26 Burst results for "Adrian Florido"

"adrian florido" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:24 min | Last month

"adrian florido" Discussed on KCRW

"Klein. Preparations are underway to demolish the portion of a condominium building and Surfside, Florida that's still standing after a partial collapse killed at least 24 people. 121 are still missing. NPR's Adrian Florido has an update. Miami Dade County Mayor Daniella Levine. Cava says crews are finalizing preparations for a demolition designed not to disturb the rubble pile that rescue workers are scouring for bodies and possible survivors. Bringing down this building in a controlled manner. Is critical to expanding our scope of the search and rescue effort and allowing us to explore the area closest to the building, which has currently not been accessible to our first responders. Given the great risk, she said. It's important to finish the demolition before Tropical Storm Elsa brings rain and wind gust to the region. It could further destabilize the building. Inclement weather is expected as soon as Monday. Adrian Florido NPR NEWS Miami Ransomware attack that crippled computer networks and more than a dozen countries is under investigation. NPR's Windsor Johnston reports. Authorities believe a Russian speaking syndicate is behind the hack. The criminal group targeted Cassia the ECE, an international software company that provides tech management tools to thousands of businesses around the world. CEO Fred Bakula tells ABC News that the company is working with the FBI to investigate the breach. We believe we've address the issues were actually 100% confident that we know how it happened. This is just the latest in a string of ransomware attacks in Maia cyberattacks shut down a major pipeline in the US that led to severe gas shortages along the East Coast. On Saturday. President Biden said he didn't know for certain who was behind the attack, but suggested that the US would respond if Russia was responsible. Windsor Johnston NPR news Deadly forest fire is raging in Cyprus for a second day. Teri Schultz reports the island nation has asked the European Union for help. Cypriot Interior Minister Nikos Norris calls this the most destructive fire the country has ever seen. In terms of both material damage and the loss of human life. Strong winds Sunday were hampering efforts by hundreds of firefighters to get control of the blaze. Had already covered some 20 square miles. The European Commission, the EU executive arm, responded to Cyprus called for assistance by deploying firefighting planes from Greece with more on the way from Italy. The block keeps a pool of civil protection capabilities on standby to be ready in such cases. An emergency satellite was also activated by Brussels to track the fire and provide a damage assessment. At least 10 communities have been affected since the blaze broke out around midday Saturday in the Troodos mountain range for NPR news. I'm Teri Schultz in Brussels. This is NPR support for NPR comes from the A been Ida Cooper Foundation Commemorating Fred Cooper by supporting programs which highlight the current issues of racism, equality, diversity, sexism and anti Semitism. Old Campbell's with you on this fourth of July. Hopefully you're having a great one. And as I mentioned earlier, just taking requests, maybe some classic barbecue jams if you're getting ready to do a little grilling. So we can't have a barbecue without this one. Drums, please..

Teri Schultz Cyprus FBI Saturday Monday European Union Sunday Troodos EU Adrian Florido Italy 121 Cava 100% ABC News Fred Bakula Fred Cooper NPR fourth of July Greece
"adrian florido" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:51 min | Last month

"adrian florido" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Building in South Beach was evacuated. Marina is standing outside the crest View towers can swell up together, says she is furious to have been forced out of her home. Many of the 20 years she's owned her unit. The Condos board has imposed special assessments on top of her regular $357 monthly maintenance feed. That money has been used for cosmetic thing, she says, like painting and replacing hallway flooring can also working day. Superficial things, she says. Things that aren't urgent. A lawyer for the condo board told NPR they hired a new engineer who this weekend said the building is safe to live in while repairs are made. But Almond Perez, who's lived there for six years to even if he is allowed to go back. You won't he plans to move to get more efficient people who died in Champlain Tower, he says. They didn't get that chance. Adrian Florido, NPR news North Miami Beach Mm. After all the delays and uncertainty. The Tokyo Olympics are set to begin later this month amid high covid infections and worry from the Japanese public and the medical establishment there. The pandemic, though, is not the only problem facing organizers. The cost of hosting the games has skyrocketed from original projections with a possible ban of all Spectators, meaning even bigger losses. Jewels. Boycott is a professor of politics and government at Pacific University and the author of four books on the Olympics, and he has long written about the many problems hosting the Olympics. Brings two nations. Welcome to the program. Thank you. You say that being an Olympic host city is not a great idea, even at the best of times, which we are certainly not in now. And you said that these games should be canceled altogether. Tell us why you think that's the best way forward. Well, I side with medical officials inside and outside Japan, who have been clamoring for the Olympics to be cancelled their arguing that there is no need to take a gamble with global public health in the name of an optional sporting spectacle, But you can see why it would be tough to cancel. It took the country years to recover from the 2011 earthquake, tsunami and nuclear meltdown that battered its economy. And Japanese economists have warned that scrapping them will bring billions more in losses. Yeah. Economists have also said in Japan that if the Olympics turn into a super spreader event, it could cost many billions more than actually the 30 or so billion dollars that they've plunged into the Olympics to make them happen. So it's just a complicated question to host an Olympic event. Such a huge event with 11,000 people athletes coming from around the world for more than 200 countries, none of whom are required to be vaccinated and to have an event of that magnitude in your city. I mean, let's zoom out for a minute due to the pandemic delays these summer games have already run around $3 billion over budget. That's a pretty big number, but the Olympics always seem to come with this massive financial burden. Why is that? Yeah, I mean, I call it a sketch economics where during the bid phase of the Games. Bidders say that the Olympics will only cost so much in order to get the public on board. But then, when the games finally arrived, they shake up that at your sketch and write a brand new number that's inevitably much bigger. For starters, it's because of the fact that they lowball numbers in the first place and then second because you have these hard deadlines and things that you just can't anticipate that allows construction workers. The firms that they're doing the construction to charge more as the deadline gets closer, and it's the taxpayers of those countries that end up footing the bill. Yes, in the case of Tokyo, all but 30 billion that's being spent all that about 6.7 billion of that 30 billion Is from taxpayers inside of Japan you've written at the International Olympic Committee or the IOC oversees the most. And I'm quoting here pervasive at least accountable sport infrastructure in the world. Can you tell me what you mean by that? Sure during the bid phase of the Olympics, the International Olympic Committee is super friendly. But once that host city contract is signed, it has just almost zero accountability. There's no oversight when they bust their budget. Nothing happens to them. They hop on their planes, and they head off to the next venue. Massive debt, though, isn't the only issue with the Olympics, low income and on house people have frequently displaced to make room for events spaces and to give cities a sort of more tourist friendly. Look. It happened in Rio in 2016 in Atlanta in 1996 and soul in 1988. We're talking millions of people over the years. Um, what happens to these communities after the circus leaves town, so to speak? Yeah, well, I was in Japan in July. 2019 and I interviewed two women who were displaced by the National stadium building for these 2020 Tokyo Games. They were also displaced by the 1964 Olympics, so they were displaced twice by these games. They received a small settlement of money that didn't even come anywhere near their overall moving costs. And they were really highlighting to me that it wasn't just the money side of it. It was that they lived in a community and it was fractured. Lot of the displacement comes at the expense of public housing. And so the Olympics roll in, and developers use it as an opportunity to get rid of public housing. And if we've known anything about the modern era, we need more public and affordable housing, Not less. I mean, I can attest to that first hand, um, the Olympics left Rio, bankrupt with unusable infrastructure. So knowing how costly and problematic these games are wider cities keep buying to host them. There is our billions of dollars sloshing through the Olympic system. The thing is, it tends to slash upwards. I think you could call the Olympics and exercise and trickle up economics. In all my days studying the Olympics, I've never seen a grassroots bid where local working people come together to try to bring the Olympics to their city. But the truth is fewer and fewer cities are game to host the Olympic Games. And they're just saying no to the Olympics. There have been numerous referenda in various cities around the world where people have had a chance to weigh in. And when they do they say no, thanks. We don't want to put public money toward the Olympics. What are the solutions? Because you know, international sport is important after all, and it is something that Does make people feel good and feel proud about, you know the athletes participating and the nation that produced them. I'm a deep believer in the power of sports. I played professional soccer in the United States, and I even had the good fortune of representing the U. S. Olympic soccer team in international matches, So I'm not some grumpy academic sitting in my office with my smoking jacket. Thinking about ways I can destroy sports. I want to see the international Olympic Committee step up and be accountable. And I'd say that one of the main ways to make the Olympics better is to give critical thinking athletes more spaces at the table where in the middle of what we might call the athlete empowerment era, And there are many smart, critical thinking athletes who participated in the Olympics and would know how to make them better not just for the athletes and that should definitely be on the top of the list, but also for everyday people in the host cities. That's Jules Boycott professor of politics and government at Pacific University and author of four books on the Olympics. Thank you very much my pleasure. And you're listening to NPR news and you're listening on KQED. Next time on the New Yorker radio, our author and activist Janet Mark on growing up transgender in Hawaii. The fact that you know.

