35 Burst results for "Adobe"

Cyber Monday deals lure in consumers amid high inflation

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

Cyber Monday deals lure in consumers amid high inflation

"Consumers are looking for more discounts on cyber Monday. Cyber Monday is expected to remain the year's biggest online shopping day with up to $11.6 billion in sales. That's according to Adobe analytics, which tracks transactions at over 85 of the top 100 online stores in the U.S. that forecast represents a jump of about a $1 billion, consumers spent last year, Adobe's numbers are not adjusted for inflation and some analysts have said, top line numbers will be boosted by higher prices. I'm Shelley Adler

Adobe Analytics U.S. Adobe Shelley Adler
"adobe" Discussed on School of Motion Podcast

School of Motion Podcast

04:33 min | 4 months ago

"adobe" Discussed on School of Motion Podcast

"Remember, we talked about revenue and multiples and the multiple Adobe paid for this doesn't make a lot of sense if you're looking at the standard deal size and the standard way these deals typically work, it seems like they overpaid. But I think the stock market's wrong and disclaimer, this is not financial advice, do not listen to me. I don't know what I'm talking about, but I think Adobe stock is probably a pretty good buy right now. I don't think most investors understand the position Adobe was in. I don't think they had a choice. I think they had to buy figma, and I think they had to pay dearly for it. And I think in the end, it's going to work out great. I think a lot of investors look at figma as another design tool. And why does Adobe need another design tool? Don't they already have a million of them? Isn't this just Photoshop on the web? They do not understand the nuance of the design field and they don't understand how transformative figma really is as a tool as a way of working. And the types of applications you use it for are not the same that you use Photoshop and illustrator for it's more of a competitor to XD and XD never got the market share figma got and that market share is just going to keep exploding because let me ask you a question. Do you think there's going to be more or less websites in the future? Do you think there's going to be more or less applications in the future? Mobile apps, web apps, desktop apps. All of them get designed in figma. So I think investors are wrong on this deal, but I also think Twitter is wrong on this deal and that my shock you because Twitter's never wrong, but in this case it is. So one reason is just the size of the deal, Adobe is spending what at the time of this recording is something like 15% of the total value of Adobe, their market cap. 15% of that to buy one company. Now, that is really going to incentivize them not to screw it up, right? And I know it can be popular to beat up on Adobe when they do something you don't like. But Adobe is filled with geniuses. Trust me, I know some of them. And I don't think they're going to screw this up. I think they understand what the stakes are. And they're going to do right by the figma community. And let's look at some more recent acquisitions. So last year, Adobe acquired frame IO, one of my favorite web apps for $1.3 billion. And it's funny because at the time I thought, wow, that's a huge deal. Go Adobe, go frame IO and now, gosh, really kind of looks like small potatoes. But a lot of people were worried that Adobe would sort of mess up frame IO somehow. And so far, they haven't. Frame IO is still a separate brand. It's a separate app, but Adobe has very, very smartly integrated it into Adobe Creative Cloud, and guess what they added a free tier. If you have Adobe Creative Cloud, you can now use frame IO for free up to a certain amount of storage. You can go to the website and find out more details if you want, but it comes with the app.

Adobe figma XD Twitter
"adobe" Discussed on School of Motion Podcast

School of Motion Podcast

04:36 min | 4 months ago

"adobe" Discussed on School of Motion Podcast

"Really, really fast, and they are world class at building new technologies, Adobe is as well, but they're not fast. I mean, they have an amazing engineering team. They're creating, you know, and have created some of the most widely used, greatest software ever, but they're a massive company and massive companies just move slower than smaller ones. That's just the way it works. And so I think Adobe probably had to do some soul searching and realize we're never going to catch figma. And so the bottom line is I think Adobe made what I feel is actually a pretty smart decision to buy the company, really the main company that actually had a chance of significantly impacting their business or even putting them out of business in the next ten to 20 years. And now I'd like to talk about Twitter's reaction to this and I'm sure you can imagine how well this went down on Twitter. But before I do that, there is a piece of news I want to make sure you are aware of. So recently, we made the decision at school motion to lower our course prices back down to where they were in 2019. That's almost a 20% cut across the board. It makes our classes much more affordable. And much more accessible, which is why we did it. In addition to that, we also removed the extra fee that was being charged to students when they would be on a payment plan. So now, payment plans are totally free. There's no penalty for spreading out your course payment over three payments. Our mission at school motion has always been to break down the barriers to learning, mastering, and working in motion design. Hopefully this step takes us a little bit closer towards achieving that goal. It's really important to us that as many artists as possible have access to this kind of training. And so we took this step literally the opposite of inflation. The opposite of what's happening to the price of gas and milk and eggs are classes have actually gotten cheaper. So I wanted to make sure you knew that. If you've ever thought about taking a class and haven't, it's actually a wonderful time to look. Now it's going to be easier than ever for everybody. That's it. Now let's get back to this very interesting Adobe figma deal. All

Adobe Twitter
"adobe" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

04:02 min | 5 months ago

"adobe" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"The company has spent the better part of two years quietly developing the new services, which some employees refer to as Z mail and Z Cal. Executives have an unveiled the products to most staff. Zoom CEO Eric yuan wants his company's forthcoming email and calendar services to be pillars of a productivity suite, especially for the 200,000 businesses that pay for zoom, most of which are small to medium size, a zoom manager told the information. The question is, will customers want zoom versions of products they already have? Microsoft and Google control 85 and 14% of the global market respectively for email and other productivity applications, according to research firm Gartner. And it isn't clear whether zoom plans to launch the kind of word processing and spreadsheet apps, Microsoft and Google offer. But Zoom has launched other services such as Internet based voice calling, a digital whiteboard to help employees collaborate and a product for employees to track the progress of internal projects and collaborate with their customers and partners. It packages the services and subscription bundles. To avoid meeting the same fate as slack, a messaging firm that sold itself to Salesforce in 2020, as its sales slowed, zoom will need to juice growth while preventing its existing customer base from shifting to Microsoft Teams and Google Meet, the zoom alternatives its rivals offer. In the past year, Zoom has launched new types of services aimed at businesses, including ones that help them launch virtual events, offer customer service and analyze salespeople interactions with potential customers. The product that handles the latter task can suggest improvements such as listening more or talking more slowly and sales pitches and quote. Something tells me the whole productivity tools space is going to be wild for the next few years. Meanwhile, the other big news of the day, happy merge day. Ethereum has activated. It's a long awaited merge upgrade in development since 2020 and transactions are now being processed under proof of stake. Quoting the block. The merge upgrade was activated at the agreed upon total terminal difficulty or TTD time on Ethereum's proof of work chain at 6 44 a.m. UTC today. TTD is a combined measure of how difficult it is to produce a black for transactions and how this has fared over time. The first epoch was finalized at 6 59 a.m.. This is the key development that core developers were looking for to see if the upgrade has gone to plan. And we finalized happy merge all. This is a big moment for the Ethereum ecosystem. Everyone who helped make the merge happen should feel very proud today, said Ethereum cofounder Vitalik Buterin on Twitter. An analogy to better conceptualize this from the Ethereum foundation is, quote, imagine Ethereum is a spaceship that isn't quite ready for an interstellar voyage. With the Beacon chain, the community has built a new engine and a hardened hall. After significant testing, it's almost time to hot swap the new engine for the old mid flight. By the way, the marriage reduces Ethereum's energy consumption by more than 99%. This means that Ethereum is now environmental, social, and governments compliant, which has been a regulatory concern dissuading businesses from participating in novel sectors such as DeFi and NFTs. On that, here's a tweet from Jonathan boys, quote Ethereum is using a 112 terawatt hours of electricity annually. The world is using about 24,000 terawatt hours annually after the merge, Ethereum will use less than one terawatt hour annually. So the merge reduces the world's electricity bill by about 0.5%. Big if true. More big if gas fees are suddenly more reasonable. Maybe I'll go back to trying to sell my podcast NFT again. And meanwhile, 31 eth was paid to ensure the whole last proof of work block was commemorated as an NFT on open sea might be worth something someday because of the history involved.

Ethereum Eric yuan Zoom Microsoft Google Gartner Salesforce Vitalik Buterin Ethereum foundation DeFi Jonathan boys Twitter eth
"adobe" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

02:34 min | 5 months ago

"adobe" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"Figma CEO Dylan field will stay on in his role as head of figma. Though shareholders don't seem to like this news, Adobe's stock dropped 12% this morning on the news. But come on, this is a smart defensive play on Adobe's part, right? Quoting Bloomberg. The deal announced by Adobe, which is a mix of half cash and half stock confirms an earlier Bloomberg report and would mark the biggest ever takeover of a private software company, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Figma, which allows customers to collaborate on software as they build it, saw demand jump during the pandemic while more people worked remotely. The company expanded its customer base in recent years from software designers at big companies like Airbnb, Google, Herman Miller, and Kimberly Clark, to also include individuals building lightweight games, maps and presentations. It is also attracted a loyal student following the combination benefits quote literally anybody who is a knowledge worker said Adobe chief executive officer shantanu naryan in an interview. Adobe, which had been a well street favorite for more than a decade, has been pummeled in the tech downturn, seeing its shares lose more than a third of their value since the start of the year. Investors have become increasingly skeptical about the dominance of Adobe's line of software for design professionals, which makes up about 60% of its revenue. The company has targeted more accessible web based offerings such as Photoshop express to sell its creative software to consumers, small businesses, and social media influencers. The initiative ran into friction from upstarts including figma, light tricks, and canva. San Francisco based figma was cofounded about a decade ago by Dylan field, and Evan Wallace, the startup introduced browser based software design tools that allow software designers to work together in real time bypassing the sometimes clumsy process of saving and sending their work to collaborators using a collection of disparate apps. The company was valued at $10 billion in its last funding round a year ago. Sigma's backers include venture capital firms, kleiner Perkins, index ventures, and greylock partners. Actually, recent history is even more impressive than that. Figma's valuation increased from $2 billion to $10 billion in funding rounds between April of 2020 and May of 2021. Well, they doubled from there to reach today's $2 billion price tag. And pitch book says that the series a round for figma was a $48 million valuation. So nice 413 X return for those funds involved in the a couple of thoughts, though, don't people use figma to avoid using Adobe stuff.

