22 Burst results for "Advertising Technology"

Investing in Bitcoin

Animal Spirits Podcast

05:08 min | 5 months ago

Investing in Bitcoin

"All right we are joined today by zach. Prince and ceo of block fight zach. Thank you so much for coming on today. Guys them so pumped to be here. I listened to your show every week for the first time. I've been nervous to go on a podcast public speaking in a while. Because i'm just so happy to be herbs so excited to be the first guest talking about cryptocurrency on the animal spirits. Podcast i think is a longtime Well thank you for saying that. We are excited as well. We actually started this pocket. And i were just talking about this in november twenty seventeen so right into the teeth of bitcoin mania and we'll get into two point out. I don't think it's quite the say manic fever that we saw in december twenty seventeen. But why don't we just start off briefly for those who don't know anything about you. Give us a quick introduction. Who are you zach. The founder and ceo blocked by. I grew up in texas. I was always kind of an entrepreneurial slash math in finance minded kid. I guess i actually put myself through college as a semi professional online poker player so unlike a lot of folks are generation unfortunate to not be carrying a big amount of college debt. I always wanted to work in the financial services industry. But i finished school in may of two thousand nine so i ended up working in an advertising technology startup that was ultimately a really successful venture. We got acquired by google. I spend a little bit of time at google but learned that. I really enjoyed building things and being at smaller companies left google to start another ad tech business that got acquired and then more recently and most relevant for blocked by i was working in the fintech sector specifically the online lending side of fintech. So there was a big boom in that industry appear to peer lending online lending and alternative investing and i worked at one of the companies. That was the biggest aggregation of data provider of technology solutions to institutional investment firms that were participating in that asset class. When i was doing nat i became kind of like the fintech guy within my friend group and i started writing a blog which i don't think rather i just i didn't stay with it as well as the Clogs and built up a readership but writing. This blog is what led me to discover bitcoin for the first time back in twenty fourteen and one of the things that struck me about it initially was a lot of what happens in fintech is just a new front end on top of the traditional financial system. So you're doing something that banks already do but you're doing it with a mobile app with a much better user experience and it's faster and easier. You don't have to go onto a branch when i learned about big like. Wow this is something truly different. You've got a brand new asset built on top of payment network where i can move something around the world. Twenty four seven and it's not using any part of the traditional financial ecosystem. So i was screaming to no one on this blog and twenty fourteen. I think you should be taking a flyer on bitcoin. Maybe it goes to zero. But with a little bit of capital you should be investing in it and then from there kind of slowly and steadily went down. What people in the crypto currency industry referred to as the rabbit hole and ended up starting block five around the same time. You'll start started this podcasts. In the fall of two thousand seventeen to before we get into what blocked by does specifically. How do you explain bitcoin. Someone who thinks they know what it means or has no idea in is never really entered. This base of workers obviously digital ledger been well. I mean i think one of the actual biggest positives about bitcoin. The fact that the narrative seems to change so many times over the years. But how do you explain it to someone who doesn't really know what it is one of the things. I like to start with when i'm explaining bitcoin. People is the best analogy and kind of story. That i've ever heard demystified a little bit and the story is actually about the platypus. So back in the sixteen hundreds explorers from europe. We're going all around the world. They got australia. They found the platypus and they sent some specimens back to europe on the ship and the scientists back in europe rigidly thought. They were playing twisted joke on them. And they're like this animal can't be real. You stapled together a duck in beaver and you're telling us this thing lays eggs like there's no way this is a real animal. It took the scientific community about fifty years to actually accept. The planet was a real animal. Create a little part of the animal classification kingdom that incorporated the platypus. Another funky animals like it but the platypus was very real and the problem that bitcoin is had is kind of this platypus problem in the traditional financial services industry. Where is it. A currency is it. An asset is it. A commodity is security is at a payment network. Well it's not really any one of those things in a silo. It's a little bit of all those things and it's something completely new but it definitely exists and the reaction from votes whether it's jamie diamond or others who are now coming around to it but back in twenty seventeen. They were saying bitcoin fraud. It's a scam. It's only used by folks who are doing illegal activities. Those types of things come from a position of not actually understanding.

Zach Manic Fever Google Bitcoin Mania Prince Texas Europe Australia Jamie Diamond
Interview With TripleLift Founder And CSO Ari Lewine

AdExchanger Talks

05:28 min | 6 months ago

Interview With TripleLift Founder And CSO Ari Lewine

"Our Hawaiian is chief strategy officer and CO founder triple lift. An eight year old programmatic advertising technology company triple lift has developed at products that have a closer match to the look feel and voice. But. Wide Range of media types and environments sounds like native. That's what they do They also support video in ot advertising and have other initiatives as well. Excited to have Arianna talk about some of that I reached out to our because I think he has a unique. Perspective on. Programmatic advertising at the current state of digital advertising overall that sometimes runs against the the larger narrative which is, which can be a negative narrative at times. So I'm looking forward to chatting him with him about that as well. Ari Welcome. Thank you so much act I'm delighted and honored to be here. Great to have you here Let's have a minute on you I. You got into start up stuff like right out of college. Is that right? Yeah. Even actually in college I. Ran My first startup analysis seventeen years old where I was really fortunate to be at a school that took entrepreneurship really seriously in fact, I I majored in entrepreneurship which is hard to believe as even a thing. And there were local businesses on my campus. I was able to as able to buy one into one of them. That did local shipping and storage, and so I got sort of taste in above that is still with me to this day building businesses from the ground up and just trying to make customer super happy. And we're your parents entrepreneurs have how did you get this bug? Yeah. So my parents are also entrepreneurs preneurs They started something on the order a dozen different companies. Many of them, not successful. And so I got to sort of see that growing up what I think is really important. It's like being around that failure from a young age and not having any stigma towards it was really impactful for me because. It shows that it's okay. As long as You keep trying my parents certainly keep trying in in some of them. Worked out okay and so I was fortunate to be in the sort of like environment where starting businesses was normal and expected in my parents very much supported me even at very young age when I tell them, this is what I want to do with my life I want to be an entrepreneur. And did they. Actively, encourage you was a kind of A. Son You're going to be startup founder. Yeah. It wasn't like you know. Jewish boy, and so the first inclination was to be neurosurgeon button when I got a D. on my first bio exam I think entrepreneurship became the clear path and it's funny because I was just going through things of my childhood from home and apparently when I was four years old, we went to FAO Schwarz he'll toy store and they printed. Out A car said Arlo an entrepreneur and so I think clearly there was there was maybe some program going on from a young age that that this was a path that they would like to see me go down and I've been very fortunate to be able to do it. I think it's like one of the most wonderful things that's happened because Entrepreneurship for many isn't considered a path at all like when you go to college or when you're young that isn't a thing that you think about you often think about professions that have a very clear path. And Entrepreneurship is not a clear path. So I would I try and do now in my clinical free time is I'm help other spying entrepreneurs. With their path towards entrepreneurship because I think, it's one of the most wonderful fans. That's Kinda funny. Hey honey sign's kind of a poor student. Push them towards the Internet. Yeah. That's where he belongs. No, that's great and Tacos through these couple of jobs you had before founding triple, you were head of business, development, oyster dot, com what was that all about? So Dot Com was a hotel review site that was subsequently acquired by trip advisor and a really beautiful idea which is people spend a lot of money on vacations and the worst thing that can happen is you get there and the hotel is not what you expected or paid for. And so the idea was to send a undercover reporters to full real expose on what the hotel is actually like with real unadulterated unedited photos and Iran monetization there. So this was a really crazy experience where they were publisher and I was twenty years old. They brought me on to make money from ads and I didn't know anything about online advertising. I just graduated college. And it was still the middle of the recession. and. So what I what I did is basically called up at that time it was ad networks. And I asked to speak with the product folks and I would just pepper them with hours of questions about how their technology worked, how the relationships of publishers and advertisers work. Essentially, I was able to learn from them how the industry worked at that time. There wasn't the wealth of knowledge of the sort of add exchanger dot com, a publications that we have today, and so one of the only way to learn about it was from other people and I was able to learn basically from the partnerships in vendors use are the publisher side and so. I started on the publisher cited from there I went to APP nexus. which became clear because when I was at one of the things I was doing all the time was you know in my lunch breaks I would log into DSP and start changing the line nine of prioritization across the different campaigns and ad networks I was working with. So I, was looking at who is paying me the that day and I would tweak the waterfall

