38 Burst results for "Administrator"

Fresh update on "administrator" discussed on Sterling

Sterling

00:31 min | 57 min ago

Fresh update on "administrator" discussed on Sterling

"Actions on Corona virus relief, criticizing the move as inadequate to meet Americans need. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, expressing concern that jobless Americans may still wait weeks for unemployment assistance, saying on ABC is this week. It's so put together in a crazy way, if he just would have renewed the $600 We do in the hero's bill through January, things would flow smoothly. The renewal of that expanded assistance, which expired in July, has been a sticking point for members of Congress. Schumer said Sunday that he and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi remain ready to resume relief bill negotiations. Adam Kelsey ABC NEWS Washington In Ohio Corona virus cases increased by 879 with one additional fatality and 49 hospitalizations in Good news, 78,435 Ohio wins Are presumed to be recovered and is Kentucky going to be implementing a curfew on bars and restaurants similar to Ohio Governor Mike DeWine's governor into Bashir says the state can't expect new guidance on Monday. Bashir says details haven't been finalized, but capacity will likely increase again to 50% inside the curfew could be said at the same time of 10 o'clock. PM This afternoon, Bashir did report 425 new cases in the state. Nine of those new Corona virus cases were from Children aged five and younger. Along with new cases, there was one new fatality. That raises the death toll in the state to 773. In good news, the governor says Kentucky is ending the week with about 330 fewer cases than the previous week. And more humanitarian aid is being sent to Lebanon following last week's explosion in Beirut, the acting administrator for the U. S Agency for International Development, John Barsa, will travel to Beirut this week to meet with the agency's response team that's been deployed to Lebanon to assist the country coinciding with farces trip is the arrival of a more than $15 million a package that includes food and medical supplies. As the Lebanese government has been plagued with allegations of widespread corruption. The U. S says thie aid will be routed through local partners like the American University of Beirut and the Lebanese American University. Margaret Malard ABC News Our Next updates at seven I'm Sarah. Least, news Radio 700 wlw. Honey, I'm.

Chuck Schumer Bashir Ohio Beirut American University Of Beirut Kentucky ABC Lebanon Lebanese Government Congress Lebanese American University Margaret Malard Adam Kelsey House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Mike Dewine Washington Acting Administrator John Barsa
Ethnic Studies: Born in the Bay Area From History's Biggest Student Strike

Morning Edition

06:50 min | 2 d ago

Ethnic Studies: Born in the Bay Area From History's Biggest Student Strike

"Legislation earlier this summer that would require all incoming freshman at Cal State universities to taken ethnic studies class listener. Michael Variety asked our Bay curious team this question I've heard that there was actually a revolution in the Bay Area for an ethnic studies field. Is this true? And how did it happen? The short answer. Yes, it's true. Reporter assault A sonnet. Poor tells us how it went down during the longest student strike in US history. It was November of 1968. The US was 13 years into the Vietnam War. American soldiers hiking their way through the sweaty jungles of South Vietnam, searching for enemy Martin Luther King had been assassinated earlier that year, and the Black Panther Party demanded systemic change for black communities plagued by poverty and police brutality. That's what black students at San Francisco State wanted to bury. Proves to be a member ofthe last. This is Nesbitt Crutchfield. He started studying at San Francisco State in 1967 and soon joined the black student union. It was the very 1st 1 in the country. It was very clear to me that Black soon Union representative. Very progressive. Among black spoons at state among black students in the very but just a small percentage of black students went to SF State admission rates for minority students had dwindled down to just 4%. Even those 70% of students in the SF Unified School District for from minority backgrounds is a black person you expected for all intensive purposes. To be one of the very few black people in whatever classroom laboratory auditorium. The U. N was overwhelmingly white. Amidst that whiteness black students were hungry to study their own history. The black student union had been pushing the university to create a black studies department for nearly three years. But administrators resisted the idea. was an era of young people asking questions and want to transform their communities. Jason Ferreira is a professor in the Department of Race and Resistance at San Francisco State College of ethnic studies. And that impulse that That hunger to transform one's communities is actually what forms the basis of ethnic studies. It's around this time that Penny no. Okatsu was grappling with her own questions about race and identity. We want Asian Americans, then we were Orientals. An Oriental is a term that was imposed on us by the largest society, so starting to use the term Asian American was a way of taking back er. Our own destiny. Henny became a member of a student organization called the Asian American Political Alliance. It was just one of many ethnic student organizations popping up on campus and an early fall of 1968. These organizations banded together in formed a coalition, the Third World Liberation Front. And at that particular time, third world referred to the Non Aligned Countries are cultures in Asia, Africa and Latin America. It was synonymous with how we might use people of color today. English professor and Black Panther. George Murray was one of San Francisco state's most influential anti Vietnam organizers. Students loved Murray, but his outspoken politics didn't sit well with us of state administrators. The war in Vietnam is racist. That is the law that crackers like Johnson are using black soldiers and poor white soldiers of Mexican soldiers as dupes and fools to fight against people of color. In Vietnam. The board of trustees fired Murray over Comment like this one on November 1st 1968 5 days later, the black student union and the Third World Liberation Front joined together and went on strength in aspic, Crutchfield says Despite coming from different backgrounds, the strikers had a clear goal. I wanted to find out and be educated about ourselves, and we could not get that the nobody getting educated Initially, strikers did things like cherry bombs in toilets and check out tons of books at once in order to overwhelm the school's library system, But almost immediately, administrators invited police on campus. Jason Ferreira says they swarmed the school armed with five foot batons. Students responded by throwing rocks and cursing out the police. Police came down heavy hard, and they just began cracking skulls Strikers carried on anyway. Penny No. Okatsu was protesting on January 23rd 1969. In what many call the mass bust. Two lines of police came up and basically surrounded the over 500 people who were there for the rally and tracked all of the individuals who are part with that net police charged at students, Penny says it was one of the bloodiest and most frightening days of the entire strike. That was a military movement, literally a practice orchestrated military movement. Hundreds were arrested. Virtually all of the individuals arrested head Tio spend some jail time. There are real consequences to having participated in that event. It's up two more months. But eventually in March, administrators and strikers negotiated a deal after five months of protesting the school agreed to many striker demands. They promised to accept virtually all non white applicants for fall of 1969 and they agreed to establish a college of ethnic studies, the first in the country. Class is about communities of color. Ethnic studies is a way of embracing all of the cultures that make up not just this country, but with the world. And if we don't understand each other, how we're going to get along. I'm a solace on before the news For more details

San Francisco Vietnam Third World Liberation Front George Murray Penny Black Panther Party Nesbitt Crutchfield Jason Ferreira San Francisco State College Of Black Panther Okatsu United States Professor Bay Area Sf Unified School District Martin Luther King Assault Michael Variety Reporter
Fresh update on "administrator" discussed on Silicon Valley Insider with Keith Koo

Silicon Valley Insider with Keith Koo

01:41 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "administrator" discussed on Silicon Valley Insider with Keith Koo

"News this hour from town. Hold on. Mon drones. President Trump has ordered a ban on two popular but suspect perhaps due to their connections with China. President Trump has zeroed in on two controversial smartphone app, Tic TAC, and we chat with executive orders that band transactions with the Chinese owners of those APS. Based on reports the apse share personal information of users with China's communist government wanted teeth of Peter's. The bands take effect in 45 days, but there are legal gaps and there is expected litigation against those orders. Meanwhile, Microsoft is in talks to buy parts of TIC Tac. U. S colleges asking Returning students TTO help promise to contain the Corona virus that means no parties, no long road trips and no outside guests on campus. Administrator's warn that figure to wear mass practice social distancing and avoid mass gatherings could bring some serious consequences that includes getting booted from school. Also a townhall dot com Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will be traveling to Central and Eastern Europe in the coming week. White House correspondent Greg Clugston without report during a week long trip to four countries. Pompeo will discuss efforts to counter Russian and Chinese influence in the region and talk about US troop deployments on the continent. The State Department says the secretary will visit the Czech Republic, Slovenia, Austria and Poland. The trip comes as the Pentagon prepares to redeploy thousands of American troops from Germany. PO is also expected to raise US concerns about countries allowing the Chinese telecom giant wall away into their five jean networks. Greg Clugston Washington officials in an earthquake has shaken much of North Carolina, rattling homes, buildings and residents. The National Weather Service in Greenville says the 5.1 magnitude temblor stock Sparta at 807 a m local time following a much smaller quake several hours earlier. It was the largest quakes it's 1916 to hit the state. Morally stories at townhall dot com. I'm the United States searching General Jerome atoms, America's doctor and all across our nation. We've taken steps together to slow the spread of Corona virus. Now we must continue to take personal responsibility to protect ourselves and our loved ones because even though not all of us risked a severe case of Corona virus, we all risk getting it and spreading it to others. Maybe without even realizing that we're sick. So if we want to get back to school back to work back to.