Figma Adobe Dylan field Bloomberg shantanu naryan Kimberly Clark Airbnb figma Herman Miller Evan Wallace Google kleiner Perkins greylock partners index ventures San Francisco Sigma
"adobe" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

06:53 min | 1 year ago

"adobe" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"And we talk a lot to our contributors who are the most successful contributors to make sure that their input is always we're always getting their input and then we're always putting that input out to our other contributors to make sure that we have the freshest up to date tips for success to communicate out to our contributors. That's part of our contributors success work. Yeah, yeah. What a fantastic team. So again, if myself, there's two there's two things to this. So if a photographer that's watching this wants to get access to the data that your team is generating, I think it just Google Adobe stock trends or is there a specific location? Stock trends, but I can also there's a specific link to our forecast. I don't know if you do a follow-up, or you can include it in your edit, but I can provide that will show you I have both a long form forecast. It's like an article and it gives you a lot of cultural context. It has links to the galleries. But I also have a spark page that's a more succinct, much more visual kind of quick read. So I'll provide both to you and it just depends on the creatives needs or desires or if they have a few minutes to read an article, which is the blog post that I wrote is really the most informative and the spark page is just a great visual overall reference. So I'll give you both and I think that's a great start for people. That's perfect. Yeah, and you answered my other question as well, which was if I want to learn and become the best that I can be when it comes to contributing or being a contributor, what are the best practices? And I'm assuming you're going to go over that in the blog post and in the spark page that you've got in the blog post, we don't really go over best practices, but again, we have a whole contributor success team and maybe Jessica we can make sure to give a link with some contributor tips to. Perfect. Yeah. Good, good, good. Okay. We will do that. We'll also burn down. So what's next? As we wrap this up, what's next for you? What's next for the team that you're leading? What's next for a world of stock? Give us the crystal ball look. Yeah, well, I think that my big push for 2019 at least, I try to take it year by year. You know, my big push right now is really getting much more information around regional priorities and we touched on that briefly. But I do think that sometimes people are starting to think that, oh, it's just a global community. And we really aren't at that point. People I think quite happily, people really do have regional preferences, regional aesthetics, regional priorities, and we're really honing in on focusing on those regions around the world. You know, you think about how much people want authentic imagery, authentic assets, people want locally authentic portrayals. And so we're very, very committed to authenticity here. And that includes clearly diversity, but also authentically portraying places all over the world. And then offering local local content. So I think it's that localism. What last year 2018 we had multi localism was a visual trend. And it's about conveying local authentic experience, but also focusing on the fact that so many of us care about and relate to and have knowledge of so many different places in the world because of digital technology. But with that comes a responsibility to understanding regional visuals. So that's really kind of what I'm honing in on this this year is really pushing regional content that we're sure is locally sourced and is providing content for every area in the world. I love that. I love that. The work you get. I don't say it flippantly. The work you're doing, I think, is really, really important from a variety of perspectives, even for just a hobbyist that are looking for what should I shoot next or what's popular or what will resonate in my area. And all the way up through photographers that are leading workshops in different areas of the world. You're leading a group of people, you should probably be aware of what the visual zeitgeist is of that area so that you can shoot in those guidelines. It makes a whole lot of sense. Also, I think it kind of comes back to one really big mission at Adobe stock, and Adobe Creative Cloud, which is something I feel like we've kind of danced around in this talk, very innocently, but it really makes me think that it comes down to the fact that Adobe stock is truly dedicated to transforming what stock offers. What stock photography or video is? What a stock offering is. And Adobe of all companies can do this. We want to transform stock offerings. We want to offer diverse, authentic imagery for all creative needs. So that's why you're seeing such a range of projects offering visual trends to the public. Becoming regionally aware so that we really blow out and make stock the most relevant visual offering that it can ever be in that it ever has been. We really trying to and are leading into the future and creating something new out of stock. I love it. I love it. Hopefully, along with that, maybe we can get away from the name stock. The main stocks are so gray and generic. It's like a stock room with stuff in it, when this is so not that, right? All right. I love it. So maybe that's what the next name. Next F meeting, bring that up. Say Frederick Van Johnson to change it. I love it. Very cool, Brenda, thank you so much for coming on today. It's been fantastic talking to you. I'll put all the links that you send me in the description for this YouTube video as well as in the blog post for this on this weekend photo dot com. So folks can click through and find any thoughts that you'd like to leave with the audience? I am always eager to get feedback if there's any way. You know, again, we are very committed to transforming the stock offering and we're committed to offering tools of creative strategy, but how we do that is by being responsive. And Adobe is so responsive. And it really is this kind of feedback loop..

Adobe Jessica Google Frederick Van Johnson Brenda YouTube
"adobe" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"adobe" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Range within each trend that creatives really can cook into it and come away with tools that keep them relevant now. And in the future. So it's not just contemporary awareness, but it's consistent awareness of how to attract and retain viewer interest. And it's exciting. The creative cloud is all about helping creatives. And it makes sense that Adobe stock is really kind of taking this thought leadership role to continue to help creatives do better work. So the content that's in that's in the creative cloud in the stock that's accessible from within Photoshop, et cetera. The content that's in there is informed by you and your team's work. I'm assuming. Some of it, you know, I would never say the entire stock collection is informed by it. Not at all. But what we're building since Adobe stock is less than four years old, what we're building is a communication program where we do signal to contributors. We have a process where we signal to contributors this is growing appeal. This is growing in search. We see the search data internally where all these keywords relate to this trend for next year. So we do communicate regularly with our contributors about this is trending, then the contributors are informed about what has marketplace appeal. They push that out to Adobe stock. That helps our stock collection grow and scale strategically. And then clients can come here and find the type of assets that they know are trending. So yeah, it's a beautiful kind of 360, honestly. Yeah, it's a nice little, it's a nice little ecosystem. There it is. So I'm going to be respectful of your time. I only have a couple of questions left here. One question in the last question, so you can embrace yourself is if I'm a contributor, and I want to make money, how has the ecosystem changed back from the I can make 6 figures and buy a house in the hills from my stock photography to now or is it the same? But before that, you mentioned you mentioned trends that are broken down by region. Is that data that I can get from Adobe stock trends for example in Cuba? I'm just picking areas out of the air in Cuba, the zeitgeist might be more primary colors and vibrant colors in that sort of thing. Whereas in Germany, a little more muted, a little more minimalist and that sort of thing. Do you guys break it down by region if I'm a designer in that area designing for a client in a particular area? That's a really good question. I wouldn't say that that's not part of the forecast. That's usually part of something that I do a lot of presentations both in North America and Europe. Around visual trends and that's usually something I kind of engage in discussion with the audience at these presentations. The forecast we've built at this point to be very much global. And then we do come away with specific trends that so in North America might be more popular than in Europe. And we get that data from our global team immediately. So for example, there are four visual trends for 2019 natural instincts, brand stand, creative democracy, and disruptive expression. Now, we knew from the outset talking to our global team and getting their feedback that natural instincts, which is a desire to see and look at pictures that reference natural elements. And connect not only with nature, but connect with oneself because of the role of technology and daily life. We found immediately that's a huge, hugely popular trend in North America, where as brand stand, which is about building brand loyalty through taking a stance around social and environmental causes. Huge globally, huge and whereas creative democracy was immediately embraced throughout amia and now is picking up speed and steam in North America. So it gets a little granular that way. We do make sure that all of the trends are global. So it's more in my speakership series than when I go to different audiences. So I do a lot of talks with different creatives and clients, but also big at big creative conferences. So we open up that conversation around regionality more in those spaces. Love it. Love it. Okay. So final final question here. I didn't answer. You were talking about contributors. Yes. And making what's the difference? What's the shift in the landscape making what you said 6 figure? Exactly. Yeah, photographers that are watching this and they're like, well, back in the day, I know that I could have made a full-time income from stock. But the landscape has I only want to say shifted, it's sort of done the transformer thing and went from a giant robot into a car, you know? What? What does that landscape look like for a photographer? In terms of making money on this? Well, I always like to talk about context too. So the first part of the answer is why? Why did it change? Why is there such a shift? And the reason really is because of the digital landscape we live in now, right? So while one of the visual trends is creative democracy, since we do live in a creative democracy where people are constantly creating work, creating visuals. And posting them, they're now is so much work. There's so many visuals available that it has turned into some it's turned into a landscape where people can get more visuals more easily from many, many places, right? So everybody's a creator now. And so that has made it trickier for photographers or illustrators to know how to become contributors and to make a living off of that. And so we do very much at Adobe stock, work with contributors on a regular basis saying there's a few things to do. One is that now it's more of a process, like a slow build to make a living out of stock. It has more to do with learning a, what sells. So that's something that's one of the reasons why we have visual trends. Really contributing a lot to see what sticks. So it is more of a learning curve now. Putting a lot onsite starting to see what sells, but also not just putting quantity on, but putting fresh content on continually because the more you put fresh content on the more often your assets will show up in a search. So it's a learning process of seeing what sells contributing more of that, but also contributing often. So what we're seeing is back in the day, it was more of people always go to this stock age and see that stock agency. Now it's learning as a contributor. What is selling, knowing your visual trends? And making sure that you're constantly putting fresh content online because that's a huge thing that a lot of people will just put a whole bunch on and then wait for the income. But what we found is the more often that you're contributing, the better your sales are going to be. You're going to be higher in that search. So it's really about the fact that since there's so many assets available so often, you really have to kind of match that as a contributor now. Yeah, it's almost like it's almost like the flow of social media to stay relevant. If you're one of those people that needs to stay relevant, you have to continually publish new stuff all the time. It's a similar kind of flow with stock where an overlay that with the work of the Adobe stock trends team, what's relevant right now what's new. Yeah, yeah, that is..

Adobe North America Cuba Europe Germany
"adobe" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"adobe" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Clearly for great reason to use free stock imagery, but there's no legal protection if there's a legal problem there. Yeah. And that's huge, right? Because there's no such thing as a free lunch. No same thing is free stock, I guess. So it's free up front. But what about on the back end? What about if you're a small business then starts to really gain momentum and become successful? It's once you get a little bit of success or a little bit of publicity, that's the irony. What if that campaign using that project using that free asset becomes popular, that's when somebody is going to go for you if they realize that there's no release, there's no legality there. Yeah. That's that whole the whole patent troll thing where they kind of wait on the sidelines for a company to become successful and they see that they're using their patents. And then, oh, that company just went public. And now it's a payday for the patent. It's really scary. And again, I always say the word indemnification doesn't sound sexy until you need it. It's a very, very important, very under acknowledged necessary aspect of using stock photography is make sure you're indemnified against any potential legal pushback. It's really important as any kind of company small or large. Photographers, you can think of indemnification, the same as inoculation. So you take your flu shots, you know? So you have to happen. So we're going to tell me tell me you mentioned earlier that you're the point person for the Adobe stock trends project. So tell me about that. What is all that about? Well, sure. So I have a very long winded title. My title Adobe is the principal of creative services and visual trends. And to unpack that what it means is that the creative services part means that I have a very small creative services team that works with clients to curate on brand assets for them. When we're working with any type of client across industries, what curating on brand assets for clients also means and here comes the visual trends part of my title is that I spearhead visual trends research and forecasting at Adobe and Adobe stock. So when I work on visual trends research and forecasting, what I do is I partner with a huge global forecasting company again global in nature that works across many industries that is doing tons of research on a daily basis with fashion, obviously, textile design, interior design, high art, pop culture, digital downloads, all social platforms. So I work with them and I do research every day all year to find patterns to recognize patterns that are emerging. And then relate that those patterns specifically to visuals. So what we do is on a qualitative and quantitative basis, look for where interest is growing with a growing audience around very specific types of images. Both aesthetics and topics. So we literally track where interest is scaling a ground very specific imagery. That's both moving and still imagery. And we offer these visual trend findings to both our contributors. So they know how strategically to be building their own style of work and what to be offering Adobe stock. And we also offer those findings to clients. Because think about it. If you're working on a project as maybe a campaign that's going to be released in a year and a half, you don't only want to know what people are interested in looking at right now. You want to have some kind of data and findings around what viewers are going to be interested in a year and a half, two years from now. So it's really not just, it's not just really exciting work, but it's really necessary information to be conveying both to the people who are making pictures. And the people who are choosing them. That is brilliant. That is brilliant. Because while you were talking a lightbulb went off in my head, I had an interview several years ago with a stock, someone that made their entire income through stock. And they were sort of telling the audience how they were able to go from whatever amount they were making to over 6 figures shooting stock. And one of the tips that she gave was to stay on top of the zeitgeist of the world in the genres of the photography that you enjoy shooting in, whether it be fashion, what's coming up where people wearing bell bottoms, I need to shoot more pictures about bottoms. Is it political? I need to get more shots of X, Y, and Z because people may be looking for political images, et cetera, et cetera. So you're doing that. So you're doing all that homework for both purchasers and contributors so that they don't have to be scouring through magazines and looking at stuff in the future. That's amazing. And not only, so visual trends are something that I've been interested in since I was in grad school. And it's funny because my background is an art history. And I use that type of research, but I've just shifted the direction. So it's kind of ironic, but also very connected that I used to study what people were interested in in the past and how that was created now I have shifted and I'm studying how trends are growing into the future. But it's very deeply related. But the thing to me that's particularly fascinating right now is that clearly we've always lived in a visual culture, at least my whole life, this has been a very visual culture, but now our visual culture is evolving faster than ever. I mean, me saying that is no surprise to anyone who's listening because of social media and the social platforms. So not only do we live in a visual culture, but because people are creating images and posting them, 24/7 on a global scale, the visuals that people are interested not only creating, but interested in are shifting more quickly than ever. So it's more important than ever to be aware of where interest is growing as you move into the future. Especially outside of outside of your bubble, because we're all guilty of living in our own echo chamber ecosystems and looking outside of it. We absolutely need someone to tell us, yeah, no one no one really needs another photo of X, Y, and Z maybe. So that said, if a photographer's watching this or listening to this, and they want to, that's gold. That's my problem. I don't know what to shoot. Yeah. Can they get access to the Adobe stock trends data or how does all that work? Yeah, how that works is yes they can. So we release we released our 2019 visual trend forecast in December of last year for 2019. And there is, I mean, I think you could just Google 2019 Adobe stock, visual trends. And so there's a forecast where we released all four of 20 19s major visual trends. And that is just public domain. To the public. And you don't have to be an Adobe with one of the agencies that supplies your footage. You just wow, that's great. That's great. Yeah..

