6 Episode results for "Adrian Florido"

Inside The Opening Days Of The Derek Chauvin Trial   And The Trauma It's Resurfacing

Consider This from NPR

16:36 min | 4 months ago

Inside The Opening Days Of The Derek Chauvin Trial And The Trauma It's Resurfacing

"Welcome to consider this from npr. And w amu. After the top story from npr. Stay with us for a look at what's happening here in the dc metro region from the w. amu newsroom. Genus scurry has been a nine one one dispatcher. In the city of minneapolis. For seven years. She's never made a call like the one she made on. May twenty fifth twenty twenty. My instincts were telling me that something's wrong. Something has not rate. I don't know what but something was. Great a may twenty fifth scurry was watching the video feed from a city camera near the corner of east thirty eighth street and chicago avenue. Police officers there had been holding a man on the ground for so long scurry thought. There was a problem with the video. I asked the street had frozen jazz that because it hadn't changed after learning the feed had not frozen scurry called the police sergeant in charge that day and the beginning of the call. You can hear her. Say you can call me a snitch if you want to. I didn't know you think. Call me if you want to you. But we have the cameras up for three twenty call home. Do they put them in. The body started leaving him And three twenty over at cup foods I don't know if they had used force or not. They got something out of the back of the squad and all of them sat on this man so i don't know if they need to do or not. They haven't said anything to me. That call is now exhibit twelve presented in the trial of derek chauvin. The former minneapolis. Police officer charged with the murder of george floyd ever prior to. That didn't call like that to a sergeant and no further questions. Thank you consider this. George floyd death. Last may sparked a movement his life in the way it ended after nearly ten minutes under the knee of a white police officer became a global story and the next chapter of that story is now being ridden in minneapolis. Courtroom will hear more from inside from npr. I'm audie cornish. it's tuesday march thirtieth. This message comes from. npr sponsor. Three m who is using science and innovation to help the world respond to covid nineteen. Three implants are running around the clock producing more than ninety five million respirators per month in the us. In addition three m also maximize production of other solutions including bio pharma. Filtration hand sanitizers and disinfectants. Learn more at three m dot com slash covid. Three m science applied to life on. Npr's pop culture. Happy hour podcast. We talk about. Tv movies and more like the new marvel discipline series falcon and the winter soldier and definitive ranking of the best. Muppets all of that. And around. Twenty minutes every weekday. Listen now to the pop culture. Happy hour podcast from npr. It's consider this from npr. Visit gentlemen of the jury. Good morning my name. Is jerry blackwell in prosecutor jerry. Blackwell's hour-long opening statement on monday. He kept coming back to three numbers. Nine two nine three most important numbers in the case. Nine minutes twenty nine seconds. That blackwell said was how long police officer. Derek chauvin knelt on the neck. A forty six year old. George floyd nine minutes twenty nine seconds. That's longer than the eight minutes and forty six seconds that was reported in the months after floyd's death. The jury was shown video of the incident and one juror gripped her arm. Rest as she watched. You can believe you're is that it's a homicide smirk blackwell till the jurors that floyd said he couldn't breathe twenty seven times and that he was breathless or pulse lewis for more than four minutes while chauvin continued to kneel on his neck. We're going to ask you find him guilty of murder. Second degree murder the third degree second degree manslaughter. That was how the prosecution opened as for the defense lack here. Defense attorneys for derek. Chauvin argued that the growing chorus of bystanders. That day distracted police from george floyd who was unarmed not resisting and cuffed on the ground screaming causing the officers to divert attention from the care of mr floyd to the threat. That was growing in front of him. Sheldon's attorney eric nelson also called attention to the mix of drugs in floyd's system and nelson argued that floyd had and ultimately died from cardiac arrhythmia all of which acted to further compromise already compromised and we should note here. The official autopsy report from county medical examiner ruled floyd's death a homicide and that report said floyd died from cardio. Pulmonary complicating law enforcement subdural restrain and neck compression also of note on monday. Both the prosecution and defense took pains to tell the jury. This case is about this case. Only he's prosecutor jerry blackwell. This case is about mr derek chauvin and is not about all police and defense attorney eric nelson. I agree with counsel for the state. There is no political or social cause in this courtroom but of course outside the courtroom. The case is widely viewed as a referendum on police accountability and the criminal justice system. Shraibman is in the court room on trial. That was civil rights activists. Al sharpton at a press conference in minneapolis. The day trial began the long swing. Everybody police are not above the law police subject to the law. And that's what's going on in his and that's why we're here now. We just told you a little bit about day. One of the trial. Monday tuesday wednesday to and among the witnesses called to the stand for several bystanders. Who watched as derek. Chauvin held his knee. On george floyd's neck reporter adrian. Florida was in the courtroom. He spoke about what he heard to. Npr's elsa chang so understand that these witnesses they also talked about what they were feeling as they watched floyd struggle to breathe under chopin's need can you tell us a little more about what they said and and who they are the witnesses today included. Dr nella frazier The teenager who filmed the cell phone video of floyd's arrested so much of the world has seen by now Her nine year old cousin also took the stand but the day started with someone who i took the stand. Yesterday donald williams. He's a young man who in the famous video can be heard pleading with chauvin to get off of floyd's neck Questioning by defense attorney. Eric nelson interesting because nelson has said that he's going to be arguing. That officers chauvin felt threatened by the crowd gathered to watch the arrest and donald williams who was black Spent several minutes pleading with and in some instances insulting chauvin as he pinned floyd down. Here's the defense attorney. Eric nelson asking him a question. It's fair to say that you grew angrier and angrier through professional professional stadium my campaign. You ought to be angry. It was a pretty tense exchange As was much of the questioning williams by the defense Williams also testified. He called the police on the police to report that floyd had been murdered shortly after the incident ended. And did you say another witness was a who filmed floyd's arrest. What did she have to say. yeah darnell. Frazier was seventeen at the time of this incident. She and her cousin were walking up to the foods store where where it all started when she noticed what was happening Her phone to film. And here's what she said when prosecutor jerry blackwell asked describe what she saw. I heard george. Floyd i can't breathe. Please get off of me. I can't breathe he. He cry for his mom. He was a pain. It seemed like he knew seemed like he was over for him. She told the court filming that video had changed her life. And how did show vince. Defense lawyer handle this particular witness a bit more delicately than he dealt with a donald williams earlier but still defense attorney. Eric nelson put a lot of focus on what he has been characterizing as this angry crowd that gathered gathered. Here's what he asked frazier about that. You heard various people calling the officers names and and the volume of people in the bystanders grew louder over time more so as he was becoming more responsive meaning else is floyd was becoming unresponsive. She later clarified that. No one in the crowd at any point threatened or attacked chauvin nor did he seem afraid of the crowd according to to what she saw obviously adrian. This trial is going to include a lot of technical medical and scientific evidence but the prosecution here is very much going to be making an emotional appeal with their case. Can you talk a little more about that. Piece of it absolutely The most poignant moment of the day came when prosecutor blackwill asked Darnell frazier helping witness to george. Floyd's death had affected her. Listen listen to what she said. When i look at george floyd look at look at my dad. I looked at my brothers cousins uncles. Because they are black. And i look at that and i look at how that could have been one of them. It's been nights stayed up. Politics is short for not doing more in not physically interacting in not saving his life. But it's like it's not what if he's said meaning what ocsar chauvin should have done. He was sitting right in front of her in court. That's npr's adrian florida. It's consider this from npr. I'm audie cornish. And i'm actually listen. Be from wmu. In for jonathan. Wilson and rachel courteous yes. Jurisdictions in the region are helping more people get the vaccine but as government leaders pullback restrictions. There's early evidence that covid nineteen cases going up for example. wmu's alley schweitzer reports that in maryland. The number of coronavirus cases has risen steadily since governor. Larry hogan lifted restrictions on indoor dining and other activities. Four point ninety nine percent. That's the state's weekly average of positive coronavirus tests as of sunday two weeks ago. When merrill lifted restrictions on jim's nail salons and other businesses the average positive rate was three point six percent health officials across the state have said. The governor's moved to lift. Capacity restrictions was premature montgomery and prince george's counties kept some restrictions in place. Cases are up in both counties regard list. It's considered this from npr and wmu support for consider this from wmu comes from the attorneys and lobbyists of common coburn llp representing clients before agencies courts and congress helping businesses and public entities solve problems. More thompson coburn dot com support for consider this from. Wmu comes from e. y. For more than twenty nine years iwo a and its affiliated companies have been developing new modern homes that offer life within walking distance more at e. y. dot com slash w. Amu ooh more recent reports on covid nineteen cases in maryland. Save the positivity rate is now above five percent and other news a new study from the greater washington partnership says the area would benefit from a regional commuter rail that runs throughout dc maryland and virginia. The regional commuter rail expansion would cost about twenty billion dollars. Joe mcandrew leads transportation policy for the business group behind the study. He spoke with wmu transportation. Reporter jordan paschal about efforts to unify the region from baltimore to richmond. Marc trains have been around since the nineteen eighties and bureau since the nineties. So why haven't these two systems been combined before great question. Part of it is the physical barriers Mark serves the maryland suburbs in the washington. Dc metro area. Goes all the way out to west. Virginia and frederick as well as to points north in baltimore at perryville via reserves But assis said down to fredericksburg collectively everyday in pre pandemic times. Both of the services provided over fifty thousand trip store area residents primarily commuters. Trying to connect into jobs central business districts. And now in the evening you know our systems. The railroads were built hundreds of years ago. Many of the railroad tracks and bridges are at capacity to provide the movement of trains beyond washington union station where both train systems currently in their trips. Why did the partnership decide to look at this issue and steady find. Yeah you know. What the partnership really wanted to look at this issue from was the fact that many have looked at this for the last couple of decades. But we haven't seen a lot of forward momentum in the region truly has kind of expanded beyond travel patterns that that the current system provides for our region to grow and abort -clusive manner we need to be able to better connect residents across borders to jobs and opportunity now. Rail system is a sleeping giant if done generate forty billion dollars at gross economic output create hundreds of thousands of jobs throughout our region. Allow for more inclusively growing bridget. Grower ridership by one hundred twenty five percent on the commuter rail network and ensure inclusive growth in expand access to moderate affordable housing options. At a time where we need it the most. So what are the major hurdles to allowing trains to run in either state. Yes some of its physical right. Governor north and secretary. Valentine at the district are working really hard to expand the long bridge that goes across the potomac river is currently a two track bridge built in the early nineteen hundreds expanding. Its four tracks Washington union station The bnp tunnel in baltimore off physical barriers but once those projects get expanded as they are planned. In the coming years then the question becomes. How do we make sure that our fleet are platforms are able to go ahead at half trans running from one state to the other and that's really important. Obviously this is good news for the fifty thousand long distance commuters but who else could benefit from this. Yeah definitely i mean. We're what we're planning for with this. Rail vision is not just a run trans beyond station that but to greatly expand service right now. Our our rail is expansive the challenges. Most of the service goes away in the evening on the weekends. We're gonna plan for service at all hours of the day enduring our peak periods up to fifteen minute frequencies providing better service at all hours the day more people can use. You can listen to the full conversation on w. a. m. u. dot org. Thanks for joining me for. Consider this from npr. Listen again next time. We'll make sense of the major stories happening in the washington region and elsewhere in your world. I'm actually listening.

