36 Burst results for "Administrator"

Fresh "Administrator" from All Things Considered

All Things Considered

00:38 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh "Administrator" from All Things Considered

"At risk for wildfire Continue on California, 49 south for nine miles. I went on a tour of some of these care homes with Randy dinning. He's a long term care ombudsman, which means he drops in at residential facilities for the elderly to check on the quality of the food or the care. Or in this case, prepping for wildfire. Off we go. First Stop of the day is here a few manner assisted living facility straightaway. Randy asked to talk to the boss. If the boss lady's around, administrator Vanessa leave, the tenis comes out. And as Randy tries to ease into questions about disaster planning, she interrupts to say We're the best. Well, I'm gonna brag right From the beginning, She begins listing the virtues of her generator cover the entire buildings and their evacuation plans. Everybody here within seven minutes and and the go bags. They prepped for each resident. But the conversation gets awkward When Vanessa reveals they only have one employee on staff overnight. We don't have one night person caring for 46 residents. She says. If wildfire strikes the folks at the skilled nursing facility next door will take them in. I have 46 bids over there. No, she says. Maybe they take them to the local high school or maybe their family members would come. But we're never going to have one of those kinds of emergencies. I insist it's human nature to believe the worst will always happen to someone else that the skeletons have burned out. Wheelchairs will be scattered outside some other facility. A new state law hasn't solved the problem of how to share this burden the job of thinking ahead. What facilities need to do. But police have to dio and what family members choose to dio to keep older folks safe from fire. You don't mind. We're going to go to Crystal Ridge. This confusion of roles played out a mile down the road at Randy's. Next stop on the Tour, the.

Randy Dinning Vanessa Leave California DIO Crystal Ridge Administrator
Hurricane Zeta hits Louisiana as strong Category 2 storm

Balance of Power

01:48 min | 1 d ago

Hurricane Zeta hits Louisiana as strong Category 2 storm

"Has has has has has has has has been been been been been been been been hit with its fifth named Storm of the year, this one named Zeta because we've pretty much run out of names. Strong winds have left over a million people without power in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia. Louisiana Governor John Bell. Edwards is particularly focused on the southeast of his state. Because this was primarily a wind event has was predicted. There are lots of power outages across southeast Louisiana. So put this storm in perspective. We welcome Now Creek Fugue, a former administrator of FEMA. During his tenure, he organized recovery efforts for a record 87 count of 87 disasters in 2011 alone. So, Craig, thanks so much for being back with us. Give us some perspective on this particular storm of Zeta before we move on to the larger perspective. The governor said. It was mainly AH wind event. We didn't see a lot of heavy rainfall move fast. So really, the recovery is damaged roofs and power outages on it's not just in Louisiana, you'll get parentage is always to Atlanta from this storm. Is that easier to him in there? No, never easy, But is that easier to deal with one of these big drenching rains that comes on onshore just sits there. Yeah, It's never easy, but the difference is they'll have a pretty good idea of damages. They get back in most of these areas. And the big driver of much of this is going to be getting the power back on. So is it my imagination, Or has there been an awful lot of storms this year? They say we're to Zeta. I don't remember getting dizzy before. Has been busy, and it's really the number of landfalling hurricanes we're seeing. Ah, they were close to tying the record for Landfalling storms on Louisiana's much like Florida's been hit multiple times in one year and correspondingly in election years. It was in 2000 for We'll

Louisiana Edwards John Bell Administrator Fema Landfalling Craig Georgia Mississippi Alabama Atlanta Florida
Caleb Barlow Discusses Healthcare Industry Ransomware Attacks and Measures to Prevent Cybercrimes

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

04:28 min | 2 d ago

Caleb Barlow Discusses Healthcare Industry Ransomware Attacks and Measures to Prevent Cybercrimes

"On background computer or cybercrimes against healthcare providers, more of a hospitals, disabled computer networks holding them for ransom. Frequently for Bitcoin fee, the tax have been prevalent since at least two, thousand and ten. This past month however, universal health services with over four hundred locations. Over in the US suffered a cyber attack disabling it's company wide computer network causing some it's hospitals to revert to pen and paper recordkeeping also last month the first known death. Resulted from a ransomware attack in Germany when a patient did not survive transferred to another hospital. Though a twenty nineteen hhs report found between twenty, twelve and sixteen. Hospital deaths increased after ransomware attacks. Earlier this month covid nineteen VACs. A covid nineteen vaccine trial was delayed by more attack or at least one. Likely. The most costly ransomware attack was to the UK's national health service in seventeen that amounted to an estimated one, hundred, twenty, million in it costs and lost productivity. ransomware attacks are on the increase especially amongst small hospitals, particularly vulnerable to phishing attacks, lasting upwards of tumor weeks because of their lean or inadequate security support. As Josephine Wolf noted in October Seventeen New York Times editorial quote Unquote cybersecurity shortcomings in the healthcare sector needs to be addressed now. More than ever when medical care is increasingly being offered via remote online formats. In twenty twenty states introduced more than two hundred and eighty cybersecurity related bills enacting several related to task forces or commissions training. Cybersecurity insurance in criminal. Penalties. The US Senate and House passed seven cybersecurity bills whoever not specifically addressed the healthcare industry and none became law. With me again and discuss healthcare cybersecurity is synergise texts, CEO. COLLAB- Barlow so club with that. As background LET'S START WITH A. Primer Info. I've read these ransomware products. in part are. Titled or named Wannacry Laki Win Plock encrypt locker. Are some these known ransomware product. So my question is, how do these encrypt clinical data and to what effect? So. So basically, what happening if you look at ransomware incident is a you know a narrow will gets access to a network and that could be as simple as grabbing somebody's credentials. You know maybe you were on a retail site, use the same credentials you used at work that retail site was compromised and There are many locations on the dark web that will. Sell compromised credentials or could have been through a phishing attack once the bad guy is into the network then there's two primary things that they're looking to do first is to move laterally. They WANNA get as much access across the networks they can, and there are a variety of tools that they'll deploy. They will actually help them harvest additional credentials once they've got a beachhead. On, the network in addition to harvesting new credentials and kind of moving lateral or what we call lateral movement. The other thing that are going to do is to try to elevate their privilege. So going from maybe an administrator or you know a nurse and triage and maybe getting access to their credentials, they're going to try to work their way up to a network. Administrator or someone that controls access to the whole domain once they've been able to get in and move their tentacles around the organization, then they're going to deploy their payroll, which is one of several of the tools that you mentioned will allow them to then lock things up effectively what these tools, our cryptographic tools, and they basically take the entire hard drive at the device. Scramble it and lock it up with a cryptographic key. What we've seen of late is the bad guys oftentimes insert a new step just before scrambling data, locking it all up in that the exfiltrated lot of it, and they're using that to increase their chances of getting paid by potentially threatening to. The organization by releasing that data if they don't pay ransom.

