18 Burst results for "Adrian Wooldridge"

"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:02 min | 7 months ago

"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Americans not to travel for Thanksgiving. But the fact is, airports saw their highest foot traffic since the middle of March. Here's how Dr Anthony Fauci summarize the situation on ABC is this week over the weekend. We may see a surge upon a surge. We don't want to frighten people. But that's just the reality. We said that these things would happen as we got into the cold weather, and as we began traveling, and they've happened, it's gonna happen again. This moment has got John Micklethwait thinking. How did we get here? And what to do now He's the editor in chief of Bloomberg and his new book co authored with the economists. Adrian Wooldridge is titled The Wake Up Call Why the Pandemic has exposed the weakness of the West men how to fix it. Thanks for being here, John. Thank you so much. Rachel. You argue that the pandemic has revealed in painful detail that the U. S. Has fallen behind much of the world in most of the functions of government house up. The main evidence of the disease is really simple. Very sadly, America is now around 800 deaths for every million people on def You compare that with other places like that in a Germany is six times better. It's around 150 deaths deaths for every million people, but you really when you get to East Asia You find these countries like Japan, South Korea, Singapore, They're all around 20 or 30 deaths for every million people said about 20 or 30 times better on what's interesting to me is that that isn't doesn't seem like a flute. Once you begin to look at things like league tables for education or the health care It looks much broader than that. So that's one element in which we're facing a wake up call. But the second thing for America is China. China claims a number of three deaths for every million people, and maybe they're exaggerating. Maybe they're hiding deaths. Even if they're hiding nine out of 10 deaths, and Bloomberg probably has more journalists and anybody else in China and we don't think it's that level. But imagine they are. They're up around 30 deaths for every million people that would still be 2030 times better than America. So I think it really is one of those things where you look at it, and you wonder whether history is being changed in the message to America is you've got to do something about this because it's part of the weight of problem. With government in America. You point to just the facts of the facts about the pandemic and how? How horrible it is. It has been in this country in you took off failures and health care education. Can you make that connection for for me? What does it reveal about the fragility of the entire American system? I think it's I mean, there's a lot of things at the moment. We're particularly if you're Joe Biden. There is the kind of false excuse, I think of blaming Donald Trump. I'm not trying to claim Donald Trump handled the pandemic, particularly well. But if you look at the evidence healthcare system that is orientated towards looking after the old and the rich was bound, I think to be to fail with a pandemic because it hits the poor disproportionately. You look at many of the other things that Donald Trump is lame for racist policing..

America Donald Trump John Micklethwait China Bloomberg Dr Anthony Fauci Adrian Wooldridge Rachel Joe Biden ABC editor in chief Germany Japan Singapore South Korea
"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:27 min | 7 months ago

"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"But that move excludes nearly two thirds of the city's students who have already opted out here to talk us through all of this is W. N. Y. C is planning editor Kate Hinds. Good morning, Kate. Good morning, David. So first of all, mayor to blows your had really been sticking to his earlier decision to close down schools. If the city why'd positivity rate reached 3%. Did. He went ahead and did it And even though he faced some pretty vocal criticism over that, what seems to have brought about this new change of heart? Yeah, there was. There's quite a bit of whiplash happening in the school's policy. But I'm going to guess it was the ferocious pushback. He got from many parents and local elected officials, who pointed out that it was inconsistent to keep Children from learning in person. At the same time, bars and restaurants are allowed to operate. Albeit at lower capacity. And that 3% benchmark was something that had been set in the summer, you know, months ago, and of course, the science is changing and evolving all the time. And it seemed, you know to some people. Inconsistent to stick to something that was a low number set, you know, way way back in the early you know what was then an earlier time in the pandemic, also, even though coronavirus cases are increasing right now, in New York City's positivity rate is 3.9%. That number's been lower in schools before the mayor shut down all in person learning 12 days ago. 0.2 point. 8% puts his B 80.28% of the school based tests were positive. So there is consensus at least right now that transmission is less of an issue in schools than in other settings. Okay, So help us understand All of this, though not all kids are going to be able to go back to schools. The decision comes with a lot of asterisks who gets to go back right s o buildings will upon on Thursday, December 10th for students in all grades of what's known as District 75. These were the students with the most significant disabilities. One week from today, December 7th schools serving pre K students and students in kindergarten through fifth grade, will reopen two families who had already chosen to be in hybrid learning blended learning. In other words, If you had already picked and all remote program, you are still all remote. If you were hybrid, you're moving to a more in person experience, but schools have to determine if they have the space to do increased in person learning. You know, spacing protocols still apply. So it may be that schools that already had high numbers of kids opting into hybrid learning won't be able to expand in person capacity hugely, so we'll be watching that closely. It's the school's who had just small numbers of students showing up for in person learning 123 days a week who might be able to expand in person learning again for those students would already signed up for it. So this turns out to be roughly about 190,000 students all told that this will effect that's still a fraction of the 1.1 million public school students in New York City. Who's not returning to school yet middle and high school students there is still no plan yet to return them to in person learning, and the mayor said they'll be working on that in the days and weeks to come. Okay. Lot of unknowns here. How is this gonna work? Well, elementary kids be using buildings and staff previously assigned to older students. Great question. I don't know The answer to that, You know, space and available teaching is the teachers is going to be a huge consideration. Um students, 20% of students and staff will need to be tested each week and the mayor keeps hammering home how important it is to fill out the consent form and that you will not be allowed to go due to Returned to a school building. Without that consent form. There are still protocols to close classrooms or schools in the event of positive cases. And of course, we have to take into consideration Governor Cuomo's zone protocols, so schools in red or orange zones have will have different requirements, and there's still an orange zone in Staten Island right now, although schools contest out of that And what about the bars and gyms that have stayed open? This is something a lot of people ask about it. Or are there any plans to rethink those staying open in the face of the recent tip increase in covert cases? Right. Well, unlike schools, which are you know, seemed to be more or less under the control of localities on Lee Governor Cuomo can determine if bars and restaurants and gyms have to shut down, so that's something that will be watching closely. Okay, a lot to watch their WN y sees planning Editor Kate Hinds. Thanks, Kate. Thank you. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Lulu Garcia Navarro. And I'm Rachel Martin. The United States has continued to set unwelcome records this fall. The country is seeing more than 150,000 new cases of the Corona virus every day, and we got to a point last week where one person was dying every minute. Just think about that for a moment, one person Every single minute. CDC urged Americans not to travel for Thanksgiving. But the fact is airports saw their highest foot traffic since the middle of March. Here's how Dr Anthony Fauci summarize the situation on ABC is this week over the weekend. We may see a surge upon a surge. You know, we don't want to frighten people. But that's just the reality. We said that these things would happen as we got into the cold weather, and as we began traveling, and they've happened, it's gonna happen again. This moment has got John Micklethwait thinking. How did we get here? And what to do now He's the editor in chief of Bloomberg and his new book co authored with the economists. Adrian Wooldridge is titled The Wake Up Call Why the Pandemic has exposed the weakness of the West men how to fix it. Thanks for being here, John. Thank you so much. Rachel. You argue that the pandemic has revealed in painful detail that the US is falling behind much of the world in in most functions of government. What's your evidence? The main evidence of the disease is really simple. Very sadly, America is now around 800 deaths for every million people on def You compare that with other places like that in a Germany is six times better. It's round 150 deaths deaths for every million people, but you really when you go to East Asia You find these countries like Japan, South Korea, Singapore They're all around 20, or 30 deaths for every million people said about 20 or 30 times better. What's interesting to.

