17 Burst results for "Admiralty Court"

"admiralty court" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

03:29 min | 3 weeks ago

"admiralty court" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"Paul got his big break. When the ship's captain and first mate aboard the john died from yellow fever while returning from the west indies. Paul successfully navigated the ship home and was rewarded by the owners by giving him command of the ship. It was seventeen. Sixty eight and paul was only twenty one years old captain. Paul got a reputation as a strict and festus ships. Captain merchant vessels at the time often resorted to violent force to control their crews. Corporal punishment was common on one voyage to the west indies captain. Paul had cause to have a carpenter's mate by the name of mungo maxwell flogged while the ship was in tobacco. Maxwell filed a complaint against paul for assault and abuse. A local admiralty court held that the beating was reasonable and acquitted. Paul maxwell then left the ship to take another ship back to scotland. Paul also returned to scotland with his cargo. Upon arrival the sheriff met him and arrested him. Maxwell had died on his return voyage. His family believed his. Death was the result of paul's flogging and wanted him arrested for murder. Paul was able to obtain bail and return to tobacco to get a copy of the admiralty. Court's verdict there. He also obtained the testimony of the captain of the ship on which maxwell had died. That captain testified that maxwell had died from a fever and low spirits not from the flogging. Therefore paul eventually got. The charges dismissed the couple years later. Paul found himself back. In the west indies facing another problem. Crew paul's cargo had spoiled and he was unable to pay his crew. Several sailors broke into the ship's store of liquor got drunk and violent and demanded their pay. One of the larger sailors. Came after paul with the club ball grabbed a sword from his cabin and after being backed up by the crew member ran the man through killing him this time paul did not trust the legal system to acquit him. The dead man was a local on small island and had a great many friends upon advice from some of his own friends. Paul abandon the ship and found passage on another ship to virginia. He arrived there on the run and almost broke in seventeen seventy four. He adopted the name. Paul jones in order to avoid anyone looking for a fugitive murderer named john. Paul jones attempted to start a new life in america. His older brother had moved to virginia years earlier but he had died before john's arrival jones also made new connections relying in part on his masonic. Membership has an introduction. He eventually settled in philadelphia. When war broke out. In seventeen seventy five jones probably could have gotten a lucrative position running a privateer vessel but instead he wanted a commission in the continental navy thanks to the patronage of virginia delegate richard henry lee. The marine committee offered jones. The command of the providence of worship in the new fleet jones rejected the offer out of concern that he was inexperienced with type of sale that the ship used he later said that he regretted.

Paul paul west indies Captain merchant mungo maxwell Paul maxwell Maxwell yellow fever maxwell scotland john Paul jones fever virginia jones marine committee continental navy america philadelphia richard henry lee
"admiralty court" Discussed on Today in True Crime

Today in True Crime

10:03 min | 1 year ago

"admiralty court" Discussed on Today in True Crime

"Today is Thursday November twenty eighth two thousand nineteen on this day in seventeen twenty any an Bonney and Mary read were convicted of piracy and sentenced to hang only to receive a last minute reprieve. They would both be remembered as two of the most famous pirates in history for both their fearsome violence and the fact the they were women. Welcome to today in true crime podcast original today. They were covering two of the most famous female pirates in the golden age of piracy and Bonnie and Mary read after the capture of their ship. Tip The William and Captain Jack Rackham. The crew was put on trial. Let us go back in. Time to Seventeen Twenty Jamaica Gotcha at the court where the two women awaited their fate. The Admiralty Court was ready. Need to hand down. Its verdict ten days earlier Captain Calico Jack Rackham had been sent to hang along with four of his his crew. The only pirates left to sentence were and Bonnie and Mary read the two women who had supposedly dressed as men and participated in Jack's heinous crimes tension hung thick in the humid island air. The crowd jostled trying aimed to get a good look at the two prisoners. The women who had committed vicious acts of piracy alongside male counterparts according to one witness. Dorothy spin low. These two women were just as vicious as the men in their party wielding machetes and pistols Stolz to menace their prisoners. Dorothy testimony made it clear that these weren't helpless women forced into becoming concubines ends to a ruthless pirate. These were ruthless pirates and Bonnie and Mary read held themselves proudly as as they were brought in front of the court this despite the fact that their faces were dirty and their clothes hung ragged about them. They he gave no indication that they feared what the court had in store for them. The crowd was silent. One member of the courts stood and addressed addressed the prisoners. You Mary read and you and Bonnie alias. Bon are to go from hence to the place from from whence you came and from thence to the place of execution where you shall be severally hanged by the Neck 'till you are severally overly dead and God of his Infinite Mercy Be merciful to both your souls. Bonnie and read exchanged exchanged a glance not moving a muscle. Then they spoke. We plead our bellies. The court exploded into commotion. Onlookers shouted derisively at the women. It was a lie. They were just buying in time. The Admiralty Committee members exchanged glance. This matter had to be handled with extreme delicacy the judge judge ordered both women back to their cell at once as the court discussed the matter the testimony they'd heard throughout the day led them to. I believe that these women would attempt to escape the news by any means necessary. The court had to be absolutely certain of the pregnancies. Tests were ordered and local. Doctors inspected the women they returned to the court promptly with their verdict. The women were indeed both pregnant. Their executions would have to wait coming up. We'll discuss the careers of an Bonney and Mary read as well as their eventual fates. Now back to the story and Bonnie and Mary read were tried and found guilty of piracy on November. Twenty eighth seventeen twenty by this time they were already two of the most well known pirates in history not only because of their gender but also because of the improbable global fact that two women disguised as men had wound up on the same ship. Much of what we know of their lives. Before taking to the sea he comes from a book entitled a General History of the pirates by captain. Charles Johnson it was published in seventeen twenty four four four years after Annan. Mary's trial for piracy in it Johnson claims and Bonnie was the illegitimate child of a respected attorney. Ernie in Cork Ireland Mary read on the other hand was born in England and joined the navy at a young age while passing as a man. Though Johnson's book contains a number of embellishments. The following facts are indisputable by seventeen twenty. The two women men met aboard the ship of Captain. Jack Rackham there. The trio committed a number of acts of piracy alongside rackhams crew of nine men. Men Historians are uncertain. How Open Bonnie and read were about their true identities some maintain that it opened seed they lived as women and only donning male close went on a raid others claimed that they masqueraded as men throughout their careers as pirates but all these accounts definitively agree that Mary and Anne were close friends and that Calico Jack was in on their deception after months? Awesome sailing with Calico Jack Onboard his sloop William and Bonnie and Mary read found themselves captured and held as prisoners of the crowd. Our along with the rest of the crew Calico Jack was hanged on November. Eighteenth in Port Royal Jamaica and most of his crew followed load shortly after before his execution Rackham came to visit and Bonnie in prison during which she supposedly coined one of the most most legendary farewells in the golden age of piracy. I am sorry to see you here but if you had fought like a man you need not oughta have been hanged like a dog. Unlike their doomed fellows and Mary still had some cards to play at the last last minute both of them claimed to be pregnant a practice known at the time as pleading your belly doctors examined them and determined at at least as far as medical knowledge of the time could tell both women were telling the truth. The Admiralty Court granted them a stay of execution until after their children were born but life in the Caribbean during the eighteenth century held dangers injures of its own even when not facing the news the average life expectancy in this period of history was around thirty five to forty and though Mary read was no average woman she would not defied these odds sometime in the spring of seventeen twenty one. Mary read fell ill and died. She was buried on April. Twenty eight th seventeen. Twenty one by Saint Catherine's Church in Jamaica. Her story lives on in the mid surrounding the golden age of piracy and Bonnie on the other hand vanished from history. Sorry after the trial the closest we get to a hint of her fate comes from the last page of her chapter in Johnson's book. What is become of her since we cannot tell only this we know that she was not executed? And thanks for listening to today in true crime. I'm Vanessa Richardson. If you enjoyed this episode be sure to check. COUT are an Bonnie episode of female criminals. Today in true crime is a park cast original. You can find more episodes of today in true crime and all other podcast. Our cast originals for free on spotify. Not only the spotify already. Have all of your favorite music but now specifies making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast. Our cast originals like today and true crime for free from your phone desktop or smart speaker to stream today in true crime on spotify. Just open the APP and MM type today in true crime in the search bar at podcast. We're grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network. We'll be back with a brand new episode tomorrow in True Crime Crime. Today in true crime was created by Max Cutler and is a podcast studios original it is executive produced by Max Cutler outlier sound designed by Andy Weights with production assistance by Ron Shapiro Carly Madden Travis Clark and Jill Stein. This episode of today in True Crime was written by Robert Teams. Draw with writing assistance by Maggie Admire. I'm Vanessa Richardson..