Administrator United States Us Senate Wannacry Laki New York Times Josephine Wolf UK Germany CEO House
New York City to begin one-time opt-in for switch to blended learning

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:53 sec | 3 d ago

New York City to begin one-time opt-in for switch to blended learning

"Parents in New York City whose kids are now learning remotely and would like to switch them to at least partial in classroom instruction will have just one chance to make that switch. The first two weeks of November will be the only time that families will be able to make the change from full remote to blended learning if they don't On their student will be fully remote for the entire school year, which is a change from what we originally had said over the summer. We think that this is better for the sake of stability for all students for families and educators, But state Senator Andrew Gone, Artist says Reducing the opt in periods from 1 to 4 makes it easy on just one group administrators. This is nothing In an attempt for the deal. We can make their lives easier at the expense of making the lives of parents and working families much more difficult. This is yanking the rug out from parent or in 280,000. Students are attending school in person as part of the city's blended

New York City Senator Andrew Gone 280,000
Early, In-Person Voting Centers Will Expand Across The Washington, D.C. Region As Election Day Nears

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 6 d ago

Early, In-Person Voting Centers Will Expand Across The Washington, D.C. Region As Election Day Nears

"Of the election process around here, as D C and Maryland are set to open there in person. Early voting centers this coming week. People have been mailing in their ballots ahead of the presidential election. But now in person early voting will be available for everyone starting Monday in Maryland and Tuesday in D. C for a look at all the locations open for in person early voting head to w t o p dot com and Search Voter guide. Alicia Alexander, elections administrator for Prince George's County, tells NBC For those who do not want a wear mask, we will as that they both outside while in person. Early voting is about to start in D C and Maryland It's been ongoing in Virginia since mid September. Nick

Maryland Alicia Alexander Prince George Nick Administrator NBC Virginia
Why The 'Kevin Bacon' Factor Is Key To Understanding How COVID Spread In Nursing Homes

Weekend Edition Saturday

02:21 min | 6 d ago

Why The 'Kevin Bacon' Factor Is Key To Understanding How COVID Spread In Nursing Homes

"In March, when the corona virus began racing through nursing homes. The federal government banned visitors. But Corona virus infections kept spreading. Professor Keith Chen tried to figure out why the people who we can infer work in this nursing home what other nursing homes do they work at Chen Study used anonymous cell phone data to help see the movements of people into and out of nursing homes. The data showed a lot of nursing home workers are like Martha working at more than one when you learned that over 20 of your workers are also spending time in other nursing homes, that should be a real red flag. Chen and his team found that on average, each nursing home is connected to seven other nursing homes. I also found the more shared workers. A nursing home had the more cove in 19 infections among the patients. Professor ELISA Long also worked on the study. There are some facilities In Florida in New Jersey, where they're sharing upwards of 50 to 100 workers again. This is over on 11 Week time period, but that's a huge number of individuals that are moving between these facilities. All of these are potential sources of coded transmission. The California Association of Health Facilities represents most nursing homes in the state. In response to the study, the group said they can't prevent workers like Martha Ta Pia from taking jobs elsewhere, and they can't pay them more because California doesn't pay them enough through Medicaid. But Mike Dark doesn't buy that argument. He's an attorney that works on nursing home reform. And he says the state already tried paying nursing homes more in 2006, that money tends to go into the pockets of the executives and the administrators who run these places. Instead, he says, regulators need to focus on the basics, especially in the roughly 100, California nursing homes with ongoing outbreaks. Right now there's poor access to peopie. There is still erratic. Compliance with things like hand washing requirements, and it's not just patients who are at risk. Nursing home workers like Martha Ta Pia are also contracting Cove in 19 in California alone. 152 of them have died since the pandemic began. For NPR News. I'm Jackie 40, a in Los

Martha Ta Pia Chen Study Professor Keith Chen Mike Dark California California Association Of Heal Federal Government Npr News Professor Elisa Long LOS Peopie New Jersey Florida
California 7th grader threatened with arrest for missing Zoom classes

Mojo In The Morning

01:23 min | Last week

California 7th grader threatened with arrest for missing Zoom classes

"Letter that threatens to arrest a twelve year old for missing class missing their zoom class has a dad all upset the kid actually missed a couple of zoom classes are fourth child in this school and other blue get a letter Lafayette Parent Mark Trump says he was stunned when the family received a letter threatening his seventh grade son with a rest for missing exactly three thirty minute zoom sessions, unexcused absences. He can't become an other state and he could be arrested I said, are you gonNA come arrest my son and my home or trying to find me for not getting into his zoom class on time perfect everyday like his classmates at Stanley middle. School. Mass Trough spends up to seven hours a day attending virtual school via zoom the letter from a Stanley administrator list the three periods merrick missed and says when a student is absent without valid excuse, the student has considered true according to California law and down below the pupil may be subject to arrest the principal hairstyling middle school. told us the letter is a result of new state guidelines. This fall Senate Bill Ninety Eight, which requires districts to keep a closer eye on student attendance reached by phone Stanley Principal Betsy Belmonte told us the letters part of our responsibility to the state for our student attendance review boards

Stanley Principal Betsy Belmon Stanley Middle Mark Trump Principal Hairstyling Middle S Administrator Senate Merrick California
Dallas ISD to continue offering remote and in person learning

CBS11 News Dallas/Fort Worth

00:19 sec | Last week

Dallas ISD to continue offering remote and in person learning

"DALLAS ISD will continue to offer virtual as well as in person classroom learning the district made the announcement yesterday in response to the increasing number of Cova cases. In a statement DISD said, it can't return to one hundred percent virtual learning even if administrators wanted to because of limits put in place by the state.