george floyd floyd chauvin Eric nelson jerry blackwell npr donald williams minneapolis Chauvin audie cornish npr scurry derek chauvin wmu bio pharma Derek chauvin blackwell mr floyd mr derek chauvin Shraibman
Vaccine Approval Looks Imminent, But Distrust, Misinformation Have Experts Worried

Coronavirus Daily

18:57 min | 8 months ago

Vaccine Approval Looks Imminent, But Distrust, Misinformation Have Experts Worried

"It could finally happen on thursday. That's when an fda advisory committee will meet and vote on whether to grant emergency use authorization and eu a for distribution of corona virus vaccine developed by pfizer. We're expecting a good discussion there of the data and then we believe shortly after that meeting will be able to make a decision. Dr steven on is head of the fda. He spoke to npr earlier this week after his agency put out a statement about the pfizer vaccine which was recently approved and began distribution in the uk. Ain't when it comes to that vaccine. The fda said that there are quote no specific safety concerns identified that would preclude issuance of an e ua and the conclusions that you just read. are are formed by a career scientists who look very detailed in a detailed way at the safety but also the efficacy of the vaccine And so that Is very very important. Part of our promise. The american that we won't cut corners in how we assess safety and effectiveness of a vaccine whether enough americans are hearing. That promise is another question. Public polling is revealed as many as forty percent of americans are expressing reluctance to get a coronavirus vaccine and misinformation on the topic is rampant online is a rating grady ready powerful parallel pandemic to the real imran. Ahmed studies misinformation on the internet he. Ceo the non-profit center for countering digital hate neck rebound who rely on social media for information about the pandemic are less likely to say they would get a coronavirus vaccine. The one hundred and fifty largest anti vaccination accounts on social media have gained eight million followers since january in essence. Ahmed says the krona virus and misinformation are twin pandemics. Amplifying each other won't be biological one being social what can in concert really undermine octopussy to contain consider this experts say at least seventy five percent of people need to be vaccinated in order to get the virus under control but there is a growing amount of misinformation and distrust in the way of that goal from npr. I'm audie cornish. It's wednesday december ninth. Let's be honest. this year has been hard from covid. Nineteen the presidential election. So much of our energy is spent just getting through the day. Join us for a new season of the story. Core podcast from npr to hear conversations from people who have faced challenges. Come out on the other side learn some meaningful lessons along the way it's consider this from. Npr back in january. The world was barely talking about a mysterious virus that had recently emerged in central china but at the university of washington researcher kalina coal tie already heard about it in the anti vaccination groups on facebook. The conversation about it was like. Hey here's this mysterious illness. Or here's a summit. Does seems to be spreading in china. You some of the people in these communities are actually well aware what's happening in other countries relationship to vaccines coal tie. Who spoke to. Npr's ted correspondent shannon bond as studied the growing anti vaccination movement on facebook for years. There's been a long outstanding concern. That took an epidemic or in this case pandemic is going to potentially cause of another vaccine to be created to potentially be like forced onto everyone and ideas like that used to be confined to specific groups groups dedicated to vaccines alternative health and parenting. The this year coltan says the pandemic has created opportunities for misinformation to become mainstream. There's so much we don't know so much. Uncertainty at uncertainty makes us also proud to misinformation to try to like that feeling in response to the growing appetite for misinformation on its platform. Last week facebook announced it would remove debunked information about the coronavirus vaccine that would quote lead to imminent visible harm. Yes there are false claims that they're taking down but there's a lot of people who were just asking questions so many ways you'd be very hard pressed to say that folks room is going to lead to imminent harm claire. Wardell is the co founder and director for straffed a nonprofit focused on research to address misinformation. She told npr. There's been a noticeable uptick just in the last few months of misinformation about a coronavirus vaccine. Some of it is to make money people trying to drive clicks to their websites where they're selling health supplements so there's those kind of people there are people who are just trying to crave connections with the community. People's lives have been turned upside down this year. They're looking for explanations and then some people are just doing this to cause trouble to see what they can get away with but no matter. The motivation wardell says a lot of vaccine misinformation that winds up on facebook doesn't meet the platforms imminent physical harm standard. And what we're missing is the daily drip drip drip drip drip of low level Vaccine misinformation none of which would break facebook's barrier but we don't know what this looks like. If over a couple of years you see this kind of content that's questioning. The government is questioning the cdc's questioning dr fauci and we have almost no research that allows us to understand that long shooting impacts of misinformation one thing experts study vaccine misinformation. Do understand is that it often takes hold where people may not be looking for it. Rene directa is one of those experts. She directs the stanford internet observatory. She spoke to. Npr's robin young about where vaccine misinformation often appears on social media. And why it's so hard to control. A page may not have a primary focus on what some would consider to be a core anti vaccine beliefs. But they're concerned about another issue that's adjacent or related so you come for the organic food the baby wearing and then in the course of that you're are also becoming their be of constant pushes of messages related to this other thing that you may not necessarily have joined four well and this is a good place to mention. We're talking about people from all across the political spectrum. A lot of people who are on the left looking for an organic lifestyle a healthy lifestyle. So this is both sides yes so there are seven or eight distinct threads of anti vaccine messaging. So there's the health component the idea that there are toxins in vaccines. There is the old conspiracy it's been debunked over and over and over again but it persists that vaccines cause autism. There are narratives related to religion. The idea that if god made you perfect why would you need a vaccine more narratives that appeal to the right ten towards the application of a vaccine. The idea that the government telling you to do something is tyranny and also knowing what you're looking at There are also very official looking websites by groups with names like the children's ethical safety research institute pushing false vaccine information. This reminds me a little bit of what we've heard that cunanan does pull people in by pushing this completely false theory that democrats in particular are running child sex trafficking organizations completely completely not true but there are people who concerned about child sex trafficking. Get pulled into that. Is it a little bit like that. There's a lot right now. you know. There's a conspiracy that financial motivation is what's driving the vaccine process that this is going to turn people into antennas for five g. There's no mechanism by which that could happen. But at the same time this is still a narrative that begins to gain traction among the conspiratorial anti five g community. And so you see a lot of these cross pollination narratives shape so meantime people are being targeted with misinformation on facebook and twitter but studies show that it would take seventy five percent of the population getting vaccinated to control the outbreak. Do you worry that we might not get there. I think the challenge has been that it's growing. It's difficult to get an accurate sense of how many people fully believe all of the things that are said in these groups and on these pages. Unfortunately a lot of the rhetoric is trending towards this. Why should i have to narrative. And i think that we need to make sure that anybody who's communicating about why these vaccines matter is is explaining the value to all of society. Not just the individual and how any restoration of our. Our old way of living is something that we bear. Collective responsibility for rene duress is the