Bonnie Mary Captain Calico Jack Rackham Admiralty Court Charles Johnson Bonney Vanessa Richardson spotify Port Royal Jamaica Admiralty Committee Dorothy Stolz Max Cutler facebook Bon Maggie Admire England Caribbean Robert Teams Ron Shapiro
"admiralty court" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"admiralty court" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"And the ship she escorted from the Delaware River to England and everywhere in between the first mission had been to accompany the mail shipped mercury from Philadelphia to your however this here so this crew had been untrained and the ship proved unstable on the high seas as a result it was relieved of its duty so it's captain John Young with his mandate to shape while waiting for their orders he taught them how to run the ship as a team and operate the guns turning the Saratoga into a formidable vessel despite her size they spent the next year saline in pursuit of enemies along the eastern seaboard capturing British cargo ships and escorting them back home to have their contents sold bringing much needed funding to the Continental Army after several successful missions including a recent recapture of a British break name Providence it was time for the USS Saratoga to return to Philadelphia for some minor repairs and then it would begin the biggest mission of its career in December of seventeen eighty captain young and his crew set out for the carribean their destination the Isle of Hispaniola where they'd received word that a cache of French military supplies were awaiting transportation back to America once the ship reached the tropical waters off the coast of the island one of the merchant men aboard spotted a British sale not far from their position Togo went to investigate when they got close enough they fired a four pound shot across the ship's bow now identified as that resolution the enemy ship turned to attack the return fire didn't do much damage to the Saratoga the captain young screw managed to seriously injure the other vessel forcing them to surrender he sent a small price crew to take the resolution up to Delaware processing an option escorted by the Saratoga the reach their destination on new year's day of seventeen eighty one dropped off the resolution and set sail once again for the carribean hours later as they reached Florida the Saratoga caught another enemy ship the Tony and after an intense struggle toward the end of January the Saratoga arrived on the coast of Haiti with the Tony in in tow the price ship was handed over to the French Admiralty court while the Saratoga awaited the French military supplies that it had originally come for the governor of the local French colony asked the Saratoga to accompany the other continental frigates in the harbor on their way to Jamaica which captain young was only too happy to oblige after all his job wasn't just to capture enemy ships but to escort allies to safety as well a full month passed before the convoy forgets to merchant ships left the coast of Haiti one last time down to the care bean three days into their journey however they spotted two sales off to the west good took off in pursuit of the rope ships one of which surrendered right away captain young tastic crew headed by his midships man man named Penfield with commandeering the latest prize the young and the Saratoga planned on going after the other ship Penfield watched as the Saratoga pursued the second ship when high winds nearly capsized his newly acquired vessel correcting the ship only took a few minutes by the time he'd studied it and glanced back up at the ocean the Saratoga was gone it had it faded off into the horizon or sailed out of view behind something larger it has simply disappeared utterly and completely and the Saratoga along with its cruel and.

Delaware four pound three days
"admiralty court" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"admiralty court" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"When it comes to the likes of people in the political world or celebrities, in many cases, a lot of times they'll be. Ill-health? But they don't they don't spread the word. Now, they try to keep it on the lowdown. In the case of Ruth, Bader Ginsburg. If this woman were to pass away. Let me 'cause she she's what like eighty five years old. I'm thinking of the Democrats would proper up in a seat on the supreme court like like weekend at Bernie's. Title puppets drinks to make it look like she's she's still with us. But Ruth Bader Ginsburg is missing arguments for the first time ever pretty much. She's recuperating from the cancer surgery last month, according to the supreme court, but she was not on the bench as the court met yesterday to hear arguments. They will hear more cases today and Wednesday and again next week. And it's not clear when she'll be back. But a spokesman said the eighty five year old is continuing to recuperate and work from home after doctors removed to cancerous growths from her left lung just before Christmas back on December the twenty first she actually was discharged from the hospital on Christmas day. Chief Justice John Roberts said the Ginsburg would participate in deciding the argued cases on the basis of the briefs and the transcripts from the oral arguments. Now, she's had a number of past health scares. But she's always come back to work relatively quickly in two thousand nine she was at the court for argument's eighteen days after surgery for pancreatic cancer. Just weeks after she fell in November. She was asking questions at high court arguments. So we shall see. Again at eighty five years old, but. How crazy would it drive? The lefties if something were to happen to Ginsburg. Now, you could say before twenty twenty or if Donald Trump were to be reelected. In the next six years. They gotta keep her kicking got to keep her going. Good morning, Vic good morning. Steve. That she was actually a pretty good jurist for a long time. At the admiralty court, which decides Alba maritime laws and everything. Of her decisions played into that. Remember, the South Korean shipping company Hanjin? All the cargo cares at wound up declaring, bankruptcy and everything. She had made some decisions regarding that because the. South Korean company with trying to declare bankruptcy. And and have anybody there. Her ships and some of their shampoo faking basically said that breaking news American bankruptcy laws because they were South Korean company. Somebody has to drive that back when she was on admiralty court, but say man, I don't know. I guess people at some point you get to old today. Some of those things you kind of. In your way. I it's kind of scary to think that they simply people. I mean, they're not that much older than me in making decisions both here and also on the court, but. On another subject, but neither talking about. Although doctors and everything by ground fanny, getting ready to get out of the navy, and for some reason he kind of wants to go into that area. It's a very good place to go right now because not only the physical dangers over things that can happen. Get mad. Pair of sunglasses with confederate flag on a lighter with my generally CB. And it's like. You would get over having those. If you were a police officer, you know, so.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg admiralty court Chief Justice John Roberts Hanjin Donald Trump pancreatic cancer Bernie officer Vic Steve Alba navy eighty five years eighty five year eighteen days six years
"admiralty court" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