Publisher Advertising Technology Dot Com Arianna Chief Strategy Officer Co Founder Fao Schwarz Founder Arlo Iran Advisor
Justice Department Hits Google With Antitrust Lawsuit

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:22 min | 6 months ago

Justice Department Hits Google With Antitrust Lawsuit

"The Justice Department filed a landmark antitrust lawsuit against Google yesterday over the company's anti-competitive practices specifically around search. The Justice Department and eleven states charged Google with maintaining an illegal monopoly on online searches through business deals and agreements that lockout competitors like paying apple billions of dollars to make google the default search engine for iphones and other deals with browser makers. And this case is a big deal. It's the most significant case against a big Tech Company and more than twenty years since the one against Microsoft in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eight, Charlotte Slayman is an antitrust attorney and competition policy director at. Age, she says, it's all about the defaults for now. So you've got the desktop and the mobile where people are doing searches. Google is the default and economists have found that those defaults are really powerful in impacting which search engine users choose it sort of sounds like a redux the Microsoft antitrust case from the nineties, right? Like this is ultimately about bundling and forcing consumers into this choice of your default. Yes. There's a lot of similarities with Microsoft case Google's unquestionably dominant in search. It seems like there may be some anti-competitive practices around the way they implement search but like is that all that's a question I've been wondering myself I was hopeful that we. Might see a case that would include some other areas. I'm concerned about in particular Google is really powerful in display advertising they represent publishers, the websites that are showing the advertisements they represent advertisers, and they also own the auction where publishers and advertisers are bidding and making their decisions about which add to run and those concerns around the advertising technologies are not in this complaint at all I think the reason that DOJ chose to focus on search is that it is a simpler place to start but I am hopeful that if DOJ has facts indicating anticompetitive conduct in the Ad Tech space that we might see an expanded complaint on those issues in the future. Is it common for there to be kind of a stair step approach to entrust enforcement? Yes and no, it's common that a complaint would be brought in an a lawsuit might finish up and follow on litigation might happen that incorporates the new president. But what I'm hopeful can happen here because that process takes such a long time. Waiting for this lawsuit to finish and then bringing another one I would really hope that if there. Are Indications, you know if there are sufficient facts to support a case that the case could be brought. Now either by state attorneys general who have signaled today that they are continuing to work on a case and that they might the future work together with DOJ that might be an opportunity to expand the case to cover more issues or we may have a change of administration and DOJ could if if they for whatever reason decided, they wanted to amend the complaints such as having new leadership of DOJ. They could amend the complaint to expand the case.

Google DOJ Charlotte Slayman Microsoft Justice Department Apple President Trump Attorney Director
Being Customer Driven With Data-Driven Marketing