Janet Mark Almond Perez United States Hawaii Atlanta International Olympic Committe Adrian Florido $357 30 Olympic Games Champlain Tower 30 billion 1996 IOC 2016 July. 2019 1988 2020 Tokyo Games 11,000 people six years
"adrian florido" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:33 min | Last month

"adrian florido" Discussed on KCRW

"And celebrate progress and grapple with the distance. We've come, but the dishes we have to travel gym. As NPR's Adrian Florido reports, the day has gained wider recognition since the nation's recent movements for racial justice President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing slaves in secessionist states on January 1st 18 63. Across the Confederacy. Many slave owners kept this news from their slaves for more than two years. On June, 19th 18 65 Union general wrote into Galveston, Texas, to announce the end of the Civil war and of slavery. Here's Texas congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee, reading that general's announcement on the House floor yesterday. The people of Texas are informed. In accordance with a proclamation from the executive of the United States. All slaves are free. Black Americans started celebrating the anniversary of that date the very next year and they have ever since with parades, festivals and prayer gatherings. Patricia Davis researches African American cultural memory at Northeastern University and says these communities celebrations have been an important way for black Americans to keep the memory of Juneteenth alive. That's the way most people get their history and particularly history that is not friendly to the idea. Of American exceptionalism. The holiday only began enjoying broader public recognition recently amid the nation's increased attention to issues of racial justice, police killings of black people and conservative efforts to limit how it races taught in public schools. All these events that have led to what people refer to as a racial reckoning. Have led to a greater awareness of histories that have not been centered in formal educational channels, and they've also inspired kind of a more critical orientation. Who had accepted historical narrative, Davis said. Juneteenth has benefited from this. Earlier this week, The Senate unanimously passed a bill making Juneteenth the 11th federal holiday on the calendar. The House approved it Wednesday and today, President Biden signed the bill into law in the East Room of the White House. It's a big deal that he's signing it, it is absolutely a big deal. Sean Jones is president of the Atlanta branch of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, which helps organize an annual Juneteenth celebration. More Americans will now know about this overlooked chapter in black history, he said. But we know that the fight and the mission for full acceptance in this country isn't over because that's what Juneteenth is. It is a recognition..

Sean Jones Wednesday Adrian Florido Patricia Davis January 1st 18 63 Sheila Jackson Lee today Davis Association for the Study of A NPR yesterday Texas Senate more than two years Earlier this week next year June, 19th 18 65 Galveston, Texas American Northeastern University
Woman's Killing In Puerto Rico Spurs Calls For Government To Act

All Things Considered

01:31 min | 3 months ago

Woman's Killing In Puerto Rico Spurs Calls For Government To Act

"In Puerto Rico Women are taking to the streets. Their demand stop killing us. The island is in shock over the murder last week of a pregnant woman whom the FBI says was killed by her lover when a Puerto Rico's star athletes Case has reignited longstanding demands that the government address a crisis of violence against women. NPR's Adrian Florido reports with San Juan and just a warning. Some details in this story are disturbing. The case drew wall to wall media attention from the moment 27 year old case let Rodriguez went missing last week after her family said she was a month pregnant with the child of Philip's better. They hold a star boxer who competed for Puerto Rico at the London Olympics. But he gets his mother told local TV that the box or had wanted her daughter to a board, but her daughter was thrilled with the pregnancy. Well, baby, he can't win on almost every Rodriguez. His body was found in the lagoon on Saturday, and the next day the FBI arrested fairly expected a whole the details of its accusation against him or so troubling. We won't describe them here. The case has reignited the fury, frustration and sorrow felt by women across the island who've spent years demanding their government do more to protect them. Puerto Rico has one of the world's highest per capita rates of women killed by their partners. Over the weekend women marched with the Lakers remedy is his body was found and outside the governor's

Puerto Rico Adrian Florido FBI Rodriguez NPR San Juan Philip Olympics Government London Lakers
"adrian florido" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