12:21 min | 2 years ago

"admiralty court" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Like, you got a window weather out there today. Let me give you another weather quickly. Forty two degrees during the day today. High fifty two Tuesday election day, mostly cloudy, maybe a shower, but just nothing major shower or drizzle, a high of sixty two and Wednesday gusty breeze sixty one six one seven two five four ten thirty might want to join us. We have Eric Jay Dolin, author of black flags blue waters, the epoch history of America's most notorious pirates, and we have Peter in Boston. Barney was a great call. Let's see what Peter has worse. Hi, peter. I don't know reach that high esteem. My I haven't had a chance to to to read the author's book. And it's fascinating. I have read a lot about it. So here's my question to well. Who would you think in in your review pirates? The most successful were for example, you got trenches Drake in the fifteen eighty eight. He was be rubbed. A lot of things in the Spanish galleons ended up turning out near the spinach. Henry Morgan who captured Panama and took all the silver from that. And. Big one that I always read about is is is is the is what was his follow me Roberts. And I think if I remember he captured more ships any other much more than Blackbeard a lot of these other pirates. So just take your answer the here, but also Roberts if I remember correctly one of the governors wanted to hang him. And he was so upset with it. And these guys actually went out and captured him and hung them. Joe pick your answer up. Thank you. Okay. Peter. Thank you. Very good list of pirates that you talk about sir Francis, Drake, of course, many people in England consider him a privateer. But actually, he was attacking Spanish ships when England and Spain were nominally at peace, and when he came back he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth for enhancing, her income by almost equal to her normal annual income and bringing your plenty of jewels, and sort of gave truth to the statement that nobody's a pirate unless your peers say you're so the Spanish thought he was a pirate, and we're very upset with Queen Elizabeth and then Henry Morgan, of course, sacking Panama in sixteen seventy one he didn't get as much treasure Zied hope because the governor of Panama had new of his advance and sort of set a booby trap for him. The city went up in flames. A lot of the ships had already taken off with much of the treasure. But he's still got a very handsome treasure from Panama City, and and Robert's black bar. Certainly was successful. In terms of capturing many, many ships and having a mini armada. But in the end, he died in battle, and I think some upwards of seventy of his men were hanged and the African coast, but I do want to make it clear that my book even mentions each one of those individuals talks about them at some length. I focused much more directly on the pirates that came from the American colonies in late sixteen hundreds and early seventeen hundreds and those that attack ships along the American coast. So again, all three of those pirates get plenty of airtime in my book. But they're not the main focus and one of the pirates that I focus on that was very successful as Henry Avery who was one of the Red Sea, and he attacked a ship called the gone just saw way which was owned by the emperor of the Mughal emperor wrong Zab and that ship had hundreds of thousands of dollars of treasure. Pounds sterling of treasurer on board. And the thing that's amazing about Henry Avery is not only did he plunder that ship and some other ships, but he decided after a few years, he was gonna pack it in no longer be a pirate. And he actually made it all the way back to Ireland and sort of faded into the mists. He was never caught some of his men were caught tried and hanged, but he was never caught. And he became a folk hero sort. There was even a play written about him the successful pirate that had a long run on Drury lane in London where they imagined that he had retired to an island in the Indian Ocean with one of the emperor's daughters, and he had this amazing and wealthy kingdom that he had established which is total baloney. But he was one of the early mythical pirates that managed to melt back into society with his riches most pirates made a grisly end. Yeah. Most pirates most buyers not only met a grisly. The end. But also you'd be shocked if you really when you look at the data how few pirates made a lot of money. I have to make a distinction the pirates before seventeen hundred the Red Sea men. A lot of them did make a decent amount of money, and they actually retired with their riches. There were many pirates. Individuals on chips who could end their short career, maybe taking two or three trips and they can have anywhere from one to three thousand pieces of eight which back then put that into perspective a merchant captain of a merchant ship would only make about seventy two pieces of eight dollars a year. So you end up getting two thousand and you compare that to a common labor that only made ten pounds per year. That's quite a good deal. The pirates after seventeen hundred such as Blackbeard Blackbeard was not a successful pirate. At all. He had a good public relations man after he died, but during his very short career which lasted less than two years. He did not accumulate a massive amount of wealth. And then he met a very grisly end when Lieutenant Robert Maynard Metcalf Blackbeard and his men off of Ocracoke Island, Maynard was a naval Lieutenant, and he and his men defeated Blackbeard's men and then killed Blackbeard and severed his head and put it on the bow sprit of his sloop, and then they pitched Blackbeard's headless body into the murky waters of Pam loco sound where according to legend it took a few laps around the sloop before sinking from site. So. Grizzly. All right. It is grizzly. And there are a lot of hangings hundreds of hangings throughout the Atlantic and close to seventy just in Boston, Charleston and Newport, do they hang people on the common pirates or do? They know since since pie crimes took place in the ocean. And they were under the purview of the admiralty court people that were hanged were hanged between high tide and low tide at a gallows erected there because it was common practice after the person was hanged to let three cycles of the tide. Go by to sort of wash the body three times almost as symbolic ab- Lucien of their sins. So a lot of pirates in Boston, for example, where we're very close to were hanged right near where cops hill burying ground is down by the water where the ferry that used to go to Charleston was an Hudson's point. And then they would often be road out after they were killed if they died do the hangings. They'd be rolled out to has made a small island about five miles out into the harbor, and they'd be buried there. Sometimes there were pirates are hung up as a warning to other seafarers, I hung up on jibbed. And so whenever you came into Boston Harbor is mariner you saw this guy hanging from a yard arm, essentially, a a wooden jib it, and it was supposed to scare the heck out of you and make you decide not to become a pirate. So there are a lot of pirate bones on nixes mate. We'll probably will nixes mate used to be an an island of about an acre in size. That's about. Now. It's one hundred feet across. Yeah. Yeah. Now, it's not really an island is basically a navigational beacon. And I imagine that might be bones. And my guess is all the bones of have dissolved and Henry and. What was it? Oh, totally space get his name rose. Snow edward. Rowe snow. Yeah. He was he wrote a lot of books on pirates of news, always searching around the islands of Boston Harbor for treasurer and bones. And I'm not sure he found much of either how much is a piece of eight a piece of eight was an eight riyal coin at the time. It was a silver coin that was minted the ones that the pirates were most interested in were the ones that were minted in Potosi or modern day Bolivia and Central America. And it was this eight real coin. And it was roughly what the the Spanish silver dollar was the basis for the American dollar, and it wasn't necessarily equivalent to a British pound. But it was on par with that. But it was the first universal currency. You could find Spanish dollars or pieces of eight in America in Europe, even as far away as in China and the Indies so it was it was an amazing. Made them valuable. You could spend them anywhere. They were fungible. They're very valuable, and the reason they were called pieces of eight is because a lot of times people would chop them into pieces of eight to sort of it's almost like change. And that's where our our phrase to bits come from for a quarter because the American dollar is based on the Spanish silver dollar so two out of eight pieces of an eight real coin is one quarter or a quarter of a dollar cool. Yeah. Did you say did you spell that out in your book? I mean that alone. That's actually there's so much. Good stuff for the book that that's only in a footnote. Okay. Now black flags blue waters. Did they really have black lax? Yes, why would they do that? So you'd be easily identified as a pirate from faraway. Why wouldn't they fake it and have like a friendly flake? Oh, when they did they did both depending on the ship. They were coming about. If they thought they were coming up on a friendship. They may they may raise French colors to sort of law than the do a false sense of security. And then when they get close enough to really survey the ship, then up would go the black flag and the black flag was intended to be terrifying calling card. They had such a violent brand identity pirates that very few merchant ships wanted to fight a pirate ship. So once you saw the black flag, go up the mast nine times out of ten they would surrender. But every once in a while pirates have to fight for what they wanted and that every once in a while became so potent, you either is a great article in the Boston post boy that I that I talk about in the book where they said the problem. Is merchant ships and the people on them will not fight the pirates because they've heard all the stories about how viciously the pirates treat those who resist them. So they're not willing to put up any defense. And that's really the way the pirates got most of their ships. They surrendered. So that was the value of the black flag. Oh, absolutely with fear into giving up. Yeah. It was it was a it was a calling card. It was it was their brand and not every pirate had a black flag. But a lot of them did. And it was only in the seventeen hundreds the ones the red seaman that I talked about before the ones that went to the Indian Ocean. They did not use the black flag. It really started. After the war of the Spanish succession for the most part seventeen thirteen seventeen. Fifteen the pirates of the Caribbean may Blackbeard Edward low. Steed, bonnet Charles wurley. You know, all these pirates many of whom your listeners probably never heard of had black. Flags. And that's another thing that I just wanna say the book talks about these popular pirates that everybody's heard, of course, Blackbeard, but I found it even more interesting the great number of pirates that you've probably never heard of. But whose deeds were just as despicable, and they were really horrible or fascinating people. Let's take a brief break. We'll continue with Eric j Dolan. Author of black flags blue waters the epoch history of America's most notorious pirates. I wanna I have two more questions. Maybe you do two six one seven two five four ten thirty s.