Marketing Trends

07:32 min | 6 months ago

Being Customer Driven With Data-Driven Marketing

"Welcome to marketing trends I mean phase on host of marketing trends, and today we are joined by special guests Marty. How are you? I'm good I. Doing it is great to have you. I'm really excited to talk to you today. Obviously, we love salesforce and and you're the amazing sponsor the show. But beyond that you've been doing some amazing work. You're writing a book that's going to be out soon, called customer driven, and we're GONNA talk a lot about data, which is at the at the top of mind for every marketer. Before we get into all that, how did you get started marketing? That's a good question. I've had a very strange career in I have a hard time explaining it to my mother. But when I look back realized started wanting to be a journalist New York and ninety s writing for magazines back when there were magazines and it seemed like a viable career and I ended up at MTV networks on a show called video. And wrote the little bubbles blurbs, which is the the peak of my journalists experience, and then after that I went into to business school, I wanted to management consultant probably the only person at the time we want to be one and I thought it would be glamorous and sexy to be a media consultant and then the dot com bomb happened two thousand and one, and so I ended up over. Counter the healthcare over over the counter healthcare consulting, which is just what it sounds like and then I ended up at an AD agency doing direct marketing and measurement, and that was kind of the beginning of my marketing advertising career and it was through consulting. It was sort of it was strategic engagements and the career was actually called measurement. I pick all these glamorous wants the measurement was basically impact. of Ad campaigns and it was dumb you know digital campaigns how did they do look at search and display and so on and I was in that field for about ten years and then I, went to garner as an industry analyst covering advertising technology and marketing technology and measurements. Still now, it will be called data science. By the way, I would get a retroactive promotion and then I joined salesforce. About two years ago. So it's always been on the MARCECA and an analytic side in interestingly enough in the beginning that was not the sexy part of marketing and now it is, of course, if you're the the data scientists on the campaign, you're the coolest person there but it was the exact opposite twenty years ago. So I've I've written the wave up. Yeah. The closest closest person to to proof. Of, being ends up being the most valuable person room I do I'm Gonna I'm GonNa follow up on the pop up video stuff because I'm endlessly fascinated in that but flash forward to today. What does it mean to Espn Strategy for Marketing Cloud salesforce? It's. It's an interesting job at spans product management product marketing, and with the flavor of thought leadership I think when I was hired, which was two years ago it was around a specific problem it was and it was into the product organization. Software companies are structured with pretty defined role. So you're in either in product management, which is sort of halfway between engineering and marketing or your product marketing, which is what it sounds like you're in sales or you're an engineer so there for basic rules and this is close. To, product management and the question was around the customer data platform category CD, which was the hottest and is probably still the hottest category and March tack that's come along in a long time since two thousand and sixteen. It's just been hyped out of out of control kind of like insider hype. If you're in the business, you know what I'm talking about. If you're outside, you'd be like what? What's a CD, but it's it's a big deal and the question at salesforce was do we have one? Should we acquire? It was billed by require that kind of thing, and they needed someone from the outside who wasn't sort of inside the the salesforce system having come as a as an analyst industry analyst who knew the industry and a new kind of outsider perspective to say it what is what I need to Dan I knew coming in that we needed to build queries harder than it looks to build something, and that's what we've done. In fact we're launching that in next month version wants it's a tremendously major effort on. As, part to pivot engineers and to develop this net new product customer three sixty audiences, which is a CPA and in fact, the topic of our book customer driven I, wrote it with my colleague Chris O'hara to give him full credit, the multi-talented era he and I wrote this book about Customer Data Platforms it's not about salesforce, but it is about this category, which is fascinating. Yeah I mean. Will we've seen you name it start-up getting snatched up data startups getting snatched up right and left being acquired. Just recently had some massive. IPO's around data companies. I mean, clearly, data is where it's not the new oil and it's not the new oil because that phrase literally never made sense but. But it is the lifeline of every marketer, and if you don't have an extremely strong philosophy and data, you're probably going to be left really far behind, which is pretty counter to the days of marketers creating you know add copying doing some of the things you were doing earlier in your career specifically around ad agencies and things like that I. mean you know going from that agency or from agency to to analyst to here on curious like what is that evolution been like for you? It's I mean, it's it's Bi modal. It's by modal is even to saying that kind of makes me a nerd, but it's a left brain right brain and and it's definitely I do this presentation sometimes say. How has marketing changed over the past twenty years as as a discipline and I remember when I was in business school as I said is right before the DOT com Bob's of two, thousand, two, thousand and one in Colombia and you could tell the people are interested in marketing back. Then just by looking at them, they were like slightly better looking. You know they dress better and they were you know I wouldn't say the social skills were definitely better. They were less interested in making money march sin hanging around with celebrities and I. I mean I'm being reductive in a way. I was one of them. So I can say this, but it was definitely a kind of a branch of show business. And today it really isn't. I mean that part hasn't gone away obviously of influencers, the celebrities if fonts and all that stuff but it's a lot less around the big campaigns and what we might call the softer side of marketing, and it's a lot more about the the foundational data layer and you have to be able to talk today to scientists give them credible instructions and you have to be able to understand things like statistical significance that marketers didn't have to worry about in the past. So I think it's it's a profession that has really Shifted, but it hasn't really shed what it was the past. So it's it's that it makes it interesting, but it also makes it very difficult to succeed in as a CMO. You see a CMO tenures being very short and it's because they have to be a statistician and an artist, and there aren't that many people could do both. So you know it's the long way round for. Saying that my background is is strangely appropriate because I was like in TV and then I was in business school, and so if you have those two elements I, think you can negotiate this strange new world It's moving more towards the data side than the graveside I would say, but we might we might see swing

Salesforce Analyst Engineer Consultant New York Marty Mtv Networks Marceca Espn Dan I Colombia Chris O'hara Advertising Technology
"advertising technology" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

09:02 min | 1 year ago

"advertising technology" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"Consort of advertising technology I have never seen before and that's the reason we got involved with a combination of direct mail and radio and digital all at once it's an app that allows you to take a picture and then when you take the picture you can have that picture if you like the picture you have sent to you in the form of an actual by six photograph that four by six photograph has an advertisement on each one of them has an add on it and you can it has this special micro perforation technology that makes it feel like it's six you know like it's been cut by razor and it was so when you take it off it's gone but while you take it off you got in at the end of your hand and this is a great way to get your ad in the hands of the people whom you want to reach most direct mail which you know direct direct males probably the easiest advertising to predict which returns gonna be most direct mail isn't even opened by the people who receive it this will be open because the pictures they ordered if you want to find out more about it go to one two three this is easy as one two three one two three dot free talk live dot com easy as one two three at one two three dot three talk live dot com making it that much easier let's go to Robert calling in from Indiana will get back to this women's soccer story hopefully Robert your entry talk live with anyone so using among his sounds like a snoring you know in Indiana that's not legal there's places where you can call in from stave off the area yeah Hey Derek Hey mark in the area yeah that's not Robert this guy has not allowed to call in funny though that's what we call Fulton for that one but I don't get to the site this point he's banned from their wives so going on this debate is not happening only on the campaign trail talking to women's soccer paid situation in new York's canyon of heroes or on Twitter the members of women's team are suing their employer the United States soccer federation and the two sides have agreed to mediate the dispute out of court that's important background for understanding why the women's team is trying to ramp up political and social pressure in the federation but really the debate over whether the US women's team should be better compensated is about to related an overlapping issues so here it is here's the meat of it but you're probably not getting one as a matter of accounting the others about economic specifically about the importance of markets and about how workers are harmed when they do not exist writing at commentary Christine Rosen dives deeply into the first argument meeting the argument about accounting she notes that last year's American less World Cup in Russia this is the men's generated six billion in revenue well the women's event in France this summer is expected to earn about a hundred and thirty one million there's a big difference ladies and gentleman belated to force more attendance at these things right between six billion and a hundred and thirty one million a lot of it's not in the United States so L. high school when I was in high school there was a girls basketball team the boys basketball team yep the boys basketball team there you couldn't find it see if you can get there twenty minutes before the show on the girls basketball team was like it was just the moms and dads yeah that was it and you could look at that and you could say it's not fair but you know what the girl tried just as hard the girls were definitely hot but the action socked and I was really into basketball right the boys games just we're a lot more thrilling yeah the seats are empty that that's the market speaking right I mean you can't force people to attend the game I'm not into a volley ball as a sport I don't know everything about it I mean I played it didn't and P. and all that stuff but I can tell you that for some reason I find the women's volleyball the two two person women's volleyball to be extraordinarily interesting whenever I see an opportunity to watch it it's probably because they're wearing something akin to a two piece bathing suit I agree I watched a lot of volleyball games and the camera man is be okay it's got the camera right up their **** most of the time and I don't know this might be a solution for some women sports to get more viewers and more attendees I don't know and I suspect there's probably some women sports players that think that I'm a sexist pig for just saying that I don't know look just say them it might be a solution anyway so the big the big difference tween six billion and one hundred and thirty one million so the difference in the men's and the women's revenue from World Cup as a percentage of total revenue FIFA the body that governs international soccer and runs the World Cup actually pays out larger prizes to the women's team than to the man that's as a percentage of total revenue not larger price so they faithfully no it's not the same it's a larger you know it's as a percentage larger to women that it is right to men but its larger to men than it is to women because the disparity is tremendous six billion versus a hundred thirty one million this is the market place speaking I mean it's just it's just reality but what about the pay disparity between the men's and the women's teams outside of prize money in major tournaments thanks to the outside of prize money in major tournaments the Wall Street journal reports that the US men's and women's teams have generated about the same amount of revenue from games played since twenty fifteen all the time the totals account for only about half of U. S. soccer's annual income it is Rosen again points out the women's team continues to get short changed when it comes to the percentage of the federation's budget spent on advertising and PR travel and training budgets and per diem for food US soccer has no good reason to feed the women's team less than the men's or to make them sleep in sub par combinations those inequalities should be addressed beyond that though that's what reason says here reasons making the assertion that if the probably the bow beanies that the teams get should probably more similar but beyond that though it's difficult to argue that the pay gap is unfair or sexist it's largely the result of different pay structures that both teams have collectively bargained with the U. S. soccer federation for again Rosen has the best explanation I've seen for the bay pick up this lady and sort of did a report the teams the women's team collectively bargained for and won a pay structure the guarantees them salaries severance pay medical benefits and some performance based bonuses the women's team one of the security of salary base pay rather than purely performance based pay and they wanted to guarantee a salary even for players who were on the roster but didn't play by contrast the men are strictly pay for play they do not receive a salary for additional benefits like health insurance or severance pay their pay structure is performance based the different pay structure is a straightforward comparison is difficult the US women earned base salary of a hundred thousand dollars annually well the men are paid five thousand dollars per game with bonuses for winning why would the women agreed to different pay structure in part that probably has to do with how much players are earning elsewhere probably also has to do different to do with a psychology there's a lot more competition if you're getting paid based on your performance the weather you know so those guys maybe try a lot harder and it's in the other you know the women are just getting paid a salary whether you know they they play or not or score you play as hard as they can there's no incentive so it's probably not as fun you know if you're on a soccer fan the competition with in the men's league is probably much greater is just like the people love college football and don't like pro football because because guys all tried really hard well the winners I mean the women are winners any these they're they're beating the other women and going to the and then going off the World Cup and doing all that stuff so you know maybe that's the case maybe it's not I don't know he's hard to become compare these again because it's not apples to apples but yeah we'll get to your calls here coming up number eight five five four five zero three seven three three it's eight fifty five four fifty free as in free talk live.