Kate Hinds New York City Lee Governor Cuomo Rachel Martin editor John Micklethwait United States David W. N. Y. C NPR News Adrian Wooldridge Dr Anthony Fauci Lulu Garcia Navarro Japan Germany America editor in chief CDC
"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:57 min | 7 months ago

"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Animal populations to a greater degree than has been before that we have an interconnected economy, so we will probably get more of these, so we need to be faster Responding. What is most extraordinary things about the Westerns. I think it is complacency. We saw this disease unveiling itself in China and the Far East. We saw them taking the steps to deal with it some of their steps that's just not done, such as closing airports. That is wearing masks were working. We should have learned from them, which should have irritated them. Now in Britain, we've only just started wearing whilst you know a few weeks weeks ago when the Chinese were wearing them, you know, last general, we have toe Study other people and learn from other people and realize that not all wisdom in the world is in our own heads. As we wrap up with you that you talked about this being a test. Is this foreboding As we move forward to say if we failed this test, what is it gonna look like in the future when something else like this comes around? Well, it's probably for voting that there are going to be more tests in the future. But what this test is revealed is being a weakness in the quality of government that has been developing for a long time in developing for decades. This isn't just Test that we failed. It's a test off the reveals something about the state of our governance. And unless we get to fixing these things pull federal government poor coordination with the state's poor provision of technology expertise within the government sector. Unless we get fixing these things, I'm afraid that the balance of power in the world is going to shift away from the West away from The Anglo Saxon world in particular and towards China, and that's not something I want to see. So Arthur Adrian Wooldridge, along with John Mikel Thwaite, the book is the wake up call why the pandemic has exposed the weakness of the West and how to fix it. Adrian, Thanks for the time, thank you so much. We'll take a break and come back with the Thanksgiving holiday edition of Colorado's Morning news on K Away news radio. Nice.

China Arthur Adrian Wooldridge poor coordination Britain John Mikel Thwaite Colorado
"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on Leadership Biz Café

Leadership Biz Café

07:37 min | 8 months ago

"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on Leadership Biz Café

"Crisis, but also look at how we can regain that relevancy that you're speaking about that governments are now starting to realize they should have Absolutely. Well, what happened in this country was was very interesting in the sense that we started off with a lot of emphasis on partnership. The issue of the Brewers game was was obviously important here as well as in your country. We had the idea of getting ventilators made by the private sector and I think is a number of car companies stepped in there. But then that partnership sort of broke down didn't work very well after a while there was an initial surge of enthusiasm and then with a lot of barriers ring count and one of the reasons for this I think was that sections of the public saying sector were very monopolistic in their thinking about things. So there's something call organization called Public Health England wage, which insisted basically the old tests should be made in house. They wouldn't Buy in tests from their private sector or bring them in from universities. They wanted their own tests off. Their own way and this of course slowed down the supply of tests and it was a ridiculous sort of Monopoly. Also Public Health England later said they had to develop the apps. They wouldn't bring apps from Google or any private-sector organization. They needed it needed to be something invented and made by public sector England. So there is an element within the public sector that's very resistant to partnership and is very Monopoly minded. We need to pray that down. Of course we do because you know, a loss of the expertise that we're we're we're going to need particularly. In fact ology resides in the private sector now, it doesn't reside in the public sector. So there any way you can advance is through through Partnerships. So we need when we talking about partnership. We also have the problem with how well you can manage that partnership because obviously private sector organizations are profit-making entities. They will try and get the best deal possible. And unless you have people in the private in the public sector wage. Who are capable of managing those relationships and capable of striking a hard bargain? You can have public sex and money being in wasted and badly used. I'm also very glad you mentioned the issue of nass for two reasons one is that NASA was an elite organization within the public sector everybody took their hats off to it. Everybody was thrilled by NASA and what we've ten years to have is a sort of squeezing of quality in the in the public sector particularly in Britain and and and and the United States are sort of public sector egalitarianism. There aren't that many elements in the public sector leverage. Wow. There's a really great people. I really want like to be one of those, you know, that sort of elitism is now focused on the private sector and I'd like to have you know much more sense that the very brightest very best people will go into the public sector because the public sector is where his ask where they've got the best people so that sense of elitism that sense of belonging to a bath A very exclusive Club I think is is is is is very importance and the other reason I'm glad you mentioned NASA is that we have the right-hand man of our prime minister Boris Johnson is Michael Dominic Cummings and he is absolutely obsessed by NASA and he wants to have the ethos of NASA a sort of the Innovative elitist Spirit of NASA and his all also is now building a sort of a prime minister's office which has screens which is real time information, which has open-plan seating rather rather traditional teaching than has very much on a sort of NASA sort of model. So it's this is no fashionable again at the heart of British government, which they can rather interesting. And it's interesting that we're talking about technology here because that's actually something else. I wanted to discuss with you because it is another point you bring up for what this covid-19 wake-up call should elicit which is a greater an investment in technology by government whether that's in building high-speed internet networks the same way they build roads and highways to creating apps that allow citizens to conduct their business with different government agencies. And again there examples out there countries creating various digital measures to help them better manage their covid-19 response. I particularly like the one you write about in how in Shanghai each subway car has its own QR code that they use our scan when they enter the car. So if someone who was on that car test positive or covid-19 the government knows who to contact the self isolate and yet we see here in the west and you just mentioned it now a lot of pushback citing privacy concerns, for example again here in Canada government launched their own covid-19 app, they did independently of Google or any other of those high-tech companies to home. Five people if they've recently been in contact with someone who's now tested positive for covid-19 yet despite assurances from the Canadian government as well as privacy Advocates that there are no privacy issues from the the app hasn't gained wide adoption, and at the same time Facebook keeps getting caught collecting data that its users hadn't agreed to and yet people keep using their platform. So give or how companies are able to get consumers to buy in on giving up their data and exchange for some service or perceived benefit. What should governments be doing to get more participation in such an issue considering the numerous cited benefits from epidemiologists at doing this kind of tracing will help reduce the spread of this virus and consequently limit the economic and social Fallout that comes from having to put very same options in place. It's quite extraordinary that people are willing to to give up their Privacy Information Vital Information about themselves in order to look at pictures of fluffy dog. That's yes beautiful dogs. I'm a dog person on campus and but they're not willing to give up their information to save their own lives or more importantly to save the lives of other people. I think that we have to be willing to give up that data. I think that's the most important thing is preserving life and if preserving life means redrawing the boundaries at least, you know temporarily for between individual rights and Collective obligations, and I think we have to move towards Collective obligations young people are being selfish because it's not just about preserving their own life. It's about serving the lives of other people if you're a healthy young person you're not going to die from this thing. But if you're an older person you've got health problems, then you are going to worry about it. So I think that you need that the government needs to appeal to a sense sense of altruism, but also I think that we need to introduce the element of accountability in the sense that I thought. I'm willing to give up information about myself providing. I'm assured that the government is accountable for the use of that information that there is a proper oversight through the parliamentary system through figure asst and peas but also select committees commissions of inquiry which are constantly watching over the government's I think the government has to put more emphasis into setting up the right song structures of accountability and also to persuading people that the rather right sort of structures to accountability..

NASA Public Health England Google Canadian government British government Brewers prime minister England Shanghai United States Facebook Boris Johnson Britain Canada Michael Dominic Cummings
"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

How Do We Fix It?