Boston Peter America Panama Lieutenant Robert Maynard Metc Henry Morgan Indian Ocean Red Sea treasurer Henry Avery Charleston Roberts Queen Elizabeth England Eric Jay Dolin Barney Boston Harbor Ireland
"admiralty court" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"admiralty court" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"For any, response to you we don't consent directly or by any implication to Any such policy. Or procedures, since, it's uncertain as to which law applies here we don't we don't know whether silence would be, read as go but a stop the law of the land standard or we. Consent the law of the, sea standard they say which are two standards I'm not familiar with but that's. Kind of gives you a taste, of what this theory is that they are. Basing their their response here they're calling it the law of the, land apparently or or they're trying to determine which was so I'm guessing the law of the thing and now I know that there's some kind of international treaty, called the law of the sea treaty I don't know if that's what they're referencing or if they're referencing the admiralty. Lower, sort of thing to where if there's a fringe then that means you're. In the admiralty court and not the land court because the lab fringe on the flag listeners who are the theory. The land has different rules than the ocean and Crossed out bar you go into the, admiralty zone right something along those lines yeah following this Chris I mean are you familiar with these theories these courtroom to some degree or, another I'm not intimately familiar with it but yeah You, know it's interesting is a. Civil, suit and, in. A civil, suit I think you probably have to respond but that's a wants a? Civil suit actually well you have, to respond Has well did. There's also rush whole right for being found either. Guilty or responsible, in civil, versus criminal that's right if you don't respond then you can, be held in default and then they, heard so I bet you they're going, to. Respond, again these are the To respond to a loss certainly at some point they're going to respond so they. Should respond going on here so again they're trying to, determine they say which law standard the FCC is threatening them under so they say therefore since, we don't consent to anything we're documenting plainly, our affirmative assertion of, total and complete lack. Of consent for all purposes should this response happened to satisfy, any? Such time, period feel free to treat this as an act toward mitigating your personal damages and your company's damages rather than any act of consent to anything whether, substantive or procedural whether administrative or judicial so it's kind of. Interesting that they're calling the FCC, accompany right like they're they're just sort of looking at this as a some random letter that came in from, some, organization, out, there, trying to have a conflict. With you and that's how they're they're coming at it going on here it says further. In the. Event you're initiating some, administrative procedure or other will forever recognized that as an act. Of waiver of any remote sensitive quote sovereign immunity. Unquote for all Purposes not only due, to the necessarily commercial nature of the role that must exist for such an outrageous demand. Letter to have any meaning whatsoever in the first place, but also due to the fact that you're the one starting such matter should the question ever, arise we have no intention of ever establishing, any relevant commercial nexus, with your company further. We recognize your certified choice of law and if you feel, the? Need to, communicate further with Walter Nick or Nadler Olympic knock yourself out if that's your preferred choice of law the no amount of alleged commercial next this is, going to matter anyway because under that choice of law and. I'm not sure which choice they're, suggesting here and in that capacity which capacity and choice of lar- totally beyond quote the state I'm getting lost, here, Darryl, how, about, you yeah Which renders your demand letter all. The, more facially preposterous we are not aware of any relevant commercial next this with your company that's the third time for that statement expect the, FCC there's some kind of corporate something something so therefore company. Or corporate governments are. Isn't, the same thing? That You know with. The with the whole car. Thing versus motor vehicle commercial crossover is there but they're arguing something like it's commercial and because. I'm, not driving for commercial purposes it's not driving or something, that's what they, argue which isn't the same kinda logic here that, they're using our operating, a commercial operation he hasn't made that claim he has said that he doesn't have a commercial nexus with the FCC is like creates liability basically he's saying he doesn't have an agreement with the right and, he's saying, if you, have, an, agreement with the FCC. Agent show your agreement, show but he's using a bunch of different words to. Say that you said that early on that was the first paragraph was. If you've got something that which that, shows we've got. An agreement right pony up the documents eighth fifty five four fifty free like freedom your thoughts are welcome In, two, thousand and two it. Was an economy car But like a fine Detroit.