advertising technology hundred thousand dollars five thousand dollars twenty minutes
"advertising technology" Discussed on We The People

We The People

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"advertising technology" Discussed on We The People

"So what are they doing? What's their business? Together. It's similar to, to paint book, just like on a bigger and more sophisticated scale that is us always different platforms. They, they control to gather all this information on you so that they can manipulate your choices and then sell their village to manipulate you to advertisers, you know, so last year, we made more than one hundred ten billion dollars by Saen after minute relation machine other, folks, you so the gathering information about you that gather your secrets they, they learn all the bad things about you. Learn to good things. Put it all to. And then they sort of use the fact that they had this licensing, Gaijin discrimination to, to, to give you different information than your neighbor to give different prices than your neighbor, to, to send you on a different route down the street, and then your neighbor, the use this ability to manipulate Jew. To, to manipulate you into binds or things are making certain choices in than they sell that to people willing to pay for. And again, it might be a Proctor gamble or might be Latimer. Putin. We don't know they'll take anybody's money. It's just long green. Right. So, you know, in terms of you know what would we do with, with go, Google is a really phenomenal? They have a whole bunch of different platforms lashed together. They're the dominant search company, but they also have chrome they also have Android. They also have you to, they also dominant mapping company. They're the dominance advertising technology company online because of their control of double click asthma, you just add these,.

Putin Latimer advertising technology Google Saen one hundred ten billion dollar
The murky world of data brokers

FT News

07:44 min | 2 years ago

The murky world of data brokers

"Hello from the Newseum of the financial times in London. I'm Josh noble did United you'll every online move is being watched and analyzed by advertising technology companies. What do they do with the data? And does it matter. Malcolm more discusses the so called privacy death stars with F T technology reporters earlier ram. Imagine bitter merger. Can you tell us a little bit about this data economy who are these companies who are collecting our data, and what are they doing with it? Industry, the ad tech data broking industry is very fragmented. So that dozens of businesses that collect data online by storing cookies on your web browsers for example, gathering data through apps on your smartphone. Then there are big companies like oracle that by that data. And combine it with information from retailers or credit card, data and other kinds of demographic information, and they use it to sell insights to advertisers about that customers. Is that a recent thing of company's been doing this for a long time? Why should we be worried about it? Now they've been doing it for a really long time. But over the last ten years is people spend more and more time on line and increasingly used smartphones. It's grown a lot. However, the scrutiny of it hasn't changed a tool, so there's a lot more data route there being traded murky. Tell us a little bit about whether individuals can do anything to stop that data being collected. If they wanted to I think it's pretty much impossible at this point to scrub your online presence. Completely. I have been considering trying to do it myself. But the feeds from which the data kind of hoses coming into these different brokers, and the inter connectivity of the network is just so deep an entangled that essentially if you live in today's world and interact with any electronic, so if you have a phone a mobile phone, for instance, your location data's captured. Similarly, if you're on the voter registry, or you get a mortgage from a Bank or perform any of these regular functions your data's on these lists that are then sold on and then cross referenced. So at this point. It's I would say almost impossible for us to completely scrubber for presence. But there are ways for us to be more hygienic about our data practices, for example, you could delete your Facebook account. If that was something that bothered, you you could for example, turnoff permissions that apps have two things that you do on your mobile phone. So we can be more aware of where. Data's going. But I don't think we can be completely off the record. Okay. You know, with the new regulations, certainly here in Europe GDP are done all of these companies need our consent to be able to track us through the nets and track all mobile phones, and everything that we're doing spending looking at the idea of GDP, you know, that's why now is the time to look at it. Because these companies has earlier said have been operating for decades within the bounds of low. But now, they do require our consent in order to buy and sell our data, but many of these companies on consumer facing. So the way that they rely on consent is that they hope that the apps that we do interface with on our phones or in our daily lives have got our consent, and then they can buy and Sal amongst themselves. So it's only now that regulators are looking into whether that's a fair use of our data and whether consumers are actually aware when they consent what's happening with their data. How much is this market worth? Now. We'll how big is the data economy. It's difficult to ask to mate the size of it. Because most companies that trade data also have other businesses and don't disclose the proportion of that business that comes from buying and selling personal information, but the European Commission and IDC the analysts have estimated that the data market in Europe was worth fifty nine point five billion euros in two thousand sixteen and could almost double to one hundred six point eight billion euros by twenty twenty. So that's one figure out there. So that sounds like a relatively large market. But is there any evidence to you know, we're being persuaded or advertise being successful using this data to sell us more stuff? I mean is it working? The irony of the story is that on the one hand data brokers an attack companies tried to downplay how much data they collect. So as to avoid scrutiny from regulators. But at the same time, they try to play up how much they they have. And how useful it is. So that they can sell it to their customers. And I think partly because they aren't transparent about exactly what data they're collecting. And how that informs the insights that they sell so they don't sell data points. They sell what they call insights into different categories of consumers. It's very difficult for either consumers or that customers to assess how useful that data actually is mud. Do a word using we should be about this. I think that the business of data brokers has grown beyond advertising. And that's what we should be worried about. So for many people up to this point. They think that the only way that data was being used was to be shown annoying personalized ads, but that's not the only fall out of this. So that customers extend much beyond marketing companies, it's insurers its banks at media companies and also local governments law enforcement. So I think we should be worried and not just because I'm a privacy activist or something like that. But mainly because. We don't have records to knowing if the data's accurate and to changing that data. So there have been many cases where people's data has been incorrectly sold on to say a mortgage company, which changes the products that they can get and they've had to spend months and months trying to find out why it's wrong and how to correct it. So if there isn't a transparency, it means that we might be sold the wrong product or an unfair pricing on a product. And we'll never know, and we can never change it. So we need more transparency do sink. That regulators are going to take action to falls more transparency. How do you see this shaping up over the medium to long term? I think this will be a crucial year. So we're coming up to one year of GDP are, and it's only now that regulators are starting to use the framework of GDP ought to see whether these companies are operating the early or not, and they are looking into it. So they do have the intention to enforce these rules, but because it's such a market practice. I think the next two years will be when. Regulators will have to figure out what actually falls within the bounds of the law and Walt's outside of it. So I think there will be enforcement, and we'll see examples of over the next few years or main shouldn't banks insurance companies and other people who are using this data simply be more responsible about the level of accuracy. They think it represents. I think in a lot of these cases, they don't even know the provenance of the data. That's the problem because it's been through so many layers, and so many levels of buying and selling that the Bank. So the mortgage brokers, they don't even know if the data's accurate or not. So there's a lot of trust that we place in this ecosystem of brokers that I think is falsely placed and there should be more levels of oversight and control. And you're right. It should be. Also, the customers of these companies who are making sure that it's accurate. Okay. Thank you very much. That was Malcolm all talking to Ali Aram Amadou meter merger. We'll be back with another news feature tomorrow. In the meantime, if you're not ready subscriber or like to discover more empty content. Take a look latest subscription offer at FDA dot com for slash offer.