Cova Dallas Disd
FAA Admin logs some 737Max time

Uncontrolled Airspace: General Aviation Podcast

07:03 min | Last week

FAA Admin logs some 737Max time

"So the administrator went flying. This is okay. I I like this story on a number of a levels. I don't know one of you may turn out to be the sinecure. All right but I like the story on a couple of so what? Mr Carteris. Yeah I know right I didn't want to name names, but that's what I figured about how I figured. It would play out So you know. The Boeing seven thirty-seven Max is still rounded but getting closer and closer to returning to the skies, the Francisco Franco all of Of Aircraft. and. And clearly I mean I'm no I'm not naive obviously this was a big publicity thing. All right. The the administrator of the FAA a conducted in evaluation flight. The pictures I showed should him in in less so? To the extent I'm going to be cynical about this. The one thing I'm questioning is the administrator the as really checked out in a seven thirty seven to fly the left I believe that's correct. Yeah. He he I think he other type he's a former airline pilot. Okay. Has a seven three typewriting. And if he does have a later model type rating for the seventy three. He's eligible the service. That airplane. So clearly, the FAA wants to demonstrate that the seven thirty seven is is safe and or you know and is is is deserving of of returning into flight service, and so they did a thing where now the story I have posted here is actually from before he said that he's going to do this thing but apparently it's been it's heads happened right on this this flight took place and because I think I've seen a story that talked about it after he and he got some Sim time before the well that's smart too that smart too. So his bio at FAA website says. A former Delta director global flight operations or Senior Vice President of flight operations for Delta Airlines. flew fluid line operations as as three twenty captain and previously flew the seven, two, seven, seven, three, seven, seven, five, seven, and seven, six seven. What that tells me as he never made captain on the seven three but he was a captain on the twenty Okay so So anyways, I like this story I think you know I mean it's it's smart marketing it's you know and it's kind of play pleasure I don't know what's the right word is but that we have an administrator who actually can fly airplanes, which is not always the case not always occurred and so so you know I I of got a little warm fuzzy about. starring. In. The best way I mean that. Going there. Okay well, we're will you go JEB. What do you think about this or dude? I was a pure pr stat. Of course it's a PR stunt, but you know I mean, it's a good pr stunned had done well, and and and it's not. You know I know it's a PR stunt, but it's not cynical PR stunt. They're trying to revive this airplane which. I don't disagree with that. and. There's so much to say but. Yeah one of the things that I caught and the aftermath. Is that. He still wouldn't sign off on the airplane. We're not quite ready yet. Well, then what was the purpose of the stunt? Timing may have been wrong, right? That's an interesting point. Now, fly it, fly the day before the day of you give it its walking papers give it. It's it's airworthiness certificate back you know Hey, I just flew the airplane is great here I'm signing the paperwork now. Yeah. Well, that kind of thing. So it looks a little phony to you know it's kind of like a well. I'm not sure which is looks phonier be honest weeping. So. David what do you think about the administrator flying the airplane? Well, I. Think it was Absolutely necessary I off. A long time ago in this saga has been going on for what? Eighteen months coming up on two years since the first crashes. That's true and. Longtime ago the administrators said that He would himself fly the airplane before it was returned to approve for return to service so From the perspective of promise made promise. Kept he fulfilled a promise? At a good thing. Was it a publicity stunt? Absolutely unless the guy was. There to do some data taking for the return to service flight tests but it was a good pr stunt. It it has some some value in that. Here's a guy who really knows the business knows his way around the cockpit. Getting some time in an airplane, it's had a troubled history. Did that, get it to the point of coming back to service no. There's still a lot that the FAA wants to get clear on and they are also working with other regulators from other countries who have grounded the airplane themselves Canada, the European Union. Brazil. There's a lot. The kind of go into this return to service enters a lot of stuff steak and I think the last thing any of these airworthiness authorities WanNa have happened is. Say Yep Yep we're good to go. You can start putting them back into service, which is problematic, and there's going to be a whole lot of pilots going to need to be brought up to speed in a recurrent training for them. Before that happens but. To have some little glitch come along. Right after you return it to service will doom this airplane forever I mean it's definitely going to be smooth no question Scott to be Smith I don't. Disagree with anything you, just said. except well, I would simply point out. that. I'm not sure that the return of the seven three is going to make or break any airlines It's GonNa make or break. Boeing. Yeah. But given the. Severe Downturn right in passenger demand over the last several months. and airlines have been doing fine making do with what they have. Be They've been retiring a number of aircraft or just parking them because the demand is not sufficient to keep them up and running it. All of a sudden. Now, we're going to have a glut of I don't know how many hundreds of of seven thirty seven Max is that are ready to go again. Big. Whoop. WHO's going to be flying.