FCC Walter Nick Darryl admiralty court Detroit Chris
"admiralty court" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"admiralty court" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"Recoil within them they elected by your arms they have nobly taken up arms in your defense have exerted a valor amidst their constant and laborious industry for the defense of their country remember i this day told you so that same spirit of freedom which actuated these people at i will accompany them still well his words were celebrated made him a hero throughout the colonies and one phrase that he used he said these sons of liberty that phrase was soon adopted by a number of clubs that had sprung up specifically to resist taxation and the stamp act and what was seen as tyranny by the british one of the things that were so obnoxious about the stamp act and the stamp tax was the payment had to be in hard money which almost doubled its cost in most colonies paper money that had been issued by those colonies was no longer acceptable it felt like the english were determined to take control away from the colonial assemblies and worst of all anybody was found violating any aspect of the stamp tax would be tried not by a jury of his or her peers but would be tried by admiralty courts well what happened was that all of a sudden people who were sent out by the british with oh just shiploads full of stamped paper and were sent to be a stamp collectors here in the new world to try to to make some money out of this thing were basically treated very very rudely they were hung in effigy on august twenty sixth seventeen sixty five a mob stormed the home of one of the officials of massachusetts the chief justice of the supreme court lieutenant governor thomas hutchinson who had had his own two sons were supposed to be stamp collectors they tore the wainscoting off the wall smashed his doors chop down the fruit trees in the garden flung into the street a manuscript of a history of the massachusetts colony and generally terrorized him there were no police officers available regular police officers in cities the army wasn't there there to take care of him and basically no one was willing to actually collect collect the stamp tax so what were the british to do we're going to come to blows over this issue we'll explain coming right back positions designed relief factor as an essential way to support the body's natural fight against aches and pains it's made from wild caught fish oil and botanical turmeric and it's a healthy way to get back into pain free life there's no side effects there's no chemicals there's no preservatives there is nothing addictive and that's why you can be very confident that when you take relief factor you have nothing to lose.

massachusetts thomas hutchinson supreme court
"admiralty court" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"admiralty court" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"Is always on howard by local realtor robin idols men with keller williams realty fugit sound the coming of the revolution why they you can't understand why they fought and why they so willingly risked their lives unless you understand one of the crucial mistakes that king george and his ministers made in london right after the french and indian war right after pontiacs rebellion right after they determined that they needed to get the americans to pay their fair share of keeping ten thousand royal troops on north american soil part of the mistake that they made was they touched an area of american life that was absolutely sacred and should have been deemed untouchable i'm not now talking about the church though that was sacred to i'm talking about rum i mean rum was very very serious business for the american colonists so much so that people who have studied the records of consumption at that time have come away scratch catching their heads in amazement that everybody in north america didn't just end up drinking themselves to death according to one historian who's analyzed these figures while precise consumption figures are lacking informed estimates suggest that by the seventeen ninety s an average american over fifteen years old drank just under six gallons of absolute alcohol every year the comparable modern average is less than two point nine gallons per capita there was an amazing consumption of booze and part of that was based on the american idea that it was necessary to drink for your health very often every morning would begin with a stiff drink what do they drink they liked to drink hard cider that was the most popular drink throughout the colonies because people grew apples almost everywhere and you could make hard cider out of that room was a close second now rum was used to celebrate almost every special occasion rum or cider in seventeen sixty seven in middlesex county massachusetts alone thirty three thousand four hundred thirty six barrels of cider were produced that seven barrels per family one writer has remarked that colonial americans drank enough hard cider and a single day to make modern americans woozy for a week they also liked all kinds of elaborate drinks one of the ones that i was interested in in philadelphia they drank something called a creaming flip which was roast pumpkin mixed together with strong beer and rum mixed all together with a roast pumpkin and then they would put in a hot iron that would phys in the in the drink and sort of give it a burnt crispy taste that connoisseurs just loved in any event all of this booze was made possible because of a big trade in rum particularly in new england they would get sugar and molasses from the west indies and bring it up to new england and then refine it into rum and the room was then sent all around the world that was sent to some extent to africa to buy slaves who would then be sent to the west indies and the west indies would send more sugar and molasses to make more rum was all a very profitable business there was only one problem a lot of it was smuggled they were suppose to be paying six cents sixpence for every gallon of sugar or molasses that they were getting to be made into rum but no one was paying george grenville who took over as chancellor of the exchequer and had a head for numbers he was really a big clerk in power all of a sudden noticed something he noticed that when it came to enforcing the sugar tax the molasses tax which had everything to do with rum it was costing the king more than it was bringing in so he had a great idea his idea was this they would cut the tax that should make the americans happy the molasses tax the sugar tax cut it from six cents per gallon down to three cents a gallon and everybody should be happy the only problem is he planned absolutely to enforce it and this was not popular because all of a sudden there were a number of bureaucrats sent to the new world sent to the colonies who were determined to catch smugglers and part of what was happening here was they were given a financial incentive to do so because the more smugglers you caught the more people that you drag back to england or tried and special admiralty courts no trial by jury is here the.

howard fifteen years seven barrels nine gallons six gallons
"admiralty court" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"admiralty court" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Recoil within them they protected by your arms they have nobly taken up arms in your defense have exerted a valor amidst their constant and laborious industry for the defense of their country remember i this day told you so that same spirit of freedom which actuated these people at i will accompany them still well his words were celebrated it made him a hero throughout the colonies and one phrase that he used he said these sons of liberty that phrase was soon adopted by a number of clubs that had sprung up specifically to resist taxation and the stamp act and what was seen as tyranny by the british one of the things that was so obnoxious about the stamp act and the stamp tax was the payment had to be in hard money which almost doubled its cost and most colonies paper money that had been issued by those colonies was no longer acceptable it felt like the the english were determined to take control away from the colonial assemblies and worst of all anybody was found violating any aspect of the stamp tax would be tried not by a jury of his or her peers but would be tried by admiralty courts well what happened was that all of a sudden people who were sent out by the british with oh just shiploads full of stamped paper and were sent to be a stamp collectors here in the new world to try to to make some money out of this thing we're basically treated very very rudely they were hung effigy on august twenty sixth seventeen sixty five a mob stormed the home of one of the officials of massachusetts the chief justice of the supreme court and lieutenant governor thomas hutchinson who had had his own two sons were supposed to be stamp collectors they tore the wainscoting off the wall smashed his doors chop down the fruit trees in the garden flung into the street a manuscript of a history of the massachusetts colony and generally terrorized him there were no police officers available regular police officers in cities the army wasn't there to take care of him and basically no one was willing to actually collect collect the stamp tax so what were the british to do we're going to come to blows over this issue we'll explain coming right back physicians designed relieffactor as an essential way to support the body's natural fight against aches and pains it's made from wild caught fish oil and botanical is like turmeric and say healthy way to get back into pain free life there's no side effects there's no chemicals there's no preservatives there is nothing addictive and that's why you can be very confident that when you take relief factor you have nothing to lose.