02:18 min | 8 months ago

"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

"That if you have people who. Find it too expensive to go to the doctor and have no a links to the health care system. Then that's a real problem in a pandemic right. But I'm saying the term public health care doesn't mean pain for people to go to the doctor. It means having organizations like the CDC that are monitoring broad public health issues might include affordability, but it also means he talked about resilience in means being prepared for future problems. I WANNA push back on one of Adrian's points, and that is he suggested that during a crisis like a pandemic, we should accept a temporary rollback of privacy. I would strongly. Guard against that you remember after nine eleven. You know a a a bipartisan Group of Republicans and Democrats passed the Patriot Act and it. We accepted some significant erosions of our rights. We've now seen those programs be. abused again and again I worry that anytime you give the government more power over your private life there's a ratchet effect it can always ratchet it up. It's very hard to ratchet it down. I'm on the fence on this but I do agree with him on the on the need to put in new whether they're regulations or rules about. Capitalism. One final pushback from me he said I think maybe we should be. Bore like the Japanese of bowing and socially distant and perhaps quieter as people no I don't think. So the thing I love about living in America and I lived overseas for twenty years is just how boisterous so many people are like the chaos I like the fact that people aren't always that polite or and certainly not bowing and. Overly respectful of others. This, how do we fix it? I've Richard Davies. And I'm Jim megs and our producer is brandon shaffer. Thank you..

Adrian brandon shaffer CDC Jim megs Richard Davies producer America
"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

How Do We Fix It?

05:27 min | 8 months ago

"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

"Before we have another lively conversation Jim. Let's go to our recommendation. Richard We've been having this beautiful fall weather in the northeast and you know it's we're in the final days of it probably. So I've been spending a lotta time out in the yard tinkering around in my garden and working on various projects and I love listening to podcasts while I do that sometimes I burn out on politics. So my latest favorite is a podcast called fifty years of music with fifty year old white guys. Now I. I WANNA get out of the way my annoyance at everybody having to identify their race in a jokey self deprecating way. But nonetheless, these guys are hilarious. They're really smart it's three. Brands I. Think it sounds like they met in college live in different parts of the country. They're absolutely avid music fans kind of music nerds and they decided to a podcast where they would go back and try to pick their favourite songs from each year. They they've been alive. So they start in nine, hundred, sixty nine, but they are really thoughtful and funny Examiners of just what makes pop music work, and why do we love and what what kind of a plan our lives. Great and what's it called again, it's called fifty years of music with fifty year old white guys. One more quick note about podcasts with music last week, spotify launched a new creation platform that makes it much easier for podcasters to add full tracks of music to their shows. So expect many more music based podcast be launched. In the future. We have a link to an article about this on our podcast website. How do we fix it dot me Adrian Wooldridge said Jim, we need to spend more on government in the short term updating it making it. More, efficient as a squishy libertarian what do you think of that idea? Well, I think he's right. We need a government, this more competent and what I thought was most productive in the analysis was what's wrong with our current system he's not advocating just pouring more money into our current inefficient system. He wants to loosen up how we judge what fair pay is civil servants. I think that's very smart. If someone is a financial expert and they're working for the government. They could make millions in the private sector that doesn't mean the has to the millions, but it should probably pay them more than. One hundred and fifty thousand dollars a year. One stunning thing was what he said about people working on it in the government. and. This is what happens when you have a system that rewards..

Jim Adrian Wooldridge Richard spotify
"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

How Do We Fix It?

05:35 min | 8 months ago

"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

"Crisis told us anything it told us the government really matters and government can be the difference during living or dying. Are Their governments elsewhere outside of of the United States and and Great Britain, and perhaps even other parts of the West that have something to teach us about technology and how that can be used to make government more efficient and deliver services better. Legrand argument of of of of this book is that from the year, if you go back a fifteen hundred. China was head of the West and West bloodstain battlefield Bab government, and what's happened since then is that the West is pulled ahead of the east for many reasons, capitalism and the rest of it but one of those reasons is they constantly reinvented improved. Governments in line with you thinking a new technology. So when you get up to about nineteen sixty, you have a world in which the West is massively ahead of the east in terms of the quality of its government. A now, I would say what the crisis revealed is that the he's probably better at West, which is an extraordinary change and the reason for batches that better. Things better employing technology to get to that collective. And I would say the Catholic abyss example of countries that have done. This is Singapore that very, very good at harnessing technology to serve the public I suppose that using intelligent technology sue managed that society in a more efficient way and I think that's if you look at the list of the world's intelligence cities I think is as it would be cool. We'll most of them are in the Far East. This is how do we fix it? I'm Jim eggs and I'm Richard. Davies where speaking with Adrian Wooldridge the CO author of the new book the wakeup call how the pandemic has exposed the weakness of the West and how to fix it. We're back with Adrian Wooldridge, the political editor of the Economist and author of the new book the wake up call. So a superficial reading of your argument might sound like you're just in favor of a more effective more powerful government. It's essentially a left-wing argument, but it's really not where do you part company with the left on how to manage the role of government? Well I mean we come at this subject both of us from classical liberal tradition, which is that what really matters is the freedom of the individual and the government's insofar as it can help individual to reach a since never life of of of freedom productivity..

Adrian Wooldridge China United States Jim eggs Britain political editor Davies
"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

03:30 min | 8 months ago

"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"But you'll never be our guy Jeter and so LeBron goes to Los Angeles goes to Hollywood creates a media empire. It's the right choice doesn't drag it out like he did the last couple of times in a way that got his fame to where it is. So now he can run Hollywood. He can get any meeting he wants in Hollywood. He's he's preparing for after his career while still in his prime in the finals, averaging whatever it is 27 10 and eight and he wins one for Kobe. And now he shouts. The storybook Hollywood story Storybook Hollywood story in the Mamba gear after all year. I mean, hell! The bubble began with Adrian Wooldridge Sorosky writing a story. Kobe would have loved it so much here. Yeah, That's the story. And the story is supposed to play out Friday unless Kelly Olynyk puts on the store. I mean, you can't wear the Kobe jerseys and lose. You can't do that. I know I'm a heat homer. Generally when you get to 31, and you have the talent disparity that you're seeing right now Play out the Lakers lead 31. You would see quip settled in on a team like okay, we'll get him next day. We had a very good year. Jimmy Butler's an insane person. I think he'd legitimately thinks he can win the series still And we will see what ends up happening on the front of LeBron. We've seen one time already in these playoffs. Somebody come back from down three won twice two times, and we've also seen LeBron the reason LeBron gets to be in this discussion with Isiah Thomas and Michael Jordan. The reason he gets to do that is because he won the one in Cleveland. Yes, if he had won three in Miami and was three and six but hadn't won one in Cleveland. We wouldn't be doing this. He gave us the emotional story book while improving his popularity, the only one that Doing? It is Isaiah Thomas. I'm not certain I wouldn't be doing this was this for Evan? Who else is doing it? Listen, he's if he wins this, he gets to afford title. It's impressive. Michael still has six and I'm not saying the broad can't win another two. We can the way he's playing. I've been consuming a lot of ESPN daytime programming. Miami Heat outside. This is one of the rare times that their Siri's has led the A block we're talking about after Jimmy Butler puts up one of the greatest finals performances. It's curtain jerking on, Petey I from mail time. Right. It's that low in the a block. It's a 31. Siri's right now, I'm sure they would much rather talk about a competitive Siri's, although first aid given their history when it comes to Jordan versus LeBron. Maybe this is exactly what they want to do. But they're talking about this because it's a 31 serious because it's a foregone conclusion that the Lakers are winning it. It's a 31 lead, but it's not your traditional 31 lead these air neutral courts. They're playing on the same court in front of no fans like it wouldn't be that far fetched to see the heat. Get to tell you what's far fetched an unreasonable of you as the character through God's. This's what What's unreasonable like because you're sitting here saying he may win tomb or they may get there. In your personal record book when he gives you the moment those are worth more. You've always done that. Like he gave you the moment against Cleveland. And if he gives you this tonight, whereas we did this for you, Kobe and and it's the mythical moment you tend to do that thing where you give people two titles or take away two titles. If they don't give you your field. He can't do it tonight. The game's Tomorrow night. You got me still got the best really trapped me. What a terrible correction. I know this will not Countess to Michael Jordan gave you so many moments. Are you saying the six threes against Clyde in Portland game or two for that? Michael.