Administrator FAA Senior Vice President Of Fligh Mr Carteris MAX Francisco Franco Delta Boeing Wanna European Union Delta Airlines. David Brazil Director Scott Canada Smith
Family Members Of Veterans Who Died In Holyoke Soldiers’ Home Coronavirus Outbreak, West Of Boston, Testify

WBZ Midday News

00:37 sec | Last week

Family Members Of Veterans Who Died In Holyoke Soldiers’ Home Coronavirus Outbreak, West Of Boston, Testify

"Support outside the Holyoke soldiers home as family members of veterans who lived and died at that facility. Testify at the State House today is the first meeting of a special commission created to investigate one of the deadliest covert 19 outbreaks in the country. Family members tell lawmakers they've had little communication about what's actually going on inside that home room with two other gentlemen believe one passed before one passed after we trusted them to be giving the best care. To our veterans. You just tend to trust and believe that that's what was since March. 1st 76 factory has died at the soldiers home from covert 19 2 former administrators are facing charges.

State House
Visits suspended at Holyoke Soldiers' Home, west of Boston, after recovered resident tests positive for COVID-19

WBZ Morning News

00:47 sec | Last week

Visits suspended at Holyoke Soldiers' Home, west of Boston, after recovered resident tests positive for COVID-19

"Suspended once again at the Holy Oak Soldiers home as there was a resident who lived at the facility who had recovered from Cove in 19 and has tested positive Once again. There was also a letter from the facility administrator, saying there were three recovered veterans. Who lived in two different units who were once again showing covert like symptoms on Sunday. So right now, staffers and residents there are being tested. Everyone there is being tested this week. The state run veterans facility has been under the watch of state investigators as 76 residents died there this spring. It was one of the deadliest outbreaks in the country at any sort of health care facility. The former manager and medical director, also facing charges from the state on negligence in the operation of the Holyoke soldiers home.

Holy Oak Soldiers Administrator Holyoke Medical Director
Chicago man, 18, accused of molesting cousin, 7, in online view of girl’s teacher, classmates

WGN Showcase

00:23 sec | Last week

Chicago man, 18, accused of molesting cousin, 7, in online view of girl’s teacher, classmates

"Denies bail for 18 year old Cottrell Wall Church with the sexual assault of his seven year old cousin during an E Learning session, a teacher of Bronzeville Academy Charter School reported seeing the girl performing a sex act Thursday afternoon during an online study hall session. Some students were also online at the time Administrators, though, don't believe any Children witnessed the attack. The girl was taken to comer Children's Hospital, D. C. F S is also investigating,

Cottrell Wall Church Bronzeville Academy Charter Sc Children's Hospital Assault
Los Angeles - Trump Administration Reverses Course, Grants Newsom’s Request For Wildfire Relief

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | Last week

Los Angeles - Trump Administration Reverses Course, Grants Newsom’s Request For Wildfire Relief

"The Trump Administration has reversed course at approved California's request for disaster relief funds for wildfire damage has been Thomas, California Governor Gavin Newsom issued a statement Friday night saying he'd just gotten off the phone with President Trump and the state's major disaster declaration request had been approved. It had initially been denied. Listen. Two days earlier, Federal emergency management Agency Administrator Pete Gain or saying the three page rejection letter. That the damage was not of such severity and magnitude as to be beyond the state's capabilities. Now they're Newsome nor the White House provided details on why the administration shifted positions. But Newsome says he's grateful for the president's quick response.

Trump Administration Governor Gavin Newsom Newsome President Trump California Pete Gain Administrator White House Thomas
Trump administration rejects California fires disaster declaration

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | Last week

Trump administration rejects California fires disaster declaration

"Trump has denied a request for a major disaster declaration to help California with recovery from wildfires. The White House says California did not provide relevant data to show it should get a presidential disaster declaration. California says it absolutely qualifies with huge areas burned hundreds of homes gone and victims dead from wildfires. Former FEMA administrator Brock Long telling ABC News politics need to be removed from emergency response and who FEMA helps goes out and render support and is not dictated by politics or, you know the victim of politics that are out there. California says it will appeal the Trump administration's decision and ask for the funding again.

California Fema Donald Trump Trump Administration White House Brock Long Abc News Administrator
Chadwick Boseman died without a will, wife files a probate case

Lewis and Logan

00:19 sec | 2 weeks ago

Chadwick Boseman died without a will, wife files a probate case

"Chadwick Boseman is asking a judge to make her an administrator with limited authority of his estate. Taylor Simone, lead word found a probate case in Los Angeles yesterday, According to court documents. Bozeman died without a legal will. The estimated value of the Black Panther star is $930,500. Disney is

Taylor Simone Chadwick Boseman Los Angeles Administrator Bozeman Disney
Dallas - What's Behind Large Early Voting Turnout?

News and Information with Dave Williams and Amy Chodroff

00:29 sec | 2 weeks ago

Dallas - What's Behind Large Early Voting Turnout?

"Covert North Texans air riding the momentum early voting has brought into the weekend. Early voting has brought high voter turnout so far in North Texas. We expect that even increase as we get towards the end of the period of early voting, but so far everything has gone Very well. Collin County Election Administrator Bruce Sherbert says more than 90,000. People have already voted in Collin County alone. With an extra six days of early voting this year, several counties project they could break early voter turnout

Collin County Bruce Sherbert North Texas Administrator
63 Massachusetts cities and towns, including Boston, at high risk for coronavirus

WBZ Overnight News

01:57 min | 2 weeks ago

63 Massachusetts cities and towns, including Boston, at high risk for coronavirus

"Cities and towns are now Considered to be high risk for covert 19. That number has tripled over the past three weeks. BBC TV's Christina Hager is on the the South South Shore, Shore, where where there there has has been been a a big big surge surge in in cases cases recently. recently. In In several several scenic scenic South South shore shore towns. towns. People People are are just just finding finding out out Cove Cove in in 19 19 is closer than they thought. It's definitely very concerning and very scary. I think it's hard to find a balance between you want your kids to have the socialization and be part of the sports sports like youth hockey now taking a hit from the virus kid that we're playing against had it So we had to take a break from hockey 15 year old Joe Hennessy plays and hang him. One of several towns south of Boston that just moved into the high risk Red zone on the state's color coded map of virus rates will hang him. Health Department has had to quarantine entire teens hang in town Administrator Tom Mayo at a virtual select mints meeting this week. We're seeing a troubling increase in covert 19 cases. And privately runs team sports, especially indoor sports, like hockey, basketball and indoor soccer earlier this month at this rink in Rockland, which is also in the Red Zone, teams from seven area towns competed, leading to an outbreak among coaches and players. This as the number of high risk communities in Massachusetts tripled in the last couple weeks to a total 63 experts say. It's not the time to let up as things get colder. Now we're going