technical research manager at the stanford internet observatory. She spoke to robin young. And now that shows a co production of npr and member station w. b. u. r. In boston public health. Experts are worried that some people who are skeptical of coronavirus vaccine or the people who need it the most including latinos and african americans who make up a disproportionate number of people hospitalized or killed by covid nineteen but there are efforts to fight vaccine skepticism within those communities. Here's correspondent adrian for ito who reports on race and identity for npr. Maria does not intend to get vaccinated. At least not right away. I definitely will be one of the people that won't take it. You know in the beginning players. She is not generally a vaccine skeptic. A discipline since this new i am not comfortable of getting it surveys. Show that kind of skepticism about the covid vaccine is widespread. Nearly forty percent of latinos told pew researchers. They would probably or definitely not get the vaccine more than half of black respondents said the same white people have also expressed hesitancy but the reluctance among african americans and latinos is especially worrying because their rates of infection are so much higher. It's it's a major concern dr keith. Norris's among an army of people ramping up efforts to ensure latinos african americans and other people colored. Trust the vaccine. He's hearing a wide range of concerns. Many stemming from a long history of racism in medical research concerned about being a guinea pig concerns about pharma and federal government. And then there's lots of social media messaging downplaying the importance of coronavirus. Norris works for ucla and is leading california effort funded by the national institutes of health to build vaccine trust. The strategy is to get clear. Concise information to black and brown communities with help from so-called trusted gers people with existing relationships in communities with high covid risk. People like tony. Wafer a longtime los angeles-based hiv educator in may he lost five close family members to covid. He's talked about that a lot as he's encouraged black friends and neighbors to volunteer for vaccine trials and now to take the vaccine is hard to say. Get getting this trial and these were people gonna help you win. These are the same white. Have been kicking your ass alway. You know what i mean. He says he acknowledges people's skepticism and meets them where they are. I tell people what are you. Won't they say well. I'm all blood pressure medicine. I'm taking central cholesterol. So you know before you've taken that pill clunk child out of thin air then they go really yeah. It was the clinical shelters. Ucla's keith. norris says this outreach. We'll take many forms in person on the airwaves and in virtual town halls. He says researchers will track. What messages about the vaccine. People respond to to see if there are certain areas that tend to have a greater impact moving people from being reticent to being willing. I'm not gonna go. Set is with sonny seattle health san diego clinic that serves a large mexican and mexican. American population fears about vaccine. Safety are compounded by language issues and concerns about immigration status. The clinic trained community outreach workers to answer questions about the vaccine the reason why this is working is because people are not relying on a government entity posed information especially due to the last four years. People rather i hear from someone that they already have a relationship with. She expects the vaccine to gain acceptance over time but she also says many of the clinics patients are already eager for the vaccine because they've spent months risking themselves in essential. Jobs have lost friends and family. Don't wanna see anyone else. Any other loved one. Have to go through that for these people. The vaccine means being able to continue to provide allies for their loved ones and to be there for them in the long run. She says that's the message. She intends to keep driving home. That's npr national correspondent. adrian florida. it's consider this from npr. I'm audie cornish. And i'm actually listen to be from. Wmu amu in for jonathan wilson around fifty thousand doses of the pfizer corona virus vaccine could arrive in maryland as early as next week. According to state officials people who work in hospitals and long term care facilities would be among the first to get the vaccine if approved by the fda maryland could also receive more than one hundred thousand doses of the modern vaccine later this month. Both vaccines required to doses. Here's maryland governor. Larry hogan at a press conference on tuesday to be effective. These vaccines need reach a vast majority of our population and to do so in a relatively short period of time this is by far the most massive undertaking of this pandemic. This is consider this from npr and wmu number of recorded covid cases in the washington region has surpassed five hundred thousand since the pandemic began and as government and health leaders in our region continued to enforce restrictions. Hope has been placed in the possibility of vaccines arriving this month and early next year. Leaders in maryland. Virginia and dc have discussed the vaccine distribution plants saying they will prioritize workers and first responders here to discuss this plans and continued efforts to stop the spread of the virus in our region. His wmu's margaret barthel. Hi margaret hi ashley. So we know that. The number of reported cases in the region since the beginning of the pandemic is more than five hundred thousand. But can you give us a sense of what that case load. Looks like in each jurisdiction sherpa. I think it's fair to say that the caseload is is the worst. It's been across the region for the whole pandemic virginia average more than three and a half thousand new cases per day. Over the past week triple springs peak. Maryland is also close to tripling its peak and the district is close to doubling its spring numbers of new cases and we heard a little bit earlier about hogan's plan for distributing the vaccine in maryland. What does that look like. In virginia and dc. Sure i think we can generally expect things in virginia to look pretty similar of frontline healthcare workers and people who work or live in long term care settings will be the first to get the vaccine in the district. Things are a little bit more complicated. The federal government appears to be getting ready to allocate vaccine doses according to state population but dc officials say that that will only be enough to cover about ten percent of the healthcare workers in the city and its extra complicated of course because c. health workers may live in neighboring jurisdictions. So there's a real question about how that's all going to work out. Who's going to get a who's going to vaccinate whom and so forth and in the meantime each leader has put limits on gatherings and enforced wearing masks but no one is saying their jurisdiction is going to shut down completely right. This came up at a press conference with dc mayor. Muriel bowser district officials have been reluctant to reimpose. Stay at home orders. Here's what health director. Dr la- quander net had to say about. That would be much easier for us as the health department to advise the mirror to move us to stay at home posture. But that would not necessarily be widely acceptable by the five residents of our community and the degree to which we adherents to. That immediately may also be debatable. Now nine months into the response and so we have to think about how we can make these incremental changes that will give us some benefit and impact based on the populations that are driving our increasing cases. So nesbitt didn't provide any particular evidence that people wouldn't comply with stricter rules but think this kind of hesitancy from local officials Certainly underscores the degree of pandemic fatigue. That we're all feeling as well as a real concern about the survival of local businesses even while we are seeing the number of cases go so dramatically up and you mentioned this concerned about local businesses. It seems that. Dc is working to help out people who are struggling financially as well. Yes bowser also announced a new plan to distribute more cares act money. It's a one time. A twelve hundred dollar stimulus check to people who applied for eligible for the federal pandemic unemployment assistance program before november thirty s. That program covers gig workers and contractors and it will expire this month if congress doesn't extend it so. Dc's taking matters into its own hands on this one. That's wmu's margaret barth fell. Thank you so much. Thanks so much for having me ashleigh and thanks for joining us for. Consider this from npr. Listen again next time. And we'll make sense of the major stories happening in the washington region and elsewhere in your world. I'm actually gonna be.