Bank Malcolm Europe London Josh Noble Advertising Technology Facebook F T Technology United SAL FDA Twenty Twenty European Commission Walt Ali Aram Amadou
"advertising technology" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"advertising technology" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Advertising technology were creating fast moving semi structured data. The user base of Facebook was growing the traffic was growing and the volume of data was growing and the popular methods for managing this data or insufficient for the applications that developers wanted to build on top in previous episodes about data platforms. We have covered similar difficulties as experienced by Uber and door dash incoming data is often in Jason which is hard to query for large data science jobs. So the Jason data is transformed to a file format like Parque and this requires an ET L job. Once it is in Parque file on disk in a data lake the access time. Is slow to query the data efficiently. The data must be loaded into a data warehouse which can load the data into memory often in a columnist format that is easy to aggregate. Imagine being a developer at Facebook or Uber or door dash and trying to build a simple dashboard or machine learning application on top of this data platform, where do you find the right data? How do you know, it's up-to-date? And what if you don't know the shape of your queries ahead of time? And you haven't defined indexes over your data. The access speed will be too slow to do exploratory analysis the rar many steps in this process. And each of these steps creates friction for applications developers that want to build on top of big data. It also creates opportunities to lose data or have time discrepancies between those pieces of data since even Facebook was having trouble. Managing this problem of the data platform, vinca figured that. There was an opportunity to build a company around solving the data platform for other software companies vinca is the CEO of rock set a data system that is built to make it easy for developers to build data driven apps in rock set. A piece of data can be ingested from data streams data lakes and databases rock set. Creates multiple indexes and schemers across the data because there are multiple models for querying rock set can analyze an income inquiry and create an intelligent query plan for serving that query vinca joins the show to discuss his time working on data at Facebook. The untapped opportunities of using that data the architecture of his company rock set. And also the changing economics of cloud resources. How it makes it profitable to build a? Application like rock set where it might not have been possible before cloud services made storage and compute so much cheaper. We are conducting a.

Facebook developer Jason Advertising technology CEO
"advertising technology" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"advertising technology" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Bitcoin protocol to bring people into the financial systems in a way that would improve their lives. So you haven't seen those use cases yet, but we, you know, we see a lot of projects that are certainly working toward them, but it does that that these become very tangible rather than because I guess you know it with the media world with blockchain even like the word could is used a lot. Yeah. I notice when people are sending me those emails right rather than is. Yeah, it's. There's no doubt that the biggest use case today for is is people will hold it like store evalu- like as an alternative to gold for that. But you know, we just from where we sit. We see a lot of these entrepreneurial projects in some of the height may be ahead of the reality, but these are projects that are that are coming. Another one that you know that we've written about that we think is is that I think is interesting is there's some really big projects around this is identity management. So you know, the one thing that in the in around this technology is the idea that you can. You can have digital assets of value. Not just, you know, the internet was we can move information around seamlessly. So the the big concept here is we can move things of real things value around seamlessly. And so there are some really interesting projects that are trying to re imagine a world where we don't give up our data to use the internet, right, you know. So there's, there's a, there's an interesting story out there that says, right, really to there's really two things that own your personal data today, either the government tells you you have ID because you got a driver's license or passport or big tech, knows what you're doing right? Those are really the two things that sort of give you identification. There are services out there that are trying to reverse that and and and sort of allow you to actually have physical ownership of your data of your personal identity and decide who you want to offend Tecate with. So this all sounds very futuristic. I understand that. But there are some really interesting projects around there that are using the technology to change major ways the economy works. If the whole idea of of data who owns your data gets reverse in you own it yourself and can decide when and where you want to do it. That'll change a lot of business models. And then I would guess once that gets worked out because I think right now I kind of reminded of advertising technology because you talk about the plumbing all the time rather than just, you know what's on top of it. Right. And so it seems like particularly with blockchain and even like there's so much talk about like all the infrastructure that has to get laid that it confuses the hell out of people. Right. Like regular people? Yeah. Yeah. Where that's why. Yoda coin desk, you you, you lead off with, you know, what is blockchain, right? Listen to. I can certainly understand. These are not simple subjects to. Although we try to make them accessible from a meat from our perspective, from my perspective. This is great for media and information business where we constantly have a narrative. Yes, a report on to try to explain to educate and that's really our mission. Let's take a quick break here. I just returned from the digital publishing some and I got to meet lots of listeners of this very podcasts. That was a lot of fun. One of the big themes that DPS was the growth of membership programs. I paid particular attention during those sessions because we to have a membership program. You might have heard me talk about it..