Joe Hennessy Hockey Cove Cove Christina Hager BBC Massachusetts Boston Rockland Tom Mayo Health Department Administrator Soccer
Largest meth bust in DEA history made in California

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:47 sec | 2 weeks ago

Largest meth bust in DEA history made in California

"Meth bust in California, one of Theo time May support of entry had the DEA calling out to major Mexican drug cartels. The D A says £2200 of meth was seized from a stash house in Paris, California, making it the largest seizure of meth domestically India history, But customs and border protection took in another £3000 of meth. Last week after getting a tip from DEA. It was their second largest meth bust, though they took in other drugs as well, like heroin and fentanyl. And while today might be a good day for law enforcement, it's not such a great day. For the Mexican drug cartels, specifically the Sinaloa cartel and cartel. Jalisco. DEA Acting Administrator Timothy Shay says these cartels have been behind much of the drug shipments, which primarily end up in Los Angeles before being distributed.

DEA California Timothy Shay Acting Administrator Jalisco Los Angeles Paris Heroin Fentanyl India
First day of Texas in-person voting sees huge turnout

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

01:50 min | 2 weeks ago

First day of Texas in-person voting sees huge turnout

"It's Day two of early voting here in Texas in the states one of the few places in the country not allowing widespread mail balloting during the pandemic voters went to the polls. Yesterday is Jill Biden former second lady and Democratic president nominee Joe Biden's wife visited. HOUSTON. And rallied supporters during a short address at a get out and vote drive event. Recent polls have shown that Texas is still leaning Republican, that still long lines were common among many polling locations as were masks but in suburban Houston's Fort Bend County technical problems kept machines offline for more than an hour as. Hundreds of people waited to vote county officials there say it's extending early voting hours for the rest of the week because of those issues early voting ends October thirtieth well, Harris County saw record turnout on the first day of early voting by two PM more people had cast ballots than the whole first day of early voting in two thousand sixteen around lives with travel has more from voters she talked with from across the region lines varied from one polling location to another in the Houston area. Harris County voters that energy cast a ballot within minutes though others waited much longer due to. High turnout but in neighboring Fort Bend County voters had to wait several hours due to technical problems with voting machines at least four voting locations had delays but Fort Bend administrators have not made it clear. The extent of the issues Faisal's odd says he waited more than three hours at two different polling locations locations to to vote vote in in the the other other location location I. I. Seen Seen People People left. left. You You know know because because they they had had an an appointment appointment ten ten an an appointment appointment at at Devon Devon somebody's somebody's old old enough enough who who doesn't doesn't want want to to wait wait for for more than our to these people goes away the Fort Bend County Judge Keep e George says he plans to. Open an

Fort Bend County Harris County Houston Jill Biden Fort Bend Texas Joe Biden Devon Devon Faisal President Trump George
"administrator" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

02:46 min | 9 months ago

"administrator" Discussed on WEEI

"We don't administrator dot come and live in studio joining us in here for the next hour you know I I always love the talk box and here's a man who is a former boxer a great documentary filmmaker an academy award winning caliber actor and one of the best standup comedians out there a very very funny man and Dan and green thanks for coming down the I mean Dave I would say right now if I had you as my hate me I wouldn't be living in van Nuys the mobile Sherman oaks man thank you so much Dave good to have you ma'am will thank you for having me I mean well you know what I love you you of just finished off a documentary film yes we finally finished about boxing in Philadelphia and went off you get you know back in the day and I don't know if it's the same today but back in the day the wars in the Philadelphia gyms and all the great fighters they get out in the sixties seventies and eighties yeah there's no town like Philly when it comes to buying and you come up with a great documentary yes yes first what I want to thank you because you've kind of follow the journey with me I can honestly really say that for about almost the last year and a half two years and right now we finished the documentary we got the trailer done our PDF file presentation package is done we we entered it in the number of film festivals we what we've submitted it we got accepted into and one of my one of water ready water recognition for the impact doc awards at a little you California and I just got to you I just got into doctors without borders in out of Delaware I just got into that Film Festival and what's the name of the film the film is called the executioners we all had a chance about a these two men in Philadelphia the start of the gym call the executioners to get boys off the street and one of creating one of the most phenomenal Amager danger friend there when yes I did I traded for like two years before I had to move my mother passed but I stayed in touch with the guys because you know being from Philadelphia and so we knew each other we got to touch I wanna boxing outside of Philly I would end and in non Ohio and then you know I just came over it is you know I ran into my old trainer again after years spoke to one phone in you don't actually know you decide to do the documentary all right when we come back when you get into this today okay we're gonna get some boxing you're gonna tell some funny joke I'm a tells a funny joke and I'm not going to charge and I'm going to come up with my top ten heavyweights of all time top ten fun and they're all white dot then yeah I don't know of a duty for the I don't know it was you're looking at one we need some radio message and data rates may apply please don't text while driving if you've been in business more than twenty minutes you've probably printed your logo on all kinds of promotional products we all know logo's work because they're on everything from the top of skyscrapers to the bottom of shoes ever wondered why or how to best use.