06:22 min | 3 months ago

"adrian florido" Discussed on WBUR

"Take the stand in his own defense. Still unknown. Okay, NPR's Adrian Florido. Thanks, Adrian. Like, you know. More than three million covert 19 covert 19 vaccines are being administered every day. But a mismatch between supply and demand is emerging. Health officials in some parts of this country say they have so much vaccine that appointments are going unfilled. In other places where cases are rising. Their vaccine shortages. NPR's Allison Aubrey is following this one. Good morning, Alison. Good morning, Noel. Okay, so we we have talked to you a lot on the show lately about Michigan, where cases air really surging. Is that state have enough vaccine. Well, Governor Gretchen Whitmer says her state needs more supplies. She says extra doses could help quash hot spots. You know so far. The White House covered response team has said it will not shift the allocation program, which is based on the state's population. The administration has promised extra resource is, but not more doses. No house so Governor Widmark continues to press the issue here She is on CBS yesterday. We are definitely grateful for the boots on the ground that they're sending the mobile units, But I am going to also continue fighting for my state, and we have thousands of partners who are ready to put shots in arms. We just need those vaccines to come into Michigan. She says. The variance help explain the surge and around the country know how they're still in more than 60,000 new cases a day. This comes at a time when allocations of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine are down due to a production issue at a Maryland facility, where vaccine ingredients were kind of mixed up that is still being worked out so fewer doses that vaccine are being shipped out. So places where there are shortages and then other places in the country where you have appointments, and they're going on filled. That's right. And some of this is the hesitancy that we've talked so much about. I spoke to Clare Hannon of the Association of Immunization Managers. He points to some areas in the south, including Mississippi, as well as Kansas in the Midwest parts of North Dakota. Now there are lots of efforts underway to directly reach out to people, including having primary care doctors reach out to their patients and other initiatives. In Alaska. There actually going door to door and in North Dakota. They're getting their providers to record messages to send out little videos to their patients. You know, encouraging the vaccine, stating that they've gotten the vaccine and hopefully that is making a difference, But we're just kind of reaching that point where supply is ahead of demand in some areas. Remember. Public health officials say that we need the 80% or so of the population to be protected to reach her community and herd. Immunity, of course, would be a global phenomenon right there still inequity. Some countries don't have access to the vaccine or too much vaccine, and the body administration now says it will help how Well. Secretary of State Tony Blinken has pointed to the partnership with Japan, India and Australia to increase vaccine manufacturing capacity and on NBC yesterday, he said, the U. S has the responsibility to take the lead here. We're going to be the world leader on helping to make sure that the entire world gets vaccinated. And here's why, Unless and until the vast majority of people in the world of vaccinated it's still going to be a problem for us, because as long as that the virus is replicating somewhere could be mutating and that it could be coming back to hit us. And given what's happening in Brazil and in India with surging cases no out it really puts the urgency into perspective. Yeah, sure does. NPR's Allison Aubrey? Thanks, Alison. Thank you, Noel. Or a top officials from the Biden administration are holding a summit with leaders of some high tech industries to address a supply chain problem. There's a shortage of semiconductors, the small computer chips that power cars and cell phones and just about everything else. At this point, they're made almost entirely in Asia, and the shortage has forced auto manufacturers to interrupt production. There are concerns that other industries could also see slow doubts. NPR White House correspondent Scott Tetro has been following this one. Good morning, Scott. Good morning. How serious is this is a shortage. You know, As Steve mentioned, cars are becoming more and more computerized demand for cars a surging right now, and there is just a huge supply shortage, not enough semiconductors to go around right now to make cars so tomb or General Motors plants. Just announced temporary shutdowns because they don't have the materials they need. GM has caused more than a half dozen plants. Now four Ford plans are temporarily shut down as well among other automakers, and the reason our White House correspondent is covering this is because the White House is actually trying to do something about it, right. Yes, I did not just shift beats. So President Biden has already ordered a review, looking at what the federal government can do to make sure more semiconductors are manufactured in the U. S because there's the supply issue. Also a sustained environment of trade wars and more economic nationalism with China in particular, so today, the White House is meeting with people from 19 different companies across the range of industries. I interviewed Duleep Singh about this. He's a Nash. He's a deputy national security advisor in the Biden administration, also the deputy director of the National Economic Council. He says. The White House knows this is a serious economic problem. And when you look at how many other industries rely on semiconductors, particularly the most high capacity ones, that it is a big national security problem, too. Pharmaceuticals space but also weapons systems and satellites. So here's the problem today. 100% all of the most advanced semiconductors air produced in East Asia. That's a critical vulnerability. The White House wants to spend a lot of money on this $50 billion to boost domestic manufacturing the same amount to create a new department within the Commerce Department to take a look at this. So he's titties Summit actually about selling the infrastructure plan. It's a big part of it, and also from the messages that we have heard. I think the White House also seems to be making it clear to these companies it is ready to intervene. Biden and top advisers have centered a lot of policy around the needs to make the economic interests of middle class Americans central to both foreign and domestic policy. And, just as importantly, for their political future toe, let voters know they're trying to do this..

Steve Adrian Clare Hannon Adrian Florido Allison Aubrey Noel Alaska Scott $50 billion Alison Mississippi Kansas 80% East Asia Duleep Singh 100% Asia Brazil Ford yesterday
MLB All-Star Game yanked from Atlanta over voting law

BBC World Service

09:11 min | 4 months ago

MLB All-Star Game yanked from Atlanta over voting law

"This is all things considered. I'm Audie Cornish and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. Totally unnecessary. That is what a top lieutenant in the Minneapolis Police Department said today about the way that former police officer Derrick Show Vin Pressed his knee into the neck of George Floyd, he testified on the fifth day of Sheldon's murder trial. NPR's Adrian Florido has been covering the proceedings and joins us again from Minneapolis. Hey, Adrian. Hi, Elsa. All right. So today wrapped up the trial's first week, which, as you know, I've been talking about has been packed with so much emotional testimony, like from bystanders who watched Floyd died to first responders who couldn't revive him. But today the trial seemed to shift a little right. Tell us a little bit about that. Yeah. Today, the prosecution worked to build its case that Derrick show Vin used excessive force on George Floyd. And to do that they called Lieutenant Richard Zimmerman to the stand. He is the longest serving police officer in the Minneapolis PD. He's been on the force since 1985. He's the head of the homicide division. And importantly, after George Floyd's death, he was one of the department employees who publicly condemned what show Vin did. Prosecutor Matthew Frank spent time today asking him about the dangers of restraining a suspect by laying them face down. Have you ever in all the years you've been working for the Minneapolis Police department. On been trained. To kneel on the neck of someone who is handcuffed behind their back in a prone position. No, I haven't. Is that if that were done with that be considered force absolutely. What level of force might that be? That would be the top tier the deadly force. Why? Because of The fact that if you need is on a person's neck That can kill him. Not not mincing words. They're obviously right. Well, what exactly did Lieutenant Zimmerman's say about the way show Vin handle George Floyd. So here is the same prosecutor asking Zimmerman a question about what he saw in the body cam footage of George Boyd's arrest. What is your? You know, your View of that use of force during that time period. Totally unnecessary. What do you mean? Well, first of all. Pulling him down to the ground face down. And putting your knee on the neck. For that amount of time. Is just Uncalled for. I saw no reason why The officers felt they were in danger if that's what they felt. And he said, the danger is what show then I would've had to field to justify keeping his his knee on Floyd's neck for that, Monk. E mean it's not every day that you hear. A police officer, especially a senior police officer criticized Another officer, even a former one, right, right? Yeah. But on cross examination, eyes show, Vin's attorney, Eric Nelson, worked to poke holes in his testimony, his main focus being the latitude that police officers are allowed during under the police department's use of force policy when they're responding to incidents, So here's Nelson asking that the same witness a question. You would agree, however, that in the fight for your life generally speaking in a fight for your life, you is an officer are allowed to use whatever force is reasonable and necessary. Correct? Yes. And that could even involve improvisation, agreed. Yes. Minneapolis Police department policy allows a police officer to use whatever means there never are available to him to protect himself and others, right? Yes. The defense attorney there, obviously giving clues about the kind of arguments he's going to make when it's his turn to present his case that show been feared for his life that he was dealing with the dynamic situation. Struggling suspect an angry crowd. And real quick. When do we expect the defense to start calling their own witnesses? Well. The prosecution is expected to wrap up their case by the end of next week. And then it'll be the defense's turn. We expect starting the following week that is NPR's Adrian Florido in Minneapolis. Thank you, Adrian. Thank you, Elsa. Critics say that George is controversial New election law restricts voter access and disproportionately effects people of color and in protest Major League Baseball announced today It will relocate the summer's All Star game and draft out of Georgia and under pressure from voting rights advocates. Major companies like Delta and Coca Cola have issued critical statements. Now. Stetson University law professor Ciara Tourist Spellissy studies the influence of corporations and lawmaking earlier today, I spoke to her about what she found striking about this wave of corporate criticism. One of the things that's remarkable about the new statements from Delta and Coca Cola is that they have changed positions a few days ago. They put out pretty Tepid criticisms and or support for the Georgia legislation, and now that the legislation has become law, and they've been under pressure from voting rights advocates They have changed their tune on. That doesn't happen that often. Let's dig into that a little more, because obviously corporate America lobbies. Statehouses Congress for all kinds of things, right? Can you talk about how aggressive they can be in this area or how reluctant they have been in this area in the past? So corporations have two main ways that they influence policy. One is through corporate donations to particular candidates. They then spend even more money lobbying lawmakers to get the policies that they want. Now, most of the policies that a corporation wants are for its own benefit. No, this is a little bit different because voting rights advocates in Georgia put pressure on corporations not just because they were located in Georgia, but also because they had given money to Some of the politicians who created this regressive Election law in Georgia. Can you talk about a moment in recent history where we've seen corporate activism lead to significant legislative change? I think the biggest Example of this was the 2017 tax cut. And the tax cut was literally for corporations. So you had political donors putting enormous pressure on Members of Congress and the corporate tax rate was cut significantly. Another example is bathroom bills and so by bathroom bills. These are Laws at the state level that direct individuals to only use the bathroom of the gender of their birth. And one of these bathroom bills was passed in North Carolina. The end see double a pulled championship games from North North Carolina. And that got AH lot of attention and and North Carolina. Rolled back that bathroom, Phil. We've been hearing a lot, especially in the last year about corporate responsibility, so to speak. What you going to be looking for going forward to see whether this is Real or not, well, one of the things that we saw after the riots at the Capitol on January 6th. Woz corporations deciding to pull back corporate PAC money from the Republicans who objected to The electoral college votes for Joe Biden. But now there is pressure from the U. S Chamber of Commerce, which is one of the largest trade associations in America. It's also one of the largest Dark money, political spenders in America, and they're urging their members to get back in the political spending game. So one of the things that I will look at After Georgia and after the riots on January, 6th is Do any of these corporations actually changed their political spending behavior. Ciara Torres Spellissy is a professor of law at Stetson University in Gulf Port Florida. Thank you so much for your time. Thank you. There is a new attempt to bring the U. S and Iran back to the 2015 nuclear deal with one The Trump administration left in direct talks are set to begin in Vienna next Tuesday.