United States Tic Tac President Trump Mike Pompeo China Greg Clugston Washington Greg Clugston White House Correspondent Microsoft State Department Administrator Greenville Earthquake Communist Government North Carolina Secretary Eastern Europe Pentagon
Montana Counties To Conduct Primary Election By Mail

America's First News

01:28 min | 2 d ago

Montana Counties To Conduct Primary Election By Mail

"Montana, meanwhile, becoming the latest to permit all male voting in November as a way to limit the spread of Corona virus Governor Steve Bullock issuing that order on Thursday. Is increasingly unlikely that the pandemic will fully abated by November, such a traditional in person voting. Won't pose a significant risk to public health and human safety. Additionally, Our election administrators are county clerks and recorders found with 2020 June primary was successful that it was quote, streamlined, accurate. It is safest possible. Under the current pandemic. It only makes sense that we start preparing now to ensure that no Montana and will have to choose between their vote. Or their health. They didn't have two in June. And they shouldn't have to in November there force we did for the June primary. Issuing a directive today to allow counties the choice to conduct a

Montana Steve Bullock
Fresh update on "administrator" discussed on America First

America First

01:06 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "administrator" discussed on America First

"For Peter's. The bands take a fact in 45 days, but there are legal gaps and there is expected litigation against those orders. Meanwhile, Microsoft is in talks to buy parts of TIC Tac. U. S colleges asking Returning students TTO help promise to contain the Corona virus that means no parties, no long road trips and no outside guests on campus. Administrator's warned that figure to wear mass practice social distancing and avoid mass gatherings could bring some serious consequences that includes getting booted from school. Also a townhall dot com Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will be traveling to Central and Eastern Europe in the coming week. White House correspondent Greg Clugston without report during a week long trip to four countries. Pompeo will discuss efforts to counter Russian and Chinese influence in the region and talk about US troop deployments on the continent. The State Department says the secretary will visit the Czech Republic, Slovenia, Austria and Poland. The trip comes as the Pentagon prepares to redeploy thousands of American troops from Germany. PO is also expected to raise US concerns about countries allowing the Chinese telecom giant wall away into their five G networks. Greg Clugston, Washington officials say an earthquake has shaken much of North Carolina, rattling homes, buildings and residents. National Weather Service in Greenville says the 5.1 magnitude temblor stark Sparta at 807 a M local time following a much smaller quake several hours earlier. It was the largest quake since 1916 to hit the state. Morally stories at townhall dot com. I am United States searching general to Rome atoms, America's doctor and all across our nation. We've taken steps together to slow the spread of Corona virus. Now we must continue to take personal responsibility to protect ourselves and our loved ones because even though not all of us risked a severe case of Corona virus, we all risk getting it and spreading it to others. Maybe without even realizing that we're sick. So if we want to get back to school, backto work, backto worship and backto overall health there things our country needs to do..

Greg Clugston Mike Pompeo United States Tic Tac Peter White House Correspondent State Department Microsoft Administrator Secretary North Carolina Eastern Europe Pentagon Greenville Czech Republic U. S Germany National Weather Service
Philadelphia - Gov. Wolf recommends, but does not order, postponement of K-12 youth sports in Pennsylvania until 2021

KYW 24 Hour News

01:13 min | 2 d ago

Philadelphia - Gov. Wolf recommends, but does not order, postponement of K-12 youth sports in Pennsylvania until 2021

"People with any connection to pre K through high school and recreational youth sports are now scrambling. Because Governor Tom Wolfe wants them sidelined at least until January 2021. Hey, Y W. Suburban Bureau chief Jim Elwood reports the announcement just about everyone by surprise, including the P I double, which oversees Scholastic Sports in Pennsylvania. Their board of directors met in the afternoon. They say they're tremendously disappointed in the decision and roll reconvene to address it. The governor's comment came in the very last line of a nearly 40 minute press briefing, mostly focused on covert 19 testing. The guidance from US recommendation is that we don't do any sports until January 1st. About five hours later, the governor's office clarified that Comments, saying it's not an order or a mandate but a quote strong recommendation coming from both the Pennsylvania Department of Education and the Department of Health. The governor says the recommendation applies to all K through 12 and youth rec league sports. But he says the final decision on sports should be made by administrators and locally elected school boards. The governor says this does not apply to collegiate or professional sports just last week that I put out guidance for each ball sport, saying the plan was designed offer flexibility for each school district. Rather than one size fits all

Scholastic Sports Governor Tom Wolfe United States Pennsylvania Department Of Edu Bureau Chief Jim Elwood Pennsylvania Department Of Health
Barrow County, North of Atlanta moves to all-virtual instruction after 90 staff members forced to quarantine

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:39 sec | 3 d ago

Barrow County, North of Atlanta moves to all-virtual instruction after 90 staff members forced to quarantine

"There's been a big change of plans for a North Georgia school district amid Corona virus, CBS News correspondent Jim Chris Ula administrators of Barrel County, Georgia schools have decided to begin the year entirely online since more than 90 staff members. I've been quarantined because of covert 19 exposure or infection. The school system 50 miles northeast of Atlanta, head plan to have both in person classes and distance learning. When the school year begins August 17th nearly 300 employees of Gwinnett Public schools in suburban Atlanta tested positive or were possibly exposed to Corona virus. Classes there in the state's largest school system are scheduled to start next Wednesday. Jim Krystle, a CBS

North Georgia School District Atlanta Jim Krystle Jim Chris Ula Gwinnett Public Schools Corona Cbs News CBS Barrel County Georgia
Getting Naked in San Francisco: A History

Bay Curious

04:01 min | 3 d ago

Getting Naked in San Francisco: A History

"Who other than reporter just plot check could take on this not safe for work assignment off she goes from. The state of California has indecent exposure laws, but those only apply if someone is being sexual like masturbating in public or intentionally offensive flashing someone. But what if you're just hanging out naked minding your own business? California leaves that up to local governments. For the first half of the Twentieth Century San Francisco didn't have public nudity laws. FRISKIN S- just didn't go nude much but then the sixties arrived and with it naked people. Some saw disrobing as a form of political artistic or personal expression college students got a taste for streaking and then there were the hippies. It's just delightful to be in I'll be in and that's what this is another exotic prank to add to a growing list of student oriented rites of Spring. It's sort of a happy happening for hippies in San Francisco hippies wanted to get closer to nature and they got naked a lot in golden gate park. Here's a quote from police chief. Thomas Hill it wasn't uncommon for a Gal that come out of the bushes there in the. Panhandle. Without a damn stitch and stand right in front of you with our hands up. I was out in the park in two started going to it on the lawn beside me just to remind you sex is sexual and as such already illegal according to the state. But still conservatives wanted tougher local laws to prevent this kind of behavior and they eventually got nudity banned in the parks. However, the rest of San Francisco was still fair game. As time passed other cities made public nudity illegal among them, San Jose, and Berkeley Berkeley's interesting because it's been mostly due to one naked Guy Andrew Martinez a student at the University of California Berkeley. Decided that American society is sexually repressed and in an effort to write things he began attending classes and going everywhere else in the nude save for a pair of sandals backpack people theorized that Martinez was able to go nude without major complaint for so long because he was easy on the is Martinez attempted shock tactic soon, became old news among his fellow students to me was simply the naked guy. Administrators however sent Martinez home to stay warm until his case can be considered by a student conduct board in Nineteen ninety-two Martinez was expelled showed up naked to his disciplinary hearing at UC. Then in one, thousand, nine, hundred, three here arrived naked to a Berkeley city council meeting members were offended and voted to make public nudity a misdemeanor crime. Back in San Francisco Nudist, enjoy their time in the Sun City developed a reputation for bodies in the buff especially at certain public events like folsom street fair a leather fetish festival or Beta breakers of rambunctious twelve k race who was an exhilarating experience people on the sidelines cheering. Go naked people go. All right. This is a rich Pasco in nineteen, ninety eight he started running naked in Beta breakers. Pasco is also the coordinator of the Bay Area Nature rests we're group of people who believe that the human body is God's divine creation nothing to be ashamed of, and that our interaction with Mother Nature is enhanced by removing the barrier of clothing. POSCO says it wasn't just public events where people could let it all hang out there also newt approved beaches in certain places where nudists would congregate lose a group of people in San Francisco who thought that going new to Jane Warner Plaza would be a good idea. It's that plaza in the Castro with a few benches where the streetcar stops, it's a little urban park. In this little urban park became an urban nude beach,

San Francisco Guy Andrew Martinez Golden Gate Park California Pasco University Of California Berke Reporter Thomas Hill Berkeley Berkeley Berkeley Bay Area Nature Jane Warner Plaza Panhandle Castro San Jose UC Posco Coordinator Newt
Ex-UCLA gynecologist now facing 20 felony charges for allegedly sexually assaulting 7 patients in Los Angeles

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:57 sec | 4 d ago

Ex-UCLA gynecologist now facing 20 felony charges for allegedly sexually assaulting 7 patients in Los Angeles

"Of 23. Is being accused of covering up the alleged sexual assault of women by his former gynecologist. An attorney representing more than 100 accusers of James Heaps tells connects, the doctor could not have acted alone. Women would go in there for cancer treatment and suffered sexual. So how could that have happened? He was the highest paid position in the UC system. It deserves an investigation. It deserves a search warrant. It's not just Dr Heaps did this. He had help. Attorney John Manley says he's now calling on the state attorney general and L, a district attorney to investigate for what it knew and when, so it's really important in my view that the D A. And the attorney general, investigate this and it's there was criminality by these administrators and Doctors in charge that they beheld accountable. It's really simple. The fact that that hasn't happened, I find disturbing. Prosecutors just tacked on an additional 17 sexual assault charges against heaps for a total of 20 and we've reached out to both the ages.

James Heaps Attorney Assault John Manley
Chicago Public Schools Expected To Announce Plan For Only Remote Learning; Chicago Teachers Union Had Called For Possible Strike Vote

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:28 sec | 5 d ago

Chicago Public Schools Expected To Announce Plan For Only Remote Learning; Chicago Teachers Union Had Called For Possible Strike Vote

"Public School administrators getting criticism for its stated plan to use the hybrid model of remote learning and in class instructor in this fall. Now unarmed, Named Source tells W. B bm today that the House of delegates within the Chicago Teachers Union Plans to hold a meeting next week to discuss the possibility of a strike vote in order to pressure the mayor in school leaders to start the year with remote learning district supposed, spokesperson insists administrators have not yet made a final decision about how the school year will begin.