Adobe flu Google
"adobe" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"adobe" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"And then every single one of the images that they offer Adobe that they send to Adobe, Adobe stock is curated by one of our curators on the team. So that once again, we're streamlining your workflow. So that let's say somebody like a stocksy stocksy is a unique contributor. In other words, they don't work with any other stock agency. So stocksy, this huge amazing, really contemporary cool agency sends us maybe 15,000 images. Our curators look at every single one of those images and choose which how many of those images are accepted or rejected according to very clear premium standards. So that what we do is we cut down on search time for all of our clients. It's only the best of the best. And everything is curated. So that's a big differentiator. From core or microstock. So it's all approach each part of our collection very differently for a different offering for different types of budgets and project needs. Yeah, so that's great. So the curation step in there is I think it's critical, especially if you're working on a depending on the level of even if you're working on a project for yourself, you don't have to go through and curate yourself. If someone has already with different eyes, has done it for you. It's kind of an extension of your team. So before we dive into the Adobe trans project that's your spearheading, I wanted to talk about the Adobe stock trans project that you're spearheading. I want to talk a little bit about the demystify the cloud around free stock versus page. There's a ton of sites popping up, right? I could just go to right now and find a picture of whatever. I mean, I find exactly what I'm looking for, but it might be okay. So what about that? What about how does Adobe fall on that? Glad you brought that up because you're right. There are a lot more free offerings free stock offerings. And while a lot of them are literally quite attractive, one of the things that I'm very concerned about is the fact that there are a lot of unwitting creatives who don't realize that they're using these free assets at their own risk, meaning that many and you don't know which or how many, many of these assets don't have model releases to use for commercial purposes or even location releases. So that a vast majority of these offerings could be, you don't know which. Not legal to use for commercial purposes, a model or a location may recognize their own bizarre or their own location and say, hey, I never signed anything saying it was okay to use on your billboard or your banner ad or even your brochure. Yeah. So that my concern is and I know there is I feel like there's a tipping point coming here where a person or a group or a or a location, a property will see a commercial use of their own property and say, hey, not only do you have to take that down or retract it, but they'll sue. And so there's a word called indemnification that so many people don't know and what indemnification is is something that once again Adobe stock offers, which is that any image you use is going to be cleared by our curators and our legal department for both model releases and property releases. And we indemnify our clients and customers saying if you ever get pushback from a.

Adobe
"adobe" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"adobe" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"And I said, what? Adobe has stock. And it was just like seeing rainbows. I was like, that's brilliant. That's the most brilliant thing I've ever heard of. They're in incredible, incredible, creative resource, and now they have visual content and how did I know I didn't know of obviously that I think within maybe a year, year and a half, I would be here working with clients and helping strategically build out the stock collection. So it really felt kind of like kismet to be honest that that's cool. Like so many creatives, I had such a long-standing relationship working on creative projects through the Adobe Creative Cloud and like so many creatives. It was so such like the last puzzle piece of what the creative cloud needed. So that you can work on these creative projects within the creative cloud. And then pull in your video, your illustrations, your photos. So it really, it's just a happy place for me to be because I feel like I can work with clients and creatives as a former client and creative. Yeah, it seems like it seems like a natural evolution of Brenda from where you were to where you are. I would imagine this is not the last sort of evolution you're midway on evolution and scale there. Yeah, it's interesting. I mean, I think hindsight is 2020 and that when you look back, it feels like a straight and narrow path. But you know, things organically evolve. And this is such a great place for me to be and build Adobe scale so quickly and so creatively and so ambitiously. So it's an exciting place to be and exciting place to build. And for me, I'm kind of a middle person between clients, Adobe and creatives. So for me, I just feel very lucky that it's such a kind of a 360 360 place where I can help lead creatives, but I also help lead clients. And we'll talk about that later when we talk about the visual trends program that I spearhead. Yeah, yeah, I definitely want to get into all that. Well, before we do that, let's for the folks that are like, okay, stock, yeah, I've heard of it, and I'm a creative cloud client, and I know it's there, but I haven't touched. I've even clicked on that palette yet. I'm afraid of it because are they going to charge me demystify what that is? For the average everyday working photographer than me, and occasional need for stock. What does this program mean for those folks? Yeah. I mean, so stock photography is simple, yet vast. Stop photography. Our visual assets that you can license for any project that you're working on where you need a visual. Maybe you need something very simple and quick and cheap. That would be microstock. And that's what we call it Adobe part of the core collection. It's work a day, vast quantities of imagery across all industries, very, very affordable. Maybe you work in video. That would be video. But maybe you are working on a really special project where you need top tier best quality imagery that's assignment quality photography. And that would be like its name at Adobe stock, premium part of the premium collection, the best available in the marketplace. So stock is just millions of assets at Adobe stock that you can license immediately to use in your own project. It's wet at Adobe, which is very unique for stock for stock agency. Every single picture or video or illustration that we have or template is royalty free. So you see it and you can buy it and download it immediately. And there's nothing scarier daunting about, like you said, oh gosh, what if, you know, I want it and I buy it. There are no mistakes. If you want to download it, it will tell you the price. It'll say, are you sure you want to license this? So there are no mistakes made. You know what? Your batches. Right, exactly. And I would encourage people. I've gone through the collection and there's just you're sitting on a mountain of just assets that photographers and any other creative obviously can put in easily drag and drop into their work. And it seems like you said in the beginning, it seems like it was one of those. Of course, this is what should be happening when you see Adobe incorporating stock into the app. So you don't have to go out to another site and figure all that out and get the asset. Bring it in. Is it the right thing? No, go back and round trip. But you talked a little bit about quality, right? And I wanted to hit on that a little bit because the word quality is subjective. So quality, there's got to be some sort of weird formula that's quality based on your budget equals what you can do. So how do you add Adobe determine what's premium and what's not and how do I draw that line between here's a picture of someone running down the beach in The Bahamas but this picture of someone running down the beach is a higher quality. What draws that line? Yeah, sure. It's a great question. And you're right. Quality like beauty is in the eye of the beholder and also based on your company, your visual brand, the nature of the specific project you're working on. But what I would say is that every person working on their creative project, whether they work for themselves or a small team or an enterprise company, they know the nature of their brand and the nature of the visual message that they're creating. So core or microstock has millions of assets available. And you can search that. But whereas.

Adobe Brenda The Bahamas
"adobe" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"adobe" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Hey, folks welcome back to another episode of this week in photo. I'm your host, Frederick Van Johnson on this week in photo. We used to, about a year ago, maybe a little bit more than a year ago. Stock photography was all the rage, and it still is, but things have shifted a little bit. And we haven't talked about those changes much on the show. So the folks at Adobe are here to talk to us a little bit about what they're doing in the world of stock photography with Adobe stock project, as well as some of the changes that have occurred in the industry. Brenda mills is on the Adobe stock team and she is here to tell us what the real deal is with doctor Tyree Brenda. Welcome to the show. Thanks so much. Good to be great. Yeah, this is good to have you. It's good to have you. So let's start off with a little bit about your background. So you're like I said, you're at Adobe right now. You're in Adobe employee on the Adobe stock team. Tell us a little bit about how you got to that point. And what is the Adobe stock team? Because that's a new thing. Yeah, it's a pretty new thing. So I came to Adobe as a creative and a stock client. From the very first day, I started working as a photo editor, which has been my career, my entire professional life. I've worked with stock photography. I started off by launching style dot com a website for Vogue and W way back in the day. I think that was in 2000. And then I've worked across digital and print editorial and branded through up until I came to Adobe about a year and a half ago. So my work was stock has been daily. And I know the ins and outs of stock as well as probably anyone going from a Bloomberg to a time to recently refinery 29 as their executive director of photography. So many brands, many looks, many types of photography, all types of photography. And I remember exactly where I was when I found out that Adobe had launched a stock collection. It was like this kind of a ha moment. I was out refinery 29 and a friend was like, oh, maybe we should try Adobe stock. And I said, what? Adobe has stock. And it was just like seeing rainbows. I was like, that's brilliant. That's the most brilliant thing I've ever heard.

Adobe Frederick Van Johnson Brenda mills Tyree Brenda Vogue Bloomberg
"adobe" Discussed on Eye On A.I.

Eye On A.I.

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"adobe" Discussed on Eye On A.I.

"Find it. Really inspiring for their own creativity and what it empowers them to do, as well as enjoying their creations of others. We're really trying to democratize the high end of film production down to the point where every aspiring creative could have that quality of outcome. And I think that's a wonderful goal for the world and also for Adobe. There are one other topic that might be worth spending a couple of minutes on is just what I call renaissance two. So the idea that in the renaissance they rediscovered classical art and they formulated rules of perspective that could then be shared almost algorithmically with each other for doing images of buildings. So that other things like lighting and people had to be done basically by learning from example in a workshop as an apprentice and so on. That had its peak in the 19th century with hyper realistic oil painting. And then in a way, the world stepped away from that with the invention of photography. With AI, it's really coming back. And we have ways to simulate and create clothing and drapery and things that would have happily been on display in the events of gallery about the renaissance. And yet democratized to a large number of people rather than limited to a few brilliant people as it was. So I really think it's an opportunity to rediscover some of the treasures embedded in classical art and we express them in algorithms, whether it's in terms of skies or drapery or faces or greenery landscapes. And by distilling it into algorithms and models we can then give it to everyone to express their own interests and the network effect of expertise adding on top of expertise rather than each individual having to learn everything from scratch as was the case with classical.

Adobe
"adobe" Discussed on Eye On A.I.

Eye On A.I.

07:29 min | 1 year ago

"adobe" Discussed on Eye On A.I.