advertising technology
"advertising technology" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"advertising technology" Discussed on This Week In Google

"Yeah, and that's where I think also the pace of technology is an interesting question, which is that we moved so quickly from being able to upload one picture one song, one, ten second video to just, you know, full blown straining HD content from people's bedrooms and in the in that massive technological change, there was very little regulation. There was very little foresight. There's very little. Yeah, come on. And so every you know, now everyone isn't just, you know, their own printing press. They're their own, you know, author and in it's really hard because people now have shifted into thinking of themselves as you know, citizen journalists and documentarian. And so everybody feels a right to the internet and they feel a right to broadcast and they feel a right to amplification, but the downstream effects of that on democracy for instance, are you know, that's what we're seeing here is that when everybody can do political advertising, then it becomes really hard to assess what the issues are in who to trust. This is really interesting conundrum. Yeah. No, that's she get into Rick's actually plenty to. I feel like I fear that any solution that you apply to this is going to have a worse outcome than the problem itself. I don't know. Because I, you know, I still really like the internet. There's still things that are useful on web pages and and like even just the ability to be able to, you know, talk to you and Stacey today. I mean, these are all positive. I think outcomes of like having access to these technologies, but there has to be a better governance model. There has to be some management. They're asked to be, you know, when we can't reduce it all to technology, I don't deny the value of. It's certainly worth saving. But I, I when as soon as you say, there has to be some governance. That's very difficult to do. Oh, yeah, people freak out and I know and I don't know how you do it without actually creating a worse. Munster is all I'm saying. We just told me about that if you do this this trust thing. Well, then there's all these other issues that come up. Part of the problem is that we set up the internet without really considering the consequences. Now we've got consequences. So now we're rushing to set up some solution without considering the consequences which is going to give us worse consequences. Yeah, in the, but that's part of why you would wanna you know, bracket some of these concerns in in work on things. You know, some, some of these are easier to solve in others. Like for instance, the ad tech problem that we've identified and we know that you know bad actors online of using advertising technology in order to force audiences to see disinformation that can be solved. But the revenue costs to these platform companies would be enormous because they would have to check every ad, you know. So there are bits and pieces of this that can be dealt with in can be moderated, and but there are other parts of it that just feel so overwhelming. When you know when you when you take it all is as you know, one big problem. I, I'm I'm for disaggregated things and then also starting to understand where they're. Needs to be nuance, and then where there's, you know room for these platform companies to. Use some of their revenue in order to either bolster local journalism or to invest in more robust content moderation, or even teach people how to use these systems in, you know, some of the things that I've seen where people do share, you know, copious amounts of fake news has to do with that. They, they don't think anybody else's seeing what they're posting. And so they just keep posting more and more and more things because nobody's engaging with it. And so even learning how to use these platforms in having limits would be useful for some. Let's take a break cost..

Munster advertising technology Stacey Rick ten second
"advertising technology" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"advertising technology" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Little bit about what happened so these women were in this car on june ninth and they say they shared a prim peck on the lips and the driver elba tari he said he made them get out because it was not a simple peck on the lips they were seriously making out and it had nothing to do with the fact that they were both women so he wants his four higher vehicle license reinstated plus unspecified damages now he's filed a lawsuit in brooklyn federal court and so now the women are alex i of who's an advertising technology consultant she said that she and her girlfriend what they're both in their twenties were looking for a ride on june ninth from brooklyn and manhattan alba tari pick them up in brooklyn but only took them as far as allen street for those of you not familiar with manhattan that's in the lower east side where he ojected them because he said they went hot and heavy in the back seat their response quote kissing is not illegal his response according to them yet is illegal you don't do that here in the car so both sides reported the incident to so when i find that's one of the booted passengers posted the video online the story goes into high gear within days of this video being posted online the tlc suspends album tories licensed and presses to have it revoked so earlier this past week an administrative law judge recommended that alba tari suspension be immediately lifted so the advisory opinion said it seemed unlikely that this driver would give up a fair and potentially risk receiving a bad uber rating for something as mild as a peck kiss so as of now his suspension is still in effect even though the chairperson the tlc has the power to override alter or sign off on the rolling i you know what with any dispute as you all know the truth is somewhere between what one per party says and what the other party says so i suspect it was more than a peck on the lips but i suspect it was not really heavily making up i could be wrong that being said look clearly this guy for whatever reason was uncomfortable driving these two kissing passengers shouldn't he have the right to stop pullover and ask them to leave and if they don't like it they can give him a poor ruber rating what do you think how.

consultant brooklyn manhattan tlc advertising technology
"advertising technology" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"advertising technology" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The national foreign trade council this is not something where you know both sides suddenly say okay we've gotta deal and everything returns to normal the longer the world's two largest economies play chicken the harder it becomes to undo the damage in new york i'm sabrina short for marketplace or now jobs and that whole thing with the unemployment rate that i was talking about that it went up last month the four percent but for the paradoxically paradoxically good reason that more people enter the labor force started looking for work in other words over the past year almost two million people have put themselves out there are people who'd been discouraged by the post recession economy who'd maybe decided to get more education so we send marketplace's mitchell hartman at this morning to see what is getting them back in the job market again steve rodriguez is thirty two he lives in los angeles and he's about to start a new job on monday patient admissions at a hospital he's worked in a pharmaceutical lab driven for uber he was injured and couldn't work for several months earlier this year he started looking again to go through firewalls of online applications known calling you back just it'd become so disheartening after awhile then someone he knew said the hospital where he worked was looking for people and so now you know when a friend reaches out and says hey are you looking for a job you jump on it pays just above minimum wage less than he was making before keith reynolds was working in advertising technology until late last year then a one two punch on the first of december i was laid off and i told my wife she said don't worry it'll be all right and then the next friday she told me i have a little bit of cancer and then i told her i said you know what we're going to figure this out reynolds took time off to help his wife through chemo he says she's doing well he started applying for jobs and got some interviews but no offers.