Public School Chicago Teachers Union Instructor
COVID-19 testing and contact tracing key for safely reopening schools, two new studies suggest

Anderson Cooper 360

06:42 min | 5 d ago

COVID-19 testing and contact tracing key for safely reopening schools, two new studies suggest

"Some classrooms begin to open the US Dr Anthony Fauci said today that schools should proceed with caution and make safety a priority down. She also said that students need the psychological nutritional benefits and pretending in person classes although acknowledges that parents have to quote. Dramatically modified their work schedule this as we touched on earlier, two new studies suggesting scaled up testing and contact tracing of those who test positive being key factors in any school reopening. To professionals who are facing these issues in different dates. Becky stone is the director of Alcoa City schools in Tennessee and Brian Woods Superintendent of the northside independent school district in San Antonio Texas, appreciate both of you for for being here tonight Becky the for the first day back to school in your area. Tennessee was July twenty second week and a half ago you. I know you've had four confirmed coronavirus cases. You expect so many. So soon and and how you responded that how does that change thing? Is. When we decided that we were going to open wing knew that we would have cases We unfortunately didn't go into it thinking that. No one was going to get sick because lots goes on those folks are going to get sick if they're in school or not but the first one we had was Just right. After we opened school and we met together and as attain. We did our contact tracing and because I felt like we had some really good protocols in place we really didn't the exposure was very limited and the second time it happened was last week and again I feel like because of the protocols we have in place in the safeguards there was very little exposure Interesting that that you're doing your own contact trae saying as a school That's a that's obviously a smart thing to do given the problems we're seeing with contract tracing on kind of you know on the large scale. Bryan Texas you're facing a different timelines. Schools haven't opened yet in your district, but once they do they'll be required to have full person learning after the first eight weeks. I correct me if I'm wrong on that do you think that timeline will allow you to keep your students and teachers say It's a good question and it's one that I hope we don't have to contemplate obviously our preferences not to have a a set timeline but rather to allow a local school leaders in elected boards of trustees to make decisions about what safe for their students in their staff. So a it is concerning to us that we have kind of an arbitrary time line of eight weeks, and then whoever wants to be back in the building. Ganvie. Becky I. Knew Your district did stagger started with students coming in for in person classes I think only one day week, which means I, think he'd only have a twenty percent occupancy at any given time. How is that working out? What are the difficulties? That you're finding just for other educators who are out there. That's true. We have about we're a small district. We only have about twenty, two, hundred students system wide good part. We're all on one campus with four schools on one campus we did decide. For. An option our our students could also choose to do all online and to do virtual learning. So when we say we brought in twenty percent, it's a little bit less than that because of those virtual learning students who are already online, but we did we stagger. So students are in school one day a week, and then they do digital learning the next four days until they come back to their in person day and it's worked out very well for US I can say. Got Of great feedback from parents teachers from other from administrators It does create some difficulty and you touched on that a second ago parents. It creates a difficulty for parents and I understand that and we want to be sensitive to that. But at the same time we thought why with the pressure to open, this is the only way that we could open safely and that was our first priority, and if if I know with contact tracing if a classroom if the student has positive. What happens in terms of quarantining D- do does the teacher they were in touch with does that person have to then leave school does the classroom what happens? Well. Again, because we open with such small numbers, it's very easy for classes to social distance and so Alvar staff are required to wear masks all times. Our students are not required. They six through twelve. We have strongly suggested that they wear and then pre K. through five. We have suggested that they wear if they're going to be in close groups. However. It's been good because most all students are wearing mask as well. But again, a classroom if a student test positive. There may only be for their students in that class right and they've been distance, and so when you do the contact tracing, what we have found is that very few of them have been in close contact for ten minutes or more within six feet of one another, and so the exposure has been very limited and most of the time both have on mass. So they can continue come to school and the teachers continue coming to school. Even though they they've. Been in the area of of a student, but not for a prolonged time. That's correct. Now, the student that tests positive obviously would corentin for fourteen days. Okay and and then anyone else that we find that may have been in close contact with that person and may have some exposure. They would also contain for the fourteen days. Brian's Brian the guidance for Best Practices for schools has been a moving target of both federal and state levels of Texas Office of in a hot spot for the virus in recent weeks how has that changed your plans and preparations have? It's changed dramatically when we surveyed our families in early June, we had about three quarters who indicated they wanted to come back for in person learning than we sent the same survey out in mid-july that was down more like a third, and so it has altered plans dramatically unfortunately in Texas we've had constantly shifting state. As well, and so I don't honestly know which version of the plan were on at this point I lost track a long time ago. But the the prevalence of the viruses. Shifted our plans but I feel good that we got a good plan on. Nimble plan. Going forward, and we'll be able to serve families either in the building or in distance learning well O'Brian woods and becky stone I appreciate can't imagine how difficult it is to be an educator right now and not appreciate all you're doing. Thank you very much.

Brian Woods Tennessee Northside Independent School D Becky Stone United States Dr Anthony Fauci Becky San Antonio Texas Becky I. Texas Bryan Texas Trae Alcoa City Superintendent Director Alvar Texas Office
Nasa SpaceX crew return: Dragon capsule splashes down

Joe Pags

00:54 sec | Last week

Nasa SpaceX crew return: Dragon capsule splashes down

"Space six crew dragon space capsule successfully returned to work splashed out NASA astronauts Bob Banchan and Doug Hurley splashed down in the Gulf of Mexico near Pensacola, Florida After two months aboard the international space station, the crew's separated from the space station Saturday night and slowly drifted toward reentry. Less than an hour before splashdown. The space six capsule began firing its rockets to slow down and after re entering the atmosphere, the parachutes were deployed, bringing the crew to the water at a gentle 15 miles an hour. ABC is Mark Millar that water landing moved from the Atlantic to the Gulf because of tropical tropical storm storm impacting impacting Florida's Florida's East East Coast. Coast. Our Our tipped tipped in in the the administrator administrator for for ST ST Lucie Lucie County County says says even even as as it it passes passes strong strong tropical tropical storm storm conditions conditions are are still likely along the barrier islands with tropical storm conditions in many passing squalls. Expect that storm to head right up the coast

St St Lucie Lucie County Count East Coast Florida Gulf Administrator Doug Hurley Pensacola Nasa Bob Banchan Mark Millar Mexico ABC Atlantic
NASA keeping close eye on Hurricane Isaias ahead of bringing astronauts back to Earth

Kim Komando

00:45 sec | Last week

NASA keeping close eye on Hurricane Isaias ahead of bringing astronauts back to Earth

"The threatening weather, NASA says the weather looks good for a Sunday afternoon splash down in the Gulf of Mexico near Panama City, Florida It'll be the first water landing for Astronauts in 45 years. Doug Hurley and Bob Benton took part in a farewell ceremony today at the International Space Station hours ahead of their plans. Departure on a space X Dragon capsule. NASA Administrator Jim Brian Steen making an appearance on Fox's Neil Cavuto live discussing what would happen if the crew can't undock from the international space station tonight. We're not gonna undock and unless we're very sure that they're going to be able to return as planned, that's number one number two. If something happens if there's Anomaly or something. We have about 36 hours of life support so they could continue orbiting for a period of time.

Nasa International Space Station Administrator Jim Brian Steen Doug Hurley Panama City Bob Benton Neil Cavuto Mexico Florida
Crane collapses in Indian shipyard, killing 11 workers

The Pittsburgh Property Diva Hour

00:29 sec | Last week

Crane collapses in Indian shipyard, killing 11 workers

"A huge crane has collapsed during low testing at government run Hindustan Shipyard in southern India, killing at least 11 workers. Television footage showed the new crane hitting the ground with full force and breaking into pieces Saturday at the shipyard. A port city in the port city in and drop reddish state a district government administrators said Most of the victims were contract laborers. Five workers were hospitalized with injuries. The cause of the accident is being

Hindustan Shipyard India
More Than 6600 Coronavirus Cases Have Been Linked to U.S. Colleges

KYW 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | Last week

More Than 6600 Coronavirus Cases Have Been Linked to U.S. Colleges

"Increasing number of covert 19 cases among college students. School administrators looked to those red solo cups and think they know why college students partying is believed to be fueling a growing number of Corona virus outbreaks at least 40 members of fraternities at the University of Southern California Have tested positive for covert. 19 A cluster of cases at Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois, has been linked to an off campus party. Colorado State University and Rutgers have suspended football team workouts after several players tested positive for Corona virus. Jim

University Of Southern Califor Colorado State University Bradley University Peoria JIM Rutgers Illinois Football
More Than 6600 Coronavirus Cases Have Been Linked to U.S. Colleges

KYW 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | Last week

More Than 6600 Coronavirus Cases Have Been Linked to U.S. Colleges

"An increasing number of covert 19 cases among college students and school administrators think they know why college students partying is believed to be fueling a growing number of Corona virus outbreaks. At least 40 members of fraternities at the University of Southern California have tested positive for covert 19 a cluster of cases at Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois. Has been linked to an off campus party. Colorado State University and Rutgers have suspended football team workouts after several players tested positive for Corona virus. Jim Krystle, a

University Of Southern Califor Jim Krystle Bradley University Colorado State University Peoria Illinois Rutgers Football
Delivering on the Promise of Safer, Smarter Surgery with Timothy Lant

