this one r w h two thousand sixteen says the king is here hey can can i hope you and your listeners i joined this black pants holiday weekend shout out to that schoolteacher in those cases lit up to that racist principle that principle as a candidate for taken out.

frederick douglass advocation new york puerto andrew cuomo andrew kumo