LeBron Lakers Michael Jordan Kobe Jimmy Butler Cleveland Hollywood Siri Miami Adrian Wooldridge Sorosky Kelly Olynyk Isaiah Thomas Jeter Isiah Thomas ESPN Los Angeles Evan Petey I Clyde Portland
"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

09:09 min | 9 months ago

"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Appoint billions and billions of dollars you know, and into political campaigns on behind various candidates. And Because of a Supreme Court decision, and now we're talking about 2010 and citizens United versus SEC. Corporations. In terms of speech were given the status of persons, you know, and they were so so they have, so they're free speech rights cannot be infringed upon which basically said that Campaign finance laws were illegal. For the most part, you know, and and that the whole idea of putting limits on this kind of speech with an infringement of the First Amendment rights, which which BLD Found the founders could never have imagined because corporations that exists now that even exists back in 17 87 when the Constitutional convention was, um, meeting you know, and so Use it. You have this reality where Politicians. Don't necessarily represent their own constituencies because their own constituencies are not on not who pays for their elections. It's these other interests on so there's a loss in that sense. Of the ability to speak because the ability to speak is being overwhelmed by the superior ability of other entities to speak. What cacophony then, you know. And it is really if you include the Internet. Especially if you include the Internet. Yeah, I mean, one that there was a professor Yoo hoo. Very many interesting point. I think in a recent article, where he or where he basically Posits that the problem of free speech now is not that that there It's not access to speech is that there's too much speech, and so much of it is misinformation and manipulative speech. And and being given equal weight. I'm being given the whole weight to more traditional forthright and honest speech. Right and that remaining minutes we have let's if we can and on some optimism if free speech is dying, what can we do to save it? Well, I think the first thing we can do is try to educate. Our citizen three better, beginning with people in school who have a very poor understanding. Of critical reasoning, which is a great way to inoculate yourself against a lot of the nonsense that comes from the Web just by critically evaluating it. On the scale of how to do that seems to be lacking, according to some research done by Stanford on other folks we need. It's these people that we need also teach people what Free speech is and then how has been defined deal because you had Ah, a Harris poll. Recently, which had 90% of people believing in free speech, but also 40%, believing that the president had the right to shut down newspapers and specifically CNN and New York Times If they were printing stuff that he thought that he disagreed with. Basically clearly those two things don't are known pants cannot coexist in the same world that we have. Freedom of the press, but also freedom of the president to shut down the press. If he doesn't like what it says, so I think that's an educational function. I think there's an excuse that I think there's The function of people like us. We're communicators to need to sort of rethink what the rules of engagement are and that part of our job. Now it seems if we have audiences Ah is to articulate the difference between ball speech and true speech on DH again helped to you educate the public. So so I don't think it's a totally bleak picture, but I, but I think There are a lot of troubling things and hopefully Supreme Court's come and go on justice coming go, and at some point I suspect That would be reason to take a look at some of these decisions, particularly including your citizens. United And rethinking of this whole to me of certain notions. Found that corporate speech should be somehow equivalent to human speech. Right? Um, I'm afraid I will let you go in it. Which is a shame because this is so interesting. I see your website is Ellis coast dot com. Dr unnamed Ellis COC, and the book is called a short Life and Curious Death of free speech in America. Thank you so much. Well, thank you. It's been a pleasure. I see it all the time. We've heard in the morning come back, very late Current. They're always closed and there's so many people living in that house. I know they look scared all the time. It seems like he runs to show he's always talking for them. Seems friendly enough. I'm not even sure if it's the same people I saw last week starts making sense way have to tell someone way need to report this modern day slavery is happening in our own backyard no the signs and joined the blue campaign in the fight to end human trafficking. Call 1866347 to 4 to three or go to www dot DHHS dot gov slash blue campaign for more information. Adrian Wooldridge, political correspondent for the Economist, and John Micklethwait, the editor in chief of Bloomberg News are journalists and long time collaborators and have a new book called The Wake Up Call why the Pandemic has exposed the weakness of the West and how to fix it. They argue that Kobe it has revealed deep flaws in the Western state. But they also lay out a plan for the West to rebuild. So what went wrong and can the West and the United States do anything to fix things? Adrian Wooldridge is with us on the phone. Welcome. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. How could the covert crisis be a geopolitical turning point, the end of the Western era and the beginning of the Asian era? Well, it's as though the whole world has been set an examination. This cove, it thing is a global pandemic and the whole world's being set. The common examination of have sold. The problem on the result has been rather surprising because Western countries with regard themselves naturally, is being very well run being very well governed. I have not done particularly well compared with Eastern countries which have done extraordinarily much better. So you have a AA death rate from covert of about 405 106 100 million in the United States. Great Britain. Um um one that's Must learn that three of them three or four per million in China. That's a bit higher than that, because there's official figures, but not that much hard in that New York City has seen 20,000 people. Die from covert London 6000 people die from Cove it at the same time soul, which is actually a bit bigger city of neither of those two have seen about 50 people die, Ivanko said. The difference in performance between these two thieves to parts of the world Has bean very dramatic. Why is that right? Why is it because Why is that? I think it's because the West has no Focused on statecraft on building a competent state. It's got its resting on its laurels think it's sold all of these problems The East. By contrast, China And countries in that region. Have bean working on improving the competence, the efficiency of their states and modernizing their state, and I think it's a wake up call. It shows us that this has been going on for some time. We didn't realize You write that it started in the 19 sixties and started gathering pace that the West has started falling behind. How absolutely If you go back to the that's not go back to the 19 sixties. Let's go back even further. Let's go back to the year. 1500, then in 1500, the China was the centre of global civilization have the world's best civil service. The world's biggest city. It had ah, vibrant economy that Western Europe the time with a sort of blood soaked battlefield. Then you get a series of revolutions in the states. In the in the West, you get the rise of the nation states, which tames the feudal baron. Get the rise of the liberal states, which provides people with security, blood plus light..

Supreme Court China United States president Adrian Wooldridge Ellis COC SEC Western Europe New York Times professor New York City Harris Stanford CNN Kobe John Micklethwait
"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on WTOP

"At 15 and 45 powered by Red River technology decisions aren't black and white. Think red. Here's been Raby CC. United has waited more than four months to return to competition, and now the black and red will have to wait a little bit longer. DC use match against Toronto FC this morning has been postponed after a D C player. Tested positive for the Corona virus. This would have been de Ces first game at the MLS is back tournament in Orlando. No makeup date has been announced. Women's Soccer, The Washington Spirit and early one. Nothing lead over Houston at the Challenge Cup that game in the first half. ESPN basketball Insider Adrian Wooldridge Kowski is usually breaking news. Now he is the news. And if your reporter that typically means bad news for general ski, reportedly suspended by ESPN after sending a profane email to Senator Josh Holly On Friday. Well, general ski apologized over social media, saying he was disrespectful and had made a regrettable mistake. ESPN described it as completely unacceptable behavior. Call final round of the workday Charity Open Justin Thomas alone atop the leader board at 19 under par one stroke clear of Colin Morikawa, both golfers with four holes to play. And Ray be w t o P sports coming up after traffic and weather research into Corona virus symptoms, it's 1 17 It's a great time to get a great.