George Floyd Minneapolis Police Department Adrian Florido VIN Audie Cornish Elsa Chang Derrick Show Vin Minneapolis Lieutenant Richard Zimmerman Matthew Frank Lieutenant Zimmerman Elsa George Boyd Floyd NPR Adrian Georgia Sheldon Eric Nelson Coca Cola
"adrian florido" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

01:57 min | 4 months ago

"adrian florido" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Elsa Chang this hour. Should businesses be required to pay the standard minimum wage to workers who make tips like waiters and hairdressers. Having to worry about whether or not I'm going to make sufficient finds for the work that I'm putting in If our cake also how young far right extremists in America are finding work arounds when they get booted off mainstream social media sites. We know there are a lot of young people online in white supremacist networks and how worries over the AstraZeneca shot are disrupting Europe's vaccination campaign. Those stories after these headlines Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. The judge overseeing jury selection in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derrick Show. Vin says so called George, who've already been seated in the case. It's to ensure they haven't been tainted by news of the city's massive settlement with the family of George Floyd. The man chosen is on trial for killing More from NPR's Adrian Florido, the $27 million Civil settlement. The city of Minneapolis, reached last week with the Floyd family is separate from the criminal cases against Derrick Show Vin and three other former officers. But Sheldon's attorney raised concerns the jury pool has been tainted by the news. He wants the judge to postpone the trial or move it out of Minneapolis. So far the judge has not agreed to do either. During questioning. Potential jurors are asked whether they can set aside things they hear outside the courtroom. So the judge said he'd video called the seven jurors who were seated before news of the settlement broke to make sure they could still be impartial. Adrian Florido. NPR NEWS Minneapolis President Biden traveled to Pennsylvania today. Seeking to highlight details of his $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief measure. President visiting a minority owned flooring business in suburban Philadelphia talk about how the plant will help small businesses, noting that hundreds of thousands of jobs have been lost in the state due to the pandemic. 300,000 Pennsylvania's.

Jack Spear Elsa Chang Adrian Florido George Floyd Pennsylvania George Sheldon Floyd Derrick Show $27 million Derrick Show Vin $1.9 trillion America Philadelphia NPR Vin today last week 300,000 seven jurors
Minneapolis reaches $27 million settlement with George Floyd's family

All Things Considered

01:35 min | 5 months ago

Minneapolis reaches $27 million settlement with George Floyd's family

"Announced a $27 million settlement with the family of George Floyd over Floyd staff at the hands of police officers last spring. The announcement comes amid jury selection in the murder trial of Derrick Show Vin, the officer who held his knee on Floyd's neck for almost nine minutes. MPR's Adrian Florido is in Minneapolis where this is all happening. He joins us now. And Adrian, I want to start with this settlement. What other details have you learned? Well. The settlement is in response to a federal wrongful death lawsuit that George Floyd's family filed last year against the city of Minneapolis and the four officers who participated in Floyd's arrest. The City Council approved the settlement this afternoon. So did Mayor Jacob Fry. Those officials then joined Floyd's family at a press conference and here's what Floyd family attorney Ben Crump said there This historic agreement, the largest Pretrial settlement in a police civil rights wrong for death case in U. S history makes a statement that judge floor deserve better. Yeah. Then what we witness Oh, may 25th 2020. That John's Florin Life madness. And by extension, black lives matter. While most of the money in the settlement body goes to the Floyd family. It also includes half a million dollars for community improvement efforts in the neighborhood where Floyd was killed. What does

George Floyd Floyd Derrick Show Vin Adrian Florido Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Fry MPR Ben Crump Adrian City Council U. John
In A Los Angeles Park, Worrying Signs Of Rising Homelessness

All Things Considered

03:55 min | 5 months ago

In A Los Angeles Park, Worrying Signs Of Rising Homelessness

"Continues to pummel the nation's economy, There are troubling signs that more people are slipping into homelessness. NPR's Adrian Florido visited Park in Los Angeles, where this is becoming more visible every day. Echo Park is one of Ella's iconic public spaces. It has a big lake lined by palm trees and a postcard view of the downtown skyline. It's always had a small homeless community. But in the last few months, people sleeping in tents have filled half of the park's 16 acres. Jesse Brandy moved in four months ago after losing his job programming office phone systems. Everything's closed. Businesses aren't putting any effort into you know, telephone lines in programming those systems out of work. He couldn't afford the rent. So that left me with friends going through, you know, house the house and then became a burden. So So he came to the park and pitched a tent. There are people have been here before hand, but a lot of these people right here. This was because of the pandemic. Federal, state and local addiction moratoriums are supposed to be keeping people in their homes, even if they can't pay the rent during the pandemic. It says that who moved into Echo Park over the summer, said a lot of people like him have left their apartments anyway. Rather than fall behind on rent. I didn't want that hanging over me. Even though there was a moratorium on Enter and I didn't technically has to pay it. I'm not making money. So how? While my loading up on death, he said in addiction over back rent would hurt him for years. He recently found a temporary job working the reception desk it a tax preparation firm. Colleagues don't know He lives in the park. Which is why he asked me not to use his last name. Like I met people out here. They had good jobs. And then could the foreground. This pandemic is just, you know, I really hit him hard. There's even like families with kids here, you know, because of the pandemic groups that fan out to do. Homeless counts have put that off for now, making it hard to know how many people the pandemic has already driven to the streets. Just because there's no academic data does not discount our own eyes. Pete White directs the Lay Community Action Network, an anti poverty organization. Us traveling in communities where there were no house with people and there are now informal settlements everywhere. There is no dept that their arm or people on the streets Ella in California have had a homeless crises for years. And while officials are using pandemic relief money to get people inside White fears. What he's saying is just the beginning here and nationally. This crisis will on Lee get worse unless we figure out how to do all we can to keep people who are barely hanging on. In their homes. And for folks who are house list, figuring out cheaper and faster and innovative ways to get people inside. Brenda Modano moved into Echo Park before Christmas and says the community has formed quickly here with weekly meetings and all We get together. We discussed that girls, if anything wrong or what? What's going on? You know how many kids you could have? She was standing with stubble. What soy who was manning a table accepting donations for the parks residents. Shoes, toilet paper soap clothing. Ah, feel crappy about because by doing that I know that I'm helping some other people and that made me happy. So I moved into the park seven months ago, almost for the first time in his life, he said. 35 years after moving here from what they might let you pulled the business card out of his tent who started with so general handyman? I do I do. Drive one painting, plumbing, hardwood floor. That's what I do. So he says that when the pandemic struck work dried up the first night in his tent, he couldn't believe it, but everything happens for every zones. You're gonna get up on my feet. I know that I don't Don't get up. I'm going after I lost everything. He started recycling cans, he says, and scraping jobs together. Little by Little Adrian flooded. NPR NEWS, Los Angeles