npr forty percent facebook fda robin young five g Npr Dr steven seventy five percent pfizer Ahmed kalina coal shannon bond coltan straffed dr fauci Rene directa cunanan stanford internet observatory china
George Floyd Case: Trial Of Former Police Officer Derek Chauvin Underway

Consider This from NPR

18:06 min | 5 months ago

George Floyd Case: Trial Of Former Police Officer Derek Chauvin Underway

"Welcome to consider this from npr. W amu after the top story from npr. Stay with us for a look at what's happening here in the dc metro region from the w. amu. Newsroom typically. we might start a story about a trial on the steps of a courthouse but the murder trial of derek. Chauvin the minneapolis. Police officer caught on film kneeling on the neck of george floyd for almost nine minutes. It's not just any trial. Most downtown minneapolis and especially the block. Where the trial is being held is barricaded in fencing barbed wire and patrolled by national guardsmen. There's been a knot in my stomach for the last few days leading up to this. Because i'm not sure we're going to see justice so lisa. Kelly has been protesting on the closest corner. She could get to the hennepin county courthouse and instead of a cardboard sign. She brought mirrors forgotten away. Pd brutalize the city and citizens for peacefully protesting all summer long. We haven't forgotten that they're still hasn't been justice and so our message to them today is to reflect. She told npr's leila fadel that she plans to hold them up. If police officers approach asked them to reflect on their actions the protests and the riots have been a thing of last year. But we're still here. We're still grieving. We're still angry. We still want to see justice so yeah we'll be out here all day. Consider this george. Floyd's death sparked a year of mass protests pledges from corporate america and social media campaigns. But so far. None of that has translated to major changes. In the way these cases play out in criminal courtrooms. That means the question of how to hold police accountable for violence still an open. One from npr. I'm audie cornish. It's tuesday march ninth. This message comes from your sponsor. Three m who was using science and innovation to help the world respond to kobe. Nineteen three implants running around the clock producing more than ninety five million respirators per month in the us. In addition three m also maximize production of other solutions including bio pharma. Filtration sanitizers and disinfectants. Learn more at three m dot com slash cove. Three m science applied to life. We are still in the middle of this pandemic and right now. Having science news you can trust from variance to vaccines is essential. Npr shortwave has your back about ten minutes every weekday. Listen and subscribe to shortwave the daily science podcast from npr. It's consider this from npr. What do you know about this case from media reports. What podcasts do you listen to. Have you ever been restrained or put a chokehold for example by law enforcement or during a self defense class yes or no. These are among the questions in a survey that went out to potential jurors in the trial of derek chauvin. Larger number two is that correct. Yes on tuesday morning. Potential began the vetting process and lawyers on both sides of the case can use the survey answers as a jumping off. Point to suss out biases. A jury might have to disqualify those. They feel have already formed. An opinion about the case but in this country hasn't heard about the death of george floyd. You're obviously aware of this case. Before you received jury notice ellsworth the case. Yes here's attorney eric. Nelson questioning juror number two. Their identities are kept anonymous about his answers to the screening questionnaire. Use the word killed in a to describe the death of george. Do you think that that the use of that word is demonstrative of your opinion about this case. Could you read the full text of that for me. I would be happy to. He was put in the back of their car but escaped and was killed when chauvin knelt on his neck area. I wouldn't say that it's demonstrative of my opinion I think that what of attempting to convey juror explained that because he's not a legal expert. He doesn't consider himself qualified to determine whether it was a murder based on media coverage it appeared to him that floyd's death was quote out of his control. And do you attribute responsibility for that to my client sitting here today based on the media presentation. I don't think i can say one way or another. I mean not here. You know maybe. At the time. I had an opinion but was some distance. I don't think i can say okay. So you are opinion or your perspective has evolved over time as aperture. That's nearly an hour later. After both sides at questions or a number two judge roger k hill announced you will be on the street again investigator tonight one investigate and avoid all media coverage of this case and if there's any jury selection will likely take weeks with each potential juror answering similar questions. Opening arguments aren't expected until the week of march twenty ninth. It's rare to see a police officer tried for murder. It's nearly unheard of to see a conviction what we know. Is that roughly a thousand or eleven. Hundred people are killed by police every year. And typically it's less than it's in the maybe double digits single digits year. The number of police who are tried jamal solarte's reports on criminal justice and police for the marshall project. Believe it or not. The most common reason why police officers are actually tried for crimes and killings. Traffic accidents not for intentional uses of force. But yeah it's typically in the single digits. Convictions are even much more rare with such low odds larget says the prosecutors in a trial like derek. Chauvin need to use every avenue they can. The prosecution wanted to reinstate a charge of third degree murder against chauvin which the court needs time to consider larter explained to. Npr's mary louise kelley. The reason for bringing a more severe charge to a case like this prosecutors tend to give a whole series of charges at the jury can convict. If you don't feel that the evidence has met the requirements for you know the top charge. You can consider this next one. So it's certainly fair to say. The reinstatement of this charge would increase the likelihood of chauvin being convicted of something. But what will you be watching for when this trial does get underway in terms of what prosecutors will need to demonstrate to try to get a conviction from the jury here one of the main things. I'll be watching for is just the volume of witnesses. There's been. I believe something in the neighborhood of five hundred witnesses listed between the prosecution and the defense. I think it'll be interesting to see who does and does not get called and that will give us a sense of what the prosecution thinks. It's best line of attack. Is another thing to watch out for. Is just obviously all of the emotion and energy around the trial in minneapolis and around the country. What this does to our national conversation to our national energy around this question of race and policing do you see things changing. Do you see any kind of shift in terms of more. Police being charged or more convictions. Being one in these type incidents. I i think it's too early to say that. I think it's too early to make direct comparisons. Were still in this moment right. I think it's fair to say that we're in a post summer twenty twenty george floyd protests moment. I think that moment persists right now. Certainly what we can say is that a lot of jurisdictions from the local level to the state level. Have taken up some of these questions. Broadly what we've seen is three baskets of reforms We've seen in the aftermath of briana taylor's death. We've seen a lot of energy around reforming the use of no knock warrants after george floyd death. We've seen a number of laws that are built around addressing colds or corroded. Control holds or different types of holds that involve the neck or the upper back and restricting persons windpipes. More generally some of these laws have endeavored to address the broader systemic issues like qualified immunity apply to the profession at large law. Tae you reports on criminal justice and policing for the marshall project for high profile case like this one. Typically the courtroom would be full of the victim's family but because of the pandemic only one family member of george. Floyd is allowed in at a time on monday. That was his sister. Bridget floyd who watched as the lawyers discussed pretrial motions in the courtroom today in. Look at the officer. Who took my brother's life. She made a statement at the end of the day. I just really wanted the opposite opposite opposites. Know how much love. Florida had not only by me and his family. But you guys to in in the people around the country. It's a journey digest as you know you take two steps forward dan. You sometimes take a step back but corey back to two thousand six. Benjamin crump has helped secure settlements worth tens of millions of dollars for the family members of people killed by police. He's one of the attorneys. For george floyd family. Now many crumbs past settlements. They haven't been accompanied by a criminal conviction and when we spoke this week crump made the argument that the money alone is still enough to help reduce incidences of police violence. I think got capitalistic society. And the more they city governments have to take their budget as compensation to these families. The more they're going to make changes so they don't have to keep an out money then crump. You know. The first time i encountered you was In the panama city. Florida case of martin anderson who was a young man who was killed after being beaten by deputies at a juvenile boot camp and he would have turned thirty years old last month. You're shaking your head remembering that case is so tragic. Marla hanson's case was trayvon martin before trayvon martin and the internet had not quite taken off but that young boy with a kick punch suffocated on that video surveillance and even though we got law about 'em paid out by the state of florida for individual wrongful death not one of those eight guys who kicked him impassioned him and put a memorial tablets of his nose were convicted. In fact the alright jerem. Panama city only stayed out for our. When i have that you know. Everything was justified That this fourteen year old child will have. Nobody held accountable for killing him. Looking back at that case as you said while there was a financial settlement in it And the state of florida ended up getting rid of those juvenile boot camps. Altogether there band. Does it feel like there has been progress since then. There has been progress. is unfortunate. We have to remember. It's just been in the last thirty years where black people even get civil compensation for the police killing us. I mean they usually just kill us. Nothing no form of justice. So deloitte flawed and light brianna taylor and so many others has an opportunity to get a civil resolution in the civil courts but also a chance to get criminal justice which so many about white brothers sisters take for granted at this point. What would you consider progress so to speak. i mean is there an actual benchmark. Is there something that you would look for to say My work has become meaningful. Where is quite straightforward. Progress would be justice and justice would be them steer here with us living that we don't have these hashtags that become household names. The few that do become household names because we have to remember there. Were thirteen hundred people on average killed by police in america and out of storage to hide. We've really only come to know for five names each year. And can you imagine the other families who nobody ever talks about how that must make them feel about the value of their lovell benjamin crump. He's an attorney. He represents the family of george floyd. You're listening to consider this from npr. I'm audie cornish. And i'm jonathan wilson from wmu. I'm rachel courteous. Capital checkers is looking for a new location. After forty years in shaw the sale of the building where the association meets his pending club members. Worry about the future of pool. Checkers in dc. The year old club president says that if members aren't diligent with recruiting at some point there won't be any members left. If we don't keep saying please visit some point dam about being a member. It's consider this from npr. And w amu support for consider this from wmu comes from the attorneys and lobbyists of thompson coburn llp representing clients before agencies courts and congress helping businesses and public entities. Solve problems more at thompson. Coburn dot com support for consider this from. Wmu comes from e. way for more than twenty nine years a and its affiliated companies have been developing new modern homes that offer life within walking distance more at e. y. dot com slash w. Amu only in other news officials will begin administering covid nineteen tests groups of public school students attending in person lessons at random. The weekly testing program is aimed at reducing the spread of the virus. It'll kick off on march fifteenth. It's part of the district's plan to test ten percent of students et public and charter schools. And don't forget. Dc's vaccine pre registration site opens tomorrow. What told has the pandemic taking teens and older siblings. Wmu's debbie wrong spoke with youth who take on adult roles in their homes over the past year. Diana race was a senior walter. Johnson high school in bethesda last spring when her mom and dad became sick with covid. Nineteen race had to drive for parents to multiple medical facilities before they could get tested. She says her parents were hospitalized for nearly two weeks once home the eighteen year old became their caretaker for several more weeks until they recovered. I just didn't know what to do. Best start right. It's kind of hard for me to send your pain. I took a shower. And i literally cried like it was so hard for me to see them. Pain university of maryland researchers interviewed students and educators in montgomery county public schools about black and latino students experiences with learning during the pandemic associate professors. A family science. Amy lewin and kevin roy published a study on behalf of a coalition that advocates were black and latino students in the county once or called worrying for their mother who is sick with the crow virus and could not work another described watching fewer of his friends for online class opting to work instead. The researchers say students who have to take on worries and household duties are experiencing adult education. Adult essence are expected to act in adult like ways before being prepared for adulthood. Here's lewin when the adults in your world are having to turn their attention elsewhere just to survive stress levels community really high fifties and living with that kind of chronic stress can take a toll in all kinds of ways physiologically as well as psychologically for and you. I'm w tron. Thanks for joining us for. Consider this from npr. Listen again next time. We'll make sense of the major stories happening in the washington region and elsewhere in your world. I'm jonathan wilson. And i'm rachel courteous.

george floyd chauvin npr Chauvin audie cornish minneapolis leila fadel bio pharma npr derek chauvin roger k hill derek george jamal solarte larget mary louise kelley national guardsmen Floyd hennepin county briana taylor
Minneapolis Lives In 'A State Of Continuous Trauma' After Another Police Killing