"You made a casual reference to conversational robots in your home. I've been building robots for 20 or 30 years that a biologically inspired. Originally, I was very interested in snakes and now I have robot spiders. They're about two feet long. And then batting a natural language models to it to really have a knowledge base of itself so that it can have a reasonable sense of what its parts are and so on. I'm trying to get to the point where you can have a dialog with it's about the nature of being self aware. It should be able to use this camera to look at its foot and recognize it as part of itself, recognize itself in the mirror, be able to understand the consequences of its actions. So do planning and so on. So it's a very humbling goal. In ways that surprise me and because I like to do creative writing when it messes up the grammar, I feel particularly modified. But it's also a way for me to try to synthesize things together to make me very parent with my staff for doing at work. And understand what it takes and practice to get these things to work as a vice president. I tend to spend a lot of time in meetings and presenting ideas rather than building them directly. So I like to keep my hand in at home just to stay credible and also see some emerging potential as things get competent. One of the things that surprised me about my job in the last few years has been the ever growing societal relevance of what we do and in particular concerns about ethics and authenticity media and so I'm involved in several of the efforts that Adobe to try to have a thoughtful response to this. Adobe loves to create tools that enable the willing suspension of disbelief. But sometimes things may be used to deceive fakes as one example. And so we have two thrusts to the way we're thinking about being a responsible company. One is around AI ethical guidelines to how we build our models. And in particular, making sure that the models to the degree to which we can avoid it don't have bias in them. So they should work equally well for every type of person, every age, background, ethnicity, and so on. And that takes an active process to ensure it doesn't just happen by default. Collections of images tend to have built in biases based on where they came from. And so we have an active process to look at emerging features to make sure that they live up to the guidelines that we're formulating around how they should work well for people and then the other side of the ethics is given this very powerful technology to transform and modify images in the case where an image is trying to be used for a historical record of truth. Is there anything we could do to make that more plausible so that you can't just say it could be fake? And the challenge is that there are algorithms to test for whether an image has been tampered with. And we've developed some ourselves. But it's a constant race between the people doing the alterations and the people trying to detect. So in addition to that effort, which is worthy, but not completely reliable. We have something called the content authenticity initiative where we're formulating ways that artists as they create their work with our tools can register them in the form that they are so that they can be a snapshot of in time. And if they want to do reasonable adjustments to their material, journalists wants to brighten an image, which is a modification, but not one that fundamentally changes the meaning of the content. They can keep a trail of what edits were done to show that we didn't delete people or anything. We just made it more approachable by adding a caption or something else. So that's the project that we're doing in collaboration with other companies. And we think that this combination of the two work, we now have over 200 partners for the content authenticity initiative, including New York Times and Twitter. There would be standards. Yes, there is a standard group that we're helping to drive as well around this. So it would be standard metadata that would then be held securely in a distributed ledger to be able to not have a single point of failure where someone could edit the record and change the history of it. That's the idea. And then this annotation would be available to people looking at images on a new site, for instance. And then be able to make their own judgment about whether they trust the asset based on the reputation of where it came from, but also the edit history of what happened to it along the way. If people are doing something where they're not even hoping that it will pretend to be true. You're doing special effect for the movie, you wouldn't necessarily do this. But if you're a journalist or a citizen journalist, you might turn this feature on because you want it to be registered before somebody else copies your image and modifies it and post their own version of it. And you then have a historical record of it, having existed in your ecosystem. Would this be involving a blockchain ledger or anything like that? It's one of the ways in which you might do a distributed trust system. But that's still a matter of design. You want to do it in energy efficient way, and so on. We talked about the generative work for stills. Does Adobe allow deepfake trainings and that sort of thing? Do you have that feature? There are a lot of legitimate uses that are quite interesting. Do you mean my changing the appearance of the face in a photograph? Yeah. By either putting synthetic face on a person so that they're anonymous or licensing celebrity faces. We have the ability to edit aspects of faces using your filters. We're not currently doing identities. Clearly we have the technology for that, but we're obviously thinking through what that would mean in terms of how it would be. You can navigate designs of faces for some use cases like coming up with a marketing persona for product where you don't want to use a real person but you just want a person that somehow represents your brand. It would be a one possible use of such technology. More in the still space at the moment than Nvidia. One of the questions I asked my stuff was, well, the more like Star Trek or Harry Potter. Was it going to look very technical with glowing screens or would it have things that look more like natural objects that had magical properties that would change, as you see in the sort of special effects for those movies? And I think even though the screens and the technology that we have a much more Star Trek, I think some of the transformations made possible by AI really are in the magical domain where you can make changes, spontaneously, that would have seemed like magic a few years ago. And so I understand that people have concerns about how this technology may be misused. We're doing our best to provide mechanisms for those fears to be addressed. But I don't want people to lose sight of the potential magic of having an image in your head of a story you want to tell. And rather like a movie director with a $100 million today in the future, you should be able to come up with a really compelling looking visual, whether it's impressionistic or realistic that tells the story in the magical way in the magical appearance that you had in mind. And we tried to build tools that will let you do that. And provided it's transparently. I think people will.

Adobe New York Times Twitter Nvidia Harry Potter
"adobe" Discussed on Eye On A.I.

Eye On A.I.

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"adobe" Discussed on Eye On A.I.

"But is Adobe looking in that direction at all. It's a really interesting question in a way I would have agreed with you more two or three years ago than I do now. I think we have our own educational challenge, which is educating our users to use our products. So we put a lot of work into online help. And so on. And increasingly, we are looking at what the users actually doing with our products. And then using that to suggest reference material for ideas of what to do next or useful help material if they're stuck or they need an idea or they want to understand something better. So in a way, we used to think that it would be an embodied social agent that would have a dialog with you and the challenge with that is you really need almost human level AI and you also need an agent that know all about everything. Whereas if you can have a helpful panel that's making suggestions based on the context you're in, it can be actually less cognitive load on the person doing the task, but just as helpful. So I think there are ways in which given the current state of NLP is somewhat easier to find relevant and helpful material to suggest in short than it is necessarily to have a fully cognizant dialog with an agent. It's the dream we're all excited about. My robots at home I try to teach them how to have simple conversations with me about themselves and what they see and everything. But the truth is, the state of the art, at least for now, is better for this other kind of help, which is also doing natural language processing, but in a way that might seem more conventional a bit less sociable than a pop up agent with a smiling face. I was actually asking more whether you're going in the direction of allowing users to create video avatars that could operate in real time as a feature. Are you familiar with Samsung's neon? Yes, I am. At the moment, the imaging workaround realistic looking people is focusing on stills. We do have interesting work with doing on a directable characters for aero, the AR project that I can audio about. And there it's probably focused more about walking around and doing tasks than having face to face conversations at the moment. But it certainly in an area that we'd like to go to in the future. How do you see AIs and creativity developing together? Certainly until now it's being used as a time saver. It's not really being used in leading creativity, but it certainly could. I mean, can you talk a little bit about that? I think you'd have to look at the oil filters to say if you feel the same way. The gams in particular and also stylization by example means that you can rapidly take an image and abstract elements of one image and apply it to another in a way that is a creative exploration. And if somebody had been doing this by hand, 20 years ago, you might have called it creative, but now it's seems more like part of the tour. The long-term vision, I think, is to have what we call a visual imagination machine where you start having a dialog about something that you want it to learn to depict back to you and you give it maybe snippets of dialog or elements of images and direct manipulation and it can hone in on a creative idea that as you see it interpret what you're saying, you may have a further idea. And so I think there'll be this very tight coupling between while the generative models display and how you then augment them with further interaction. And I think it'll be a combination of rushing or painting where that makes sense. There's something called semantic paint where you paint an idea. I want a river in this region or a mountain or trees over here. And then the algorithm generates the detailed photorealistic coherent lighting version of that high level description. And then there may be points at which you want to go in and click the eyebrow and nudge it by a tenth of an inch and the face responds naturally to that adjustment. So I think your zoom out to the high level concept of what you want to do all the way into the fine details of how you want the final presentation of that idea to be expressed. And that to me is almost a new medium. You're not directly manipulating the pixels anymore. You're really interacting at the level of an idea. And to some degree, it's like an art director with a great technical artist working for them, but dramatically accelerate. And that dialog between the two. And even the directors not quite knowing what they want, but when they see it, it inspires another idea. I think that's where we see the future of creativity going. So it doesn't take the creative out of the loop, if anything it accelerates the loop and lets them explore many more ideas and find a great one. And then once they have it to publish it to what they view as their sense of perfection. Of course, none of us can imagine how this is going to affect creativity in the future, but what we're talking about is a democratization of a lot of these processes, which previously required very high level human skill. Correct. And now the human directs the AI to do these things, but it's at this point still a human with a high level of technical expertise, but as the interface is becoming increasingly abstracted, it'll be available to a broader and broader swath of humanity. But when things become too common, they lose their value, and what made me think this the other day is I have a couple of the style transfer apps on my phone and I took a picture of myself and put it through a couple of processes and I thought it looked very cool and I put it on my family WhatsApp channels so my kids could see it. And my older brothers reaction was, wow, that is so cool. My younger son's reaction was, oh yeah, you put it through a filter or I don't remember it. Yeah. To him it's just like, yeah, okay, you punched a few buttons and he made it look different. That's very cool dad. So that's what we call the one trick pony problem that if it's too precooked as a technique, then it rapidly loses interest as it becomes commonly known. I think this will have two effects. Say you are rather than using an algorithm you were using an example image where you love the style of it and you were applying that style to your own image. That other image came from somewhere. It could have been a hand on painting using something like Adobe fresco which simulates oil paint and water. A very precisely and people could spend hours making a.

Adobe Samsung
"adobe" Discussed on Eye On A.I.

Eye On A.I.

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"adobe" Discussed on Eye On A.I.