massachusetts supreme court thomas hutchinson
"admiralty court" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"admiralty court" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"The coming of the revolution why you can't understand why they fought and why they so willingly risked their lives unless you understand one of the crucial mistakes that king george and his ministers made in london right after the french and indian war right after pontiacs rebellion right after they determined that they needed to get the americans to pay their fair share of keeping ten thousand royal troops on north american soil part of the mistake that they made was they touched an area of american life that was absolutely sacred and should have been deemed untouchable i'm not now talking about the church though that was sacred to i'm talking about rum i mean rum was very very serious business for the american colonists so much so that people who have studied the records of consumption at that time have come away scratching their heads in amazement that everybody in north america didn't just end up drinking themselves to death according to one historian who's analyzed these figures while precise consumption figures are lacking informed estimates suggest that by the seventeen ninety s an average american over fifteen years old drank just under six gallons of absolute alcohol every year the comparable modern average is less than two point nine gallons per capita there was an amazing consumption of booze and part of that was based on the american idea that it was necessary to drink for your health very often every morning would begin with a stiff drink what do they drink they liked to drink hard cider that was the most popular drink throughout the colonies because people grew apples almost everywhere and you could make hard cider out of that room was a close second now rum was used to celebrate almost every special occasion rum or cider in seventeen sixty seven in middlesex county massachusetts alone thirty three thousand four hundred thirty six barrels of cider were produced that seven barrels per family one writer has remarked that colonial americans drank enough hard cider in a single day to make modern americans woozy for a week they also liked all kinds of elaborate drinks one of the ones that i was interested in is in philadelphia they drank something called a creaming flip which was roast pumpkin mixed together with strong beer and rum mixed altogether with a roast pumpkin and then they would put in a hot iron that would fizz in the in the drink and sort of give it a burnt crispy taste that connoisseurs just loved in any event all of this booze was made possible because of a big trade in rum particularly in new england they would get sugar and molasses from the west indies and bring it up to new england and then refine it in toronto and the room was then sent all around the world that was sent to some extent to africa to buy slaves who would then be sent to the west indies and the west indies would send more sugar and molasses to make more room was all very profitable business there was only one problem a lot of it was smuggled they were suppose to be paying six cents sixpence for every gallon of sugar or molasses that they were getting to be made into rum but no one was paying george grenville who took over as chancellor of the exchequer and had a head for numbers he was really a big clerk in power all of a sudden noticed something he noticed that when it came to enforcing the sugar tax the molasses tax which had everything to do with rum it was costing the king more than it was bringing in so we had a great idea his idea was this they would cut the rump tax that should make the americans happy the molasses tax the sugar tax cut it from six cents per gallon down to three cents a gallon and everybody should be happy the only problem is he planned absolutely to enforce it and this was not popular because all of a sudden there were a number of bureaucrats sent to the new world sent to the colonies who were determined to catch smugglers and part of what was happening here was they were given a financial incentive to do so because the more smugglers you caught the more people that you dragged back to england tried and special admiralty courts no trial by jury is here the.

fifteen years seven barrels nine gallons six gallons
"admiralty court" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"admiralty court" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"And laborious industry for the defense of their country remember i this day told you so that same spirit of freedom which actuated these people at i will accompany them still well his words were celebrated made him a hero throughout the colonies and one phrase that he used he said these sons of liberty that phrase was soon adopted by a number of clubs that had sprung up specifically to resist taxation and the stamp act and what was seen as tyranny by the british one of the things that was so obnoxious about the stamp act and the stamp tax was the payment had to be in hard money which almost doubled its cost and most colonies paper money that had been issued by those colonies was no longer acceptable it felt like the english were determined to take control away from the colonial assemblies and worst of all anybody was found violating any aspect of the stamp tax would be tried not by a jury of his or her peers but would be tried by admiralty courts will what happened was that all of a sudden people who were sent out by the british with oh just shiploads full of stamped paper and were sent to be a stamp collectors here in the new world to try to to make some money out of this thing we're basically treated very very rudely they were hung in effigy on august twenty sixth seventeen sixty five a mob stormed the home of one of the officials of massachusetts the chief justice of the supreme court and lieutenant governor thomas hutchinson who had had his own two sons were supposed to be stamp collectors they tore the wainscoting off the wall smashed his doors chopped down the fruit trees and the garden flung into the street a manuscript of a history of the massachusetts colony and generally terrorized him there were no police officers available regular police officers in cities the army wasn't there to take care of him and basically no one was willing to actually collect collect the stamp tax so what were the british to do we're going to come to blows over this issue we'll explain coming right back freedom one nation in all of human history was built on that bedrock ours a republic of the people by the people and for the people selfgovernment requires freedom justice freedom requires an individual willingness to selfgovern freedom has made america exceptional but it can only last as long as you and i seek the good as expressed by the laws of nature and nature's god it can only last if you and i choose to act as people of character forging character has been the pursuit of hillsdale.