Consider This from NPR

18:25 min | 3 months ago

Minneapolis Lives In 'A State Of Continuous Trauma' After Another Police Killing

"It was erected on martin. Luther king day as sheet metal sculpture replacing an earlier wooden one at the intersection of thirty eight and chicago. Avenue in minneapolis. That's where george floyd was killed. The sculpture depicts a raised fist. This week it was moved from downtown about half an hour's drive north to the minneapolis suburb of brooklyn center. Brooklyn center of course is where another black man twenty year old. Dante right was killed by police. This time by an officer who apparently meant to use a taser instead of gun since then. The town's police station has been the site of nightly protests. The officer who shot right resigned and has now been arrested. She will be facing criminal charges. The brooklyn center police chief. Tim gannon resigned too but not before he was asked this question at a press conference on monday. Police officers the states killing black man. Young women higher breaking the navy. I don't have an answer. That question consider this minneapolis in the midst of a trial over one. Police killing is now grappling with another. Well here how. The city is trying to cope and the latest from the trial of derek. Chauvin mpr elsa. It's wednesday april fourteenth support for considered this and the following message. Come from the jab. A new podcast from the economist. How well we'll covid nineteen vaccines work. And what did they mean for life going forward. What are vaccine passports. And will you need one. Find the answers in the jab each week. The economists science correspondent and health policy editor unpack a different theme along the complex supply. Chain that takes vaccines from the lab. The people who needed subscribe and listen to the jab for free today on apple podcasts. A cast or your podcast app whether you're looking to discover a new series to binge find your next great read or check out that movie everyone's talking about npr's pop culture happy hour. Podcast is your guide to all things entertainment every weekday wiki pop culture in high spirits. Listen now to the pop culture. Happy hour from npr. It's considered this from. Npr of the nearly fifty police officers who work in the brooklyn center police department mayor. Mike elliott said on tuesday that he didn't believe any actually lived in town that is Something that we are aware of Up until this time obviously You know we. We had a different leadership over the police department by up until this time the mayor meant literally that our this was the same press conference where he announced the resignation of the brooklyn center. Police chief we feel very strongly that we that we we need officers to be from the community. Obviously not every officer can live in the city where they work but there there is a Huge importance to having a significant number of your officers living in the community with a serve because But we should say at the police officer who shot dante. Right was no stranger to brooklyn center. That officer can potter had worked there for twenty six years. She was a police union president and she was actually training a new officer on sunday when they pulled dante. Right over for an expired registration. His car everybody. That was an accident and She should be allowed to resign. And that way she gives to keep a pitch and her benefits and so forth attorney benjamin crump who represents the right family spoke to npr wednesday morning later that afternoon potter was arrested. County prosecutor announced she would be charged with second degree manslaughter. Which in minnesota is punishable by up to ten years in prison. We just can't believe that can miles from the courthouse. Where derek chauvin on trial for killing george floor that you have a police office exercise such standard of care nor the gravity of west on dot on the minnesota all over america we are living in a continuous state of trauma. That is what minnesota state representative esther. J told a local paper in minneapolis. This week badge is a democrat who represents portions of north and downtown minneapolis. We spoke on wednesday about how the city is coping. It's it's difficult You know we are coming still through a pandemic. We have are dealing with the killing of george floyd which happened last may as well as the ongoing trial of former officer derek chauvin and then now as of sunday we have another police officer killing a young man dante right so when you put that on top of each other without having the space and the ability to mourn to grieve to heal it makes it very difficult to continue on As business as usual shot dante. Write her name. Is kim potter. She was arrested today and she is has been charged with second degree manslaughter. Do you think that that is the correct course of action here. I believe that that is actually the correct course of action. We need to begin to hold police officers accountable for when they kill black men when they killed by people when they killed people in general. This is not something that we can just easily wave away to say that it is a mistake but we as the community members. And i and i imagine that the family as well really wants to see some accountability and this is a form of accountability that we have in our system so i believe that this is correct. Well what about the recent departures from people at the top. The city manager. Who used to oversee the brooklyn center. Police department was fired and the police chief. There tim gannon. Who called the shooting an accident. He resigned yesterday. Do you think they're departures will help address some of the problems with policing there. I hope so. I mean as resident minneapolis. We have a very different system than a city of brooklyn center. And so i think you know brooklyn center. We'll have to decide for itself. What is what makes sense for its community But overall i believe that the more that we can do to ensure and show that community members that we are taking action and that we are taking action that reflects the needs of the communities. That is something that all of us should do across the state of minnesota. I wanna turn out to the trial of derek chauvin. The entire country obviously is volunteering. This trial tell me be sideshow. Wtn's guilt or innocence. What do you think is at stake in this trial. This trial is not the end. All be all of what justice actually means so. I people to remember that. This is a trial to hold does officer accountable for the murder that he committed but at the end of the day you know for us i think justice really means making sure that we are investing in our communities that are people have what they need to live successful thriving lives and that we are not cut down in the prime of our lives just because of an interaction with police officer that was minnesota state representative esther at j like you heard earlier brooklyn center. Where dante right was killed is about ten miles away from downtown minneapolis where the trial of former police officer. Derek chauvin is happening in the state of minnesota arrests. Thank you ms nelson ready to proceed. I with us tuesday morning. The prosecution rested its case and turned the floor over to the defense which continued to call witnesses on wednesday for her perjury with plus jurors heard from a key witness for the defense of forensic pathologist who offered an alternative explanation for george floyd stepped. Npr's adrian florida is in minneapolis covering this trial and joins us now. Hi adrienne high. Also so who was this witness. And what did he say exactly. What his name is. David fowler He is the former chief medical examiner for the state of maryland. And you know. The prosecution has spent days and several expert witnesses presenting technical and medical evidence to show that derek chauvin killed george floyd by pressing his knee into his neck fixating him but today this defense witness said no so. In my opinion mr floor had a sudden cardiac arrhythmia cardiac arrhythmia ju to his atherosclerotic and hypertensive heart disease. Will you can write that down. Multiple different ways during his restraint and joe by the pizza restrained by the please wait. What does that mean exactly. Well it means in his opinion that George floyd had a heart attack that his heart stopped because of pre existing heart disease. And this'll happen while he was being arrested He said that contributing factors were floyd's abnormally large heart which was found not topsy build up in his coronary arteries methamphetamine. That were found in floyd system. And something new that we hadn't really heard the defense lewd to before today which is He suggested that floyd could have suffocated from carbon monoxide poisoning because he was breathing in exhaust from the police. Car with your next to which he was being arrested. what do you think fowler's testimony signaled about the defensive strategy going forward well the defense spent all morning with fowler them over for the cross examination until after lunch she spent more time on the stand than any witness. During this three week trial it speaks to how how critical it is for the defense to raise doubts about the prosecution's argument that chauvin suffocated george floyd and unlike the prosecution which has to prove its case. The defense has to raise doubts in the minds of jurors so listen to this exchange. In which the defence attorney eric nelson tried to do that by asking fowler about the absence of any injuries on george floyd's neck in so in european the absence of such injury. How does that speak to the cause of death. It speaks to the amount of force that was applied to. Mr floyd was less than enough teresa nip occasion was that if it wasn't enough force to bruce him. It wasn't enough to kill him. Well how did the prosecution handle this witness on. Cross examination so prosecutor jerry. Blackwell came out swinging. And i think it's fair to say started dismantling fowler's testimony point-by-point within the first couple of minutes. He got fowler to admit he had not factored in the weight of derek chauvin equipment when calculating how much pressure came onto floyd's neck. I'm suggesting of carbon monoxide poisoning got to. He didn't even know if the police car was turned on And on the claim that a heart arrhythmia killed. Floyd listen to this exchange if a person dies as a result of oxygen that i also go into that ultimately of a fatal right correct every one of us in this room will have a fatal arrhythmia at some point right. Because that's kind of how you go. Yes this kind of questioning went on and on on most of the points in fowler's testimony he's one of the most important and possibly last witnesses for the defense. The defense is expected to close. Its case possibly soon as tomorrow that was. Npr's adrian. florida in minneapolis. It's considered this from npr. I'm elsa chang. And i'm rachel curzio from m. wmu. And i'm jonathan. Wilson congressional lawmakers debated whether dc should be a state wednesday before voting to bring the measure to the house floor for a full vote. Wmu's christians of potter reported on a recent letter. Twenty two republican attorney generals including those from texas ohio. Nebraska and north dakota wrote opposing dc statehood. They sent a letter to president but in congressional leaders tuesday that says making dc. The fifty first state goes against the founding fathers wishes and would give district residents outsized influence. National debates activists argue that statehood would grant voting rights to more than seven hundred thousand residents empowered disenfranchised black voters and allow the city to enact laws without congressional approval. It's consider this from npr. And w amu support for consider this from wmu comes from the attorneys and lobbyists thompson. Coburn lop advising businesses and public entities on changes in law regulation and policy helping clients innovate in a world defined by change thompson. Coburn dot com e. y. a. For more than twenty nine years e. y and its affiliated companies have been developing new modern homes that offer life within walking distance more at iwo aid dot com slash w. Amu so rachel. You've been covering the statehood markup session today. Can you tell us about the amendments to the statehood bill that lawmakers such as georgia republican representative jody hice and north carolina republican representative virginia. Foxx or proposer. A lot of the had to do with what the transition into statehood would look like. And that's something that the chair of the committee democrat carolyn. Maloney said was an improvement over last time the idea that republicans were already looking at the transition she took is this kind of tacit agreement. That dc would transition into statehood republicans. As you might imagine disagreed with that. But they're qualms with the transition for example had to do with the fact that the federal government is currently in charge of dc's court system and responsible for its incarcerated residents and some of these amendments set. Specific timelines for dc taking on those responsibilities. Dc delegate norton said that dc does plan on taking all those responsibilities but no other state had such a time like that in the dc. Shouldn't either another interesting amendment was from heiss of georgia. He introduced an amendment that would allow dc residents to vote for federal legislators in maryland in his mind that would give dc residents representation on capitol hill without giving them to entirely new senators. That would change the balance in the senate. Dc of course voted for statehood for itself not to be able to vote in in maryland and the democrats disagreed with that amendment. End all others. The gop introduced all of the amendments. And they all failed on party lines. So republicans appear to be worried about dc's influence on the federal government and the financial burden statehood would bring how are democratic representatives responding to those points. I've got to be totally with the on this one. jonathan. I still haven't entirely wrapped my head around what they mean when they talk about. Dc's influence on the federal government. No one for example would reasonably argue that maryland or virginia has outsized influence on the federal government. And that's basically what republicans are saying that. Dc is so close to the action that somehow that would translate into more power but if that were the case of for example as we heard the last hearing that yard signs had such outsized influence than dc would likely already have statehood giving how many statehood for dc signs. You see in dc lawns. There was also an argument. That dc was so liberal that somehow that meant that they wouldn't protect federal buildings Which struck me as kind of didn't make that much sense. Given the federal buildings have their own police force but also on january six that was. Dc's local police department that went in and secured the capital after the violent mob from pro-trump extremists so those arguments were somewhat unclear to me but certainly were made nonetheless. It's funny what comes up when we talk about dc statehood car dealerships yard signs all right anything else that caught your ear about today's discussion. One thing that definitely caught my that you hear a lot from republicans saying that. This is some sort of nefarious plot of socialist conspiracy to help inactive an outsized liberal agenda. Virginia representative jerry connolly framed it differently and he says that the real plot is from republicans and their opposition to dc. Statehood is part of a much broader effort on their part to disenfranchise voters specifically voters of color. He brought up a report that we also saw in the washington post that republican lawmakers have proposed at least two hundred and fifty laws that would limit ballot access in forty three states that's based on data compiled as of mid february and that more proposals have even been been introduced since then and he was saying basically that republicans didn't want to fight or compete for those votes instead. They just wanted them not to count at all. You can follow this and other stories on dc dot com. Thanks for joining us for consider this from. Npr listen again next time and we'll make sense of the major stories happening in the washington region and in the world. I'm jonathan wilson. And i'm rachel kersey us

george floyd derek chauvin minneapolis brooklyn center minnesota dante fowler npr Brooklyn center of course brooklyn center police Tim gannon Chauvin mpr elsa brooklyn center police departm Mike elliott Npr benjamin crump kim potter tim gannon potter brooklyn center
The End Of Police In Minneapolis