dot administrator
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Everyday is dependent on space the way, we communicate the way we navigate the way we produce food the way we produce energy the way, we do whether prediction and understand climate the way we do national security and defense the way we do disaster relief banking regulate flows of power on the on the on the the power grid. All of it is dependent on space. And and all of those capabilities are available because of a trail that was blazed by NASA. And and for the very small budget that NASA has we have enabled a a human condition that is far beyond. Anything? Anybody would have imagined agreed completely mass as one of the best invest investments that that citizens make for you know, pennies and dollars relatively speaking. As are a no the weather service and others as well. I have one more question before I do that quick update. Because I know I set to is going to be going up soon. Everything going okay with that. Yeah. We're on. We're on schedule for for ice at two. And and it's a obviously a critically important mission for the United States to understand, you know, the the these sheets of ice in the Arctic that that people are concerned about where are they going and understanding our hydrogen fear, even even better than we already do. Yeah. No. We're looking forward to that. Final question. As I mentioned earlier, I spent twelve years at NASA and one of those years, I actually did a detailed down at NASA headquarters. And so got to look at the agency from that perspective as well. In your time at NASA, so far what has surprised you most about the agency the people there. The culture. I'll tell you the raw intellect. The smart people. There are the raw. And they're like I'm working in an agency where I know that everybody here is smarter than me. And that's a that's a good thing. And and I and not only that, but they're all opinionated. And that's even better. There's there's no shortage of people here who are willing to speak their minds and tell the administrator exactly what they think the administrator needs to hear. And so that's a very positive thing for NASA and for our country. Yeah. That that's the that's it is amazing. You know in the science culture there. You know, we can disagree and challenge each other and tell people how we feel, you know, at the end of the day, we go, and, you know, share drink across or do whatever we do. That's that's what I enjoy about the science culture and particularly NASA administrator brightens now, I really wanna thank you for joining us here on the weather podcast. And we wish you continued success in your current role in for your continued service to this country. We thank you. Thank you, Dr shepherd. I appreciate it. Thank you very much. And that's the way. Geese podcast. Thank you for joining us..

NASA NASA administrator administrator United States Dr shepherd Arctic twelve years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Everyday is dependent on space the way, we communicate the way we navigate the way we produce food the way we produce energy the way, we do whether prediction and understand climate the way we do national security and defense the way we do disaster relief banking regulate flows of power on the on the on the the power grid. All of it is dependent on space. And and all of those capabilities are available because of a trail that was blazed by NASA. And and for the very small budget that NASA has we have enabled a a human condition that is far beyond. Anything? Anybody would have imagined agreed completely mass as one of the best invest investments that that citizens make for you know, pennies and dollars relatively speaking. As are a no the weather service and others as well. I have one more question before I do that quick update. Because I know I set to is going to be going up soon. Everything going okay with that. Yeah. We're on. We're on schedule for for ice at two. And and it's a obviously a critically important mission for the United States to understand, you know, the the these sheets of ice in the Arctic that that people are concerned about where are they going and understanding our hydrogen fear, even even better than we already do. Yeah. No. We're looking forward to that. Final question. As I mentioned earlier, I spent twelve years at NASA and one of those years, I actually did a detailed down at NASA headquarters. And so got to look at the agency from that perspective as well. In your time at NASA, so far what has surprised you most about the agency the people there. The culture. I'll tell you the raw intellect. The smart people. There are the raw. And they're like I'm working in an agency where I know that everybody here is smarter than me. And that's a that's a good thing. And and I and not only that, but they're all opinionated. And that's even better. There's there's no shortage of people here who are willing to speak their minds and tell the administrator exactly what they think the administrator needs to hear. And so that's a very positive thing for NASA and for our country. Yeah. That that's the that's it is amazing. You know in the science culture there. You know, we can disagree and challenge each other and tell people how we feel, you know, at the end of the day, we go, and, you know, share drink across or do whatever we do. That's that's what I enjoy about the science culture and particularly NASA administrator brightens now, I really wanna thank you for joining us here on the weather podcast. And we wish you continued success in your current role in for your continued service to this country. We thank you. Thank you, Dr shepherd. I appreciate it. Thank you very much. And that's the way. Geese podcast. Thank you for joining us..

NASA NASA administrator administrator United States Dr shepherd Arctic twelve years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"That that's a that's a good point. Are wh what can you tell our listeners about Nasr's plans for the Mars and the moon? We're going back to Mars anytime soon. We well. We we are we've got a we've got a emission on its way to Mars right now insight, and in fact, we're gonna we're gonna use insight to understand Mars quakes. We're going to try to get a three D image of the interior of Mars. So that we, you know can understand not just whether or not, you know, how active the the geology is. But every time an asteroid impacts Mars. We're going to be able to detect it because. Yeah. So it's going to have a size monitor on there. And we're gonna. Understand that the temperature of Mars deep down. So all of these different instruments are on the insight project, and we're going to be landing insight on Mars thanksgiving, which is going to be a great day for NASA. Yo this is interesting Marshall, there's only one nation on the face of the planet. That's ever landed successfully on Mars one and it's the United States of America. And we've done it seven times. And this will be our eighth time. You think about that achievement? I it really is amazing that that that, you know, think about NASA being created in nineteen fifty eight and here, we are all these years later, sixty years later, and we're still the only country that can land on Mars and do it over and over again, successfully is the point of pride for this country and for the world because NASA through all of its partnerships with international partners and many of these missions are actually in partnership with other countries as well. I think it's NASA still is considered one of the sort of. Crown jewels of American. I know you're you're proud the lead that and I wanna use this last few minutes here to kind of get some big picture thoughts from you fast forward twenty years from now you look back on your time at NASA. What do you hope to accomplish your what do you hope had been accomplished at NASA under your tenure? That's a great question. Well, we wanna make sure we're heading back to the moon that that's happening. We're going to do it in a sustainable way. In other words, we're going to take advantage of reusable systems. We all have seen. What happens when you re re rockets the cost of access to space goes down, the the access to space goes up for more people when I say people, I mean hardware equipment, and we want an entire architecture between earth and the moon to be reusable now is all of that. So so tugs to be reusable between earth orbit and lunar orbit Landers to be reasonable from from from moon orbit. Lunar orbit to the surface of the moon. We want we want all of it to be reasonable. We want it to be replicable at Mars. We want to take advantage of the hundreds of billions of tons of water ice that we now understand is on the surface of the moon. We wanna use use that not only for life support. In other words, human activities on the surface of the moon. But also we want to use it for propulsion hydrogen oxygen is in fact, rocket propulsion. So all of that. Now is that going to happen in my time as the NASA administrator? No, but well, we wanna do is. We want to get that well underway. So that in in in years in, you know, my children will grow up right now there are kids graduating from high school knowing that their entire lives. We've had Americans living and working in space on the international space station. We want to make sure that when my kids kids grow up there growing up in a world where there have been people living and working in orbit around the moon and on the surface of the moon their entire lives. We want that sustainable architecture that uses our international partners, use our commercial partners. That's what we want to develop. And it starts right now with the president space policy directive one, and then the other thing that I hope I can accomplish a lot of America is still not aware of how dependent we are on space every single one of us..