Outcomes Rocket

05:24 min | Last week

Delivering on the Promise of Safer, Smarter Surgery with Timothy Lant

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Sal Marquez here and thank you for tuning in. Again I have the privilege of hosting Tim Lance today. He's the president and Chief Operating Officer at Care Syntax before that Tim was also the Senior Vice President and general manager at Sentry Data, systems, and previous to that managing. Director of supply chain. Academy, he's had multiple leadership roles across the healthcare. Industry and today he gonNA be talking to us more about health technology and what they're doing to impact global healthcare markets with their work at Care Syntax Tim such a pleasure to have you here with us today. Thank you. It's great to be here. I appreciate you having me. Absolutely. So before we get into the work that you guys do at Care Syntax me a little. Bit about you and what inspires your work in healthcare. Yeah happy to so you know for me it's a it's been an interesting journey into healthcare. I think a lot of people get into healthcare sometimes because their parents are involved in was no exception to that. So my mother is a clinician she was in healthcare for thirty years and I learned from a very. Early, age how important it was to have a well-functioning high quality, affordable healthcare system in any community that I also got to see how complex it was for my mom both as a clinician as administrator and healthcare I watched a lot of challenges that she faced and so I promised myself that I would never work healthcare and graduated from college I immediately started working in healthcare. And You know I think today you know almost twenty years later now right would. Kinda keeps. ME excited and getting up every morning. Excited about what we're doing is you I experienced firsthand during my time spent several years with with your on healthcare and I worked in the frontline. Saw You know I'm not a clinician but I worked side by side with doctors and nurses and social workers and case managers to try to improve communication and coordination and clinical care inside seen firsthand how complex it is and how difficult it is. But critical it is to you know to our communities into our societies and in some ways I. think it's a it's a little bit how I feel about golf right as you can have A. kind of a a tough rounding Gulf. But you have that one magical shot met keeps coming back for more in healthcare little bit that same way. I think we tend to fixate sometimes on all the problems and healthcare. But then you are on the front lines and you watch how you can save a life writer keep a family together bring somebody back from the brink of death and I think there's no greater thing that that I'd want to spend my time doing than than trying to increase the number of great shots that we have in our healthcare system. So love at your those those winds that keep you in the game for the long haul. And so I, appreciate you sharing that. Plenty of like I'm not GonNa get a nail care you graduate. You're, in. Healthcare. I there's something about something magnetic about the purposeful kind of impact. You could have in health care and I and I share that with yeah and I think a lot of listeners share that with us Tim, and so tell us about care syntax and what you guys are doing add value to the healthcare ecosystem. Yes. So I think care syntax is we're very focused on. Surgery and on the or which I think in some respects especially in the US a little bit is oftentimes I don't WanNa say overlooked. But when we think about population health and a lot of the trends in the last ten years and we tend to hear a lot about chronic disease management and end of life care in these kinds of things and we're very. Focused on surgery, which you know if you take a step back, you know it's a, it's not the majority of cases in our healthcare system, but it is certainly the majority of revenue in the healthcare system for most hospitals comes out of the or and it's also a place where from a quality standpoint you know a lot of quality problems can begin. In the or you know if those surgeries aren't optimal. So this is where we've chosen to focus and you know in our vision as a business is to really enable caregivers to save lives on specifically for us. Kind of Our big vision is millions of lives around the world you know to be saved through use of our technology by by those. Caregivers at the frontline. So that's really really where we're focused and the think You always think about adding value to the ecosystem I, like to look at it in a couple of ways but I think the thing that makes us really unique that we've you know we've chosen to look holistically at the healthcare ecosystem and within that world of of the or. And try to look at stakeholder alignment. So you have kind of your clinical stakeholders, financial stakeholders, stakeholders, and operations, and supply chain, and then obviously the patient. So we really try to look with our technology at how we can bring those key stakeholders together right and drive convergence there, and then we do the same thing around the process side. So looking at kind of that end end process of what it takes to deliver a high quality safe. Surgery and so you've got you know operational components, throughput capacity management logistics supplies, and then you've got quality and safety, and then you have all the analytics learning and Research and development that comes on the back end in that sort of trust creates a continuous cycle. Then that's really where we look to add the most business value is by bringing those stakeholders together and by creating value, not just one small facet but looking at how can create. Value

Tim Lance President And Chief Operating Senior Vice President And Gene Sal Marquez Sentry Data Director United States Golf Administrator Writer
NASA reveals how Perseverance is doing as it hurtles toward Mars

Hugh Hewitt

00:34 sec | Last week

NASA reveals how Perseverance is doing as it hurtles toward Mars

"NASA administrator Jim Brighton, Stein says shortly after it's Thursday morning lift off the Mars rover perseverance went into a safe mode. After a temperature alarm. There was also a communication glitch. We do need Tio No. Fine tune our receiving stations on the ground, but both have been resolved. If all goes well. The rover will land on Mars in February and pick up a rock samples to be retrieved in 2026. China and the United Arab Emirates also have spacecraft and route to Mars after launching last

Mars Nasa Administrator United Arab Emirates Jim Brighton Stein China
Philadelphia - Wolf says state has no plans to tell schools how, when to reopen

KYW 24 Hour News

01:06 min | Last week

Philadelphia - Wolf says state has no plans to tell schools how, when to reopen

"Wolf says the Commonwealth is leaving leaving the the decision decision of of how how and and when when school's school's really really open open up up to to the the local local boards boards as as we've we've seen seen here here in in Philadelphia. Philadelphia. Hey, Hey, what what abuse abuse Suburban Suburban bureau bureau chief chief Jim Jim Mel Mel Word Word tells tells us us that that there there are are no no easy easy answers. answers. However, However, Governor, Governor, Wolf Wolf says says While the state has offered guidance on how to safely reopen schools, there is no plan to issue a statewide mandate on how schools will open. There's your local school board decisions asses how they open. In the open. It's it's up to them to decide how they're gonna do away kinds of things. Some school administrators say the guidance from the states put them in a difficult spot, for example, desks being six feet apart, where feasible parents who want their Children in school point to where feasible, But staff for parents who were concerned it's not safe are pointing to the six feet. Montgomery County Commissioner Dr Barker says she and the county's office of Public Health have made themselves accessible to school boards. Now them address safety issues that may be outside their expertise We have conveyed to them That whatever those school boards, and those were the elected school board officials who have the responsibility of making the decision for their individual district at the suburban bureau, Jim Mel, work edible you news radio.

Wolf Wolf Jim Jim Mel Mel Philadelphia Jim Mel Bureau Chief Commissioner Dr Barker Commonwealth Montgomery County
Palo Alto Unified Middle, High Schoolers to Get Later School Start Times

KCBS Radio Morning News

01:04 min | Last week

Palo Alto Unified Middle, High Schoolers to Get Later School Start Times

"Schools and high schools in California on a path to later start times. You may remember that Bill passed last year before all this stuff started. KCBS Keith Man Cockney reports for one school district on the peninsula. The pandemic is pushing up the timeline for the time change when the false school term starts, middle and high school students in the Palo Alto Unified School District will be starting their school days. No. Earlier. 9 a.m. It's a school board decision that reflects widespread concern that the early start for schools is cutting into students much needed sleep time. Still in any other year, this change probably would have been a harder sell. But with virtual learning said to return. There's a little more flexibility in the schedule, says District Superintendent John Austin was so many things thrown at us that we can't control start times are completely within our control. So we thought if there's ever a time to test assumptions and give something to try, this is this is the year so with a lot of unknowns and a lot to be learned, he says administrators We'll be taking notes in the Silicon Valley Bureau Keith Man, Cockney KCBS coming up

Palo Alto Unified School Distr Keith Man Cockney John Austin Keith Man Bill Superintendent California
F5 Networks "Big-IP" devices in Big-Trouble

Security Now

07:01 min | Last week

F5 Networks "Big-IP" devices in Big-Trouble

"At the very end of last month, I think it was June thirtieth. F Five networks released a critical. Patch for their so called big IP systems. It was a maximum. Eighty as the way, it was termed remote code execution flaw. Disclosed it don't get worse. than their so called. Tm You I the traffic management user interface of the big Ip, which is actually you know like a trademark. I don't know what it stands for Ip Internet Protocol that big. Maybe it's Ad for something other than just big. Their application delivery controller ADC big on initials here. Anyway this came to light. As a consequence of F. Five publishing this patch. And with it was an urgent call for users of the so called big IP systems to immediately update with the highest possible priority. and. Big Big. Big Big Ip's f five's customers using these big IP solutions, our government's fortune. Five hundred firms banks service providers well known brands, including Microsoft Oracle and Facebook I. Mean You know this is big iron? So as we noted at the time, F five's website boasts that forty eight of the fortune fifty rely on five so somehow they missed two of the top fifty companies in the US. And at the time of the disclosure. So not quite, but almost a month ago. More than eight thousand of these big IP F five networks devices were found online. Publicly accessible on the Internet and vulnerable to attacks designed to exploit this vulnerability, US Cyber Command urged F- like independently urged F. Five customers to patch their devices urgently. They tweeted patching. E twenty, twenty, five, nine. Oh, two and five nine three should not be postponed over the weekend. remediate immediately. Wow! Five also offered some interim mitigation measures that they recommended for their customers. Who could not for whatever reason patch their big I fe- big IP equipment immediately you know sometimes that requires you take it down for some length of time and reboot, but later came to light that the mitigation could be mitigated and bypassed, which made emergency patching the only safe course like you know, do it now. So two days after the patches for this critical. Vulnerability were released. Researchers started publicly posting proof of concept exploits, showing just how easy it would be to exploit them. So that was then. Three weeks later last Friday the twenty fourth, the cyber and infrastructure security agency. Say posted. They, said CIA ESSA is issuing this alert. In response to receiving to recently disclosed exploits that that target F five big IP devices that are vulnerable to Blah Blah Blah. unpackaged big five. Unpacked F five big IP devices. An attractive target for malicious actors. Affected organizations that have not applied the patch to fix this critical remote code. Execution Vulnerability risk an attacker. Outing that CV to take control of their system note, EH, five security advisory states that there is a high probability that any remaining unpack. Each devices are likely already compromised. CIS A expect to see continued attacks exploiting unpackaged big F five big IP devices, and strongly urges users administrators to upgrade their software to the fixed versions. CIS also advises that administrators deploy the signature included in this alert to help them determine whether they're systems have been compromised, and so the the signature was a a a traffic inspection. Script in order to see whether there is bad stuff going on, they said see I say has observed scanning and reconnaissance as well as confirmed compromises. Within a few days of F five's patch release of this vulnerability as early as July sixth. CIS Say has seen broad scanning activity for the presence of this vulnerability across federal departments and agencies. This activity is currently occurring as of the publication of this alert meaning gay from as early as July six as one that did began and this this alert was last Friday the twenty four th, so this has been going on. They conclude the ISI has been working with several entities across multiple sectors to investigate potential compromises relating to this vulnerability. has confirmed to compromises and continuing to investigate. CIS CIS will alert will update this alert with any additional actionable information. Okay so. Now this is a classic example, and actually this sort of ties into where will be going here in a minute when we talk about Garmon. I've often been speaking about the growing critical need for companies and to a lesser degree individuals, but certainly individuals who care to be certain that they have an are maintaining an open channel of communication for receiving vulnerability notices I've been talking about email as that channel. But in thinking about this further. I think that twitter likely makes the most sense now. As I noted last week. Twitter really has become our global information dissemination platform. Warts and all

CIS F. Five Publishing F. Five Twitter United States Cia Essa Garmon ISI Microsoft Facebook
"administrator" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