ESPN Adrian Wooldridge Kowski Red River Colin Morikawa Justin Thomas Senator Josh Holly DC Ray Toronto Soccer Orlando United reporter Washington Spirit Houston basketball
Chaos and calculation: Brexit

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:02 min | 2 years ago

Chaos and calculation: Brexit

"Stay. Prime minister. There would be chaos if the United Kingdom were to crash out of the European Union without a proper divorce deal, but after months of widespread worry about that, no deal Brexit. It seems to have been avoided for now. Anyway. Commissioned Mr Speaker, I would like to make statements on the government's work to secure withdrawal agreement that can command the support of this house the deadline to agree a deal with the EU is in just over a month. Prime Minister Theresa may has told parliamentarians that if they don't vote in favor of the agreement she's already negotiated. She will empower them to vote for a delay to Brexit. So the United Kingdom one only leave without a deal on the twenty ninth of March. If there is explicit consent in the house for that outcome. Avoiding no deal scenario is one of the few aspects of Brexit for which there is a strong parliamentary majority that is not the case for Mrs Maes own deal, which he's still pushing to get through what's happening in this country. At the moment is that the government is losing control of events power is slipping away from the prime minister, quite news with that power is going Adrian Wooldridge rights badges are column about British politics. He was in the house of Commons for MRs maith announcement. That morning. She came to the house of Commons straight away from a cabinet meeting. We should be a very tense cabinet meeting in which number of members of our cabinet confronted her and said, you must extend you must take new deal off the table mustn't be the case that will be allowed to crash out of the EU without a deal, and that has been part of our negotiating position. So taken off the table was a huge embarrassment and reduction of power so power slipping away from the prime minister. So where does this leave the timetable is we understand what happens next? Well, the return things going on in the Commons of the moments. I mean, the atmosphere is electric the atmosphere is is furthered people in an extreme state of high political frenzy tying the government's hands by seeking commandeer. The auto paper. She's rather discourteous. The prime minister is delivering a statement. It should be and colleagues. No, I'm just under strong, feelings comics from the record. Everybody will get things going on his business made his speech chaos on the one hand and calculation on the other hand people trying to say what does this really mean? And I could see the members of the European research group, the hardliners that all in little plump all discussing as she was speaking. What do we do about this? What does it mean? So everybody was trying to think what does it mean mean what does it mean what she promised was. There will be votes on March twelfth he will vote on Mrs Maes deal that failed last time by thirty. It's very difficult to turn it around on the thirteenth. There will be votes on whether to accept new deal that will almost certainly there is a majority in the house against new deal then on the fourteenth whether to apply for an extension to the needing. Brexit day March the twenty ninth I think that would come onto majority in the house. So what are the important things? That's happened. This week is that Britain is unlikely believing the European Union on Brexit. They March the twenty ninth. It'll be leaving two months perhaps after that whatever the the extension if it comes to that do not find ourselves in the same position again close to that date. Absolutely. We do and it does seem that we're gridlocked that the sides of roughly the same size. They can't get a majority. And so that's probably the case. Both leaders have lost control of their parties or losing control of their parties were fighting desperately to keep control of that party's against very powerful forces and Theresa May con- controller cabinet. She can't control the lower ranks of her government, and she can't control her party. And that's also being strangely mirrored on the labor side where Jeremy open is also suffering from internal rebellions of significant rebellions and is desperately trying to reassert control. But at the expense of making very big concessions. His critics. Amid all this the labor party dropped its own breaks at bombshell, Jeremy Corbyn. The labour leader has said if Labour's owned Brexit withdrawal plan is rejected a vote today. He'll threw his weight behind public vote a second referendum. Mr. Corbin is still smarting from the resignation of nine MP's last week. They left the party in frustration at his Brexit strategy and its failure to tackle anti semitism on the face of labor who switched position to be in support of a second referendum. But that would only happen after Mrs Maes deal passes in parliament and macelroy senior editor of the economist. And one of our chief breaks apologists is skeptical that Mr. corbin's announcement has much substance. Jeremy cool been moved his party position this week to woods a second referendum quite clearly his shadow. Brexit secretary said that remain would be on the ballot paper, which is the big question for a lot of people who want this. However, that's not a commitment that we've. Yet heard unambiguously from Jeremy Corbyn himself, so to your mind than what's materially changed. Should we consider this week as the week that the the prospects for a second referendum really changed? I think we should consider as the week when the labor party was no longer able to straddle the positions as Abe liaise. It had done here to four Jeremy Kuban doesn't really want to second referendum wants a general election. He said it over and over again, but he has conceded that the emotion in his party, particularly with this breakaway group in mind that they want hit words second referendum from him. So you could see things moving gently not direction. Unfortunately, he hasn't spelled out. Whether it's the second referendum that most people mean, which is the woman that says, oh, we going always staying does the outcome of all this does the outcome for Brexit matter beyond that or is this just damage control by party leaders. I think it's to party leaders discovering, the Hoed way that Brexit is a powerful fragmentation of what they considered to be their power base so labor you're finding a leader from the left of the party who was trying to build a big momentum as he calls his movement sweeping away. The conservative government is finding that he has difficulties to unite his party around the Brexit question on the conservative side. You have a prime minister who's doubled down on getting do with the EU and eventually getting herds Dobbin, really hard core. Eurosceptics own booed and finding that process much harder. That superglue is not sticking. It's not so sticky on the other side only the two leaders to very different muse same fundamental problem.

Prime Minister Brexit European Union Mrs Maes Jeremy Corbyn Prime Minister Theresa Jeremy United Kingdom Mr Speaker Mrs Maith Theresa May Jeremy Kuban Adrian Wooldridge Mr. Corbin Labour Eurosceptics
"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on KCRW