NASA America NASA administrator Nasr United States Marshall Landers president twenty years sixty years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"That that's a that's a good point. Are wh what can you tell our listeners about Nasr's plans for the Mars and the moon? We're going back to Mars anytime soon. We well. We we are we've got a we've got a emission on its way to Mars right now insight, and in fact, we're gonna we're gonna use insight to understand Mars quakes. We're going to try to get a three D image of the interior of Mars. So that we, you know can understand not just whether or not, you know, how active the the geology is. But every time an asteroid impacts Mars. We're going to be able to detect it because. Yeah. So it's going to have a size monitor on there. And we're gonna. Understand that the temperature of Mars deep down. So all of these different instruments are on the insight project, and we're going to be landing insight on Mars thanksgiving, which is going to be a great day for NASA. Yo this is interesting Marshall, there's only one nation on the face of the planet. That's ever landed successfully on Mars one and it's the United States of America. And we've done it seven times. And this will be our eighth time. You think about that achievement? I it really is amazing that that that, you know, think about NASA being created in nineteen fifty eight and here, we are all these years later, sixty years later, and we're still the only country that can land on Mars and do it over and over again, successfully is the point of pride for this country and for the world because NASA through all of its partnerships with international partners and many of these missions are actually in partnership with other countries as well. I think it's NASA still is considered one of the sort of. Crown jewels of American. I know you're you're proud the lead that and I wanna use this last few minutes here to kind of get some big picture thoughts from you fast forward twenty years from now you look back on your time at NASA. What do you hope to accomplish your what do you hope had been accomplished at NASA under your tenure? That's a great question. Well, we wanna make sure we're heading back to the moon that that's happening. We're going to do it in a sustainable way. In other words, we're going to take advantage of reusable systems. We all have seen. What happens when you re re rockets the cost of access to space goes down, the the access to space goes up for more people when I say people, I mean hardware equipment, and we want an entire architecture between earth and the moon to be reusable now is all of that. So so tugs to be reusable between earth orbit and lunar orbit Landers to be reasonable from from from moon orbit. Lunar orbit to the surface of the moon. We want we want all of it to be reasonable. We want it to be replicable at Mars. We want to take advantage of the hundreds of billions of tons of water ice that we now understand is on the surface of the moon. We wanna use use that not only for life support. In other words, human activities on the surface of the moon. But also we want to use it for propulsion hydrogen oxygen is in fact, rocket propulsion. So all of that. Now is that going to happen in my time as the NASA administrator? No, but well, we wanna do is. We want to get that well underway. So that in in in years in, you know, my children will grow up right now there are kids graduating from high school knowing that their entire lives. We've had Americans living and working in space on the international space station. We want to make sure that when my kids kids grow up there growing up in a world where there have been people living and working in orbit around the moon and on the surface of the moon their entire lives. We want that sustainable architecture that uses our international partners, use our commercial partners. That's what we want to develop. And it starts right now with the president space policy directive one, and then the other thing that I hope I can accomplish a lot of America is still not aware of how dependent we are on space every single one of us..

NASA America NASA administrator Nasr United States Marshall Landers president twenty years sixty years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And we are back on the weather beaks podcasts with NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein. We're talking about sort of NASA and his evolution on climate. And so he gave you some perspective on sort of some of the statements. He made for about climate in the past. This gets me to something that you started talking about earlier in the podcast. And you know, after NASA made this very important announcement of the new NASA, astronaut corps, and that's so important. I want to talk a little bit about that. I saw people saying oh Nastase back the space program is back. But I pushed back and said, well, it never went anywhere. We got the, you know, the Parker pro and we've got the GPS satellite. We got. I sat to coming up. What do you think that people just see NASA as the mand program, which is critical, by the way? But why do you think we the citizens just see NASA? And what we do is just the man to program, and yeah, yeah. I think it's because of the drama around it and the. The prestige of it. It just seems to get more more attention. All that being said, you're absolutely right. Nasa has amazing missions going on all the time. In fact, we recently launched I think, you know, when when you. The last time we launched American astronauts from American soil on American rockets was back in twenty eleven and I think when when people remember the space shuttle's, they it's it's it's nostalgic. It people remember how impressive it was. And the all of it. And and I think because that is so emotional. That's that's what people think of when they think of NASA. Right. And of course, people think of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landing on the moon, and and the the five moon missions that came after that. So all of those all of those things are what people think about because I think that that that's the most salient piece of NASA. But you're absolutely right nostril does so much more than that. When you think about the science mission directorate, and planetary science and helium physics and earth science. We we do astrophysics deep space exploration. We do all kinds. Of things that aren't necessarily tied to human spaceflight, and the people that the people that follow that. Of course, are the scientists and people that are enthusiastic about exploration. But not it's it doesn't get the drama on national television the way human space. Yeah..