"Okay, governor, it's wonderful to meet you. I'd like to start by having you give us your background, particularly in AI and AI research, how you got to Adobe, and then we can talk about the things that you're doing with Adobe and how the future of creativity looks now that AI is becoming part of the creative process. My original background was realistic computer graphics. I worked at the startup company in Canada after my PhD at Cambridge. And then joined apple's advanced technology group in the late 1980s and was there till the mid to late 90s worked for an incubator for Paul Allen called interval, where we did media research, including VR. And then joined Adobe in 2000, working on a interactive 3D virtual worlds project. And then in about 2005, as adobes advanced technology group became Adobe research, I joined and initially focused on accelerating a technology with GPUs, which were in their early days at that time. And then as I became head of Adobe research, AI has just become an indispensable part of most of the projects we do, particularly things around audio and video, but increasingly natural language processing and other things. So my role is really managing world class research in this space. And then I also have hobbies where I build agents and other things just to really try to understand the technology both from the visual side as well as the natural language processing site so that I can engage with my staff and see the potential of these technologies as they become relevant to Adobe products and future ideas as well. I've talked to a lot of AI researchers that came out of computer graphics, particularly gaming, because there's so much potential for AI in that world. Could you give me an overview of how Adobe uses AI? One of the first use cases really identifying characteristics of images and being able to generate. First of all, auto tagging and then ultimately auto captioning of assets. This then enable much research at large content collections. We have stock photography collections, but we also have portfolios online with artists share their work. And so there was an explosion of content. People wanted to be able to navigate and find fairly fine grain variations of things. And then increasingly, we realized that language alone, and particularly individual words alone wasn't sufficient to capture the nuances of the content. And so we worked on similarity search, which has abstract geometrical properties of the images as well as the more recognizable categories. And so then we could search both by example as well as by keyword. So search was really the first frontier. There was this virtuous cycle between the amount of data that was available for training, but also the need to navigate all of that data by the user. And so the abundance of data both created a problem and then AI with the data presented a solution for how to make the most of those large collections of assets. So that was the first stage. The second stage was really looking at some of our classic tools and tools like Photoshop and say we're doing our best with what you might call classical algorithms, things based on some abstract idea of energy or some optimization that you might be doing. And the problem with those algorithms was they only went so far. They only knew about the image they were looking at. And so you'd be looking for things like boundaries in images to be able to do a segmentation. And some images are basically ambiguous. And human beings bring experience of the world to these tasks, whereas the algorithms as they were then set up only had experience of some abstract mathematical idea plus the image in front of them. So the second generation of AI adoption was really taking our classic tools like segmentation selection and so on. And retraining them with examples as neural nets. And we found that fairly rapidly they could eclipse the handcrafted algorithms of the previous generation of software. And so this gave us the confidence to double down on research. So reinventing the classic things like whole filling as well as selection was the next step. The advantage of this was not only did it do a better job, but you could do with one click while previously took a whole bunch of strokes from the user. And in some cases, with something we call select subject, you could literally recognize what is the foreground object in this image and also magically segment it from the background with no clicks from the user. Another example of that would be sky segmentation where you might just automatically recognize the region of an image, which is the sky. And then you can automatically swap that for other images of the sky that match geometrically. These sort of reinvention of the algorithms to the point where they were automatic then meant we could do compound features like sky replace where we put a bunch of these together and added some conventional imaging operations in the mix and we could suddenly do a whole new capability. Something that could have been done in maybe 5 or ten minutes before in Photoshop may happen in less than a second. And that meant you could then see the final production quality, but with a whole bunch of variations. And so you spend more time sort of making artistic choices rather than the mechanics of getting those productions done. Is that available on all levels of Photoshop or is that a professional level? Interesting question. Sometimes the AI feature is one that's better suited to consumers because it's a transformation of ease of use, but maybe isn't quite perfect yet. So sometimes we go from there, mass market to the professional market. Sometimes it starts in the professional tool and then as we make the algorithms more automatic, we democratize them to be consumed by facing versions of Photoshop. So it works both ways. It's really an attempt to democratize things that were previously tedious and hard to learn how to do to a much broader audience so they can focus on the creative outcome that they want. When I'm using Photoshop, for example, are those algorithms embedded in the product on my device or is it communicating back to a central server? Some of it's on device and some of it's going back to a sample server. And it's usually determined by two things, the amount of compute you need, and then also the size of the model. We recently released some features called neural filters, which included a number of fairly complicated neural nets. Some of which can be downloaded on a locally and some of which would run in the cloud. And what are those neural nets doing? One of them is figuring out given a black and white image how to make a color image. And that's obviously ambiguous. There is some valid choices. It could be green or blue. So you might have the user give you a single point on the shirt to say what color they want it to be and then the rest of it is in fact automatically by the algorithm. And then the smart portrait is letting you take an image of somebody's face and then edit the expression, the orientation of the head, you can rotate it slightly from left to right. You can change where the person's looking and you can even change their age. Not necessarily biologically predicted.

Adobe adobes advanced technology gro Paul Allen Cambridge apple Canada
Apple Watch Executive Takes Over Secretive Car Project

Geek News Central

01:09 min | 1 year ago

Apple Watch Executive Takes Over Secretive Car Project

"Apples always pushing the edge. And i thought apple kind of watched walked away from from cars but the apple watch executive is taking over secretive car project now. Just two days before hideaway. Doug field ahead of apple secretive car project that tech china's tap apple watch exact former adobe. Co kevin lynch to take his place so in the latest changing of the guard for the project known as project titan which is rotated leaders about as much as reporting shifted focused They replace individual so he's been working on this since july when he was brought in to help develop the vehicle software. He's been with apple since two thousand thirteen. Curiously bloomberg rights at lynch still reports to apple's cheap chief operating officer jeff williams and not to john daria the company's head of ai. So we'll keep a watch on what's apple doing anything apple build some apple bands will

Apple Doug Field Kevin Lynch Adobe China John Daria Bloomberg Jeff Williams Lynch
Mask Sales Start to Rebound Amid Surge, Guidance

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Mask Sales Start to Rebound Amid Surge, Guidance

"Masks sales are up again amid rising concerns about surging coronavirus cases a spot check of stores and other data sources shows more masks are being sold at retail analysts figure that'll continue after the CDC guidance this week that vaccinated people mascot be indoors in areas where cases are rising the adobe digital economy index says mask sales rose twenty four percent for the week ending Tuesday compared to the prior week they've been falling weekly since may as more people buy masks stores now face a challenge in figuring out how may need to stock given all the uncertainty over the pandemic's path Sager mag ani Washington

CDC Adobe Ani Washington
The Ruby Super Team

Ruby on Rails Podcast

01:57 min | 1 year ago

The Ruby Super Team

"Nick how're you doing. I am doing fantastic. Thanks for asking brittany. This is my first time on the new exciting format. I kind of like by. The way is bit feedback. How we're still in the canonical. Podcast was like a new kind of iteration. I think of like when comic books. Have kind of a new series within the canonical series. You know this is like the next greatest thing so it is. It's veto but yeah thanks have been going well. Actually as of sunday. I have been a chopper five for half a year. I can't believe to say it's been six months already. And in settling in pretty well. I still feel like i'm in my on boarding phase. I think toby road something a year or two ago. Adobe look at the ceo saying something like it takes a year to onboard. But i thought that was just like a thought leader kind of concept. But i certainly do still feel like i'm on boarding to the company in a good way. So what have you been up to chapel find now that you are. Let's say halfway on boarded. It sounds like you had a recent hack day. That's right yeah so like in my day job. We have internal tooling which i get to work on. Even though i'm not on shop i core. We still get scale like all right. We're adding an endpoint. Can it take a million or question. Our yup okay. Moving on right like so. It's pretty exciting even in the day to day but recently yeah i got to go onto a hack day so a just come back from america. I been visiting family out there. And i didn't intend to work this act. I think they do it every three months or six months. This is my first one. And since it's going to be a way for part of it. I never thought of kind of checking n and i drop in on day two of three day. Hack day and start work. And i'm like oh goodness what do i do now. And kevin newton. Who was a teammate of mine. Now works on a code foundations team. Message me and said hey. Join my team. We're working on something. Cool all right. Let's do this

Brittany Nick Adobe Kevin Newton America
Are We Ready to Let the Network Override the Hierarchy?

Trent365

02:18 min | 1 year ago

Are We Ready to Let the Network Override the Hierarchy?

"Who's the famed author of the tipping point amongst others has suggested that the future looks pretty bright and one of the reasons he says that is that because he believes we as a society moving away from reliance on hierarchy and becoming more accepting of the network and the that the network is a more effective and more efficient way to get stuff done and it could be right. He cites examples like the black lives matter movement. Compared to say the martin luther king marches the marches will very much structured and hierarchical in nature whereas the black lives matter movement just was that it was a movement. The network took over and the committees that that has been more effective in raising awareness and making changes than the marches. Now there's a bunch of other factors of course the plane to that but it's an interesting point. The other point he makes is the vaccine role in the us could have been very structured and hierarchical it could have been like a military rollout but it wasn't they instead distributed the vaccines to the network to the medical health network around the country and very quickly. A huge bulk of the population got vaccinated. It was very efficient way to do it. So the network one versus the structural the hierarchy in that sense. And if you look at the way a work has changed over the last year or so. A lot of people working from home distributed workplaces. All these things. The hierarchy starts to become less. The hierarchy becomes weakened. And if that's the case the network by default starts to take over and so in your business. Are you ready for the network to take over. Is your business still very hierarchical in nature probably is. I know my knees and a lot of people are comfortable that because that's the way we've done things but in your business both from the way your company is set up and the way you deal with your customers your clients your distributors all of these different aspects of your business. What changes if you rely on the network more than the hierarchy. Are you ready for it. Are you willing to accept it. You might not have a choice. it might come anyway. It's an interesting thought. I'll put a link to. The article was in inc magazine. That also references a presentation. he did. I believe that the adobe summit which you can probably get a link to that video as well so check it

Martin Luther King United States Inc Magazine Adobe
Total E-Commerce Sales During Amazon Prime Day Surpass $11 Billion, Adobe Says

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:12 sec | 1 year ago

Total E-Commerce Sales During Amazon Prime Day Surpass $11 Billion, Adobe Says

Amazon Prime Day Sets New Online Record

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

Amazon Prime Day Sets New Online Record

"Day one of Amazon's Today prime sale set an online record, Adobe says First day sales totaled $5.6 billion that makes Monday, the biggest day for online spending so far this year. The previous record was 5.1 billion spent

Amazon Adobe
"adobe" Discussed on This Week in Photo

This Week in Photo

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"adobe" Discussed on This Week in Photo

"Of this week on your host frederick johnson. Today's going to be a interesting discussion. That i've been waiting for for a while. Now this a little bit of a little bit back story on this a. I used to be a you when i worked at adobe. I was in light room. Photoshop team specifically the light room team. So i have an affinity for light room. I member internally at the company kind the wasn't a it wasn't a a rivalry between the bridge crew and the light room crew. But it was definitely a you know you guys are overstepping here. Or why are you putting their feature in. When it's you know it was that kind of feel. I don't know if it's still that way now. This is many years ago. But i as a result of that i definitely have a you know a line in the in my tree rings of light room right. So and not so much a bridge for that reason because it's lightroom is the way forward musing room a photographer. Adobe built it for photographers. That's me. I'm going to use that tool and forsake all others fast forward to some of my conversations with this guy blake brutus. Who doesn't necessarily use light room and just put this in a in a box. I'm speaking with blake. I don't even know if you know this. I'm speaking with matt. Clusky and dave cross shortly. Hopefully they're either this week or next week about lightroom very so we're going talk about. Their experience is going to be very similar to this conversation. But i wanted to. I from what i've learned from our conversations blake route is the evolution and the growth of bridge in its capabilities and integration with photoshop. It means that we should be taken another. Look at it in. If you're a light room that combination bears bear some looking at now especially because of smart objects and how everything kind of works together so all that to say. Welcome blake rudeness to the show. We're going to dive in and talk about. There's blake before we dive in and a lot of people in the audience. Know who you are already. But for the people who don't can you give us a little primer on who the root is sure. Thanks so i'm blake. I'm the host of f sixty four academy dot com and pretty much like a photoshop I dunno addict. if there's a there's a group for people like me then. I would probably be the leader I eat sleep and breathe photo shop in there. All the time and my goal is essentially to make photoshop which is a very convoluted piece of software very simple for people who wanna make their images better and more importantly make experiences for their viewers. And i feel very strongly that photoshop is a place for that so I have never used light room I did once. That was a long time ago. So i've really been on this photoshop kicking because of that. I kind of have married to be camera all because I don't use like so. Yeah let's talk about that before In this just set the stage we're going to use just a little bit of the time with you and i- dialoguing back and forth. And then i'm gonna let you just show your some magic within photoshop to kind of what you're talking about. So the the light room. The photoshop argument. If there is an argument they're set the stage there. So when when i look at lightroom as a again as a former adobe employee and as someone who uses it almost day now i look at it as a tool that like i said before. It was built four photographers and strips away. All the stuff that you don't need in photoshop proper so that you can focus on the photo itself. It's photo specific with its localized adjustment tools in raw processing. You know obviously camera engine but we're a processing all. That stuff is very specific focused. To what i wanna do as a photographer. When i look at the photoshop bridge combination. It makes me feel like okay. I'm going from mom and pop hardware store to home depot or lowe's and i gotta figure out what i wanna do. Can i just go over here and get my mail. You know from from the mom and pop shop. How do you set the stage. What keeps you as a photographer. 'cause you're a very accomplished photographers wills and educator. How do you how do you. How do you reconcile not using a tool that was built specifically for photography versus a hydra like photoshop bridge for sure so we gotta go way back So i've been using photoshop since nineteen ninety eight. I believe seven photoshop. Like twenty three some years. right Lightroom came out around two thousand six two thousand seven and i only remember that because right before i went to afghanistan downloaded lightroom put on my laptop and so i'm going to learn this while i'm gone right so mean afghanstan you do go to war to when you go to war just everyone knows but there is some down time in the other stuff. I'm sitting there in my in my office. I'm trying to learn lightroom on going. Do my pacers there. And as i'm digging into it opened up an image. And i'm like this is all i can do. Why would i want this like. I'm so used to photoshop with unlimited possibilities. When i saw light room it was more like chrome. This is just like a darkroom but they call a light room. That's cute so for the for that reason it was it was very interesting at first Trying to understand why. Adobe made light room when i was so used to photoshop then i started digging into raw files and understanding that light room was basically a conduit To open raw files so that you could then transport those files into photoshop. Which if we look at adobe camera and bridge as essentially the same thing as light room..