"Laura sydell reports Twitter says the accomplice using misleading information to manipulate the public conversation. The video went viral. In a number of different ways. But a major player was an account with the handle at twenty twenty the video shows a native American elder banging on a small held drums random by group of high school, boys. Some of whom are wearing make America great again. Hats one of the boys stands a few feet from the man's face staring at him with a slight smile. It's a brief moment in a much longer more complicated situation. The twenty twenty-five account had been in the sights of rob mcdonagh with story full a firm that analyzes social media conversations that I had spotted before tweeting very, hyper partisan views very much in democratic talking points. Well that in itself didn't necessarily mean anything was wrong. There were other signs. What made this account standout is? It's high rate of tweets out, Heidi political tweets, you're talking one hundred and thirty post tweet today, and it had a fake profile Paco's using the profile Brazilian blogger. Mcdonagh says the account also had over forty. Thousand followers, but it wasn't verified by Twitter. He says that's unusual for an account with so many followers. According to mcdonagh CNN pointed out the account to Twitter, and it was taken down Twitter has not disclosed who it believes might be behind the at twenty twenty-five account. But Molly McCue thinks it bears the hallmarks of an account designed to spread discord. I think this little bit officio content really hit a nerve with a lot of people. And I think that's exactly what it was intended to do McCue is a researcher who's worked for the governments of the countries of Georgia and Moldova consulting on how to fight Russian disinformation. She says the video hit a nerve with Greg because it looked like a member of a minority group. A native American elder was being attacked by a group of white boys with maga- hats, everybody Russia's to their polls as quickly as possible McHugh says she also noticed that at twenty twenty five is followed by accounts, she thinks you're suspicious. Those accounts re tweeted the video incentive out to more people. Would he Phillips professor at? Syracuse university has studied the way stories like this blow up on social media. Philip says the situation is in your perfect model of how social media in the news media end up working together to heighten conflicts between Americans you basically throw a match into some kindling. And then the American people supply the oxygen, then it rises to the top on Twitter and the professional media notices it. And so you have this race to cover the story first. And then once the story has been covered every publication needs to publish their own take, including NPR Phillips says the end result is the small group that wants to keep Americans fighting amongst themselves is able to leverage social media and manipulate the traditional media. Unfortunately, she says social media companies like Twitter are ultimately, not prioritizing, the good of society, sometimes it takes down really offensive content. And sometimes it keeps that content up because it is good for their bottom line. Philip says divisions in our society are real and the video may have. Taken off without fake accounts. But she would like to see people look at the source of the information before re tweeting, Laura sydell, NPR news. This is morning edition on KCRW ahead on morning edition Louisiana's governor sappy NFL Commissioner a letter complaining about a missed penalty. And then New Orleans Saints fans say cost their team a chance to play in the Super Bowl. The letter follows lawsuits about Sunday's NFL championship game. And in his new book prisoner Jason rising on of the Washington Post recounts. His time in Iran's notorious Evine prison those stories coming up on morning edition on Thursday. January twenty fourth KCRW and Sokolow public square present. How has America survived two hundred years of capitalism in little Tokyo KCRW is Warren only sits down with Adrian Wooldridge, political editor of the economist to discuss America's unique tolerance for an economic system. That produces so much pain alongside its gains. This event is free and open to the public for details. Visit KCRW dot com slash events. Now this from KCRW news last night was the first night of Los Angeles annual homeless count..

Twitter America rob mcdonagh KCRW McHugh Laura sydell Molly McCue NPR Philip Phillips NFL Adrian Wooldridge Syracuse university New Orleans Saints Heidi Washington Post CNN Iran Paco
"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:23 min | 2 years ago

"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Well, I think it's basically the combination of not what the fed is doing which remember short term interest rates. It's what the market itself is doing for the ten year treasury note and say the thirty year treasury bond, they've moved up significantly. We also asked him whether the tax cuts had already had their impact on the economy, or whether there was more to come. Impact has been really quite significant. But it's already completed. He did say the impact of the tax cuts on the deficit is concerning and could lead to inflation. We also talked with him about the economy more. Generally, he writes about it in his new book capitalism in America a history, which he co authored with Adrian Wooldridge, I asked Alan Greenspan if there are two economies in America. Oh, we have more than two it's more directly related to. Structure becoming for example, the so-called rust belt is populated largely by industries, which are very old Silicon Valley. For example, is a classic case of very new. There are very different pockets of economic growth various degrees of stagnation throughout out the country. And it depends, obviously, whether you're in the agrarian areas were swabbing prices means something or whether you're on the west coast where the issue of high tech stock prices, everyone talks about so the one thing about this country. It's very diverse. Depends where you are. You write in your book that the growth surge this country experience from nine hundred ninety eight to two thousand four increasingly looks like a brief interruption of a much longer term decline rather than the dawn of a new era of tech driven growth. Why do you say that? Well, you look out into the future or we're slowing down our rate of growth and productivity. Why? Well, basically because fear. You know when the deal with fear. It is very difficult to classify you can look at the consequences of the consequence is basically surpressed level of innovation and therefore capital investment. Disinclination to take risks and the book until I might add discussing where the long-term outlook is all about. We say that the issue of the aging of the population and its consequences on entitlements is having a significant negative deterioration over the long run the reason for that is what the data on equivocally show. Entitlements, which are mandated by law. Are gradually and inexorably bribing out gross domestic savings and the economy. Dollar for dollar. So long as that happens. We have to borrow from abroad, which is our current account deficit. We're now built up an a trillion dollar debt to foreigners. But what this is causing. This is largely the demographic issue. The fact that the population is aging right now, the official actuaries of the social security system. So in order to get our social security and retirement funds and balance they'd have to cut benefits by twenty five percent indefinitely into the future to do you think they should do that? First of all, I think it's going to happen. I don't know. But this is one of the reasons why inflation is the major problem out there. So long as you don't do it because the debt overall total government that over arise indefinitely and that is an unstable situation. We you say inflation is a big problem out there. We've been talking about this for years that inflation is actually remained very low for the last many years. That's correct. And in fact, it's been the lowest in American history. And that's all the more reason to be concerned about for example, interest rates since fifth century BC. Greece were not terribly different from where they are today. So the presumption is that interest rates will rise. If no other reason that they're below the long term human nature determined to -bility. What do you say to people who say that you kept interest rates too low during the dotcom, boom or right afterwards? And that helped lead to what we saw back in two thousand eight recent week kept rates low. Unemployment rate fell with the fact that productivity was rising in a very rapid pace. In the dot com. Boom was now moving through the economy the latter part of the nineties. So the reason we didn't move is that we didn't feel that signals were there. And indeed the unemployment rate kept falling. Well, below usual expectation of like four percent, but with productivity rising as rapidly as it did it change the numbers. And indeed the unemployment rate kept falling below four percent with no impact on inflation. So if those low interest rates were not a cause of the financial crisis in your view. What was what do you think led to that in two thousand? What we specifically. Learn stringently for the first time in two thousand eight two conditions cried for crisis one is toxic asset like securitized mortgages. But the critical issue is how those mortgages financed and when they are financed by a leverage debt. That's the dangerous signal. You see anything like that right now? Nope. Not in any area. Well, I don't wanna be general. Now that was a furry extraordinary period. Ordinarily, it would have been wholly inappropriate for the Federal Reserve to keep writes down during the period of very low on employment. That was the period was there. I was having a conversation with somebody in the banking industry. Recently who said that one of their concerns was that unemployment is so low right now that they're going to be a lot of people who are hired for jobs and paid more than they should be paid. Then they're not actually qualified because it's a job seekers market right now that the people that want to hire are having a difficult time in many cases, hiring people and that that is going to lead to lower productivity and potentially inflation. What do you think about that? Well, basically, it's not lower productivity issue when you get this sort of tight labor market where each rates begin to rise of necessity. It's the wage rate rises which affect the cost of production and hence induce corporations to start raising prices, basically because their costs are going up. That's where the problem lies. It hasn't really begun yet. I want to ask you about one more big thing that you talked about in your book. And that is the issue of creative destruction. First of all explain what that means. Creative destruction is the process by which people do two things they continuously invest, but the investment is displacing older equipment, but more importantly, engenders unemployment. And it's the process which unfortunately is a necessary condition for growth and standards of living. You have to let bad things happen in order for the overall picture to be better in the future. Well, because the very nature of progress economically as we pointed out on a book is the result of creative destruction, which means essentially, for example. When. The open hearth furnace the steel industry. A whole slew of procedures within the steel industry. So-called Bessemer furnaces they became obsolete, and they were scrapped, but also workers associated with those particular. Furnaces so to speak. They lose their jobs the labor forces continuously changing. People lose their jobs are people getting them. That's the reason. The unemployment rate per se is the best measure of finding out how successful the labor markets are. So so let me take that to the to the next level. Which would be do you think that the government should just let recessions happen? Should they not have stepped in? When the financial crisis happened and just allow things allow the chips to fall where they may. And maybe in the long run everybody be better off. Well, that's the big argument. When did you got to a state such as the contagious, the Fulton that what's going on in two thousand eight we put an solutions, which is to give twenty five billion dollars to every commercial back on the grounds that would enable them to come through the system. And actually, it was a major factor which did solve the problem and stabilize for system. Former.