Echo Park Adrian Florido Jesse Brandy Pete White Lay Community Action Network Ella NPR Los Angeles Brenda Modano LEE California United States Little Adrian Npr News
"adrian florido" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:46 min | 6 months ago

"adrian florido" Discussed on KCRW

"New law. I'm eliminating that policy. A second order involves replacing the nation's system to process asylum cases. Ah, third calls for a review of the legal immigration system. Including the public charge rule that made it harder for immigrants to get permanent residents or green cards if they were likely to require public benefits. Franco or Dona as NPR news was in a bind, joined Senate Democrats for virtual lunch today to further outline details of his proposed $1.9 trillion corner virus relief measure. President, joined by Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, who along with the White House has said the concern is not providing too much shade to the coronavirus ravaged economy, but rather too little. Both Biden and yellowing of also urged lawmakers take bold actions to address the pandemic and the virus. Senate Democrats then use their slim majority to vote 50 to 49 to move ahead with or without Republican votes by met with GOP senators yesterday discussed there slim down $618 billion proposal, saying he is unwilling to settle on too small of an aid package. Abide. Administration is releasing more than a billion dollars installed disaster aid for Puerto Rico. NPR's Adrian Florido reports as part of an effort to ease restrictions the Trump administration had put on funding for the island's recovery from Hurricane Maria. $1.3 billion will pay for projects to strengthen Puerto Rico's infrastructure against future natural disasters. The money was approved two years ago is part of a $20 billion package for the U. S territory from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. But the Trump administration set strict rules before the island could get that money stricter than for states like Texas and Florida. Recovering from similar disasters. Officials said they were concerned about corruption and inefficient spending. But many on the island believe racism was a factor. The Biden administration said its decision to release the money is part of the new president's commitment to equity in government. Adrian Florido NPR News The second full flight test of Space axis Starship Rocket is ended pretty much like the first one with another fiery crash. On. Most company launched the prototype rocket from the company's facility in southeastern taxes flew to a height of more than six miles, but it never strayed doubt upon returning to earth and slammed into the ground. Space X is developing starship for a future mission to Mars. On Wall Street. The Dow was up strongly. This is NPR man. This is KCRW and Larry Parole. Here's what's happening at 604. It is increasingly looking like the rest of this school year will be spent online for students in Los Angeles and many other parts of the state. That's prompted some education officials. Look into making the school year longer as KCRW sterile SATs been reports, not everyone thinks that's such a good idea. Several Ellie's school board members have joined other education officials around California in signaling support for more time in the digital classroom. Supporters say the extra time is needed to help close gaps created by distance learning. Ella USD Superintendent Austin Buechner went even further this week, suggesting the district could hold a mandatory summer session. Some education experts say students and teachers are already exhausted by a difficulty year of distance learning, they warn, adding more time runs the risk of ignoring mental health needs. The L U. S. T is also among the district that will consider extending the 2021 2 22 school year when students will hopefully be back in the classroom. State schools chief Tony Thurman kicked off a global contest today for the best plan to expand high speed Internet access to all Californians. We can now offer a million dollar cash prize to support this innovation competition. The money comes from philanthropist Gary Michaelson, General Motors and biotech firm Genentech. There will be judges who will have the opportunity to review proposals as they come in, and we think that this could really lead to the next big thing In closing the digital divide, Thurman says. The lack of equitable access to computers and connectivity disproportionately affects low income students and students of color, he says almost 1/5. California students still can't participate in distance learning and a Beverly Hills salon owner who could be seen in video footage encouraging writers rioters to storm the U. S. Capitol. January 6th. Has been indicted. Gina Bisignano could go to prison for decades if she's convicted of the seven counts against her and the indictment. The grand jury says Busan, Jano not only impeded the official proceedings of Congress but aided and abetted others. The jury accuses her of obstructing an official proceeding, civil disorder and destruction of property, among other crimes. Support for NPR comes in the Walton Family Foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems to improve lives today and benefit future generations. More information at Walton family foundation dot or right now, 64.

NPR Tony Thurman Adrian Florido Biden KCRW Puerto Rico California Walton Family Foundation Gina Bisignano Biden administration official Department of Housing and Urba Janet Yellen GOP Trump Los Angeles President
"adrian florido" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:46 min | 6 months ago

"adrian florido" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A second order involves replacing the nation's system to process asylum cases. Ah, third calls for a review of the legal immigration system. Including the public charge rule that made it harder for immigrants to get permanent residents or green cards if they were likely to require public benefits. Franco or Dona as NPR news was in a bind, joined Senate Democrats for virtual lunch today to further outline details of his proposed $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief measure. President, joined by Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, who along with the White House has said the concern is not providing too much shade to the corner virus ravaged economy. But rather too little. Both Biden and yelling of all swords, lawmakers take bold actions to address the pandemic and the virus. Senate Democrats then use their slim majority to vote 50 to 49 move ahead with or without Republican votes by met with GOP senators yesterday discussed there slim down $618 billion proposal, saying he is unwilling to settle on too small of an aid package. By the administration is releasing more than a billion dollars installed disaster aid for Puerto Rico. NPR's Adrian Florido reports as part of an effort to ease restrictions the Trump administration had put on funding for the island's recovery from Hurricane Maria. $1.3 billion will pay for projects to strengthen Puerto Rico's infrastructure against future natural disasters. The money was approved two years ago is part of a $20 billion package for the U. S territory from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. But the Trump administration set strict rules before the island could get that money stricter than for states like Texas and Florida. Recovering from similar disasters. Officials said they were concerned about corruption and inefficient spending. But many on the island believe racism was a factor. The Biden administration said its decision to release the money is part of the new president's commitment to equity in government. Adrian Florido NPR News The second full flight test of Space axis Starship Rocket is ended pretty much like the first one with another fiery crash. On. Most company launched the prototype rocket from the company's facility in southeastern taxes flew to a height of more than six miles, but it never strained out upon returning to earth and slammed into the ground. Space Sex is developing starship for a future mission to Mars. Wall Street. The Dow was up strongly. This is NPR lie from KQED News. I'm terrorist. Siler State Assembly member Mark Levin is calling for the removal of the federal receiver in charge of health care in state prisons. This comes after an inspector general report found the state's decision to transfer dozens of inmates into San Quentin at the onset of the pandemic led to a massive outbreak at the prison. Veen says court appointed receiver Clark Kelso and his team knew or should have known that some of those men may have already been infected with covert 19. They, in fact, pushed forward with the transfer, knowing that the data they had was flawed and probably faulty. Prison officials have reported that 28 men at San Quentin and one employees have died from the virus. The Oakland City Council has passed an emergency ordinance that will give grocery store workers an additional $5 per hour as temporary pandemic hazard pay. Thea Ordinance on Lee applies to larger grocery stores and retailers such as Target. An estimated 2000 workers would be covered. Councilman member Nikki Fortunato Bass authored the legislation. Her chief of staff, me a psycho, Chin explained how it works. If a large grocery employer is already paying hazard pay this emergency ordinance gives them credit for doing the right thing. It allows employers already offering hazard pay to use that amount as credit towards reaching the $5 per hour bonus cities across the state have passed or are considering similar measures. One in Long Beach is being.