new york mitchell hartman los angeles keith reynolds advertising technology steve rodriguez four percent
"advertising technology" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"advertising technology" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"But you know our platelet rich platelet rich plasma therapy plasma therapy so when kobe did it whenever this was twenty eleven or something it was totally exotic and he had to go to germany because i hadn't been cleared for therapeutic use here and now if you go and get your meniscus repaired which i did at zakho you did well when i was like thirty years old somebody landed playing basketball on my knee and hyperextending mrs just a little so that was like two years ago when you were no no no that was seventeen years ago well now it's a standard adjunct to to someone sport surgeries and even if you're like your grandma would so it's like giving you like pain medication after or whatever it's just like a standard check box yeah they think it accelerates recovery a little bit more fascinating also with us alex kanter it's who is a senior technology reporter at buzzfeed before that alex where were you at i was at advertising age started my career in advertising industry so i bought ads for a couple years and then sold advertising technology for another year maybe not so well but you know i have been in that industry so not shooting blanks completely yeah comes to that stuff although sometimes it's still pretty complicated it has gotten to the level that what we dreamed would be possible in advertising has not only come to fruition it's gone further than we actually imagined and now has started the snake it started to eat its own talent is that an accurate description of what's happened collapsing on itself music not surprising because you've watched in the past few years this exceleron of targeting capabilities and it was only a matter of time till the big guys were just like we know everything about people let's offer those advertisers yeah so that's what they did so it's not surprising evolution is like you know we're not really good at stopping technological progress whether it's like creating new products or offering new ad targeting capabilities and it sometimes takes a backlash or a great reckoning.

kobe basketball alex kanter reporter buzzfeed advertising technology germany seventeen years thirty years two years
"advertising technology" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

Wall Street Oasis

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"advertising technology" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

"You know a good chunk of my working life on and that ended up leading to solar into getting wonder off the ground interesting so you leave this company with the idea of wonder already kind of starting to form lies in your head or you left it with really no plan at all it's it's interesting in that it's actually some productive outcome from basically a complaining session between a bunch of people but it was actually my co founders and i both of whom were in the advertising technology space when we were doing this thing but we were hanging out good friends for six years at the time decade now hanging out on a google hangout basically complaining about how we were working so hard and getting these companies off the ground is difficult in straining and you sacrifice so much and you know how much did we really care if the analytics was good or they did some targeted marketing spend like how much was the world really you know changing or would be different if we weren't doing those things right if we just disappeared tomorrow and so it really came from us you know at some deeper level obviously driving that conversation i think wanting a problem that when we look back and like i said it's been a decade or more building a company or solving space and getting smart about it and leaning into it that it was something that mattered to us that we found rewarding defensible and we'd be proud to tell our kids and grandkids about so that was the seed crystal if you will that ended up leading to looking into actually a couple of markets and ultimately just getting really really excited about what was happening in solar and also i think you know an under penetrated opportunity just broadly for software entrepreneurs in solar ray particularly in space.

advertising technology google six years
"advertising technology" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"advertising technology" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Google and amazon have those markets locked up and so we do need to be looking at whether there's too much power and not enough possibility for competition as another part of the thing raskin about here mark surman is the executive director of the mozilla foundation a nonprofit internet advocacy organization tomorrow on the show we'll look at advertising technology and the company's that pioneered the ad targeting that brought us here today if you're into reading as well as listening i'm also writing about the data economy on our website marketplace tech dot org i'm ali would this is a pm here's an investment opportunity with a guaranteed return when you donate to support marketplace today your gift will be matched dollar for dollar by our friends at the condado fund listeners like you who give to marketplace do more than just help keep the show on the air you actually help us grow and get better it is a way to directly support independent reporting and journalism you can trust and to make it possible for us to tell the stories of modern life through our digital economy don't miss out on his chance to make your donation go twice as far give today at marketplace dot org and thanks this marketplace podcast is brought to you by kronos fmla f l essay aca eeoc it's harder than ever for businesses to keep up with today's evolving alphabet soup of regulations what's a company to do kronos with cronos you can minimize compliance risk and track hr policies making sure they are applied consistently and fairly hr payroll talent and timekeeping in one unified system all with approve.

Google raskin mark surman executive director mozilla foundation advertising technology ali amazon
"advertising technology" Discussed on Download This Show

Download This Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"advertising technology" Discussed on Download This Show

"Wanted surface it quite easily you know this highlights for everything and and just select what you want to watch i think i mean ashamed said sbs is doing it quite well i think abc actually said of came out of the gate pretty early and that's why i b c avi look so much better than a lot of them um just set at sort of finding things in and having a search facility and also i think the fact that rv doesn't necessarily have to support ads my think would that one of the reasons why add tick is actually quite complicated my don't know that a lot of people realize this is your the advertising technology you employ in many guises has to be different each platform somebody's viewing it on so the attic for sending it to a samsung tv sending it to to apple tv sending it to a desktops and into an off the all in many cases different pieces of technology the need to be applied so when you get adds that have different volume an that's one of my my all the same add three times in a row which drives me up more often that's why because they've had to plug in multiple different paces of technology to make it work and somehow i feel like at an ira 2018 we should be better than i mean collectively like as as an industry i'm not naming anyone in particular i really feel like the most simple sort of way to boil it down his commitment to to the platforms right the fact that as jin sayed i've he was very early in it means it's tad isolation over quite a few years now all of a k you know they've made aversion they sat they watched outworked they made another version i kept kind of improving it does feel like for particularly some of the commercial broadcasters that they just not really committing resources to saying okay what easel isn't working with this platform how do we make it better how do we how do we make sure people it kind of getting what they want you how we serving people about their experience on these platforms and making it better on a regular basis rather than just going well he is the two 2017 version and that'll that'll lost for quite a while and on may be will then ask those guys in the that department to make another version.

sbs rv advertising technology abc samsung apple ira jin sayed
"advertising technology" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"advertising technology" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"A gift box role new employees uh before the first day included was accompanied t shirt the required hr paperwork and a history of the company there's even a picture frame so new hires who come to work with the picture of friends or family the grace their desk that's thoughtful i love that help people feel like they're part of the team from day one and yet when he brought up his gift box ritual to new business course a few liters relievers i'm gonna i'm not sure i wanna follow suit in that he feel disappointed by that disinterest in says being productive by day to isn't the goal the goal is to help new employees fuel belonging affirmation m meaning that work is you want to promote those values your company here four things you can do to make incoming employees immediately feel like part of the team of it we we cover this was thoppigala on occasion in the past the first thing is to do this to preboard preboarding should involve educating people about your company in the impetus situation what did he do he uh he put together a history of the company in that box that he gave to his new employees before the day of their first revealed that the first day on the company uh get that when history your company that way they can at least know the language in the in the vibe the feel of the company that there jumping in gives them an opportunity to get an indepth look your company's the structure organization values mission and culture uh some companies of differently that the north york canadabased medical cannabis company mp x by a suitable corporation pre boards starting during the interview because we a like we get a great story who tells a we tell it we give examples of our history our our employees who started lowerpaying position of succeeded in managerial another pivotal positions when the interviewee leaves the interview we want them to feel like they could make a difference and they could excel with us the their start with their preboarding during the interview process how about this uh you addicts timed with to learn names and faces but a new hires also trying to become familiar with the company policies and procedures seoul do something like eur worth texas based advertising technology companies simply a dot.