frederick johnson Adobe next week photoshop chrome adobe matt twenty three Today dave cross this week many years ago afghanistan seven around two thousand first eight Photoshop six two thousand nineteen
Founder of Adobe and developer of PDFs dies at age 81

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Founder of Adobe and developer of PDFs dies at age 81

"The man who helped invent the pdf file as co founder of software company. Adobe has died software so widely used. you almost take it for granted. It's the portable document format better known as the pdf and sadly charles. Chuck geschke the man who helped to develop it and co founder of adobe is dead at age eighty one went onto invent pdf acrobat. Illustrator premiere pro and photoshop. But his wife. Nancy says geschke was also proud of his family in nineteen. Ninety-two guess she survived a kidnapping. When he was held for four days a suspect caught with six hundred. Fifty thousand dollars in ransom. Money eventually led police to the hideout where he was held captive and two two thousand nine. President obama awarded guests and adobe co founder. john warnock the national medal of technology

Chuck Geschke Adobe Geschke Charles Nancy John Warnock President Obama
Founder of Adobe and Developer of PDFs Dies at 81

Leo Laporte

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

Founder of Adobe and Developer of PDFs Dies at 81

"Helped invent the PDF file is co founder of software company Adobe has died software so widely used, you almost take it for granted. It's the portable document format better known as the PDF and, sadly, Charles Chuck Geschke. Man who helped to develop it and co founder of Adobe is dead at age 81. Adobe went on to invent pdf Acrobat illustrator premiere pro and Photoshopped, but his wife, Nancy, says, Guess he was also proud of his family. In 1992 guess she survived a kidnapping when he was held for four days. A suspect caught with $650,000 in ransom money eventually led police to the hideout where he was held captive and in 2009, President Obama awarding Geschke and Adobe Co founder John Warnock, the national Medal of Technology. I'm

Adobe Charles Chuck Geschke Nancy Geschke John Warnock President Obama National Medal Of Technology
"adobe" Discussed on podcast – Lawyers, Guns & Money

podcast – Lawyers, Guns & Money

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"adobe" Discussed on podcast – Lawyers, Guns & Money

"Had no.

"adobe" Discussed on podcast – Lawyers, Guns & Money

podcast – Lawyers, Guns & Money

08:04 min | 2 years ago

"adobe" Discussed on podcast – Lawyers, Guns & Money

"Same ship Crusade right neither waiting the end of the world and the Rapture or he's awaiting for land grants just working towards both is that he really truly exploits the women in his family and when it comes to his first wife Mary S provide, that means some physical abuse went dead. To his oldest daughter and I mean I there's a lot of left out of the book. But all of a sudden may not have been alone during statistics say she probably wasn't it was sexual abuse and so the challenge for me and also I mean the Elvis died also worked ten years as unpaid secretary. So that tells you another formula rotation. This is a challenge for me was how do you we've all these parts to wage the right? He's a he's like a man who abuses his family's repulsive at points and then he's a man who has his deep insights about the the nature of American Empire and and democracy, right? And she's constantly trying to find a way forward. So well, how did you manage to tie those threads together, I guess right. I mean, it's just in terms of writing this book and this this incredible stories, you know, I mean if somebody who's read it and thought it was great. How did you how did you manage to sort of keep these this this incredible vision of tearing as as Fighter for justice home? It combined with you know, what is in many ways a really awful person. So well for one thing it took me a really long time but I think was never happened and I would have liked month versus like this was chapter one. But oh, well, this was separate one in 2015 not the way so what happened is my first tapes were always is long seventy page chapters that were filled with Paula Faith because when people say this material he really was he would say something like on April 5th and then say the exact opposite on April 6th. So how do you make sense? It's not and then he kept he has such a good sense of himself that he kept writing about himself. So when you go to his archive is what he said about a certain event accurate the Virgin he said it's 67 or 57 or seventy-seven like think it was just primer shifting. So I did a good job. I think one day it was smart enough to ask a dear friend of mine who was not a historian. He's just a smart kind man, and he made me sit down and down. Talk about dating it for three hours straight it was painful and at the end of it. I realized I mean probably people for me and probably really horrible for Dan but God bless them so off at the end of it. I realized that I had at the beginning of a key which is a I took all the parts of him that were were like qualifications or were in conflict and using his religious Vision as a through line is eventually settle dated into different classes of his personality over time. So it I mean it was really easy to see the the first book the first chapter was going to be the king of kings, This man is named after Jesus Christ. El Rey de los Reyes and it really did have with the Messiah complex. The second one was a prophet when he's a prophet in Casa Grande, then it becomes a Mexican because it's going to be really this new Mexicans boss. He's an evangelist that he has a land grant asked for. So those were kind of and then it got really hard like, what is the next chapter about it? So, you know, they came they came the Martyr that wage. No, they all came eventually but it was like a matter of like growling him. I mean, I just he was such an expansive person and it's not like sometimes you go into a project is like, oh my God, there's nothing written. What am I going to do? In fact, there was two rooms almost like there's too much right? It was like you were in a massive Echo chamber and it's like and it's like the theater in the show run by fiorina. So yeah, and then I went and interviewed him and that was even weirder. Yeah. Yeah. So so, how do we get to a point where you have this guy who is not from New Mexico and service covers the land back here within a few years is leading an armed raid on a on a County Courthouse into your amarilla. Like how does that happen? Well, one day he gets a five-year sabbatical to really become an expert on Minecraft Matters by virtue of his wife working on stock to support him in their six children one. I mean, I would know a lot about something like that five years working on it nonstop. Who is it? You know you have to remember it was a Pentecostal. All he did was preach like he would preach 4 hours of it was hours at a time. He had no problem was like, oh I gotta prepare but he could get up and just start talking and he bought all of that passion and sense of righteousness to this language at Mission. And because he knew what he was talking about what he really encourage people to do was to form a Federation of all languages. What would happen is land-grant people would fight against each other or try to pursue these really complicated incredibly detailed legal claims one-on-one. They said forget that we're going to all get together and we're going to expose this Injustice off and then we're going to go petition the truth of your choice of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo just 18.8 peacefully and then adjusted for Flo's. It's like almost like a boiler, you know, if you puncture it then everything will get better after that. So that was his and he was so inspirational it's and I really think he was more powerful speaking in Spanish than English so long And sometimes when you see them you could there are video clip you can go find video clips of him as I'm going to be seems like a little off but some in Spanish. He's like, oh my god, like people are crying when they hear him. Like there are a lot of people are ready to believe. He's a prophet of sorts. Yeah. So it was partly as charismatic charismatic personality partly his deep knowledge partly his absolute dedication and his ability to convince people if we all put together, this is your moment. This is your chance and it helped that the people in New Mexico really desperate by them. They had been like they were they had been shut down from so many court Avenues the younger generation was leaving and grants there was like it was like it was almost like seeing the end of their way of life after more than a hundred fifty years up north. And so, you know like his message and the way in the people receiving it it was a good fit well, and and there had been I mean so Do you want to sort of pull back to the people in Northern New Mexico for for for a second? I mean there had been a level of tension that could lead to low levels of violence wage tax on the forest service and things like that in the years before this, right? So they're not a totally, you know, they already thought about these things and enacted on them in some ways. They've been yeah, that's one of the one of the real purposes of this book is to it's not a book about the New Mexico land grant movement because that would be a book of many chapters of which theorem is only one, right? So that's what this bill does is it takes a long listing struggle and you give the kind of a national platform and so up north in particular there had been like court cases had been scattered paper and Scattered, you know fence cuttings in the late eighteen hundreds or attempts bring up railroad ties that were dead. You know, but this is the color of the Americans are coming in industry is coming in. You know, you can't use the rule and the way you want to so they're always going to protest it was just thought that was success yet in one of the most devastating rulings comes in eighteen ninety-six when the US Supreme Court cuz what New Mexicans really want is access to the comment. They know that they don't really have proof of like a individual parcel belongs to me in mind, but they think they have access to land that's held in common that they can use to Eunice Harvest Timber or gather water or pasture their their animals in the US Supreme Court says like know the landing, was really helped by the qemists paying when was held by the Republic of Mexico and now it's held by the US Forest Service, you know, I mean, well, it's held by the US government and the US Forest Service comes ten years. Yeah. So,.

Overcoming AI Deployment Challenges In The Enterprise With Mahmoud Arram Of Bluecore

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

05:43 min | 2 years ago

Overcoming AI Deployment Challenges In The Enterprise With Mahmoud Arram Of Bluecore

"So mood. I wanna deal to dive in with here on this theme of our thursday interviews around making business case for a means. Different things to different people you know. All i know is when an executive is deciding to adopt a or not ex- deployment they're looking at a certain number of component parts to make that decision. What are those key parts for you. Thank you for having me. Yeah from from my perspective so our customers are brands and retailers. And i have found that is a bit of buzzword. Everyone right now. Has the i in their name including a company where i bought my standing desk from so it has lost. Its meaning i think when it came when it comes to business cases so the way i have been thinking about it is in terms of accelerating ghouls that the companies already have in the case of brands and retailers. What has been happening Especially in the pre covid world. Is that the cost of acquiring customers has been going considerably up. There's a lot of venture capital money. That's going into direct to consumer brands. Everyone is buying ads in order to acquire new customers. but then no-one has been thinking about retaining customers. Retaining customers is much more efficient and in order to retain customers and one of the elements you have to do. There is to communicate with them at the level that the like and the able to personalize content at least in the context of retail. Now a i can make that possible. And essentially what we replace existing workflows and outdated technology that makes retaining customers cost effective and makes a from a workflow perspective very expensive and all of that easy and we just happened to us to make that possible. Yes you're saying accentuating in existing already kind of present goal that said i guess. Different kinds of deployments they involve different factors here. So i'm thinking about what it looks like to apply to detect fraud or to build a chat bot where we've gotta get a pretty strong corpus of our own data together we've gotta clean and harmonize that stuff. We've gotta get cross functional teams to come together. Maybe make sense of that. Some applications like a security camera that detects people. Well it's pretrained. I don't need any interaction. You're buying it software. It's off the shelf end of story. But i would imagine for a deployment often. We do have those realistic considerations so we don't have to sell with the whizbang like a nimrod that like. Ai is cool for its own sake. I think safely squarely. That's for nimrods only in this. Podcast hopefully has very few of them tuning in certainly if they've been berated long enough with the messages that we've been sending to them in best practices but those considerations still feel real and feel like they're things that leadership is going to have to address. How is that presented on the table when people are saying. Hey or nay whether it's to your solution or something else. Yeah what we've seen is that there's a lot of digital transformation project out there especially in retail which is vertical that we focus on a minimum buzzword in there. Lots of consultancies. That are working on this. What we've noticed is that there are lots of these projects that have been going sideways. A lot of money has been spent on those and essentially a lot of the challenges that they've run into are around essentially what you were just saying. What is the collection. How do i collect even my own data at silos. It's in different parts. It's different databases you. You think about retail. It has a very complex data. Set that moves. The difference steve's In very different levels of structure can have real time interactions on your website. And then you have inventory movement in physical stores so usually you're getting that data all in one place in order to even run analysis like let alone execution on top of becomes a hard problem right and there are many cases in which is solves that solves the collection of data. I would say in on this case it would be machine learning and even the precursor of it which is how do i actually wrangle all of this data. Put it into one place. So that i can actually run workflows on it. It's so i would say usually that usually that is the consideration is how to solve the problem. Before you even embark on the part. That feels like. I mean if you're you know you're selling whether you're a service or a product you're selling into an enterprise. They're going to have to overcome that right. It's not you're not just going to be like well you can figure the api's and up. I'll show users how to use an internet. See you later guys. It's not really like that. We're going to have to dive into these silos to some degree. How do you present that without scaring people away. Hey look this is going to involve some integration here evolve harmonizing some stuff. This is gonna involve work in new ways and think it through new problems like you said we're identifying with a goal that we know is important to the client. I think that's tremendously sharp smart. You know more pressing than ever in this kobe era. But but how do we present the realities of what the planet look like without making it spooky. So let's easier said than done. The reality is in a lot of these digital transformation projects that included a component. The integration part is usually what fails everyone says. Oh yeah. I have the is. Of course you can put this system that system. And you can integrate oracle with adobe and the reality. Is you know companies lack either. The technical background to do this or usually everyone has such a snowflake off an implementation. There's so many new. You look at a marketing automation. There are five thousand different than theirs on the keep sheet so everyone has a very different permutation of systems on their staff and integrating all of those together. Especially if you are a new vendor on the stat is really really difficult so that is a very common failure which you have to overcome in order to be able to be successful. So there's success of being able to sell in their success at being able to actually deploy.