NPR Adrian Florido Puerto Rico San Quentin Biden Nikki Fortunato Bass Biden administration Department of Housing and Urba Thea Ordinance Siler State Assembly Janet Yellen Trump GOP Franco President Long Beach KQED News Dona
"adrian florido" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:44 min | 8 months ago

"adrian florido" Discussed on KCRW

"Public health experts are worried that some of the people who are skeptical of a Corona virus vaccine are those who need it the most that includes Latinos and African Americans who make up a disproportionate number of people hospitalized or killed by covert 19. NPR's Adrian Florido reports on some of the efforts to fight vaccine skepticism within those communities. Maria today is does not intend to get vaccinated, at least not right away. I think if I get the vaccine that I'm going to get Whatever, like Kobe house and I'm going to die, so I definitely will be one of the people that won't take it. You know, In the beginning, you says she is not generally a vaccine skeptic, but this one since it's new I am not comfortable of getting it. Surveys show that kind of skepticism about the Cova vaccine is widespread. Nearly 40% of Latinos told Pew researchers they would probably or definitely not get the vaccine. More than half of black respondents said the same white people have also expressed hesitancy. But the reluctance among African Americans and Latinos is especially worrying because their rates of infection are so much higher. It's a major concern. Dr Keith Norris's among an army of people, ramping up efforts to ensure Latinos, African Americans and other people of color trust the vaccine. He's hearing a wide range of concerns, many stemming from a long history of racism in medical research. Concern about being a guinea pig concerns about farmer and the federal government. And then there's lots of social media messaging. Downplaying the importance of coronavirus. Norris works for U. C. L A, and is leading a California effort funded by the National Institutes of Health to build Vaccine Trust. Strategy is to get clear, concise information to.

Dr Keith Norris Maria Adrian Florido NPR Cova National Institutes of Health Pew California
Louisville preparing for another night of protests after Breonna Taylor decision

All Things Considered

04:22 min | 11 months ago

Louisville preparing for another night of protests after Breonna Taylor decision

"Of Louisville is bracing for another night of protests after Kentucky's attorney general said he would not charge three officers in the death of Briana Taylor. She is the black woman shot and killed by police in her apartment in March. The decision not to charge the officers involved drove demonstrators into the streets around the country. But it's Louisville. That is the center of this story. And that is where NPR's Adrian Florido is now. Hey there, Adrian. I'm a really describe to us what you are seeing. What you're hearing is you're out and about reporting on the streets there in Louisville. So, so far today, things have been calm. That was not the case. Last night, however, the streets of downtown Louisville were really tense as police worked to enforce and nine PM curfew and disperse crowds or furious Attorney General Daniel Cameron's announcement just before curfew, two officers were shot. Their injuries were non my threatening and the suspect was arrested. But this morning, Mayor Greg Fischer pleaded for peace. We never had control over what attorney General of the grand jury would do. We do have control over what happens next in our city, So I'm asking everyone to reject violence and join me and committing Ourselves to the work of reform for justice and for equity and do that now. And Adrian. How our people out on the streets protesting. How are they hearing that? How are they responding to that? I think that there is a lot of skepticism that meaningful change that the mayor is calling for if they participate will actually happen, You know, people here in Louisville protested for 120 days. Demanding that the three police officers who participated in the raid on Briana Taylor's apartment be charged with her murder. Instead. What they got was a grand jury and the state attorney general deciding to charge just one of those officers not for Taylor's death, but because the bullets that this officer fired into her apartment, entered the apartment next door and endangered the lives of Taylor's neighbors. This morning, I spoke to a man named Marcus Reed. He runs a barbecue joint near where Taylor was killed wasn't what he said. If it was may 20 years, But you know, this is police and he's not my skin color. They Just a slap on the wrist. They keep doing it. He told me that his friends and family are deeply resentful of the decision not to charge and that he would not be surprised if tensions on the streets actually actually grow worse after this, Yeah, well, I was going to ask where where my things go because people out protesting many of them had some pretty specific goals in mind. They weren't just angry. They wanted all of the involved officers to be fired and charged with murder. Which, as of yesterday seems to be off the table. So so where do things go now? Rights of the local investigation into Taylor's killing is complete. There will be no more charges Theater New general has said that but the police Department is continuing an internal investigation on whether the officers followed department protocols on the night of the raid. There's also an ongoing federal investigation. The FBI is looking into whether police violated Briana Taylor's civil rights and they're looking at How they obtained that warrant raid Taylor's apartment to look for drugs drugs that they did not find, And aside from that Kentucky's governor Andy this year, he is calling on the attorney general to release the evidence from his investigation against the officers. Here's what the governor said just a little while ago. I know the attorney general talks about the truth, and I talk about the truth. I think we ought to let the people of Kentucky see all of that evaluate and come to the truth. I believe that it is fully appropriate to do at this point in time, Put it all on line. The attorney general has said that he won't do that for now, because of the charges brought yesterday against the one former officer Onda also that pending FBI investigation so briefly, Adrian, you're watching for more protests there in Louisville tonight. There will be more protests. You know, The police say that they're going to continue to enforce the curfew, which is still in effect. Police say that they will do the same thing they did yesterday. They have today arrested more than 100 protesters yesterday. I should also say Marie Louise that we're expecting to hear from Briana Taylor's family tomorrow. NPR's Adrian Florido reporting from Louisville tonight. Thanks, Adrien.

Briana Taylor Louisville Attorney Officer Adrian Florido Marcus Reed Kentucky Police Department NPR Murder Greg Fischer Daniel Cameron FBI Marie Louise Adrien Onda Andy
'This is a crisis': National Urban League finds persistent racial disparities exacerbated during pandemic

BBC World Service

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

'This is a crisis': National Urban League finds persistent racial disparities exacerbated during pandemic

"Urban League says its annual report on racial inequality in America explores various ways that the corona virus pandemic is exposing racism. NPR's Adrian Florido has more. The report titled The State of Black America Unmasked highlights how the pandemic has laid bare persistent racial disparities that the group has been documenting. For decades. It published data showing that African Americans and Latinos are roughly three times as likely to be affected by the Corona virus is white people. An African Americans, or roughly twice as likely as whites or Latinos to die from it. The reasons are complex but rooted fundamentally, the Urban League wrote in longstanding systemic racism. The urban lynx has decades of economic and social progress have not been enough to prevent much of the devastation that has befallen black and brown communities during the pandemic.

Urban League Adrian Florido America NPR
Minneapolis council members pledge to disband police as protests mount

BBC World Service

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Minneapolis council members pledge to disband police as protests mount

"A majority of members of Minneapolis city council in the United States have promised to dismantle its police department the move follows the death of an unarmed African American man George Floyd in police custody two weeks ago respond one spread protests nine of the council's thirteen members said they would work with the community to create a new system of public safety Adrian Florido is a reporter for national public radio this is something that black activists in the city of Minneapolis actually been advocating for for many years but that really only in the last couple of weeks and really in the last few days in the aftermath of of these protests that they have gotten a more receptive audience the decision really was kind of whiplash even for a lot of these black activists who hadn't expected such a willing reception a positive reception to the proposal from the city council itself

United States Adrian Florido Reporter Minneapolis George Floyd
"adrian florido" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"adrian florido" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"The life of the black man whose death in police custody on Memorial Day has led to more than a week of protests across the country NPR's Adrian Florido was at the ceremony and he joins me now hello hi Sarah Nigerian I understand you're there at the chapel describe what you sing for us right the memorial for George fight is underway as we speak George played casket gold casket is a different the chapel and he's being eulogized from a white lectern that was designed after the one that Dr Martin Luther king used to deliver his I have a dream speech a judge with family family is here members of Congress Minnesota officials leaders we just heard from the Reverend al Sharpton let's hear a little bit of CO two get your **** George George we keep changing we keep we and just after that fiery speech there there was a very emotional everyone went silent for eight minutes which is about the amount of time to shop and had his neck wonderful its neck I'm sorry he has me on for a second Adrian and clearly this is an impassioned event a political event in many ways but it's also a memorial have there been some more personal there have been in your it well the speech is here our continuing the calls for justice for George Floyd in for all black Americans a goal of this memorials to kind of take a step back from this global outcry that Floyd killing is set up to remember the joyful and may be a simple now but he is also a man son brother so I'd like you to listen to what his brother aloneness said when he took the lectern.