Federal Reserve Boom America Adrian Wooldridge Alan Greenspan equivocally Greece official four percent twenty five billion dollars twenty five percent
"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on Here & Now

"We had the rare opportunity last week to speak with Alan Greenspan. The man who led the Federal Reserve from nineteen eighty seven to two thousand six he served through booms and recessions he's now ninety two we asked him about the recent volatility in the stock market. Well, I think it's basically the combination of not what the fed is doing which remember short-term interest rates. It's what the market itself is doing for the ten year treasury note and say the thirty year treasury bond, they've moved up significantly. We also asked him whether the tax cuts already had their impact on the economy, or whether there was more to come. Impact has been really quite significant. But it's already completed. He did say the impact of the tax cuts on the deficit is concerning and could lead to inflation. We also talked with him about the economy more. Generally, he writes about it in his new book capitalism in America a history, which he co authored with Adrian Wooldridge, I asked Alan Greenspan if there are two economies in America or we have more than two. It's more directly related to struck for becoming for example, the so-called rust belt is populated largely by industries, which are very old Silicon Valley. For example, is a classic case of a very new. There are very different pockets of economic growth. Various degrees of stagnation threw out the country. And it depends, obviously, whether you're in the gray area narrows or were soybean prices means something or whether you're on the west coast where the issue of high tech stock prices, everyone talks about so the one thing about this country. It's very diverse out of depends where you are. You write in your book that the growth surge that this country experience from nine hundred ninety eight to two thousand four increasingly looks like a brief interruption of a much longer term decline rather than the dawn of a new era of tech driven growth. Why do you say that? Well, you look out into the future or slowing down our rate of growth and productivity. Why? Well, basically because fear. You know when a deal with fear. It is very difficult to classify. But you can you can look at the consequences of an a consequence is basically suppressed level of innovation and therefore capital investment and a disinclination to take risks in the book until I might add discussing what the long-term outlook is all about we say that the issue of the aging of the population and its consequences on entitlements is having a significant negative deterioration over the long run the reason for that is what the data on a quickly show is that entitlements which mandated by law, a gradually and inexorably driving out gross domestic savings and the economy dollar for dollar. And so long. As that happens. We have to borrow from abroad, which is current account deficit and we've now built up an eight trillion dollar debt to foreigners. But what this is causing. This is largely the demographic issue. The fact that the population is aging right now, the official actuaries of the social security system say in order to get our social security on retirement funds and balance they'd have to cut benefits by twenty five percent indefinitely into the future to do you think they should do that?.

Alan Greenspan Federal Reserve America Adrian Wooldridge official eight trillion dollar twenty five percent thirty year ten year
"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

06:31 min | 2 years ago

"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"This country at least two recessions during what she avoided. Frightening inflationary spirals that often come and go with great devastation. The chairman at age ninety two has co authored a great book with Adrian Wooldridge capitalism in America. History was a recent guest of mine on the Hugh Hewitt Show. Capitalism in America history is the brand new book authored by Alan Greenspan and Adrian Wooldridge. Of course, you know, Alan Greenspan has the legendary chairman of the Federal Reserve from nineteen eighty seven to two thousand and six what you may not know is he's a brilliant writer and this sweeping history of capitalism in America is really a book I had been waiting for for decades. Mr. Greenspan, I am curious as to why after such a story and distinguished career. You would under. Take this had to be a lot of work capitalism. America is is large and long and great. But it had been a lot of work was a lot of work. But after understand that communists, like myself, it's learning experience, and I'm always trying to get new ideas as to how the domestic and global economies alerts. Why did I tell you Mr Chairman, I I've been teaching law students for twenty three years, and I've always longed for a book could explain to the underlying economic dynamism that has birthed the constitutional order and regulatory system we have I finally got it. And thank you for that. They're gonna have to read this now in every class, and they're gonna love reading it. Because they'll finally have a grasp of how we got here. I always begin. How did we get here? And we got here because of capitalism is that a Thursday. Exactly. Correct. Okay. So I'm going to cover with you a number of subject because the book begins at the beginning and say I want to start at the end because it's kind of dark, America's fading dynamism, and I quote from page three Ninety-six Winston Churchill once said to his fellow countrymen that we have not journeyed across the centuries across the oceans across the mountains across the prairies because we are made of sugar candy, but Alan Greenspan writes today, thanks to a malign combination of litigation regulation, pedagogy fashion sugar. Candy, people are everywhere. Can you expand on that? Mr Chairman, basically imbredded into the American psyche. In fact, that's what's defines us. It's the entrepreneurial spirit, which doesn't exist in any other place in the world. And when you go back, and you look at history, it is just awesome. I learned more about American history writing this book with incidentally. Out of the loop is critical factor and the two of us. So we're pretty much picking up to his from colonial America Clements. All the way through current days. But at the end, your tone is not optimistic Mr Chairman. Well, it's not after the single statistic which. And that. Did not get to someplace. Data on gross, domestic savings and governments social benefits entitlements. His remarkably stable. One is driving out the. And it's not credible. Konami is a whole sector, but it's perfectly credible. If you think in terms of what basically entitlements are there? Their actions implemented government edict. Therefore of necessity. Trying to figure out who is doing what to whom and you'll find out that the some two percent of the. Remarkably slaps since nineteen sixty five. Conclude of necessity. Title, which you're driving out the savings. And then I go further into the analysis and demonstrate savings flow. We borrow from abroad. Now, I might add eighteen trillion dollar debt. Foreigners. The combination is basically crowd. Dr capital investment that does come through. But I was curious about the current situation. There was an argument that Donald Trump's election unleash the animal spirits again. Now, you're a student of irrational exuberance student of bubbles does the current period of vigor in the economy, look like a bubble to Alan Greenspan. Well, it was done in a different manner. Find particular tax cut is one which does loose capital investment. And hence productivity. Standards of living. The only problem is we're not paying for it. What you're saying dramatic rise in central debt? Nobody cares about several to the public. It's not a political issue until ultimately engenders. I have to ask you about one headline fidelity says it will trade bitcoin for hedge funds. All right. Alan greenspan. What do you make of crypto currencies in our current market situation? Well, you have to understand what it is a currency. I crypto currency. I know. Race to the world at large continental issued in seventeen seventy five to fund the war. Paper money. Has no backing. Results. What happened in seventeen seventy five. Through. The whole structure of fell apart. Tried currencies. Don't exist indefinitely. Impact some prudent? It is a fire currency when you have fired currency either. Plus addition to finance. Or zero. Have a negative. Currency..