NPR Politics Podcast

13:34 min | 1 year ago

The End Of Police In Minneapolis

"Hi. This is Karen in my. She shed in rally where I just finished sowing, the one thousand, three hundred and thirty fourth facemask made by our Church for the triangle community while listening to NPR politics podcast. This show was recorded at two six PM on Thursday. June eleventh things may have changed since then, but I'll still be sewing face masks while listening to NPR. Glad. We can provide nice background. Entertainment for folks do that work, Kudos to you. Well. Hey, there. It's the NPR politics. PODCAST must call it. I'm covering the Presidential Campaign and I'm Carrie Johnson. I cover the Justice Department. We have spent a lot of this week talking about police reform at the federal level, but in Minneapolis where George Floyd was killed by local police officers. The city council has already begun making changes. It has pledged to dismantle the city's police department entirely. Adrian Florida has been in Minneapolis covering this story for NPR and he's joining us on the pod now to talk about exactly what that means Hadrian. Hey, so Adrian were hearing a lot about ideas at the federal level. You know some of them conflicting about how to ensure that police don't use a disproportionate amount of force, especially with black and Brown people and Congress is pledging to reform policing activists have been talking about defunding police departments, but talk to us about what's happened there in Minneapolis where the city council has said that they want to dismantle police. What does that mean? On Sunday. nine members of the city council showed up at a park at a rally that black activists had organized, and basically announced that they wanted to begin the process of dismantling and defunding and spending the police, and said that they were going to start doing that. In the coming weeks and months through a series of policy decisions. You know what it means is still unclear because they don't yet have a plan for what would come next. If The police department were just to be completely disbanded but what they said is that there have been. Many, many years of failed reforms within the Minneapolis Police Department efforts reforms that just haven't amounted to much, and so they said at the time was now to do something much bolder, much more radical, which was to begin the process of defunding, ultimately disbanding the police department entirely. Know is this decision really entirely in their hands, or could the mayor other people step in and have a say so importantly the nine members of the city council who voiced support for this idea, represent a veto proof majority. Of the thirteen member at City Council so they could take very significant decisions on the council toward this goal of of of defunding dismantling the police department. It's more complicated than that. Though because you know. Minneapolis City Charter requires that the city fund a minimum police force, and so in order to completely end the police department, the City Council would have to amend the city charter. That's not something that you can do even with a super majority of the council. You need an unanimous vote of the city council to do that. another option. If you don't have unanimous vote of the council is to put an amendment to the city charter. To voters while there are a lot of steps there, Adrian. It seems like whatever happens next. It's GonNa. Take a lot more action by city, officials and police unions so people in the streets now may not be getting action as quickly as they expect. and carry. How does what we are seeing now in Minneapolis compared to reform efforts that we've seen from cities in the past. It feels different you know. After after Ferguson Missouri after Michael Brown's death and Ferguson. We heard a lot of pushes for body cameras, more training of police on excessive force and implicit bias, and even calls to try to end programs in which the military military provides equipment to local police forces, but this call to disband or dismantle. Dismantle the police force entirely. It's not unprecedented, but it's a really big step one that even some civil rights advocates say they're surprised. We got to so quickly. Adrien this is not the first time that Minneapolis has tried to reform its police department. Anything people who were hearing the story of dismantling the police are wondering. Why does the music reforms not work or did they work? But maybe just like not sufficiently in the mind of some folks. There just wasn't enough. Yeah. There's a long history here. In Minneapolis of attempts to reform the police department, because there's been criticism for a long time of racial disparities in use of force in two thousand fifteen report found that only twenty one percent of conduct complaints lodged against the police department, where even investigated about a half of those were were dismissed outright the re-. The rest of resulted night undisciplined, but in in coaching. Basically you know police officers given a little refresher course on on department policy. there's also been a lot of attempts to establish civilian review boards here in Minneapolis. and those have have mostly failed largely because critics have said that these review boards just ignore the vast majority of complaints that come in against police departments, and so there's just sort of this long list of reforms have been attempted over years and really decades that almost everyone agrees have failed, which is why people who say that more reform is what's needed. Aren't well received by by activists who say the time is now to do something different people who've been really hungry for reform for ten years, and and longer in the civil rights community say that these are problems with systems and systems and cultures are very difficult to change because people have a lot invested in them. Their livelihoods, police unions mayors and elected officials I had. Had A conversation earlier this week with Alec haircuts on us who is a civil rights lawyer and works on fines and fees and and cash bail? issues around the country, and he says almost none of what police do everyday is dedicated to violent crime as we would see it, and almost all of their activity disproportionately targets black and Brown people and he thinks that. From what he seen on Capitol? Hill and some of the conversation Nationally a lot of the proposals here for change reflect a failure of leadership and imagination. He thinks talking about things like defunding in disbanding is where the culture needs to go in is where real change will take place. There's a city councilman here in in Minneapolis. Who has said you know? Know I I know that. You know we could fire every single. One of the one thousand police officers in the Minneapolis Police Department and Rehire a thousand people to replace them I would not be interested in that because it's about the people, it's about the systems and what they represent and the culture that is ingrained in just the very idea of of policing. And he said I'm not interested in that. We need to come up with something different. All Right? We'll have lots more to talk about this. After a quick break support for NPR and the following message come from Duck Duck Oh. Are you tired of being tracked online duck duck? Go can help they help. Millions of people like you take control of their personal information online with one download you can search and browse privately. Avoiding Trackers Duck Duck go privacy. Privacy simplified. You may have noticed something that all these protests over police violence. There are a lot more white people there than you'd expect. But how long will that last this of woken? Among White American voters? How far they really willing to go theon dethroning trump Adam server on race and lessons from history. Listen and subscribe to. It's been a minute from NPR. All right we're back and as we've been discussing this effort in Minneapolis doesn't have a lot of precedent, but it does come at a moment when police oversight at the federal level has been receding now for a Few Years Aka talked to us about that. You know somebody who covers the justice. Department I'm used to priorities changing when presidential administrations change, but one of the starkest. Transitions I felt on the justice speed ever was in terms of civil rights between the Obama Administration and the trump administration, the new Attorney General Jeff sessions came in at the start of the trump administration basically viewed law enforcement as partners. He pointed out all the time that something like eighty five percent of the nation's law enforcement officers are state and locals. He didn't want to be overseeing them. He wanted to be walking hand in hand with. With them, and that's how the Justice Department. Basically got out of the business of investigating systems of misconduct and wrongdoing in police forces around the country. That's where we are are right now. Where even some Republicans on Capitol Hill are leaving open the possibility that maybe this justice department needs to start doing more of that now, but it has been a big change for the last three years, or so, and on that point of the sort of. Political partisanship nature of this one of the things that I've noticed in covering Joe Biden's campaign is that he's made a point of saying that in his first one hundred days. If elected, he would set up a police oversight body, and I believe you know this is a reference to what we saw during the Obama years, but it's clearly not also the fact that he feels like the trump administration is completely. Let that priority go. Aswa I view Joe Biden is a complicated figure here in part, because yes, he was a big part of the Obama Administration, and he does believe in civil rights I think, but he also has been a major partner to police dating back to the nineties when he was on the Senate Judiciary Committee assuring through a major crime bill received a lot of criticism in recent years when I talked with left leaning police organizations in the Obama Administration their biggest and best partner was. Was Always Joe Biden and they knew when they wanted something they would go knock on the door of the vice president, so I'm going to be watching that relationship very closely. In the course of this campaign, that is a very important point to keep in mind, you know it is worth noting as much as we're talking about what's happening at the federal level that the local level does remain the place where a lot of policing happens, and so I mean as much as we've. We've been talking about federal oversight. It still feels like the site where any changes to the system will actually happen are likely to happen with what we're seeing in Minneapolis and possibly other cities. Isn't that right couldn't agree more. You know really what needs to happen here. If you want to see real change, experts are telling me is four. The communities to be very involved in various invested because at the heart of this is the idea that police are partners with communities that police. Police are walking hand in hand with their community members that community members know when they do need the police. The police will be there to help them now to arrest them not to abuse them not to use excessive force on them and the best oversight that can happen of that relationship is at the local level where Adrian is right now Minnesota for instance, and you know to that point Adrian I mean. How are people in Minneapolis reacting to the City Council's plan? Will. There's there's a really wide mix of reactions I mean. I was in that park on Sunday when when they announced this plan even within this large crowd of people that was supportive of the idea. Surprise and shock that it was actually something at the council had had voiced. Overwhelming support for people hadn't really expected this and and so even among people who support the idea in concept. People were telling me Oh. Wow, so, what does this mean now? What does this look like what happens if there are no police and there are people who are sort of willing to walk that path with council members to figure out what that might look but there are also. Sort of much more defined battle lines being ron already, there are people who are saying. Hey, this is a horrible idea. our colleague. Leyla fatal texted me as we were speaking just now and said she was at a press conference up in North Minneapolis press conference, being held by by black leaders in those communities. WHO said that they're against this idea that they support sort of massive reforms. Reforms to department, and that they support the Minneapolis, police departments, police chief, who who is African American, and who actually sued the police department years ago over claims of racial discrimination within the department, but they don't support sort of disbanding and defunding, and so you know even though there is a big push by the activists that we've seen in the streets over the last couple of weeks to do this. The actual sort of coalescing support around this among the community at large here locally is going to be much more difficult, much more interesting, and it's going to be really messy too all right well. They're still feels like there's a lot more to talk about and a lot more questions, but we are going to leave it there for today. Adrian. Thank you so much for joining us. And we'll be back tomorrow in your feet. Don't forget to let us know what you can't let go of by recording yourself in sending it to NPR politics at NPR dot org I must McCall it. I covered the presidential campaign, and I'm Carrie Johnson I covered the Justice Department and thank you for listening the NPR politics podcast.