NPR Adrian Florido Dr Martin Luther king George George George Floyd Sarah Nigerian Congress Minnesota al Sharpton
'I can't breathe' protests heat up as curfews imposed in several U.S. cities

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:04 min | 1 year ago

'I can't breathe' protests heat up as curfews imposed in several U.S. cities

"Let's go to Minneapolis now we've got NPR's Adrian Florido agent good morning good morning look not only did we see protests all across the country last night we saw a very heavy police response as well as National Guard response can you tell us about that yeah well the national guard's been activated in in several states including California Ohio Georgia and here in Minnesota where I am as well as in Washington DC so I met many cities we saw not only police in riot gear facing off against protesters but also troops at writing through through the streets in military vehicles in addition to those large number of troops and police what about the tactics they're using there's been a lot of criticism of their tactics people of that been posting videos of protesters being tear gassed hit with rubber bullets attacks on journalists in in New York there's a video of a police cruiser driving into protesters a video that mayor bill de Blasio called upsetting but even with this massive response police around the country have struggled to take control there were violent clashes with police in Chicago chaotic protests in New York and Salt Lake City one person killed in Indianapolis I'm in LA LA as you mentioned the the the the the mayor issued a curfew order and and deployed the National Guard and other cities have the National Guard on standby hoping to prevent the kind of damage that we've seen here in in Minneapolis and there's been mass arrests and injuries on both sides of police and protesters what was it like last night in Minneapolis well over the last few days police had been completely unable to control them the looting and rioting on the streets here and so large swaths of the city of burnt because the police and firefighters in many instances didn't even try to respond but last night things were were different police were out in full force patrolling the streets with with the help of the National Guard and they were determined to take control of the streets they they used tear gas here too they they used rubber bullets and police lines to to disperse protesters still really furious over at George Floyd's killing and and police violence in general and I can tell you Lou the police mostly did take control here there was very little damage reported last night to to to build businesses another property and I don't believe any major fires reported in Minneapolis last night either so what's happening there do you think the unrest is subsiding it's hard to say things still feel very tenuous here many people are still furious like I said over what the police did to George Floyd and though many people did obey the city's eight PM curfew last night many did not listen to what this young man named Q. Henderson who I spoke with last night said he was a he was marching with a group of about a hundred people at peacefully but angrily at around ten o'clock two hours after the curfew took effect I think the curfews

Minneapolis NPR Adrian Florido
"adrian florido" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"adrian florido" Discussed on KQED Radio

"African American neighborhood of Oak Park limit hill attended with her daughter angry I'm frustrated and something has to change and in New York City state assemblywoman Diana Richardson protesters with the group that was made by the police we want the NYPD began so what we look at where even speaking we're watching what he's doing meanwhile murder charges were filed against one of the officers involved in Florida's death NPR's Adrian Florido joins us now from Minneapolis where he was at the protest in that city Adrien thanks for being with us hi Scott and what did you see there last night to match the chaos well I spent a couple of hours last night on a stretch of a couple of blocks in south Minneapolis for this incredible scene unfolded people broke into businesses and started looting someone set fire to a car in a parking lot which then exploded and engulfed at least a dozen other cars a gas station was set on fire people were cursing the police and chanting George Floyd's name you know just one of several places in the country where it seems like this are starting to play out and of course Adrian the destruction that you describe happened within hours after officials announced that the officer had been seen in that video with his knee on George Floyd snack had been charged with murder protesters clearly wanted something more than yeah they were not at all satisfied most people I spoke with on the street here last night agreed that that charge is an important first step but they said that it's it's not enough listen to what they were Jones one of the protesters I spoke with said we want all four officers in jail.

NYPD Florida Adrian Florido Minneapolis Scott George Floyd officer Jones Oak Park New York City Diana Richardson murder Adrien
"adrian florido" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"adrian florido" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm straight in and something has to change and in New York City state assemblywoman Diana Richardson protesters with the group that was made by the police we want the NYPD began so what we look at where even speaking we're watching them aggressively look at what he's doing meanwhile murder charges were filed against one of the officers involved in Florence death NPR's Adrian Florido joins us now from Minneapolis where he was at the protest in that city Adrien thanks for being with us hi Scott and what did you see there last night amidst the chaos well I spent a couple of hours last night on a stretch of a couple of blocks in south Minneapolis for this incredible scene unfolded people broke into businesses and started looting someone set fire to a car in a parking lot which then exploded and engulfed at least a dozen other cars a gas station was set on fire people were cursing the police and chanting George Floyd's name you know just one of several places and in the country where it seems like this are starting to play out and of course Adrian the destruction that you describe happened within hours after officials announced that the officer had been seen in that video with his knee on George Floyd snack had been charged with murder protesters clearly wanted something more than yeah they were not at all satisfied most people I spoke with on the street here last night agreed that that charge is an important first step but they said that it's it's not enough listen to what David Jones one of the protesters I spoke with said we want all four.

NYPD Adrian Florido Minneapolis Scott George Floyd officer New York City Diana Richardson murder Florence Adrien David Jones
"adrian florido" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"adrian florido" Discussed on KCRW

"Across the country in Denver in Louisville hundreds of people gathered demanding justice for another life lost at the hands of police Riana Taylor who was killed back in March but we focus now on Minneapolis where protesters set fire to a police precinct last night and this morning a black CNN reporter and his crew or arrested live on television while covering the protests they have since been released all this comes after a tweet from president trump sanctioning police violence against demonstrators and here's Adrian Florido is in Minneapolis and joins us now Adrian can you just tell us what's going on I mean what's the situation this morning good morning Rachel yeah this this this morning state police have sort of retaking control of the area around this police precinct that was set on fire last night right now there are there are lines and lines and lines of police officers sort of that sort of making a very sort of heavy show of their of their of their force in their presence in around this police precinct last night it was much different scene hundreds of people possibly thousands of people watching this police precinct burn this police precinct which had become a symbol of the police power that they feel is responsible for for George Floyd's death and also a symbol of the broader tortured relationship between police and and and and all black Americans and here it was burning and there was not a single police officer or firefighter on the scene last night officials just let the building burn the mayor had said in a late night press conference that he pulled personnel from that precinct because he hadn't wanted to risk more violence between police and protesters clearly the scenes change this morning you were there last night you watched as this precinct building burned what were people telling you well there are some people I spoke with in the crowd who are conflicted by what they were saying but by and large you know in this crowd people were happy to see this police building burning I spoke to a woman named Sam Sam vara and I want to listen to what she said that's what they gave.