02:46 min | 6 months ago

"administrator" Discussed on WEEI

"We don't administrator dot come and live in studio joining us in here for the next hour you know I I always love the talk box and here's a man who is a former boxer a great documentary filmmaker an academy award winning caliber actor and one of the best standup comedians out there a very very funny man and Dan and green thanks for coming down the I mean Dave I would say right now if I had you as my hate me I wouldn't be living in van Nuys the mobile Sherman oaks man thank you so much Dave good to have you ma'am will thank you for having me I mean well you know what I love you you of just finished off a documentary film yes we finally finished about boxing in Philadelphia and went off you get you know back in the day and I don't know if it's the same today but back in the day the wars in the Philadelphia gyms and all the great fighters they get out in the sixties seventies and eighties yeah there's no town like Philly when it comes to buying and you come up with a great documentary yes yes first what I want to thank you because you've kind of follow the journey with me I can honestly really say that for about almost the last year and a half two years and right now we finished the documentary we got the trailer done our PDF file presentation package is done we we entered it in the number of film festivals we what we've submitted it we got accepted into and one of my one of water ready water recognition for the impact doc awards at a little you California and I just got to you I just got into doctors without borders in out of Delaware I just got into that Film Festival and what's the name of the film the film is called the executioners we all had a chance about a these two men in Philadelphia the start of the gym call the executioners to get boys off the street and one of creating one of the most phenomenal Amager danger friend there when yes I did I traded for like two years before I had to move my mother passed but I stayed in touch with the guys because you know being from Philadelphia and so we knew each other we got to touch I wanna boxing outside of Philly I would end and in non Ohio and then you know I just came over it is you know I ran into my old trainer again after years spoke to one phone in you don't actually know you decide to do the documentary all right when we come back when you get into this today okay we're gonna get some boxing you're gonna tell some funny joke I'm a tells a funny joke and I'm not going to charge and I'm going to come up with my top ten heavyweights of all time top ten fun and they're all white dot then yeah I don't know of a duty for the I don't know it was you're looking at one we need some radio message and data rates may apply please don't text while driving if you've been in business more than twenty minutes you've probably printed your logo on all kinds of promotional products we all know logo's work because they're on everything from the top of skyscrapers to the bottom of shoes ever wondered why or how to best use.

dot administrator
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Everyday is dependent on space the way, we communicate the way we navigate the way we produce food the way we produce energy the way, we do whether prediction and understand climate the way we do national security and defense the way we do disaster relief banking regulate flows of power on the on the on the the power grid. All of it is dependent on space. And and all of those capabilities are available because of a trail that was blazed by NASA. And and for the very small budget that NASA has we have enabled a a human condition that is far beyond. Anything? Anybody would have imagined agreed completely mass as one of the best invest investments that that citizens make for you know, pennies and dollars relatively speaking. As are a no the weather service and others as well. I have one more question before I do that quick update. Because I know I set to is going to be going up soon. Everything going okay with that. Yeah. We're on. We're on schedule for for ice at two. And and it's a obviously a critically important mission for the United States to understand, you know, the the these sheets of ice in the Arctic that that people are concerned about where are they going and understanding our hydrogen fear, even even better than we already do. Yeah. No. We're looking forward to that. Final question. As I mentioned earlier, I spent twelve years at NASA and one of those years, I actually did a detailed down at NASA headquarters. And so got to look at the agency from that perspective as well. In your time at NASA, so far what has surprised you most about the agency the people there. The culture. I'll tell you the raw intellect. The smart people. There are the raw. And they're like I'm working in an agency where I know that everybody here is smarter than me. And that's a that's a good thing. And and I and not only that, but they're all opinionated. And that's even better. There's there's no shortage of people here who are willing to speak their minds and tell the administrator exactly what they think the administrator needs to hear. And so that's a very positive thing for NASA and for our country. Yeah. That that's the that's it is amazing. You know in the science culture there. You know, we can disagree and challenge each other and tell people how we feel, you know, at the end of the day, we go, and, you know, share drink across or do whatever we do. That's that's what I enjoy about the science culture and particularly NASA administrator brightens now, I really wanna thank you for joining us here on the weather podcast. And we wish you continued success in your current role in for your continued service to this country. We thank you. Thank you, Dr shepherd. I appreciate it. Thank you very much. And that's the way. Geese podcast. Thank you for joining us..

NASA NASA administrator administrator United States Dr shepherd Arctic twelve years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Everyday is dependent on space the way, we communicate the way we navigate the way we produce food the way we produce energy the way, we do whether prediction and understand climate the way we do national security and defense the way we do disaster relief banking regulate flows of power on the on the on the the power grid. All of it is dependent on space. And and all of those capabilities are available because of a trail that was blazed by NASA. And and for the very small budget that NASA has we have enabled a a human condition that is far beyond. Anything? Anybody would have imagined agreed completely mass as one of the best invest investments that that citizens make for you know, pennies and dollars relatively speaking. As are a no the weather service and others as well. I have one more question before I do that quick update. Because I know I set to is going to be going up soon. Everything going okay with that. Yeah. We're on. We're on schedule for for ice at two. And and it's a obviously a critically important mission for the United States to understand, you know, the the these sheets of ice in the Arctic that that people are concerned about where are they going and understanding our hydrogen fear, even even better than we already do. Yeah. No. We're looking forward to that. Final question. As I mentioned earlier, I spent twelve years at NASA and one of those years, I actually did a detailed down at NASA headquarters. And so got to look at the agency from that perspective as well. In your time at NASA, so far what has surprised you most about the agency the people there. The culture. I'll tell you the raw intellect. The smart people. There are the raw. And they're like I'm working in an agency where I know that everybody here is smarter than me. And that's a that's a good thing. And and I and not only that, but they're all opinionated. And that's even better. There's there's no shortage of people here who are willing to speak their minds and tell the administrator exactly what they think the administrator needs to hear. And so that's a very positive thing for NASA and for our country. Yeah. That that's the that's it is amazing. You know in the science culture there. You know, we can disagree and challenge each other and tell people how we feel, you know, at the end of the day, we go, and, you know, share drink across or do whatever we do. That's that's what I enjoy about the science culture and particularly NASA administrator brightens now, I really wanna thank you for joining us here on the weather podcast. And we wish you continued success in your current role in for your continued service to this country. We thank you. Thank you, Dr shepherd. I appreciate it. Thank you very much. And that's the way. Geese podcast. Thank you for joining us..

NASA NASA administrator administrator United States Dr shepherd Arctic twelve years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"That that's a that's a good point. Are wh what can you tell our listeners about Nasr's plans for the Mars and the moon? We're going back to Mars anytime soon. We well. We we are we've got a we've got a emission on its way to Mars right now insight, and in fact, we're gonna we're gonna use insight to understand Mars quakes. We're going to try to get a three D image of the interior of Mars. So that we, you know can understand not just whether or not, you know, how active the the geology is. But every time an asteroid impacts Mars. We're going to be able to detect it because. Yeah. So it's going to have a size monitor on there. And we're gonna. Understand that the temperature of Mars deep down. So all of these different instruments are on the insight project, and we're going to be landing insight on Mars thanksgiving, which is going to be a great day for NASA. Yo this is interesting Marshall, there's only one nation on the face of the planet. That's ever landed successfully on Mars one and it's the United States of America. And we've done it seven times. And this will be our eighth time. You think about that achievement? I it really is amazing that that that, you know, think about NASA being created in nineteen fifty eight and here, we are all these years later, sixty years later, and we're still the only country that can land on Mars and do it over and over again, successfully is the point of pride for this country and for the world because NASA through all of its partnerships with international partners and many of these missions are actually in partnership with other countries as well. I think it's NASA still is considered one of the sort of. Crown jewels of American. I know you're you're proud the lead that and I wanna use this last few minutes here to kind of get some big picture thoughts from you fast forward twenty years from now you look back on your time at NASA. What do you hope to accomplish your what do you hope had been accomplished at NASA under your tenure? That's a great question. Well, we wanna make sure we're heading back to the moon that that's happening. We're going to do it in a sustainable way. In other words, we're going to take advantage of reusable systems. We all have seen. What happens when you re re rockets the cost of access to space goes down, the the access to space goes up for more people when I say people, I mean hardware equipment, and we want an entire architecture between earth and the moon to be reusable now is all of that. So so tugs to be reusable between earth orbit and lunar orbit Landers to be reasonable from from from moon orbit. Lunar orbit to the surface of the moon. We want we want all of it to be reasonable. We want it to be replicable at Mars. We want to take advantage of the hundreds of billions of tons of water ice that we now understand is on the surface of the moon. We wanna use use that not only for life support. In other words, human activities on the surface of the moon. But also we want to use it for propulsion hydrogen oxygen is in fact, rocket propulsion. So all of that. Now is that going to happen in my time as the NASA administrator? No, but well, we wanna do is. We want to get that well underway. So that in in in years in, you know, my children will grow up right now there are kids graduating from high school knowing that their entire lives. We've had Americans living and working in space on the international space station. We want to make sure that when my kids kids grow up there growing up in a world where there have been people living and working in orbit around the moon and on the surface of the moon their entire lives. We want that sustainable architecture that uses our international partners, use our commercial partners. That's what we want to develop. And it starts right now with the president space policy directive one, and then the other thing that I hope I can accomplish a lot of America is still not aware of how dependent we are on space every single one of us..