Alan Greenspan Mr Chairman America Adrian Wooldridge Hugh Hewitt chairman of the Federal Reserv America Clements Konami Donald Trump Winston Churchill eighteen trillion dollar twenty three years two percent
"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:39 min | 2 years ago

"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Of a brand new book on America and capitalism. Critical issue. Tossed. Policy is one. The suture dosing. Cut it off. Concerned about what's going on today? It's not only the United States North started visually with Brexit. London. Emigrant showed up on the streets of London. Presumably as number three per said caused. Reaction. Farmers dot led ultimately, Brexit and. The best way of putting it is that what causes that. Slowdown in productivity growth because of the crowding out of. Private savings causes that. Engendering? Much slower rate of GDP rose standards of living are growing much less rapidly. Because. Grossed has virtually ground to a halt two or three percent. Are you now down under one percent year? This is why the regulatory revolution is in my view so important, but before we run out of time tell you with former fed chairman Alan Greenspan about his new book capitalism in America co authored with Adrian Wooldridge, and it's really remarkable read I have to finish on China because last Thursday, firmness NBC I sat down with national security adviser John Bolton previously had sat down with Mike Pompeo. They're both talk me in terms of China, which are very resonant with your attitude, which is it has taken an unfortunate direction away from Deng Xiaoping's approach that president gee is abandoning the rule of law, and that they're becoming not a good operator for the world economy or for the United States. Can you expand on that? Mr. Greenspan after remember the nineteen nineties China working off dunk Xiaoping's generals philosophy. Have gotten to the point where. Who is prime minister of the time. A versus Bush. Replicate in China. What the United States economy looks like they were doing it remarkably effectively and the real surge in Chinese advance per capita, GDP productivity. Occurred in that particular period and. The chairman of the Senate, obviously, I dealt fairly closely with. For both. Richard both prime minister and the president of China. It was remarkable. They knew more about emerging markets. Most Americans had any notion of something happened at the end of that period. And we're. Remember one from Deng Xiaoping, floored that came creasing liberal and progressive. Yes, rule of law was taking root. Exactly and something happened. And it's not what it is. But the prime minister under president. Stops the improvement. Sorta street report of you somebody releasing free markets. Resulted that. Stagnated in park. But most importantly. President xu. Rubio throwbacks as soon as I saw that they had eliminated the automatic ten year turnover. And it did not have a successor. I said something fundamentalists happened. China. Capita GDP. Third of where it is in the United States. Reverse themselves. Dr. Very classical. Policies free markets, which the Chinese were initiating many respects doing better than we. So I don't know what happened to your closed doors in the politburo something fundamental happened shifted back in time. I'll be back to you. But back in time. China will numbers has only a third of a crooked capita GDP. The United States far removed from where we are. We we say nineteen sixty where China is today..

China United States Deng Xiaoping prime minister president Alan Greenspan America Brexit chairman President xu London Mike Pompeo politburo Adrian Wooldridge fed Senate Bush Rubio
"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

05:43 min | 2 years ago

"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Of a brand new book on America and capitalism. Critical issue. Policy is one understands the future. Cut it off. Concerned about what's going on? It's not only the United States. Shorted visually Brexit, London. Showed up on the streets of London. Presumably as number two said because reaction. Foreigners that led ultimately to to Brexit and. The best way of putting it. What causes that? The slowdown in productivity growth because of the crowding out. Private savings. What causes that? Engendering much slower rate. GDP rose standards of living are growing much less rapidly. Because. Gross virtually ground to a halt to be two or three percent. Are you now down under one percent the year? This is why the the regulatory revolution is in my view so important, but before we run out of time. I'm telling you with former fed chairman Alan Greenspan about his new book capitalism in America co authored with Adrian Wooldridge, and it's really remarkable read I have to finish on China because last Thursday premise NBC I sat down with national security adviser John Bolton previously had sat down with Mike Pompeo. They're both talk me in terms of China, which are very resonant with your attitude, which is taking an unfortunate direction away from Deng Xiaoping's approach. The president gee is abandoning the rule of law and that they're becoming not a good operator for the world economy or for the United States. Can you expand on that? Mr. Greenspan, you have to remember that the nineteen nineties China working off Deng Xiaoping's. Joe's lawsuit. Gotten to the point where. Who is prime minister? A couple of. To replicate in China. What the United States your comedy looks like they were doing it remarkably effectively and the real surge in Chinese advance per capita, GDP productivity. Occurred in particular, period. And. Chairman of the Senate the time. I obviously, I don't. Closely with. Both. Originally, prime minister and the president of China. It was remarkable. They knew more about marriage and free markets. Most Americans had any notion of something happened at the end. Subsequent remember from Deng Xiaoping floored came creasing liberal and progressive. Yes, rule of law was taking root. Exactly and something happened. And it's not what it is. But. The prime minister under president. Roots? Far stopped the improvements. So to speak. From a point of view, somebody religion free markets. The result of that. Things start. Part. But most importantly. President xu. Peruvian throwbacks as soon as I saw that they had eliminated the automatic ten-year turnover. And it did not have a successor. I said something fundamental happened. Remember the China? Capita GDP. Third where does is in the United States? Reverse themselves. Doc. Some very classical. Policies free markets, which the Chinese were initiating in many respects doing better than we. So I don't know what happened to your closed doors in the politburo, but something fundamental happened shifted back in time, obviously back multi tone. She's in time. China will number still has only a third of the capital GDP. The United States far removed from where we are. We. We say nineteen sixty. China. That concludes my broadcast.

China United States Deng Xiaoping prime minister president Brexit America London Chairman Alan Greenspan President xu Mike Pompeo Adrian Wooldridge politburo fed Senate Joe NBC
"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"adrian wooldridge" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Former Federal Reserve chairman author of a brand new book on America and capitalism. Critical issue. Policy is one which understands the future. I'm going to cut it off. Concerned basically about what's going on? It's not only the United States, you're shorted visually with Brexit. London. Emigrants showed up on the streets of London. And presumably number three. Reaction against foreigners dot led. Ultimately brexit. And the best way of putting it. What causes that? The slowdown in productivity growth because of the crowding out. Private savings. What causes that? Engendering a much slower raped. GDP rose standards of living are growing much less rapidly. Because. Grossed has virtually ground to a halt used to be two or three percent. Are you now down under one percent year? This is why the regulatory revolution is in my view so important, but before we run out of time, I'm telling you with former fed chairman Alan Greenspan about his new book capitalism in America co authored with Adrian Wooldridge, and it's really remarkable read I have to finish on China because last Thursday for MSNBC I sat down with national security adviser John Bolton previously had sat down with Mike Pompeo. They're both talk me of China, which are very resonant with your attitude, which is has taken an unfortunate direction away from Deng Xiaoping's approach that president gee is abandoning the rule of law, and that they're becoming not a good operator for the world economy or for the United States. Can you expand on that? Mr. Greenspan, you have to remember that in the nineteen nineties China working off Deng Xiaoping's general philosophy. To the point where. Who is prime minister of the term couples versus Bush. Men. Fishing to replicate. What the United States economy looks like and they were doing it remarkably effectively and the real surge in Chinese dance per capita, GDP productivity occurred in that particular period. And. Chairman of the Senate the time are obviously closely with both. Richard prime minister and the president of China. It was remarkable. They knew more about nursing free markets. Most Americans had any notion of something happened at the end curiosity. Subsequent. Remember from Deng Xiaoping froward came creasing liberal and progressive. Yes. Rule of law was taking root. And something happened. And it's not what it is. But. But. Prime minister under president. Stops improvements, so discreet, reporters view, somebody releasing free markets. And. The result of that. Stagnated park. But most importantly. President shoot her. She jumped up. Peruvian throwback as soon as I saw that they had eliminated the automatic ten-year turnover. And did not have a successor. Something fundamental has happened. Remember that China? Capita GDP. Third of where the United States. Reverse themselves. Very classical. Policies three markets, which Chinese were initiating. Many respects doing better than we. So I don't know what happened to your closed doors in the politburo, but something fundamental happened shifted back in time. I'll be back to. Doc in time. China. Remember still has only a third of a crook capita GDP. The United States far removed from where we are. We. We say nineteen sixty or is where China is..

China United States Deng Xiaoping president Chairman prime minister Alan Greenspan Federal Reserve America London Richard prime Brexit Mike Pompeo Adrian Wooldridge MSNBC Senate Stagnated park politburo