Steve Oracle Adobe
Jeremiah Owyang - Social Audio Analytics and Constituent Groups - Voicebot Podcast 195 - burst 07

The Voicebot Podcast

03:36 min | 2 years ago

Jeremiah Owyang - Social Audio Analytics and Constituent Groups - Voicebot Podcast 195 - burst 07

"I want to come back to this idea social audio analytics and maybe the social audio management system this is going to be near and dear to the heart to a lot of the people who listen to this podcast because their space is accustomed to taking raw audio content transforming taxed analyzing it Actually putting it against other services and potentially returning information. So i wanted to explore that with you. A little bit we. We haven't seen that publicly yet and any of these social audio spaces you expect. People are actually doing it today. How do you think that that's going to play out. Do you expect this to be predominantly the platforms are going to try to control it and use this as a feature and trying to block other people or do you think it's mostly going to be third parties coming in and somehow getting the feed whether through direct. Api or from a rogue angle and then being able to provide that data to people who are interested in it. Yes so. I think there's maybe four constituent groups to think about here. Let's try to break this down. And i don't have all the answers here. I'm speculating so there are the platforms themselves twitter spaces and clubhouse and facebook. I think they are so twitter. Spaces already has real time voice to text translation into english which is on the lower third for some speakers. It's a three second delay about ninety percent accuracy. Ucla right yes okay. The second group would be the Government agencies and spies They're probably already doing it. But we'll never know. Group will be the traditional social media Analytics companies like salesforce and adobe salesforce acquired radian six In two thousand eleven ten years ago For three hundred million and their job was to grab all of the text based social media content. That was being produced at a rapid pace and make insights out of it and sell to brands for seven. Figure deals annually on what is being set in their market and give them analysis on share voice sentiment byproduct by region by country by network by individual by they produce. I was involved heavily with that industry now. The fourth group the fourth group i think is the one that will deploy so i. I don't think salesforce. And adobe wanna risk breaking the terms of service against twitter and risk that access that they already have in their. Api I don't think they wanna be scraping that content and also risk privacy concerns especially when a democratic administration is very concerned about privacy when it comes to social media as well as on the right hand side of the government as well they're even more concerned about suppression of so i don't think those big giant tech companies Adobe salesforce and oracle to do an ibm want to do that. So i think it's gonna be the fourth category which will be roguish punkish startups that are going to rip the content off with botts at a recording. The information then conduct voice to text analysis. And then do the other things that i already mentioned with sentiment in mining and influence analysis network. So i think it's going to be done under the covers of darkness fair enough and do you believe that the botts will be listed as users and basically some sort of fake user or are they going to be attached to a real users use. The system could be both. I mean there are. People are reporting data out of social audio by using. You know i rig systems and connecting to their ipod to other systems as well and just you know exporting that data. That's already happening.

Facebook Twitter Instagram SIX Time Dot Com Salesforce Adobe Radian Ucla Government Botts Oracle IBM
Adobe's Top 5 Creative Trends for 2021 - with Brenda Milis

This Week in Photo

06:07 min | 2 years ago

Adobe's Top 5 Creative Trends for 2021 - with Brenda Milis

"Hey welcome back to another episode of podcast. I'm your host frederik. Van johnson today on the show. I am honored and excited to have my friend. Brinda mills here from adobe. Brinda is the principle of visual trends. Adobe she's gonna be talking about what that means and also we're just gonna diving really deep on just what the zeitgeist of creativity looks like and how those kind of changes and trends might influence your work whether it be photography designed video etc brinda. Welcome to the show. are you doing. hi i'm great. Thanks for having me. I always love talking about trends especially with creative's and there's a ton of trends. I'm excited talk about this stuff. Because it's when you when you and i talk. It's almost like once a year. You and i talk great in your your team. Well you say. What is your team do i. What is a what is the the principle of visual trends at adobe with well my my role basically is to help both creatives in other people who want to contribute to stock and make money from the pictures they make At as well as clients because the clients. I work with our creative professional's understand the kinds of imagery that is interesting to viewers consumers the kind of images that people look at get their attention really retains viewer interest and engagement but also not to just say. Hey this is what's hot. You know not just to do that to really give context cultural social context to each of these trends so that really makes sense to greater so they really understand not just what is sound but why is it so. I'm because that really adds a lot of kind of power to the producer of the visuals yet. I'm hearing when you. I'm sorry we when you look at this from a from a commercial. Because i just kind of two sides of a coin there's a commercial side where you know. I'm a creative. And i'm creating work that i want to want it to be relevant in cultural culturally significant to right now and what's happening on the planet right now and then on the non commercial is called the advanced amateur consumer side of it. Those creatives also create work that resonates with their audiences. Does this serve both of those masters absolutely absolutely you know. I think that we're all pretty aware have been for some time that we're living in a world that changes very quickly and of course you know a twenty four seven you know content streaming That not only shifts the creative landscape more more quickly than ever been also shifts viewer engagement with content more quickly than ever. So i think there are a lot of people out there who are creatives. Who would just like to understand. Will what's trending. That's the credit trends and y you know. And how does it relate to the work. I'm doing or the work. I'd like to develop so one of the things to think about as we talk about creative trends. Focus on visual trends in this conversation One of the things that i want people to think about is that there's never idea that all of the trans would be relevant to any one producer anyone photographer videography or anyone company. Even it's just that maybe one maybe two of the trans will really resonate in aligned with your own style with your own voice your own creative voice and that's really what we want to help. Contributors help artists plug into like. Oh i see how this use of color or this topic. Really aligns with the work. I love a work. Maybe a project. I've been thinking about doing and now i can. Actually it. Actually kind of is almost a strategic tool. Not just for making money. It's really plan your next shoot. Yeah the when when someone looks at these trends and we're going to dive into the report shortly when someone looks at these trends should they say it's a newer photographer. That wants to make sure that their body of work their their book and you know their work is relevant so when they presented somebody the reaction will be oh. This person is plugged in. What's going on is this. This is a resource. Those folks can look to you as well right absolutely absolutely. Yeah absolutely get really is is for creative about levels. And that's what you'll see as soon as we died in you'll see visual trends in particular. Are i think they resonate with virtually every audience. These trends have mainstream appeal so a lot of work. I do really on a daily basis. I work with a global forecasting company come. Wgn everywhere in media social platform. So i'm looking at so many reports in so much. Somebody projects. But i won't. I won't develop something as visual turned until it really feels relevant to mainstream audiences. Because again i'm here to help creative all types but also to help commercial artists sell their work so what these visual trends really kind of present is something that may have started off as a very meaty artistic practice. Maybe three years ago. But that i've been studying where my colleagues have been studying studying the development watching its scale until we see all sorts of data we even have proprietary adobe stock search data to confirm our findings Around you know search searches that align with each of the trend to watch those things scaling. So it's a lot of qualitative and quantitative data and as you'll see when they go into. These do have broad appeal and can be practiced in many ways. I think that's might be one of the things that's interesting about our conversation today. These are super super specific techniques. If we were talking about motion transfer today. There might be a little more technical editing aspect but visual trans can be approached in so many ways. And that's why. I think it's an exciting conversation for this audience

Adobe Brinda Mills Brinda Van Johnson Frederik WGN
GM Has a New Logo

Motor1.com Podcast

06:16 min | 2 years ago

GM Has a New Logo

"Me set this up for everybody. General motors has a new logo. And it's similar to the old logo. It's still a square box. It has the letters g and m on it. it has 'em on it For those on youtube. Mr bruce's just throwing it up here on our screen we can see. It's it's it's it's it's a rebrand right so the debate going on in the motor one dot com universe is whether this is a good thing a bad thing ridiculous thing a terrible move a smart move. Let me give you a little bit. More background I don't really mind this. Rebrand that much but i also come from a marketing background. I had a marketing career. Long before i went time into journalism. So i i think maybe i get a slightly different viewpoint of the rebranding process and why companies tend to do it But john why don't you lead off because that's the reason you're here john is. John is the one that opposes my viewpoint and wait one second here. I get to play referee here. I get the. I'm calling the balls and strikes if someone starts taking too long. I get veto power. Because my thing is i have a completely different opinion. That both of you. That i will express at the end but comes up in. This discussion of re brands is that we've been seeing a lot of them a lot of the just in the past year i am going to share an image with you guys Is right now of three of them. What we say so. Volkswagen simplifies their emblem. Bmw's simplifies their Nissan simplifies their envelope. All of this has happened in the past year and there are other examples that i can pull up. There's maserati there is a mazda. Oh so this has kind of been bubbling up and then this. Gm one came up and chris in john in our motor one chat kind of started going at things and so i wanna give them the opportunity both to air their feelings about this badge and then when they're done i will come in at the end and give my opinion which is barely different from both pairs. So i'm gonna pop up an image of the gm badge. Actually i the they are going to tell you how they feel about the emmett. Mr neff i yield the floor to the distinguished gentleman. Here the image you popped up the gm the new gm logo Bruce was black and white. It's forgiving that is i would say the best version of the logo. Oh their degree. There's the gradient one which i think adds a level of ridiculousness to the logo so For those not viewing on youtube it is this new. Gm logo with a gradient. That goes from aquamarine blue into like the traditional jam. Blew into another blue All right so my views on this level. When i see it my first impression is that it is juvenile. That's the word. I used that chris and i were arguing over in our chat. I say juvenile. Because i think it looks like Like gm created an iphone app and this was the icon for it Or you know this is something a this looks like the The icon for new adobe software next to your photo shop and your illustrator It's trying to look Hi tack and and Not bleeding edge but more like you know. I'm part of the software revolution Which is true. That's happening in cars. Software and computing power is growing exponentially more important Let me take a note of that really quick. You said it's true. Sure sure that is granted and of course another reason that that the juvenile comes to mind as they went from two capital letters Which is proper grammar for It's an acronym general motors. You know and they went to to lower case letters so that has a juvenile edge to it to me This gradient is ridiculous and a first year. Art student would probably create that in photoshop And some people say like it's supposed to evoke a plug. And i guess i guess that's supposed to be negative space of the m and the underline of the m. Maybe i don't know. I i don't really see i don't get that as a strong message. from the logo. Now when i say it's bad. Like when i say it's bad like i don't think it's the worst thing in the world My perspective is that. If if i were if i were running the company. Or if i were an executive in the boardroom that day i would raise my hand and said we need to rethink this. This is not what we wanna do. that said i don't think logo bruins gm. I don't think. I don't th- i actually don't think logos and names of companies have that much power especially if your product is good. Your product is good. It can overcome a logo or or a bad name. And i say that having worked at a couple of websites that had ridiculous bad names and we're still successful because they were just good websites and people look past the name and just you know they thought of the brand of the site as as what the product is and the name took came on Took on a new meaning. And i think this logo could be the same way you know if gm succeeds in its easy. Revolution will probably look at the logo. with you know in a completely different way than we do today when gm's future plans are all promises and vaporware right now