NASA America NASA administrator Nasr United States Marshall Landers president twenty years sixty years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"That that's a that's a good point. Are wh what can you tell our listeners about Nasr's plans for the Mars and the moon? We're going back to Mars anytime soon. We well. We we are we've got a we've got a emission on its way to Mars right now insight, and in fact, we're gonna we're gonna use insight to understand Mars quakes. We're going to try to get a three D image of the interior of Mars. So that we, you know can understand not just whether or not, you know, how active the the geology is. But every time an asteroid impacts Mars. We're going to be able to detect it because. Yeah. So it's going to have a size monitor on there. And we're gonna. Understand that the temperature of Mars deep down. So all of these different instruments are on the insight project, and we're going to be landing insight on Mars thanksgiving, which is going to be a great day for NASA. Yo this is interesting Marshall, there's only one nation on the face of the planet. That's ever landed successfully on Mars one and it's the United States of America. And we've done it seven times. And this will be our eighth time. You think about that achievement? I it really is amazing that that that, you know, think about NASA being created in nineteen fifty eight and here, we are all these years later, sixty years later, and we're still the only country that can land on Mars and do it over and over again, successfully is the point of pride for this country and for the world because NASA through all of its partnerships with international partners and many of these missions are actually in partnership with other countries as well. I think it's NASA still is considered one of the sort of. Crown jewels of American. I know you're you're proud the lead that and I wanna use this last few minutes here to kind of get some big picture thoughts from you fast forward twenty years from now you look back on your time at NASA. What do you hope to accomplish your what do you hope had been accomplished at NASA under your tenure? That's a great question. Well, we wanna make sure we're heading back to the moon that that's happening. We're going to do it in a sustainable way. In other words, we're going to take advantage of reusable systems. We all have seen. What happens when you re re rockets the cost of access to space goes down, the the access to space goes up for more people when I say people, I mean hardware equipment, and we want an entire architecture between earth and the moon to be reusable now is all of that. So so tugs to be reusable between earth orbit and lunar orbit Landers to be reasonable from from from moon orbit. Lunar orbit to the surface of the moon. We want we want all of it to be reasonable. We want it to be replicable at Mars. We want to take advantage of the hundreds of billions of tons of water ice that we now understand is on the surface of the moon. We wanna use use that not only for life support. In other words, human activities on the surface of the moon. But also we want to use it for propulsion hydrogen oxygen is in fact, rocket propulsion. So all of that. Now is that going to happen in my time as the NASA administrator? No, but well, we wanna do is. We want to get that well underway. So that in in in years in, you know, my children will grow up right now there are kids graduating from high school knowing that their entire lives. We've had Americans living and working in space on the international space station. We want to make sure that when my kids kids grow up there growing up in a world where there have been people living and working in orbit around the moon and on the surface of the moon their entire lives. We want that sustainable architecture that uses our international partners, use our commercial partners. That's what we want to develop. And it starts right now with the president space policy directive one, and then the other thing that I hope I can accomplish a lot of America is still not aware of how dependent we are on space every single one of us..

NASA America NASA administrator Nasr United States Marshall Landers president twenty years sixty years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And we are back on the weather beaks podcasts with NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein. We're talking about sort of NASA and his evolution on climate. And so he gave you some perspective on sort of some of the statements. He made for about climate in the past. This gets me to something that you started talking about earlier in the podcast. And you know, after NASA made this very important announcement of the new NASA, astronaut corps, and that's so important. I want to talk a little bit about that. I saw people saying oh Nastase back the space program is back. But I pushed back and said, well, it never went anywhere. We got the, you know, the Parker pro and we've got the GPS satellite. We got. I sat to coming up. What do you think that people just see NASA as the mand program, which is critical, by the way? But why do you think we the citizens just see NASA? And what we do is just the man to program, and yeah, yeah. I think it's because of the drama around it and the. The prestige of it. It just seems to get more more attention. All that being said, you're absolutely right. Nasa has amazing missions going on all the time. In fact, we recently launched I think, you know, when when you. The last time we launched American astronauts from American soil on American rockets was back in twenty eleven and I think when when people remember the space shuttle's, they it's it's it's nostalgic. It people remember how impressive it was. And the all of it. And and I think because that is so emotional. That's that's what people think of when they think of NASA. Right. And of course, people think of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landing on the moon, and and the the five moon missions that came after that. So all of those all of those things are what people think about because I think that that that's the most salient piece of NASA. But you're absolutely right nostril does so much more than that. When you think about the science mission directorate, and planetary science and helium physics and earth science. We we do astrophysics deep space exploration. We do all kinds. Of things that aren't necessarily tied to human spaceflight, and the people that the people that follow that. Of course, are the scientists and people that are enthusiastic about exploration. But not it's it doesn't get the drama on national television the way human space. Yeah..

NASA NASA administrator Jim Breitenstein Neil Armstrong Buzz Aldrin
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And we are back on the weather beaks podcasts with NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein. We're talking about sort of NASA and his evolution on climate. And so he gave you some perspective on sort of some of the statements. He made for about climate in the past. This gets me to something that you started talking about earlier in the podcast. And you know, after NASA made this very important announcement of the new NASA, astronaut corps, and that's so important. I want to talk a little bit about that. I saw people saying oh Nastase back the space program is back. But I pushed back and said, well, it never went anywhere. We got the, you know, the Parker pro and we've got the GPS satellite. We got. I sat to coming up. What do you think that people just see NASA as the mand program, which is critical, by the way? But why do you think we the citizens just see NASA? And what we do is just the man to program, and yeah, yeah. I think it's because of the drama around it and the. The prestige of it. It just seems to get more more attention. All that being said, you're absolutely right. Nasa has amazing missions going on all the time. In fact, we recently launched I think, you know, when when you. The last time we launched American astronauts from American soil on American rockets was back in twenty eleven and I think when when people remember the space shuttle's, they it's it's it's nostalgic. It people remember how impressive it was. And the all of it. And and I think because that is so emotional. That's that's what people think of when they think of NASA. Right. And of course, people think of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landing on the moon, and and the the five moon missions that came after that. So all of those all of those things are what people think about because I think that that that's the most salient piece of NASA. But you're absolutely right nostril does so much more than that. When you think about the science mission directorate, and planetary science and helium physics and earth science. We we do astrophysics deep space exploration. We do all kinds. Of things that aren't necessarily tied to human spaceflight, and the people that the people that follow that. Of course, are the scientists and people that are enthusiastic about exploration. But not it's it doesn't get the drama on national television the way human space. Yeah..

NASA NASA administrator Jim Breitenstein Neil Armstrong Buzz Aldrin
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Here's the other thing that's important to note and Marshall, I'm sure, you know, this like right now in the United States, the average person who lives who lives in Oklahoma. The average person gets thirteen minutes of lead time on a tornado. Right. That's not very much. Yes. Not. And when you think about the fact that that's the average has an improvement from what it used to be. But still probably not enough. That's absolutely not enough, especially if the average is thirteen minutes that means half, the people are getting less than less team that absolutely. And so, you know, you think about the person's getting five or ten minutes of lead time, and maybe they're not they don't have the TV on or they're in a part of Oklahoma where they? Have sirens. You know, the the it it becomes a very serious threat to their lives, and we should be well past that we should be giving people over an hour of lead time based on technology that already exists. We just need to feel it and part of fielding requires us to do these observations system simulation experiments, and so we put that in the Bill as well. Are we what is your home? Sorry. I wanted to pick up before you move on the wooded share thought on some out there in our community and in the social sciences community that say that one hour lead time or too much lead time actually also has its problems too. Because people be maybe let their guard down a bit too much. I'm curious about your thoughts on that. I think that is absolutely wrong. I mean, I can't tell you how wrong the had a, and I'm gonna tell you from personal experience. More lead time is better. We have to understand people are smart, if if people know an hour ahead of time, then they're going to do the right thing. And if they don't do the right thing, at least, it's not because they didn't know. Right. And and and so we have an obligation. To increase that lead time. But you're absolutely right. I heard people tell me when I was a member of congress that we don't want to give people too much lead time because then they might play a video game and not and not move out of the way or might not take cover. And you know, I think that that is that is social experimentation that we don't wanna play we want to give people the information they need and then allow them to make good decisions. Now, if they're not making good decisions, we can do things to increase, you know, their their decision making capacity. If necessary we can warn them as to you know, what the end result is if they don't do the precautions that they're being told that they need to take. But but the last thing we want to do is restrict their information because they're not smart enough to make the right decision while I wanted to just whether geeks of your listeners how many NASA administrators or congressmen have you heard talking about Mexico models and data assimilation and Aussies. Clearly. A NASA administrator in person that understands our community. So it's a pleasure to be to have the administrator on whether geeks. I want to shift back around to the NASA world now and kind of transition because NASA desert sciences, I again, I was a scientist at NASA Goddard Space white center for twelve years was involved in the global precipitation measurement or GPS mission. Would you say about Nasr's role in studying planet earth because there's some that say why is NASA doing that? Why is it? No are USGS doing that. What what's your response to people that say that? So that's in Nastase mission set, and it always has been and it always will be..

NASA Oklahoma NASA administrator NASA Goddard Space white cente United States Marshall USGS Nastase Nasr Bill congress Mexico scientist thirteen minutes twelve years ten minutes one hour
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Here's the other thing that's important to note and Marshall, I'm sure, you know, this like right now in the United States, the average person who lives who lives in Oklahoma. The average person gets thirteen minutes of lead time on a tornado. Right. That's not very much. Yes. Not. And when you think about the fact that that's the average has an improvement from what it used to be. But still probably not enough. That's absolutely not enough, especially if the average is thirteen minutes that means half, the people are getting less than less team that absolutely. And so, you know, you think about the person's getting five or ten minutes of lead time, and maybe they're not they don't have the TV on or they're in a part of Oklahoma where they? Have sirens. You know, the the it it becomes a very serious threat to their lives, and we should be well past that we should be giving people over an hour of lead time based on technology that already exists. We just need to feel it and part of fielding requires us to do these observations system simulation experiments, and so we put that in the Bill as well. Are we what is your home? Sorry. I wanted to pick up before you move on the wooded share thought on some out there in our community and in the social sciences community that say that one hour lead time or too much lead time actually also has its problems too. Because people be maybe let their guard down a bit too much. I'm curious about your thoughts on that. I think that is absolutely wrong. I mean, I can't tell you how wrong the had a, and I'm gonna tell you from personal experience. More lead time is better. We have to understand people are smart, if if people know an hour ahead of time, then they're going to do the right thing. And if they don't do the right thing, at least, it's not because they didn't know. Right. And and and so we have an obligation. To increase that lead time. But you're absolutely right. I heard people tell me when I was a member of congress that we don't want to give people too much lead time because then they might play a video game and not and not move out of the way or might not take cover. And you know, I think that that is that is social experimentation that we don't wanna play we want to give people the information they need and then allow them to make good decisions. Now, if they're not making good decisions, we can do things to increase, you know, their their decision making capacity. If necessary we can warn them as to you know, what the end result is if they don't do the precautions that they're being told that they need to take. But but the last thing we want to do is restrict their information because they're not smart enough to make the right decision while I wanted to just whether geeks of your listeners how many NASA administrators or congressmen have you heard talking about Mexico models and data assimilation and Aussies. Clearly. A NASA administrator in person that understands our community. So it's a pleasure to be to have the administrator on whether geeks. I want to shift back around to the NASA world now and kind of transition because NASA desert sciences, I again, I was a scientist at NASA Goddard Space white center for twelve years was involved in the global precipitation measurement or GPS mission. Would you say about Nasr's role in studying planet earth because there's some that say why is NASA doing that? Why is it? No are USGS doing that. What what's your response to people that say that? So that's in Nastase mission set, and it always has been and it always will be..