massachusetts supreme court thomas hutchinson america
"admiralty court" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"admiralty court" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"The coming of the revolution why they fought you can't understand why they fought and why they so willingly risked their lives unless you understand one of the crucial mistakes the king george and his ministers made in london right after the french and indian war right after pontiacs rebellion right after they determined that they needed to get the americans to pay their fair share of keeping ten thousand royal troops on north american soil part of the mistake that they made was they touched an area of american life that was absolutely sacred and should have been deemed untouchable i'm not now talking about the church though that was sacred to i'm talking about rum i mean rum was very very serious business for the american colonists so much so that people who have studied the records of consumption at that time have come away scratching their heads in amazement that everybody in north america didn't end up drinking themselves to death according to one historian who's analyzed these figures while precise consumption figures are lacking informed estimates suggest that by the seventeen ninety s an average american over fifteen years old drank just under six gallons of absolute alcohol every year the comparable modern average is less than two point nine gallons per capita there was an amazing consumption of booze and part of that was based on the american idea that it was necessary to drink for your health very often every morning would begin with a stiff drink what do they drink they liked to drink hard cider that was the most popular drink throughout the colonies because people grew apples almost everywhere and you could make hard cider out of that room was a close second now rum was used to celebrate almost every special occasion rum or cider in seventeen sixty seven in middlesex county massachusetts alone thirty three thousand four hundred thirty six barrels of cider were produced that seven barrels per family one writer has remarked that colonial americans drank enough hard cider in a single day to make modern americans woozy for a week they also liked all kinds of elaborate drinks one of the ones that i was interested in is in philadelphia they drank something called a creaming flip which was roast pumpkin mixed together with strong beer and rum mixed all together with a roast pumpkin and then they would put in a hot iron that would fizz in the in the drink and sort of give it a burnt crispy taste that connoisseurs just loved in any event all of this booze was made possible because of a big trade in rum particularly in new england they would get sugar and molasses from the west indies and bring it up to new england and then refine it into rome and the room was then sent all around the world that was sent to some extent to africa to buy slaves who would then be sent to the west indies and the west indies would send more sugar and molasses to make more rum was all very profitable business there was only one problem a lot of it was smuggled they were supposed to be paying six cents sixpence for every gallon of sugar or molasses that they were getting to be made into rum but no one was paying george grenville who took over as chancellor of the exchequer and had a head for numbers he was really a big clerk in power all of a sudden notice something he noticed that when it came to enforcing the sugar tax the molasses tax which had everything to do with rum it was costing the king more than it was bringing in so we had a great idea his idea was this they would cut the tax that should make the americans happy the molasses tax the sugar tax he'd cut it from six cents per gallon down to three cents a gallon and everybody should be happy the only problem is he planned absolutely to enforce it and this was not popular because all of a sudden there were a number of bureaucrats sent to the new world sent to the colonies who were determined to catch smugglers and part of what was happening here was they were given a financial incentive to do so because the more smugglers you caught the more people that you dragged back to england or tried and special admiralty courts no trial by jury is here the.

fifteen years seven barrels nine gallons six gallons
"admiralty court" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"admiralty court" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Defense have exerted a valor amidst their constant and laborious industry for the defense of their country remember this day told you so that same spirit of freedom which actuated these people at i will accompany them still well his words were celebrated it made him a hero throughout the colonies and one phrase that he used he said these sons of liberty that phrase was soon adopted by a number of clubs that had sprung up specifically to resist taxation and the stamp act and what was seen as tyranny by the british one of the things that was so obnoxious about the stamp act and the stamp tax was the payment had to be in hard money which almost doubled its cost in most colonies paper money that had been issued by those colonies was no longer acceptable it felt like the the english were determined to take control away from the colonial assemblies and worst of all anybody was found violating any aspect of a stamp tax would be tried not by a jury of his or her peers but would be tried by admiralty courts well what happened was that all of a sudden people who were sent out by the british with oh just shiploads full of stamped paper and were sent to be a stamp collectors here in the new world to try to to make some money out of this thing were basically treated very very rudely they were hung in effigy on august twenty sixth seventeen sixty five a mob stormed the home of one of the officials of massachusetts the chief justice of the supreme court and lieutenant governor thomas hutchinson who had had his own two sons were supposed to be stamp collectors they tore the wainscoting off the wall smashed his doors chop down the fruit trees in the garden flung into the street a manuscript of a history of the messages colony and generally terrorized him there were no police officers available regular police officers in cities the army wasn't there to take care of him and basically no one was willing to actually collect collect the stamp tax so what were the british to do we're going to come to blows over this issue we'll explain coming right back freedom one nation in all of human history was built on that bedrock ours a republic of the people by the people and for the people selfgovernment requires freedom just as freedom requires an individual willingness to selfgovern freedom has made america exceptional but it can only last as long as you and i seek the good as expressed by the laws of nature and nature's god it can only last if you and i choose to act as people of character forging character has been the pursuit of hillsdale.

massachusetts supreme court thomas hutchinson america
"admiralty court" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"admiralty court" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"Defense have exerted a valor amidst their constant and laborious industry for the defense of their country remember i this day told you so that same spirit of freedom which actuated these people at i will accompany them still well his words were celebrated it made him a hero throughout the colonies and one phrase that he used he said these sons of liberty that phrase was soon adopted by a number of clubs that had sprung up specifically to resist taxation and the stamp act and what was seen as tyranny by the british one of the things that was so obnoxious about the stamp act and the stamp tax was the payment had to be in hard money which almost doubled its cost and most colonies paper money that had been issued by those colonies was no longer acceptable it felt like the english were determined to take control away from the colonial assemblies and worst of all anybody was found violating any aspect of the stamp tax would be tried not by a jury of his or her peers but would be tried by admiralty courts well what happened was that all of a sudden people who were sent out by the british with oh just shiploads full of stamped paper and were sent to be a stamp collectors here in the new world to try to make some money out of this thing we're basically treated very very rudely they were hung in effigy on august twenty sixth seventeen sixty five a mob stormed the home of one of the officials of massachusetts the chief justice of the supreme court and lieutenant governor thomas hutchinson who had had his own two sons were supposed to be stamp collectors they tore the wainscoting off the wall smashed his doors chopped down the fruit trees in the garden flung into the street a manuscript of a history of the massachusetts colony and generally terrorized him there were no police officers available regular police officers and cities the army wasn't there there to take care of him and basically no one was willing to actually collect collect the stamp tax so what were the british to do were going to come to blows over this issue we'll explain coming right back freedom one nation in all of human history was built on that bedrock ours a republic of the people by the people and for the people selfgovernment requires freedom just as freedom requires an individual willingness to selfgovern freedom has made america exceptional but it can only last as long as you and i seek the good as expressed by the laws of nature and nature's god it can only last if you and i choose to act as people of character forging character has been the pursuit of hillsdale.