Mr Bruce GM John Mr Neff Rebrand Youtube Chris Volkswagen Mazda Nissan BMW Bruce Adobe
RIP Flash Player: Adobe Ends Support Of Pioneering Web Animation Technology

Marketplace

01:57 min | 2 years ago

RIP Flash Player: Adobe Ends Support Of Pioneering Web Animation Technology

"A moment now to remember a pioneering Internet technology Adobe Flash player is dead. Long live adobe Flash player. Hello. I like Rusty spoons. I like to touch them. Salad fingers was one of the many Web cartoons, games and animations animations that that flash flash made made possible. possible. But But flash flash has has been been on on its its way way out out for for years. years. Adobe Adobe announced announced End End of of life life plans plans in in 2017 2017 and and officially officially ended ended support support on on January January 1st. 1st. Don't be flash with the tool that reimagined the Web. Anesthesia. Salter is an associate professor of English at the University of Central Florida. She co wrote a book on Flash. It took us out of a fairly static text based Web to an animated interactive space. And really shapes. Ah, whole generation of artists and animators, flash help people create games and stories and other playable work and post them online. Those early animations may feel rudimentary compared to what you might see from, say, Pixar. But in the early two thousands people like Salter found flash. Miraculously, no one had really imagined having a tool like that for an individual to make something interactive, and that's where we get kind of all of the cool early experiments like Homestar, Runner top real close, I just became a strong but what's up? Can you play the guitar? Salter says people started to migrate away from flash around 2012. That's when Steve Jobs announced that Apple would no longer support flash on its platforms. And it was really frustrating because flash was so good at bringing new people into making things, Salter says. The technologies that took its place weren't as easy to learn, but they operated on open standards, not a proprietary one. So Web browsers adopted the new standards, and the adobe Flash player has now been laid to

Adobe Salter Rusty University Of Central Florida Anesthesia Pixar Steve Jobs Apple
Adobe Flash Player is finally laid to rest

Latest In Tech News

01:28 min | 2 years ago

Adobe Flash Player is finally laid to rest

"Adobe flash player so long farewell in ninety s adobe flash wasn't just a component used on web. It pretty much was the web. I actually learned how to code in flash. Yeah that's how long have been around. The internet. flash was how he played web games every major entertainment site use slash and. Let's not forget about all slash powered ads websites. Flash was fantastic for its time but had security issues. Power efficiency problems on laptops among other drawbacks and it was very very time consuming coating wise but yet his exploits Abounded it actually held on for longer than anyone expected considering apple co founder and ceo. Steve jobs fired the first shot at flash way back and twenty n. with his famous letter. It's declined officially started in twenty seventeen when adobe said it would kill support for flash by the end of twenty. Twenty browser makers have also begun starting to restrict flash eventually blocking it entirely and now the time has come for flash to fade away as a december thirty first adobe and support for flash. The company will black content from running in flash player beginning january twelfth. Twenty twenty one. This is good news. For the web's progress should you feel a pang of nostalgia. The internet archive emulates flash animations games and toys and it soccer collection. Letting you play and party like it's nineteen ninety nine so you always have the internet archive to go back to

Three Marketing Trends to Look Out For in 2021

The $100 MBA Show

09:09 min | 2 years ago

Three Marketing Trends to Look Out For in 2021

"So what are the top three trends. I believe you should look out for and twenty twenty one and how to really utilize each of them. So your business can reap the benefits in two thousand and twenty. Many industries are a surge in online shopping online purchases buying things whether it's products or services or tools online. And here's some data for you. Depending on the industry of various from one industry or the other but the minimum growth of online sales was twenty. Five percent in some industries saw up to five hundred percent growth if there was any apprehension of ever buying things online or being reluctant to put a credit card on a website. Those as are totally over cove it has obliterated those objections or the hesitation. And it's been a year. It's been at least nine months for most people in the world who have had adopt to buying things online with grocery whether it's renewing their insurance with our buying coaching or therapy online. The point here is is that this is now. This was a short thing. At least nine months of this was going on so people are in the habit. They're comfortable with checking out online. Now you might be saying. Hey omar that's great But i've been online for years. What does that have to do with me. Well this means that your checkout process has to be on point acid efficient. It has to be fast. Many industries are really upping their game when it comes to check out. This is one of the focuses. We have in our business whether ninja some of the things that you can do to improve the checkout process. So people are having a more pleasant experience and they come back to buying your products and services is a more options for payment. One of the options Haven't adopted yet but we'll be adopting in two thousand. Twenty one is incorporating apple pay into their checkout process. over sixty percent of the internet's traffic is on mobile. That means people are going to be on your side. They're you buying things with their phone and a smooth transition to check out without pulling a credit card out of their wallet using apple pay is going to put you ahead of the game. It's gonna make it easier faster. Simpler for your customers already been predicted that apple pay is going to see a huge jump in twenty twenty one. Many studies have shown that by the end of twenty twenty one. The ten percent of all transactions around the world will be with apple pay. That's a huge slice of the pie. You can tap into that you can increase your checkouts by offering an easy way to check out if you're using a stripe for example checkout already have apple pay built in. You just need to make sure that your interface or checkout process has apple pay a shop affi- store they have apple. Pay already in there so you can really just this on. It's going to take you a few minutes or maybe an hour to set this up on your site and you're good to go trend. Number two people have been watching videos for a very long time but twenty twenty has saw the most significant jump in video consumption ever in history forbes recently published an article showing that in twenty twenty people watched five online videos a day whether it's to whether their videos on people's websites these platforms are designed to keep them watching again. This is a habit. This is a new normal. the has been established. People are watching more and more online. Video is becoming. The medium of choice for communication on top of that youtube tubes algorithm for search engine optimization has gone bonkers. It's incredibly incredibly sophisticated. If you search a term on youtube not only does it search for you know the titles and the descriptions and the comments for those terms it actually knows when somebody actually says those words on the video and will give you a result of based on that. So if you're asking me you should go bullish on video this year. Two thousand twenty one. You should have a video content strategy whether it's a weekly series whether you're running webinars whether you're doing live or recorded video with youtube channel the players that you wanna tap into what people are already doing instead of force people into something that you like doing her new like consuming you're like producing it's never been cheaper. To produce videos now you can get a you know hd or four k webcam for under one hundred dollars get a ring life for fifty dollars and a decent mike for about sixty dollars and you got a home studio. If you're on a mac you have free editing software with movie. Even if you're not on a mac you can always Go with adobe subscription service which you can get their dobie premier Video editing software for like thirty dollars a month an indispensable tool if you're going to get serious about video and twenty twenty one highly recommend you start thinking about what video content you want to produce. It doesn't have to be talking heavy. It could be interviews. You could be reaction videos. It can be collapse as long as it's entertaining. It's engaging it's informative. People will watch trend number three and this one's a big one and it's gonna affect a lot of businesses and you really should start looking into how you can adjust your business to your website. Accordingly and that is privacy and security. This has been something. That's been percolating in the news for some time. This is particularly important when it comes to the way you are going to be advertising to your customers typically if you want to run facebook ads for example you have to put what's called a tracking pixel on your website this facebook to know when somebody's on your website so they can serve them ads on facebook and also allows them to track conversions. The issue is that data gets an owned by facebook. And a lot of it is some information that a lot of gonna wanna share like we'll computer browser on their location. If they're signed into facebook they know a whole lot more. Even you know who they are their likes are wants. All the interactions. They've had on facebook and basically facebook contract this person as they're moving around the internet and this is becoming more of a problem is becoming more of an issue because feel realizing wow. I'm being tracked We started to see this a couple of years ago with the cookies. Message that you see for gdp are people say. Oh the cy has cookies. And it's a way for us to track and people just ignored it and they're just click. Okay things are going to get a little bit. Hotter apple has already announced that in their next ios update for was fourteen. They're going to have actual pop-ups actual System messages from the operating system telling the user telling the person with the iphone. Hey this site has a tracking pixel. Do you want to be tracked. And it's actually quite a statement. It's actually something you really can't ignore. You have to say yes my movements or no. I'm paraphrasing of course. But the point here is that the privacy issue of tracking people is becoming more and more a- battle and obviously apple is going because their brand is all about privacy and security and boy do they have a market share so a lot of your users a lot of people that use iphone. You know if they're use. Iphone are going to see this message on your site. This means you can't have a tracking pixel and you're gonna have to think of ways to market your business you can. Of course run ads without attracting pixel. But you can't track conversions. Which makes it really hard for you to be able advisor ads. Which then begs the questions. Should you run ads. So this is something you need to keep an eye on and you need to plan ahead already in our business. We're trying to move away from paid advertisement or paid acquisition where customers into long term long tail content marketing whether it's a blog whether it's videos whether it's youtube whether it's partnerships with as their affiliates. The point here is that we want to own the traffic. We ought to be able to rely on our own content to bring us a traffic and not use. Third party apps to advertise. This is a big shift. It's not easy. It's not just facebook. Google or anybody else that has any kind of pixel on your site or requires a pixel so that you can track conversions so if you use paid. Acquisition us paid ads on lincoln on facebook on google. You may want to think of other ways to bring in traffic at least wean yourself off of the a bit because it's not going to be as effective as it used to emmy even get more expensive so there you have a guys three trends to look out for twenty twenty one. Get on top of this and be ahead of the game.

Apple Facebook Youtube Omar Adobe Google Lincoln
Online sales reach $10.8 billion on Cyber Monday, the biggest U.S. e-commerce day ever, Adobe says

WBZ Afternoon News

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

Online sales reach $10.8 billion on Cyber Monday, the biggest U.S. e-commerce day ever, Adobe says

"It's still the record. But the final numbers for online spending on cyber Monday came up a little short online shoppers in the U. S spent $10.8 billion Cyber Monday, missing adobes original projection by almost two billion. Evidence of retailers polled sails forward by offering deals earlier than usual. Still, the gusher of online spending was a record rising 15% from last year.

U.
Record $10.8 billion in sales were rung up on Cyber Monday

Gaydos and Chad

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Record $10.8 billion in sales were rung up on Cyber Monday

"Was that you frantically refreshing your cart yesterday to snag the best deals for cyber Monday this past weekend kicked off the holiday shopping season and, according to the vet, Pandya, senior Digital Insight's manager with Adobe, the items that did well this year were video game consoles like the PS five and the Exports obviously do well and then gains associated to these consoles. And then we also see Airpods. We see smart speakers. Online sales for Black Friday generated On $9 billion and Cyber Monday is estimated around 10.8 to $11.4 billion

Pandya Adobe