t north york medical cannabis eur texas advertising technology
"advertising technology" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"advertising technology" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"At a big enough scale every software product produces lots of data whether you're building an advertising technology company a social network or a system for i o t devices you have thousands of events coming in at a fast pace and you want to aggravate them you want to study them you want to act upon those events for the last decade engineers have been building systems to store and process these vast quantities of data the first common technique was to store all of your data h d f s the hoop distributed file system and run nightly had dupe map produce jobs across that data hdf s is cheap because you're store data on disc it's effective because dupe had this revolutionary effect on business analysis and it's easy to understand what was happening every night you take all the data from the previous day you analyse it with a dupe and you sit in email report to all the analysts but of course the problem was that this was a a batch system and you did not have the ability to react to events as they were coming in you were just running nightly had duped jobs and your application of your business would get updated the next day the second common technique was the lambda architecture the lambda architecture used a stream processing system like a storm to process all incoming events as soon as they were created so that software products could react quickly to the changes occurring in a largescale system but events would sometimes be processed out of order or that we get lost due to node failures and to fix those errors the nightly had duped map produce jobs would still run and they would reconcile all the problems that might have occurred win the events were processed in the streaming system the lambda architecture worked pretty well systems were becoming real time and products like twitter were starting to feel alive as they were able to rapidly processed the massive volume of events on the fly.

twitter advertising technology
"advertising technology" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

GeekWire - Geared Up

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"advertising technology" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

"Amazon doesn't want to touch oh i think they want to touch it i agree i think this is going to be a huge area and i think amazon has said he not so much interesting customer data here i think a big area for them is going to be an advertising technology here where they are really going to go after the cash cow at gugel in a big big way and so again these are these pockets of major massive businesses out there that i think they're gonna perhaps disrupt even more in 2018 but i agree monica i think that's a big area for them to expand into endured freer we know we've talked about amazon's year for about ten minutes and we haven't even mentioned echo an alexa i read this company is gist astronomical in terms of their ambition and one interesting point on that front was we saw the first real boundary of consumer acceptance of amazon's invasion into the home in terms of the backlash against the amazon key service which i think showed that consumer privacy is going to limit some of what at amazon's gonna be able to due to your point so i have another poll question for his should i by an alexa for my son eight year old son for the holidays todd no yes absolutely not why not i wanna hear monica's view why not too much uh i think data collection on a youngster that's definitely one part of and i even think that parents should maybe think about the digital record that they're building for their child before their child can consent to it in many ways but i also think that while while his brain is still forming and he still learning about human interaction and relationships it's a pretty sensitive time to introduce this digital relationship that we really have no haven't studied at all in terms of child psychology and child development that the austroczech and i couldn't figure this out that's awesome but yeah it's it's right this really interested you want to know what's going to make everybody in your home family the happiest just tell you don't give it don't give him for your son don't put it in his room don't leave it.

Amazon advertising technology monica alexa todd ten minutes eight year
"advertising technology" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"advertising technology" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"It's an of also double been thought of as well on him on but first my first work uh so to speak with business last otto kugler pantheon events which was any spokesman management business about ten used rarely for that at of the ballot would have been much more successful wickford that intially tighten off in a big way on pot owner in ah in a baku gd easy which sinise will spa on a car found that a startup cold contact white working on symbolic out of five advertising technology at a really cool transit application which has been picked by biathlon seven right times so you have two pretty varied european pretty busy downs what i've done in the yeah yeah people people who would have done in the past nagata while it's kinda random but for me it's just a waste bin about the future and i think when about uh what technology is is around the corner and more opportunities that presents for us to walk bondage of elkhart horizon state itself to put it in a nutshell where utilizing distributed led the technology of look train technology to create an act will ballotbox a temper ballot box mmhmm um and this has some pretty wide and farreaching implications in that in know people generally they'd be connotations when you talk about a a ballot box immediately go to electoral processes and i either voting in elections spot had a democratic processes where you vote or there is something akin to embarked are taking place um is action quite dynamic and varied and it extends far into process what so we are deeply engaged with a few highprofile multinational enterprise opportunities wear out technologies dunk used for things such as membership engagement.

advertising technology nagata baku sinise elkhart
"advertising technology" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"advertising technology" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

"Business solutions dot com so dc are we ready to introduce our guest ready our guest is mike smith hi mike how you doing well thank you thank you for having me martic this is going to be an interesting conversation we're going to talk about your book and the title of the book is the native advertising advantage build authentic content that revolutionises digital marketing and drives revenue growth great tidal so mike rather you have an interesting background and actually end the book it says are on the copper the book it's us mike smith is senior vice president of revenue platforms and operations for hearst magazines digital media in addition to that mike how whilst saw what else would you like to say about yourself so the we kinda set to stay to talk about your book well i work in advertising technology for for many years there is a particular focus that i said since two thousand ten in an area specifically hall programmatic advertising i published a book about programmatic advertising titled us targeted and in addition to programmatic advertising for it which is a very popular and growing form of digital advertising i work a great deal on native advertising and most specifically the branded content type of native advertising two to help service are are advertising clients here it hurts so i published the native advertising advantage as as a way to end by industry practitioners as as well as of folks who are our students sore.

mike smith senior vice president mike advertising technology digital advertising
"advertising technology" Discussed on Adlandia

Adlandia

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"advertising technology" Discussed on Adlandia

"The washington post has gotten a ton of notoriety and awards ray around new advertising technology and new models how you balance creativity and the tech side and the washington post y'all so um one our founders jeffries irs which i don't think we say enough i think people can we stop there are so people and we were just talking about this earlier to like people get confused sometimes they're like oh the washington post his own by amazon no the washington post is owned by a faith us right up and there's a big difference their huge difference and the inspiration that we get through jeff in his time that he dedicated to the post arm is amazing because it's very particular it's not how could we work with amazon it's our distracted with his other holding companies you know one of which is soon to be whole foods right and so but we get actual attention you know when it comes to what's the best benefit journalism and how we can grow our brand and how it could be noticed in this very congested marketplace so we balance creativity and tekin in a variety of ways i think you mentioned earlier the operational side of things getting engineers in the newsroom i mean when i was at hotpots we did that are cto did sit next orator and chief but on the advertising side we did not have engineers on the sales floor you know we'd weeding out of engineers within marketing in here we do and i think that's very crucial when it comes to being creative from a tech perspective and not just being taskoriented of saying hey build this this didn't work and so forth you know we push this big idea and paul barre you know who were very level now much closed with from have a pile and rebel mass huff posts days in an amazing collaborator.

washington post advertising technology jeff paul barre amazon cto