NASA Oklahoma NASA administrator NASA Goddard Space white cente United States Marshall USGS Nastase Nasr Bill congress Mexico scientist thirteen minutes twelve years ten minutes one hour
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And we are back on the weather. Geeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia. And I have the pleasure to be joined by the NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein, I wanna now this is weather geeks. This is a show powered by the Weather Channel. And we're let's talk a little weather. You many people may not realize this. But you were one of the most significant figures behind the weather research and forecasting innovation act along with colleagues. Why was weather so important to you that you push forward? One of the most significant pieces of major legislation and weather in the history of the country Marshall, I just want to say this. You're an amazing PR guy. We need to hire you, and I need to have you go everywhere I used to work there. But I'm quite happy in university world. But you know, I give credit where credit is due. And I'll I'll I'll poke and criticize where it is the duty as well. But this was a signal. I was the president Jim of the American meteorological society AM in two thousand thirteen. So there you go much involved in some of the as this was coming about. So I know it's difficult. So why why why was it so important you so I I was representing the first district of Oklahoma, which is Tulsa, Oklahoma. And every year, I was in congress. I had constituents that got killed in tornadoes every year except for one year, and in two thousand thirteen there was a a massive tornado in Moore, Oklahoma, which is not in my district, but not too far from my district and that tornado hit a school and it killed twenty one people, and it devastated, you know, lives are gonna forever be changed and not for the good because of that horrible horrible event. And I resolved at that point to try to figure out how do we move to a day where we? Have zero deaths from tornadoes in the United States of America. We have the technology. If you think about the airplanes, I used to fly we have in the nose of those airplanes, we have something called a phased array radar where we detect and track and eventually target aircraft on the horizon, a classified number of miles away. And then, you know, you take that same technology in the nose of an airplane, and you put it in you put it to work on a cloud. And so instead of detecting and tracking tiny little targets on the horizon, namely airplanes. Now, you detect and track.

Dr Marshall shepherd Oklahoma Jim Breitenstein NASA administrator university of Georgia congress United States Tulsa president Moore America one year
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And we are back on the weather. Geeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia. And I have the pleasure to be joined by the NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein, I wanna now this is weather geeks. This is a show powered by the Weather Channel. And we're let's talk a little weather. You many people may not realize this. But you were one of the most significant figures behind the weather research and forecasting innovation act along with colleagues. Why was weather so important to you that you push forward? One of the most significant pieces of major legislation and weather in the history of the country Marshall, I just want to say this. You're an amazing PR guy. We need to hire you, and I need to have you go everywhere I used to work there. But I'm quite happy in university world. But you know, I give credit where credit is due. And I'll I'll I'll poke and criticize where it is the duty as well. But this was a signal. I was the president Jim of the American meteorological society AM in two thousand thirteen. So there you go much involved in some of the as this was coming about. So I know it's difficult. So why why why was it so important you so I I was representing the first district of Oklahoma, which is Tulsa, Oklahoma. And every year, I was in congress. I had constituents that got killed in tornadoes every year except for one year, and in two thousand thirteen there was a a massive tornado in Moore, Oklahoma, which is not in my district, but not too far from my district and that tornado hit a school and it killed twenty one people, and it devastated, you know, lives are gonna forever be changed and not for the good because of that horrible horrible event. And I resolved at that point to try to figure out how do we move to a day where we? Have zero deaths from tornadoes in the United States of America. We have the technology. If you think about the airplanes, I used to fly we have in the nose of those airplanes, we have something called a phased array radar where we detect and track and eventually target aircraft on the horizon, a classified number of miles away. And then, you know, you take that same technology in the nose of an airplane, and you put it in you put it to work on a cloud. And so instead of detecting and tracking tiny little targets on the horizon, namely airplanes. Now, you detect and track.

Dr Marshall shepherd Oklahoma Jim Breitenstein NASA administrator university of Georgia congress United States Tulsa president Moore America one year
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"The way we do whether prediction and understand climate the way we do national security and defense the way we do disaster relief banking regulate flows of power on the on the on the the power grid, all of it is dependent on space and and all of those capabilities are available because of a trail that was blazed by NASA and and for the very small budget that NASA has, we have enabled a a human condition that is far beyond. Anything anybody would have imagined agreed completely mass as one of the best invest investments that that citizens make for, you know, pennies dollars relatively speaking as are a no in the weather service and others as well. I have one more question before I do that quick update because I know I sat to is going to be going up soon. Everything going. Okay with that. Yeah, we're on. We're on schedule for for ice at two, and and it's a obviously a critically important mission for the United States to understand, you know, the the these sheets of ice in the Arctic that that people are concerned about, where are they going and understanding our hydrogen fear even even better than we already do. Yeah. No, we're looking for the final question. As I mentioned earlier, I spent twelve years at NASA and one of those years I actually did a detailed down at NASA headquarters. Gotta look at the agency from that perspective as well in your time at NASA so far, what has the prized you most about the agency? The people. They're the culture. I'll tell you the raw intellect, the smart people. There are the raw, like I'm working at an agency where I know that everybody here is smarter than me, and that's a, that's a good thing and and and and not only that, but they're all opinionated. And that's even better. There's there's no shortage of people here who are willing to speak their minds until the administrator exactly what they think the administrator needs to hear. And so that's a very positive thing for NASA and for our country. Yeah, that's the it is amazing. You know, in the science culture there, you know we can disagree and challenge each other and tell people how we feel, you know, at the end of the day we go and you know, shared drink across or do whatever we do. That's what I enjoy about the science culture. And particularly NASA administrator brightens. Now I really wanna thank you for joining us here on the weather podcast, and we wish you continued success in your current role in for your continued service. To this country. We thank you. Thank you, Dr. Separate I presented thank you very much, and that's the weather geese podcast. Thank you for joining us.

NASA NASA administrator administrator United States Dr. Separate Arctic twelve years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Yeah, that's, that's a good point. Are wh-what can you tell our listeners about Nasr's plans for the Mars and the moon? We're going back to Mars. Anytime soon we well, we we are. We've got a, we've got a a mission on its way to Mars right now insight. And in fact, we're gonna we're gonna use insight to understand Mars quakes. We're gonna try to get a three d. image of the interior of Mars so that we, you know, can understand not just whether or not you know how active the the geology is, but every time an asteroid impacts Mars, we're going to be able to detect it because yeah, so it's gonna have a size Mamata on there and. We're gonna understand that the temperature of Mars deep down. So all of these different instruments are on the insight project, and we're going to be landing insight on Mars thanksgiving, which is going to be a great day for NASA. This is interesting Marshall. There's only one nation on the face of the planet that's ever landed successfully on Mars one. And it's the United States of America, and we've done it seven times and this will be our eighth time you think about that achievement. I, it really is amazing that that that you know thing about NASA being created in nineteen fifty eight. And here we are all these years later sixty years later, and we're still the only country that can land on Mars and do it over and over again successfully is the point of pride for this country and for the world because NASA through all of its partnerships with international partners and many of these missions are actually in partnership with the other countries as well. I think it's NASA still is considered one of the. Sort of crown jewels of American. I know you're, you're proud, the lead that and I wanna use this last few minutes here to kind of get some big picture thoughts from you fast forward, twenty years from now, you look back on your time at NASA. What do you hope to accomplish? What? What do you hope had been accomplished at NASA under your tenure? That's a great question. Well, we wanna make sure we're heading back to the moon. I mean that that's happening. We're going to do it in a sustainable way. In other words, we're going to take advantage of reusable systems. We all have seen what happens when you re reuse rockets. The cost of access to space goes down the the access to space goes up for more people. When I say people, I mean hardware equipment and we want an entire architecture between earth and the moon to be reusable. Now, all of that. So so tugs to be reusable between earth orbit and lunar orbit Landers to be reasonable from from from moon. Orbit lunar orbit to the surface, the moon, we want, we want all of it to be reusable. We want it to be replicable Mars. We wanna take advantage of the hundreds of billions of tons of water ice that we now understand is on the surface of the moon. We wanna use use that not only for life support in other words, human activities on the surface of the moon. But also we want to use it for propulsion. Hydrogen and oxygen is in fact rocket propulsion. So all of that now is that going to happen in my time as the NASA administrator? No, but we want to do is we want to get that well underway so that in in in years in, you know, my children will grow up right now. There are kids graduating from high school knowing that their entire lives. We've had Americans living and working in space on the international space station. We wanna make sure that when my kids kids grow up there growing up in a world where there have been people living and working in orbit around the moon and on the surface of the moon. There. Tire lives. We want that sustainable architecture that uses our international partners use our commercial partners. That's what we want to develop. And it starts right now with the president space policy, directive one. And then the other thing that I hope I can accomplish a lot of America is still not aware of how dependent we are on space. Every single one of us everyday is dependent on space. The way we communicate the way we navigate the way we produce food the way we produce energy..