Minneapolis Minneapolis Police Department NPR city council Justice Department Adrian Florida Minneapolis City Charter Joe Biden NPR Carrie Johnson NPR Obama Administration Karen Obama George Floyd Congress Adrien
Weekly Roundup: April 16th

NPR Politics Podcast

30:23 min | 3 months ago

Weekly Roundup: April 16th

"Hello this is. Danielle kurtz laden i am excited to announce our next pick for the npr politics podcast book club fulfillment winning and losing in one. Click america by mcgillis. It's deeply reported book about amazon's huge economic and political impact in america will be interviewing alec in may in the run-up to that he'll be joining our listeners and followers to discuss the book in the npr politics podcast facebook group at n. Dot p. r. slash politics group. Go buy or borrow your copy of fulfillment and join us. There hi this is free of acceler for of public school. Civics teacher calling from stockholm sweden. This podcast was recorded at. It is eleven. Thirty five am on friday april sixteenth. Things may have changed the time you hear this both in sweden and in the us. But let's keep trying to give children the best education possible. Okay very nice. I wonder what the weather's like in stockholm right now. Oh i wanna be there. I can't wait when it's safe to travel again. I've never been to sweden but You know maybe he'll invite us one day maybe we'll do a lot of politics show. Hey there is the npr politics podcast. Misha roscoe i covered the white house. I'm carrie johnson national justice correspondent and adrian's laredo is here with us at thanks for joining us adrian. All right thanks for having me. Testimony ended yesterday in derek chauvin trial for the murder of george floyd george floyd's death led to protests all over the world. Adrian you've been covering this trial of derek chauvin for npr. Let's start with the prosecution. And what was their case against him. Well the case that the prosecution said during its opening statements three weeks ago that it was going to set out to prove that then officer derek. Chauvin betrayed his badge when when he used excessive force to kneel on george floyd's neck for about nine minutes that video that we've all seen Officiating him to death and the prosecution called thirty eight witnesses to prove that case bystanders. Who watched george floyd arrest and death under show wtn's knee Who pleaded with the officer to get off him. called the first responders and the doctors who tried to save george floyd life. It called police officers and use of force experts who've laid out their opinions on. How chauvin violated minneapolis police department policy in his arrest in restraint of george floyd it called medical. Experts argued floyd died of asphyxiation. And not as the defensive suggested a heart arrhythmia and his drug use so they laid out a very meticulous case. It was clear to me that the prosecution did a lot of preparation And and that it really feels the pressure of this incredibly high profile case to prove its case and to win a conviction here. It seemed like it. Just i mean from what you know seeing the coverage of this there were so you said there were so many experts. It seemed like they were really trying to in a way. Just kind of stacked the deck because it is so difficult in the us or it is so rare in the us for police officers to be convicted for you know what they do while they're on duty and they were aided in that by the mountains of evidence in this case at one point the defense attorney kind of complained in court that he had over fifty thousand evidence. Submissions had been passed to him by the prosecution. I mean there's so much video video that we hadn't even realized existed in this in this case There were a lot of experts that actually reached out to the prosecution to volunteer themselves as expert witnesses. Because what a high profile case this was and so. They really had a lot at their disposal to try to make this case training the defense case. It didn't last very long at all. It was the heart of the defense argument on behalf of derek. Chauvin here. you're right it. Don't you know the the prosecution case lasted more than two weeks. The defense rested its case after just two days Called only seven witnesses. Compared to thirty eight the prosecution called so remember that unlike the prosecution the defence only has to prove a reasonable doubt in the mind of one juror in order to prevent a conviction So in order to do that at called Really two main witnesses of of the seven. It called total it called. It's of force expert And a medical expert of forensic pathologist who both worked to contradict the case at the state made basically arguing that what. What what derek chauvin did interesting. George floyd was totally appropriate and and And not an excessive use of force And also to make the case that george floyd did not diversification that there were all kinds of different contributing factors that led to his sort of sudden death. His heart disease his drug use. There was even the suggestion that that floyd may have been poisoned by carbon monoxide from the from the exhaust pipe of the police car under which he was being Pinned so Really their goal here is to raise a reasonable doubt in the mind of one juror. And we'll we'll see if they did that kerry what are the range of repercussions that chauvin could face if he is found guilty. He faces three charges if he's convicted on the most serious charge which is a second degree unintentional murder the sentencing guidelines call for something like ten to fifteen years. He also faces a possible charge of third degree murder. That also is at ten to fifteen year sentence and it's worth noting a few years ago when a black police officer in minneapolis was convicted of killing a white woman. He was sentenced to about ten years There is a third charge against chauvin. Second degree manslaughter. Which will be something more. Like forty one to fifty seven months but there could be real. Time here involve real prison time. Whatever happens with this verdict. You know the the issue of police reform is not going. Away is not going anywhere at this point. The biden administration has pledged at. It is going to try to take on these matters now. Policing is a local issue so with the federal government can do is is somewhat limited but but what is the biden administration saying that they will try to do within their power. You know i shall. We heard from attorney. General merrick garland on this this week. He spoke at the national action network. That organization led by the reverend al sharpton. He basically said the doj civil rights division is the tip of the spear here. he wants to see vanita. Gupta confirmed as the number three at justice she would be responsible for overseeing the civil rights division. He wants to see. Kristen clark confirmed she had her senate confirmation hearing this week to run this civil rights division itself. He also pledged to use the justice department's power to investigate wrongdoing patterns of wrongdoing police departments around the country. Here's what he had to say is stepping up. Its efforts to ensure the right to vote. It has combat discrimination in areas from housing to education to employment and it will work hard to ensure accountability for law enforcement misconduct. It will also prioritize investigating whether government agencies are engaging and patterns or practices that deprive individuals of their federal or constitutional rights and. It is redoubling its efforts to investigate and prosecute hate crimes and we have some news on that just this morning america arlen scrapped trump era memo at the justice department that impose really tough conditions and requirements on settlements with state and local governments over things like policing practices. Some of the consent decrees that were reached in the obama. Years for instance. These new practices at justice garland just introduce will make it a little bit easier for the civil rights division to reach consent degrees with police departments and try to get courts to impose monitors to examine the practices of these departments. That are discriminating against people. Do do we know when there should be a verdict in this case well. The closing arguments are scheduled for monday. after that the jury goes into deliberations almost immediately. So you know. The judge told the jury When he excused them for the weekend it could take an hour or could take a week. Could take longer. He told them to pack a bag. Because they're going to be sequestered in a hotel I think we'd all like to see expeditious Decision by the jury. But we're kind of hunkering down in case it takes a long long time regardless of what happens in this case with chauvin would has transpired. Whether it's it's the the shooting of dante right you had another young boy that was shot in chicago by the police. What happened over the summer. After the george floyd the video of that it was a response to the fact that people are tired. There is a pain anna womb in this country. That is not. that's not being dealt with. Whatever it is whatever happens. In these cases there is something that is not being dealt with right now It has not been and no one case or anything like that is gonna fix it but there is something in this country that is broken and evatt is what at i think exploded over the summer and those are the things that people are responding to one of the things. That's so interesting to me. Is to see all the other ways in which the george floyd case is explicitly affecting things that are happening in the cases of other Cases of police of police misconduct or or or police killings. You know kim potter. The police officer who just outside of minneapolis. A few days ago shot and killed dante right was charged Almost immediately within a day in large part because of the protesters who were already out preparing for a verdict. In the george floyd case you know the case of adam little the young boy in in In chicago right. The response to his pet killing by police has been directly. Influenced the george floyd case Even the case of this former police officer more than a decade ago it was fired for for pulling off one of her colleagues when he was beating up a black man and sued to get her pay reinstated. That decision came down just a few days ago and the judge who sided with her. Granting all of that back pay for more than a decade cited the george floyd case so really the repercussions of this case are rippling far far and wide adrian. Thank you so much. For sharing your reporting with us in adrian and carey a hopefully. We can get you back to talk about a a happier happier things. I'm on another friday. I would love it. Yes but thank you. Thanks so much for joining us when we get back. We'll talk about how the johnson and johnson pause is playing out on the internet support for npr and the following message. Come from exxon mobil. As part of its ongoing commitment to help address climate change. Exxon mobil is increasing the efficiency of its operations and advancing low-carbon technologies that can be deployed at yale with that and more it expects to reduce its absolute upstream greenhouse gas emissions by an estimated thirty percent by twenty twenty five. Learn more at exxon mobil dot com slash solutions support for this. Npr podcast and the following. Message come from safa well. politics can be fun. They can also be exhausting so rest up with sada a different kind of online mattress company. The safa classic comes with two layers of coils one for support and the other for comfort. They provide the kind of sleep. You dream about at half. The price of retail stores visit safa at s. Aa tv dot com slash npr. Whether you're looking to discover a new series to binge find your next great read or check out that movie. Everyone's talking about npr's pop culture. Happy hour podcast is your guide to all things entertainment. Every weekday. We keep pop culture in high spirits. Listen now to the pop culture. Happy hour podcast from npr. And we're back with miles parks and danielle kurt slave. Ben hey guys hello happy. Friday help friday to you so this week. We had some news break that the federal government was going to pause the johnson and johnson vaccine over concerns about what seems to be a one in a million risk of blood. Clotting that review by the food and drug administration is still ongoing But obviously this is something that people really zeroed in on because of the pandemic because of you know how vaccines have become such a flashpoint for people miles. While a lot of those articles that were pushed on on this topic. Were from credible sources. There were some others that were pushed by people that were not as credible right. Yeah right. I mean going back to your first point just about the scale of just how much this blew up online. I think it's important to realize. Johnson and johnson was being mentioned online every hour on tuesday as much as it was being mentioned in entire weeks prior to that according to tracking data from this firm signal labs so people were talking about it and whenever. There's a topic like that. That people are talking about the misinformation actors are going to jump in there and try to take advantage of that and so what we saw with this