Denver Louisville Riana Taylor Minneapolis reporter Adrian Florido George Floyd officer Sam Sam vara CNN president Rachel
Black people hit hard by coronavirus in Los Angeles

Forum

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Black people hit hard by coronavirus in Los Angeles

"Fang public health officials in Los Angeles say preliminary data there show African Americans dying from corona virus at higher rates than other racial groups NPR's Adrian Florido reports Los Angeles county health department released data on Tuesday that showed African Americans accounting for seventeen percent of LA's cove in nineteen deaths well I forget Americans make up only nine percent of the county's population the figures are preliminary officials don't yet have racial data for everyone the virus has killed still only black people were significantly over represented in the death figures Latinos were underrepresented while deaths among whites and Asians track more closely to their shares of the population nationally other counties and states have also reported data showing coronavirus disproportionately killing black Americans result experts believe of longstanding inequities in black people's access to economic opportunity and health

Los Angeles Adrian Florido LA Los Angeles County
"adrian florido" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"adrian florido" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To two women who claim to have had affairs with trump the president's attorney say the record should not be released until president trump leaves office. tonight it will be mostly clear will have a low around sixty degrees tomorrow sunshine again with highs in the mid seventies currently seventy seven degrees and mostly cloudy at four thirty five. support for NPR comes from member stations and from MD Anderson cancer center where physicians treat all types of cancer with a team of nearly twenty one thousand all devoted to ending cancer and providing hope to patients more at making cancer history dot com and staples with printed marketing solutions for business including manuals signage and banners more at staples stores for staples dot com staples. it's All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Audie Cornish and I'm ari Shapiro two years after hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico we only have a rough idea of how many people died in and after the storm that's partly why people protesters earlier this year and forced the governor of Puerto Rico to resign NPR's Adrian Florido reports on the pain that lingers long after Maria. hurricane Maria not to put the because power out there they'll be as is oxygen machine stopped working his daughter Maddy ideas drove him from one overwhelmed hospital to another she said none could provide him the proper medical treatment is at the level in local more moral for the galaxy and assume his skin started turning purple because he wasn't getting enough oxygen six weeks after the storm he died but his family's pain kept growing four thirty because government down played the hurricane death count the SS it felt like her dad's death didn't matter then this summer the worst of it in leaked group text messages between the governor and his inner circle one of his advisers cracked a joke about the hurricane debt named Morley they won't chase the monthly K.. so but I mean some Daniel emotion and coming. and when I say I was so upset he said the mock my pain.

president trump NPR MD Anderson cancer center Audie Cornish hurricane Maria Puerto Rico Adrian Florido Maria. hurricane Maria Morley attorney ari Shapiro Maddy Daniel seventy seven degrees sixty degrees six weeks two years
"adrian florido" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"adrian florido" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The British Virgin Islands was the U. S. Virgin Islands bit harder than Porter Rico what what is the latest your hearing there were widespread power outages in the U. S. Virgin Islands both at Saint Thomas and Saint Croix but work is under way to restore power they're at now and other than that they also don't seem to be any reports of major damage other than possibly some damage from minor flooding all right that's in pairs Adrian Florido he is in San Juan Puerto Rico where it looks like people are breathing a sigh of relief this morning as hurricane Dorian moves away Adrian thanks so much thanks David as we mentioned the US Virgin Islands were closer to Dorian's path and Stacey Plaskett was on Saint Croix as the storm was hitting she represents the U. S. Virgin Islands in Congress comes on plastic thank you for joining us this morning I know it's probably been a rough a rough night as the storm was gone by thank you so much this storm was really here for most of the day into the afternoon so by evening on thing Corey seven thirty the governor's lifted the curfew I think Thomas of course if you're probably aware got hit a little quite a bit more it picked up from now on in the door and picked up and really did a bit of damage over there of course we were really concerned because we are already in a fragile state I've like quarter Rico we have over a thousand people maybe twelve hundred who still have harp on their route and some of our infrastructure of course our hospitals and such have issues in terms of their ability to be able.

British Virgin Islands U. S. Virgin Islands Porter Rico Saint Thomas Saint Croix Adrian Florido San Juan Puerto Rico Dorian David US Stacey Plaskett Congress Corey
"adrian florido" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"adrian florido" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from npr news in washington on korver coleman president trump has tweeted this morning that congressman tom marino has withdrawn his name from consideration as drug czar marino had come under fire for helping to push legislation to weaken the drug enforcement administration's powers to stop drug makers from distributing opioids california fire officials say at least forty one people have died as wildfires scorched northern california firefighters are putting up more containment lines around several blazes one of the worst affected cities a santa rosa residents tom and catherine andrew's returned to find their homestanding but saw that many of their neighbours lost their is to the wildfires burned all the way up to our house burned overblown bloomberg word to say we were spared lordy but none of our in how many of our neighbours lost their homes as you know this on the other side of us california fire officials say that more than forty thousand people remain evacuated stress and anxiety levels are rising among people who live in puerto rico it's been nearly a month since hurricane maria hit npr's adrian florido says many residents are looking for ways to relax it was raining but the net look by some yoga and her friends were sitting outside their housing project east of the capital sungkwon on monday singing and playing bomba linda films were trying to ease our stress she said because they're still no power and food is still hard to find across the people are going a little stircrazy from being in the dark going on four weeks.

washington trump congressman tom marino puerto rico maria adrian florido npr president california santa rosa catherine andrew bloomberg four weeks
"adrian florido" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"adrian florido" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from npr news in washington on giles snyder authorities the northern california now say the wildfires arab to have now killed at least forty people and destroyed some fifty seven hundred homes and businesses a fires broke out a week ago governor jerry brown calling them one of the greatest tragedy says state has ever faced hundreds of people are still reported missing and although officials say they expect to find most alive elissa junk perry from member station kqe deep reports of the work of search and rescue teams search and rescue units from up and down the state spent saturday going through piles of rubble destroyed neighborhoods of santa rosa but there's so much ashish and debris and that ashen debris is almost like a powder it's almost like a baby powder and you have to sift through that and in some way find human remains and be able to hopefully identify them in some way if you can you can see of a bone in you pick it up just turns to powder in your hands sergeant ray kelly of the alameda county sheriff's department says unfortunately searching for bodies a similar to an archeological tank special taking tools and cadaver dogs were brought in for assistance for npr news i'm over such a pain santa rosa authorities in puerto rico have revised the death toll from hurricane maria they now say the storm is led to the deaths of forty nine people much of the island remains without power in pierce adrian florido visited a remote community this weekend where people are skeptical that he like trysts city will be restored anytime soon noone here expect power to be restored before next.

washington california santa rosa ray kelly puerto rico adrian florido npr giles snyder governor jerry brown alameda county
"adrian florido" Discussed on Code Switch

Code Switch

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"adrian florido" Discussed on Code Switch

"Laura goldblatt the organizer nub a researcher agrees with him she brings up a lot of the same issues the directed advocates have been pushing the city to improve affordable housing and to address concerns over police stops last year local paper found that nearly eighty percent of people pulled over by sharlto police were black only twenty percent of the town's population is black the city is also still dealing with the fall of its decision in the fifties to close white schools for months rather than integrate them the next decade it tore down black homes and businesses here's goldblatt it in some ways feels almost and so obvious that you should resist something like what we saw on saturday but now we need to move into some of the nuts and bolts and the things that make us say this was so ugly but we actually have a lot of really ugly policies here goldblatt said those policies or what she hopes charlottesville residents unite behind next that was our team adrian florido after the break we've got some history for you and we talked to a reporter who lives in charlottesville uncovers the trump administration he tells us about its ties to white nationalist sans we talked to a republican strategist who says trump's response to the incident in charlottesville could deal a major blow to his party's efforts to become more inclusive stay with us support for this podcast on the following message come from blue apron blue apron partners with sustainable farms fisheries in ranchers to bring you all the ingredients you need to create incredible home cooked meals ingredients compared with an easy to follow recipe card delivered to your door weekly in a refrigerated box rediscover how fun cooking can be while enjoying specialty ingredients and exploring new flavours and cuisine.

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