NASA America NASA administrator Nasr United States Mamata Marshall Landers president twenty years sixty years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"I'm still part of the NASA family in some ways masses willing to take those risks on a new radar that can measure thunderstorms in a hurricane or send a probe to the fun and and that that really is a little bit different than an operational mission. And I wanna I wanna pause here for one moment. And we are back on the weather spot cast with NASA administrator, Jim, Brian Stein. We're talking about sort of NASA and his evolution on climate, and he gave you some perspective on sort of some of the statements he made for about climate in the past. This gets me to something that you started talking about earlier in the podcast, and you know after NASA made this very important announcement of the new NASA astronaut corps, and that's so important. I want to talk a little bit about that. I saw people saying, oh, Nasr's back the space program is back, but I pushed back and said, well, it never went anywhere. We've got, you know, the Parker pro. We've got the GPS satellite got I set to coming up. What do you think that people just see NASA as the mand program, which is critical by the way? But why do you think we the citizens just see NASA and what we do is just the man to program. And yeah, yeah, I think it's because of the the drama around it and the. The prestige of it, it just seems to get more more attention. All that being said, you're absolutely right. NASA has amazing missions going on all the time. In fact, we recently launched, I think, you know when when you. The last time we launched American astronauts from American soil on American rockets was back in twenty eleven. And I think when when people remember the space shuttle's, they, it's, it's, it's nostalgic it people remember how impressive it was and the author of it and and I think because that is so emotional, that's, that's what people think of when they think of NASA. Right. And of course, people think of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landing on the moon and and the the five moon missions that came after that. So all of those all of those things are what people think about. Because I think that that that's the most salient piece of NASA, but you're absolutely right now does so much more than that when you think about the science mission directorate and planetary science and helium, physics and earth science, we, we do astrophysics deep space exploration. We do all. Kinds of things that aren't necessarily tied to human spaceflight and the people that the people that follow that, of course, the scientists and people that are enthusiastic about exploration, but not it doesn't get the drama on national television, the way human space..

NASA NASA administrator Brian Stein Nasr Neil Armstrong Buzz Aldrin Jim
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"I'm sure you know this like right now in the United States, the average person who lives who lives in Oklahoma, the average person gets thirteen minutes of lead time on a tornado, right? That's not very much. Yes, not. And when you think about the fact that that's the average and has an improvement from what it used to be, but still probably not enough. It's absolutely not enough, especially if the average thirteen minutes that means half the people are getting less than less team that absolutely. And so you know, you think about the person's getting five or ten minutes of lead time and maybe they're not. They don't have the TV on or they're in a part of Oklahoma where they don't have sirens, you know the the, it, it, it becomes a very serious threat to their lives, and we should be well past that we should be giving. People over an hour of lead time based on technology that already exists. We just need to feel it. And part of fielding requires us to do these observations system simulation experiments. And so we put that in the Bill as well. What are we? What is your home? Sorry, I wanted to pick up for you. Move on the woods, your thought on some out there in our community and in the social sciences community that say that one hour lead time or too much lead time actually also has its problems too, because people be maybe let their guard down a bit too much. I'm curious about your thoughts on that. I think that is absolutely wrong. I mean, I can't tell you how wrong that hit. I'm gonna tell you from personal experience, more lead time is better. We have to understand people are smart. If people know an hour ahead of time, then they're going to do the right thing. And if they don't do the right thing, at least it's not because they didn't know. Right. And and and so we have an obligation to increase lead time, but you're absolutely right. I heard people tell me when I was a member of congress that we don't want to give people too much lead time because then they might play a video. Game and not and not move out of the way or might not take cover. And you know, I think that that is that is social experimentation that we don't wanna play. We want to give people the information they need and then allow them to make good decisions. Now, if they're not making good decisions, we can do things to increase, you know, their their decision making capacity if necessary. We can warn them as to, you know what the end result is. If they don't do the precautions that they're being told that they need to take. But but the last thing we want to do is restrict their information because they're not smart enough to make the right decision. While I wanted to just whether geeks of your listeners, how many NASA administrators, congressman. Have you heard talking about Mexico models and data assimilation and Aussie's clearly a NASA administrator in person and understands our community. So it's a pleasure to be to have the administrator on whether geeks I want to shift back around to the NASA wh. World now and kind of transition because NASA desert sciences. I again, I was a scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight center for twelve years involved in the global precipitation measurement or GPS mission. What would you say about Nasr's role in studying planet earth? Because there's some that say, will wise NASA doing that? Why is it? No. Are US GS doing that? What? What's your response to people that say that? So that's in Nasr's mission set, and it always has been and always will be. I mean, there's still so much. We don't know about our own planet and it's changing all the time. You know when I was a member of the house representatives. You're right. Some people suggested that I was a climate denier I, I heard that and and you know, all that stems from speech that I gave back in, oh, it was two thousand thirteen. In fact, it was after the Moore tornado, I, I had all these folks Twenty-one. Kids get killed in a tornado in Moore, Okla. Homa not just kids..

NASA Oklahoma NASA administrator Nasr NASA Goddard Space Flight cent United States Moore Bill congress congressman Mexico scientist thirteen minutes twelve years ten minutes one hour
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"We're excited to welcome Yuli confirm NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein, Jim hails from Tulsa Oklahoma, where he became all too familiar with extreme weather. So he understands the importance of improving our forecast capabilities will discuss the major piece of legislation. He helped past port expansion of weather research and forecasting. Plus we'll hear about the Evelyn of his on climate change and how the work at NASA can further our understanding of its impact. If that's not enough, we'll also get Jim dots on the future space exploration could include a visit to Mars. It's all next on the weather Deeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia. Thank you for joining us. Well, thank you for having me. It's good to be here. I want to jump right in with some science because NASA just launched a. Really interesting mission. The types the sun. Why is that important? And why? Why should all Americans be excited about that? And why is it important for us as citizens? That's a great question, and it's an important one. And a lot of people don't realize just in fact how important it is. So when you think about the sun, the sun actually creates what we call solar wind. So the sun is actually very responsible for what we call space weather. And of course, people are familiar with solar flares. Some people are maybe not so familiar with what's called a coronal mass ejection. So what happens is inside the sun, you know, it's, it's a nuclear fusion going on inside the sun hydrogen fusion, and from that charged particles are released. And of course, in some cases, they're released in the form of a solar flare, which means you got charged particles moving at a at a high rate of speed and another cases you can have. It's called a coronal mass ejection, which means there's a whole lot of charged particles moving at, you know, at a very, very rapid speed, almost the speed of light if you will. And so in this particular case, what happens is the the, the, the solar radiation, the radiation that comes from the sun can be very damaging not only to humans and other words astronauts that could be in deep, split deep space or could be on the international space station and lower orbit, but also very damaging for our our satellites. So when you think about how important the satellites are to to to to us as a civilization, the way we predict whether the way we understand climate the way we do disaster relief and national security, the way we do communications, we've got, you know, an entire architecture in geostationary orbit for over the horizon communications. Fact, many of your viewers might be listening to this on a on a podcast. They might download it on the internet. They could have internet from space. They could be getting it. You know, from from that architecture for communications in in geostationary orbit, the way we do navigation. When you think about GPS and how important that GPS timing signal is all of these satellites and that that GPS timing signals important for banking, it's important for regulating flows on the power grid and a whole host of other infrastructure, critical pieces of infrastructure for the United States and for the world. So all of these things are dependent on space, and when we have a coronal mass ejection, those things all be, they can all be put at risk. In fact, they could ultimately go away. They could be permanently damaged. And of course it's not just that. But you know if the lights go out on earth or our cell phones, quit working things get really ugly, really quickly as. Ashley, if they don't come back very fast. So what the what Parker solar probe is doing. It's going to help us understand how the sun works so that we can better predict those solar flares and those coronal mass ojection ze. Yeah, this is important stuff. When you hear the term space weather when I often mentioned it to people, I think they think, oh, a thunderstorm on Mars or something..

Jim NASA Dr Marshall shepherd NASA administrator Jim dots Tulsa Oklahoma Jim Breitenstein United States Ashley university of Georgia
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Need be checking on your neighbors we know that's the fastest response and the more we can get local state governments to bill capabilities both to respond to their disastrous but support their neighbors through mutual aid the more we get communities to embrace this idea that we need to build appropriate for our hazards the easier it gets to be as a nation to be able to respond to what has been a very high tempo of operations and this isn't about making the federal government job easier is about the recognition that does pastors are not just one level government's responsibility and i think that's probably the one message that people really need to hear from brock is it's a team effort if local and state governments aren't doing what they're supposed to be doing to get ready for disasters and being prepared fema kate fill all those gaps right fema wasn't built that way fema require strong partner state and local level to support but not replace now one question i have and this is irrespective of who the female administrator administrator is who the president is if you've been at the head of fema if you had a magic one their ways that famous should be changed structured to really do what it is function to do or a task to do are there a couple of things now that you're on the outside looking in ben if i could really restructure femur the just the way things work are there any things that come to mind well you know when i was in fema i looked at yeah people say what walls do we need to change what do you need to do differently i said you know it's not so much what the lol congress gave us a lot of thority and a lot of flexibility it's overcoming a mindset that fema response to a lot of smaller events as ninety percent of our business and it's almost as mindset that we're going to scale up for big disasters and i i really fought that and said look you've got a bill for big disasters and scale down and i think that's again one of the challenges that you have in any big organization is you tend to optimize for what you do most of the time and then hope it was scale up it didn't work in hugo work at andrew didn't work and katrina it's early hasn't worked the last couple of years and so i think that's the thing that is people like brock comes in as an emergency manager he gets he knows what do is it isn't the individuals individuals are trying everything they can to saw problem is tennessee for bureaucracies to solve for themselves and simplify their programs which make them so complex to the people using them so if i could do one thing at fema i'm like i would try to and this is what we try to do but it's hard to do i'd reorient my programs around the people i serve not what's easy on the other side to administer we sometimes are more fearful of making mistakes i g the spectre general finding fall you being accused of fraud and waste and not accountable so he turned to build all these controls in the minimize that right i would rather see a a congress say hey look we know in disastrous there's not going to be precision you're going to have to take risks we'd rather build the programs for speed around the people we serve we'll make mistakes we'll make errors but we better be fast in officiant in meeting the needs of the people we serve because the bottom line is they're paying the taxes they're they're they pay our salaries we are there serve them but bureaucracies tend to solve for themselves right it's not that they're bad people but it's just a nature of you get more yelled at for you you know know errors mistakes and stuff and i'm like look guys disasters are by their very nature infra cise responses i'd rather have too much too fast and to be there too late with too little what i used to tell my team right but it's a hard concept on the day to day basis when you're fighting budgets you're fighting just a day to.

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