story. Was you know people who have built their brand online brand on vaccine skepticism. Really jumped on this news to kinda push. This false premise. That vaccines are unsafe or unreliable. In some way you know. The top shared link on facebook in terms of engagement was by a prominent conspiracy theorist on tuesday. So we're just seeing a lot of people jumping on this news to push this false premise. But the tricky thing with this is that some of the social networks have clamped down on false information being pushed about vaccines. But there's a way that you can put out information that is true but frame it in a way that is misleading. Totally and i mean. That's exactly the problem here. The companies themselves. Facebook is like no these are from mainstream news outlets. There's nothing we can do when people are sharing true information but the problem what experts. I talked to say that this is kind of what's called gray area misinformation where the information nugget might be true. You know the government is recommending pause in the johnson and johnson vaccine but the people who are sharing. It have built this idea. They've built their audience because people are coming to them for information about whether it's the vaccine is being unsafe for the pandemic being a cover for government control or something like that and then when these people are able to jump on news like that those people who are receiving information take it as kind of a furthering of those belief systems instead of what the cdc is hoping people take this as which is hey. We're investigating. this is a really really really rare side effect. It's more likely that you'll get struck by lightning than get a blood clot from the johnson and johnson vaccine. But that's not how these people are going to receive that information as what experts say right well and there's also sort of a double edged issue here right if you are the type of person to distrust the government for example or to distrust politicians. Then if you hear politicians or the government saying hey get the vaccine that can backfire and there is a recent focus group from pollster. Frank luntz that has been written about reported on where various trump supporters at many of them. Republican men said look. I don't wanna be indoctrinated. That was their big push back on some of the messaging about. Hey go get the vaccine. Their their immediate response was well. Hey you can't tell me what to do. And also especially the government can't tell me what to do so getting the messaging right on this on a vaccine that can very much save. Lives is very difficult and might be a bit of a tight rope. Walk so for both of you. How how do you do then. How do you convince people that these conspiracy. Theories are not true. And how have you help them. Get over these fears in and misperceptions. Well i think that the biggest thing going to daniel's point is trying to build back some of this confidence in scientific institutions and. I think what's kind of ironic around the johnson and johnson. News is that federal health officials are actually probably looking long-term and not short-term when they made this decision to pause this because obviously we're probably going to see a dip in confidence in the johnson and johnson vaccines specifically from this news. But you know this is a situation where the government is being unbelievably transparent and taking action as in response to some of these very very rare side effects and so long term it potentially could cut into this idea that oh the government is trying to sweep these issues under the rug or something like that it. This is very much science at work. And it's transparent so i think long term the hope is that this sort of pause akshay leads to people being more confident in the government response right and i think the thing that i would add. Here's jumping back to that. Focus group that. I mentioned like look. If it's true that a lot of people who aren't getting the vaccine are saying. I am not gonna listen to messages. I'm not going to blindly. Follow you when you tell me what to do. The flip side of that is that in the same focus group Frank luntz presented them with information on the vaccines they had public. Health officials. say not. Hey go get it but instead okay here are some basic facts about the vaccine side effects are not as bad as co vince effects on your body and that message got through to people much better that made people trust the vaccine more. So maybe the sort of upshot of this is that it's possible that making people feel as if they have the choice not hey go get it but here let me present you with the information. Now you choose. That is possibly a winning however that also raises other questions like okay. How are people going to get this information. If fox news isn't presenting it if your friends are presenting it if the people around you are presenting it then how is it going to get to you. So if your social media feed isn't necessarily exactly yes oh for every answer. There's a new question there is. There is a new question and i. I have her that when people hear that most doctors have gotten the vaccine that that is one fact toy that helps to convince them that it's probably safe But as you said it's very hard it's a very difficult Situation in we'll have to see what happens. let's take a quick break and when we get back it's time for can't let it go. This message comes from. Npr sponsor hint fruit infused water with no calories or sweeteners hints. Water comes in over. Twenty-five flavors the watermelon water actually tastes like watermelon. The blackberry water tastes like blackberries. Hint is water with a touch of true fruit flavor. You can get hint water at stores or you can have it delivered directly to your door. When you buy two cases you'll get a third case. Free and free shipping visit drink hint dot com and use promo code. Npr at checkout on npr's considered as podcasts. We don't just help you keep up with the news we help you make sense of what's happening like why. The housing market is wild right now. What safe looks like once you're vaccinated and how an increase in border crossings is testing the biden administration all of that in fifteen minutes every weekday. Listen now to consider this from npr. And we're back. There was definitely really heavy. News this week But we're going to try to you. Know lighten the moment as as we always do an end. The show with can't let it go but before we do that danielle. You've been the ringleader of our. Mpr politics book club reading books with our listeners. And putting their questions to the authors in an interview for the podcast. what is the new pick. The new pick We announced today in the facebook group. In our announced here it is fulfillment by alec mcgillis. The far i am not finished with it yet but thus far excellent really well reported book about amazon about it being in economic and political behemoth. So i'm absolutely excited to talk to him about all things amazon. I love my same day in two day deliveries so this sounds like that there might. This might mess with that. I just watched. Nomad land with frances mcdormand. And i will say that. Yeah my picture of amazon dot not exactly bolstered by that movie. So i'm really. I'm afraid to watch it. I don't know if my film but really sad okay. Well well well danielle on a brighter. Note what can't you let go of this week It's going to be a brighter note for you to than me This is a poll by yougov. And i cannot recite all of the results here for reasons that will become clear in a moment but our listeners can find poll by just going to google and typing in yougov fifty state poll because the polling organization yougov did a poll on which states are best and states. And let me tell you something I would did not fare. Well all right but hold on so they basically did was. They matched up you know x. State and y st ohio vs minnesota and then said all right so so which is better and well Let me let me give you guys some good news north carolina which is where you're from asia s Is number five okay. Tied with that is florida. Oh yeah congratulations you too. Thank you iowa. Forty six wow noah. What was below you arkansas new jersey mississippi and alabama district of columbia fifty one And i'm wondering if maybe district of columbia people were just like well. That's not a state. I don't know so. Can i ask you danielle real quick. Where do you think iowa should have been. You know. i'm not gonna say number one. Please cannot say come on come on. Is hawaii number of course hawaii but like look i feel like the most iowan response possible is to say you know. We maybe slightly above middle twin. You'll look we're great. We know were great but there are more important things. We don't have to get full of our oldest fine right there you know. We don't need all the attention. It's okay we have other things to do. I love the accent that comes out. Thank you miles. What can't you let go up when i can't let go of. Is this tiktok video. That i've watched like twenty five times and it makes me laugh every single time. Basically the premise is like a guy gets back to. I think what seems like. He's like group house or with his mates and he told them that he has vaccine appointment that day. And he he gets back and they realized he did not get the johnson and johnson pfizer or moderna vaccine and chaos ensues fascinated yet. Maderno the pfizer. The doom break suffers. Break the break yet. It was like the cheapest fun was like three hundred or something. Just having it's working already is our super blurred ari breaking that sounds monitoring the healthy been expelling a ton of blackbox. Helping you break ben. Marshall was the guy's name he's like a comedian. I think actor in new york. So shout out to you ben marshall. You've made me laugh like thirty times over and over and over again this week. But you're you're into the you're into combatting misinformation and this is a way to kind of do that or poke fun of your job to i mean. Yeah it's like it's like poking fun at eventually doubts. I guess but yeah i was. I was unclear. I was playing this somehow. Someway somebody going hear this be like more hesitant vaccinated. But i i hope not. I thought he was going to turn into a zombie. Which is what. I always when people talk about this like look. I mean. we'll know if people are like running around like you know chopping at the bit like well no like you. You know it agrees running and then we'll know what happened right. I'd hope so what's your what's your can't let asia on a happier note. Oh my goodness but actually. It's not very happy. This is a mystery. That i'm really unsettled by and i really want to get to the bottom of this but i'm there is A giant bunny that is missing. It's missing it's a giant four foot long rabbit like a real rabid a real rabbit and it is you have to look it up so whoever yacht look up this rabbit. Rabbit is four feet long it is. It is massive the picture of it. Do i just google giant bundy roundup worlds. Yes funny yeah. Let's let's bury north for long donkey. That's not a rabbit. That's a donkey also need like a caterpillar. ej sub and someone stole it and now there is a professional pet detective. I'm serious who is saying that you need to lock down the borders because this you know so that this animal cannot be moved. The the pet detectives robert kinney and he said that if the animal remains in the uk no doubt whatsoever that it can be recovered. But you can you have to contact all the ports and make sure that they don't try to get this big rabbit outside of the to do god knows what a rabbit was stolen or did he make a break for freedom. That's a good point. I think it probably run like forty miles an hour. They said it would enclosure and that someone was probably scoping out the place and and they got god what they had to have like a truck. You can't just grab this thing like what if it starts fiving. I'm kinda scared for the bunny to my husband. My husband love actually looked at this bunny and started talking about rabbit legs. And i said you know what you wrong for that don sued and we don't eat rabbit to be clear he was joking. We don't eat rabbit. But how do you look at this. This cute little bunny and start talking about rabbit legs. It's not right. yeah. I'll be keeping the bucket. Dear his name is darius by the way darius i i i hope you're okay. Go home darius. I think i think that's it for this week I gotta find into descript. Collect too busy looking at the bunny i was. I was due to miss. I was mesmerized But anyway our executive producer is surely henry. Our editors are finding maturity and eric mcdaniel. Our producers are barton gird would and chloe winer. Thanks to lexi piddle and brandon. Carter are inter is clear. Lovie on my roscoe covered the white house. I'm daniel kurtz lebron cover demographics and culture parts cover voting and misinformation and. Thank you for listening to the. Npr politics podcasts. This message comes from. npr sponsor ford. A large chandelier dangles directly above a stationary all electric. Mustang mach e. It's held aloft by an intricate police system. Attached to the rear of the vehicle visit four dot com for gravity defying display of torque.

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