massachusetts supreme court thomas hutchinson america
"admiralty court" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"admiralty court" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Medved an age sixty am the answer the coming of the revolution why they for you can't understand why they fought and why they so willingly risked their lives unless you understand one of the crucial mistakes that king george and his ministers made in london right after the french and indian war right after pontiacs rebellion right after they determined that they needed to get the americans to pay their fair share of keeping ten thousand royal troops on north american soil part of the mistake that they made was they touched an area of american life that was absolutely sacred and should have been deemed on touchable i'm not now talking about the church though that was sacred to i'm talking about rum i mean rum was very very serious business for the american colonists so much so that people who have studied the records of consumption at that time have come away scratching their heads in amazement that everybody in north america didn't just end up drinking themselves to death according to one historian whose analyze these figures while precise consumption figures are lacking informed estimates suggest that by the seventeen ninety s an average american over fifteen years old drank just under six gallons of absolute alcohol every year the comparable modern average is less than two point nine gallons per capita there was an amazing consumption of booze and part of that was based on the american idea that it was necessary to drink for your health very often every morning would begin with a stiff drink what do they drink they liked to drink hard cider that was the most popular drink throughout the colonies because people grew apples almost everywhere and you could make hard cider out of that room was a close second now rum was used to celebrate almost every special occasion rum or cider in seventeen sixty seven in middlesex county massachusetts alone thirty three thousand four hundred thirty six barrels of cider were produced that seven barrels per family one writer has remarked at colonial americans drank enough hard cider in a single day to make modern americans woozy for a week they also liked all kinds of elaborate drinks one of the ones that i was interested in is in philadelphia they drank something called a creaming flip which was roast pumpkin mixed together with strong beer and rum mixed all together with a roast pumpkin and then they would put in a hot iron that would fizz in the in the drink and sort of give it a burnt crispy taste that connoisseurs just loved in any event all of this booze was made possible because of a big trade in rum particularly in new england they would get sugar and molasses from the west indies and bring it up to new england and then refine it in toronto and the room was then sent all around the world that was sent to some extent to africa to buy slaves who would then be sent to the west indies and the west indies would send more sugar and molasses to make more rum was all a very profitable business there was only one problem a lot of it was smuggled they were suppose to be paying six cents six pence for every gallon of sugar or molasses that they were getting to be made into rum but no one was paying george granville who took over as chancellor of the exchequer and had a head for numbers he was really a big clerk in power all of a sudden noticed something he noticed that when it came to enforcing the sugar tax the molasses tax which had everything to do with rum it was costing the king more than it was bringing in so we had a great idea his idea was this they would cut the rum tax that should make the americans happy the molasses tax the sugar tax cut it from six cents per gallon down to three cents a gallon and everybody should be happy the only problem is he planned absolutely to enforce it and this was not popular because all of a sudden there were a number of bureaucrats sent to the new world sent to the colonies who were determined to catch smugglers and part of what was happening here was they were given a financial incentive to do so because the more smugglers you caught the more people that you drag back to england or tried and special admiralty courts no trial by jury is here the.

Medved fifteen years seven barrels nine gallons six gallons
"admiralty court" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

1170 The Answer

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"admiralty court" Discussed on 1170 The Answer

"Were radio on am eleven seventy the answer am eleven seventy theanswer the coming of the revolution why they fought you can't understand why they fought and why they so willingly risked their lives unless you understand one of the crucial mistakes the king george and his ministers made in london right after the french and indian war right after pontiacs rebellion right after they determined that they needed to get the americans to pay their fair share of keeping ten thousand royal troops on north american soil part of the mistake that they made was they touched an area of american life that was absolutely sacred and should have been deemed untouchable i'm not now talking about the church though that was sacred to i'm talking about rum i mean rum was very very serious business for the american colonists so much so that people who have studied the records of consumption at that time have come away scratching their heads in amazement that everybody in north america didn't just end up drinking themselves to death according to one historian who's analyzing these figures while precise consumption figures are lacking informed estimates suggest that by the seventeen ninety s an average american over fifteen years old drank just under six gallons of absolute alcohol every year the comparable modern average is less than two point nine gallons per capita there was an amazing consumption of booze and part of that was based on the american idea that it was necessary to drink for your health very often every morning would begin with a stiff drink what do they drink they like to drink hard cider that was the most popular drink throughout the colonies because people grew apples almost everywhere and you could make hard cider out of that room was a close second now rum was used to celebrate almost every special occasion rum or cider in seventeen sixty seven in middlesex county massachusetts alone thirty three thousand four hundred thirty six barrels of cider were produced that seven barrels per family one writer has remarked that colonial americans drank enough hard cider in a single day to make modern americans woozy for a week they also liked all kinds of elaborate drinks one of the ones that i was interested in as in philadelphia they drank something called a creaming flip which was roast pumpkin mixed together with strong beer and rum mixed all together with the roast pumpkin and then they would put in a hot iron that would fizz in the in the drink and sort of give it a burnt crispy taste that connoisseurs just loved in any event all of this booze was made possible because of a big trade in rum particularly in new england they would get sugar and molasses from the west indies and bring it up to new england and then refine it in toronto and the room was then sent all around the world it was sent to some extent to africa to buy slaves who would then be sent to the west indies and the west indies would send more sugar and molasses to make more rum it was all a very profitable business there was only one problem a lot of it was smuggled they were suppose to be paying six cents six pants for every gallon of sugar or molasses that they were getting to be made into rum but no one was paying george granville who took over as chancellor of the exchequer and had a head for numbers he was really a big clerk in power all of a sudden noticed something he noticed that when it came to enforcing the sugar tax the molasses tax which had everything to do with rum it was costing the king more than it was bringing in so we had a great idea his idea was this they would cut the rump tax that should make the americans happy the molasses tax the sugar tax he had cut it from six cents per gallon down to three cents a gallon and everybody should be happy the only problem is he planned absolutely to enforce it and this was not popular because all of a sudden there were a number of bureaucrats sent to the new world sent to the colonies who were determined to catch smugglers and part of what was happening here was they were given a financial incentive to do so because the more smugglers you caught the more people that you drag back to england or tried and special admiralty courts no trial by jury is here the.

fifteen years seven barrels nine gallons six gallons
"admiralty court" Discussed on WREK

WREK

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"admiralty court" Discussed on WREK

"And again the fame opposition came up and you know to really interesting thing area advocates of relying on state court when they would put forward their proposals for eliminating federal courts which usually provide an exception so richard relief from virginia proposed that there be no inferior federal court except admiralty court we're ought to be federal admiralty court part that was irving knowledge in this example in thing well we did have the big problem with captors the and so we do need in period of course deal that but it'll be fine otherwise but most of the delegates congress just didn't find that convincing and they thought that the the example of dealing with these cases of capture was really going to be the more typical experience it they rely on state court so that's why i think it it's so important i've never seen it in a textbook but the history of of seafaring um uh and and our experience the trying to deal the cases that arose out of our conflicts with people to other countries really provided a crucial example for the constitutional convention and for the first congress for why they really needed their own federal court in fact you know usually when you read american history textbook tour american government textbooks you know you you get reference to things like shays rebellion instead you know you you have these conflicts and the states clear debtors are sort of taking up arms yet they're states try your debt relief legislation now there's a lot of talk about that driving the creation of the constitution and the mv recreating more powerful national government uh but i really think that this sort of experience at the nra experience with state court defying a federal appellate court and i in cases like the active or are just as important for informing the kind of sinful government that was needed to remedy the defects of the confederation um but yeah madison had this uh had to say algerian this metaphor i think really fit he he said at one point that a government without executive and judicial institutions it's like a body without arms and likes to act of that was really the emphasis for creating a powerful presidency and an extensive fifty even period federal court really carry out federal law directly on pay people and not be reliant on state for exercising federal power it.

virginia congress shays madison federal law richard admiralty court american history nra executive