NASA NASA administrator Jim Breitenstein Neil Armstrong Buzz Aldrin
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And we are back on the weather beaks podcasts with NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein. We're talking about sort of NASA and his evolution on climate. And so he gave you some perspective on sort of some of the statements. He made for about climate in the past. This gets me to something that you started talking about earlier in the podcast. And you know, after NASA made this very important announcement of the new NASA, astronaut corps, and that's so important. I want to talk a little bit about that. I saw people saying oh Nastase back the space program is back. But I pushed back and said, well, it never went anywhere. We got the, you know, the Parker pro and we've got the GPS satellite. We got. I sat to coming up. What do you think that people just see NASA as the mand program, which is critical, by the way? But why do you think we the citizens just see NASA? And what we do is just the man to program, and yeah, yeah. I think it's because of the drama around it and the. The prestige of it. It just seems to get more more attention. All that being said, you're absolutely right. Nasa has amazing missions going on all the time. In fact, we recently launched I think, you know, when when you. The last time we launched American astronauts from American soil on American rockets was back in twenty eleven and I think when when people remember the space shuttle's, they it's it's it's nostalgic. It people remember how impressive it was. And the all of it. And and I think because that is so emotional. That's that's what people think of when they think of NASA. Right. And of course, people think of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landing on the moon, and and the the five moon missions that came after that. So all of those all of those things are what people think about because I think that that that's the most salient piece of NASA. But you're absolutely right nostril does so much more than that. When you think about the science mission directorate, and planetary science and helium physics and earth science. We we do astrophysics deep space exploration. We do all kinds. Of things that aren't necessarily tied to human spaceflight, and the people that the people that follow that. Of course, are the scientists and people that are enthusiastic about exploration. But not it's it doesn't get the drama on national television the way human space. Yeah..

NASA NASA administrator Jim Breitenstein Neil Armstrong Buzz Aldrin
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Here's the other thing that's important to note and Marshall, I'm sure, you know, this like right now in the United States, the average person who lives who lives in Oklahoma. The average person gets thirteen minutes of lead time on a tornado. Right. That's not very much. Yes. Not. And when you think about the fact that that's the average has an improvement from what it used to be. But still probably not enough. That's absolutely not enough, especially if the average is thirteen minutes that means half, the people are getting less than less team that absolutely. And so, you know, you think about the person's getting five or ten minutes of lead time, and maybe they're not they don't have the TV on or they're in a part of Oklahoma where they? Have sirens. You know, the the it it becomes a very serious threat to their lives, and we should be well past that we should be giving people over an hour of lead time based on technology that already exists. We just need to feel it and part of fielding requires us to do these observations system simulation experiments, and so we put that in the Bill as well. Are we what is your home? Sorry. I wanted to pick up before you move on the wooded share thought on some out there in our community and in the social sciences community that say that one hour lead time or too much lead time actually also has its problems too. Because people be maybe let their guard down a bit too much. I'm curious about your thoughts on that. I think that is absolutely wrong. I mean, I can't tell you how wrong the had a, and I'm gonna tell you from personal experience. More lead time is better. We have to understand people are smart, if if people know an hour ahead of time, then they're going to do the right thing. And if they don't do the right thing, at least, it's not because they didn't know. Right. And and and so we have an obligation. To increase that lead time. But you're absolutely right. I heard people tell me when I was a member of congress that we don't want to give people too much lead time because then they might play a video game and not and not move out of the way or might not take cover. And you know, I think that that is that is social experimentation that we don't wanna play we want to give people the information they need and then allow them to make good decisions. Now, if they're not making good decisions, we can do things to increase, you know, their their decision making capacity. If necessary we can warn them as to you know, what the end result is if they don't do the precautions that they're being told that they need to take. But but the last thing we want to do is restrict their information because they're not smart enough to make the right decision while I wanted to just whether geeks of your listeners how many NASA administrators or congressmen have you heard talking about Mexico models and data assimilation and Aussies. Clearly. A NASA administrator in person that understands our community. So it's a pleasure to be to have the administrator on whether geeks. I want to shift back around to the NASA world now and kind of transition because NASA desert sciences, I again, I was a scientist at NASA Goddard Space white center for twelve years was involved in the global precipitation measurement or GPS mission. Would you say about Nasr's role in studying planet earth because there's some that say why is NASA doing that? Why is it? No are USGS doing that. What what's your response to people that say that? So that's in Nastase mission set, and it always has been and it always will be..

NASA Oklahoma NASA administrator NASA Goddard Space white cente United States Marshall USGS Nastase Nasr Bill congress Mexico scientist thirteen minutes twelve years ten minutes one hour
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Here's the other thing that's important to note and Marshall, I'm sure, you know, this like right now in the United States, the average person who lives who lives in Oklahoma. The average person gets thirteen minutes of lead time on a tornado. Right. That's not very much. Yes. Not. And when you think about the fact that that's the average has an improvement from what it used to be. But still probably not enough. That's absolutely not enough, especially if the average is thirteen minutes that means half, the people are getting less than less team that absolutely. And so, you know, you think about the person's getting five or ten minutes of lead time, and maybe they're not they don't have the TV on or they're in a part of Oklahoma where they? Have sirens. You know, the the it it becomes a very serious threat to their lives, and we should be well past that we should be giving people over an hour of lead time based on technology that already exists. We just need to feel it and part of fielding requires us to do these observations system simulation experiments, and so we put that in the Bill as well. Are we what is your home? Sorry. I wanted to pick up before you move on the wooded share thought on some out there in our community and in the social sciences community that say that one hour lead time or too much lead time actually also has its problems too. Because people be maybe let their guard down a bit too much. I'm curious about your thoughts on that. I think that is absolutely wrong. I mean, I can't tell you how wrong the had a, and I'm gonna tell you from personal experience. More lead time is better. We have to understand people are smart, if if people know an hour ahead of time, then they're going to do the right thing. And if they don't do the right thing, at least, it's not because they didn't know. Right. And and and so we have an obligation. To increase that lead time. But you're absolutely right. I heard people tell me when I was a member of congress that we don't want to give people too much lead time because then they might play a video game and not and not move out of the way or might not take cover. And you know, I think that that is that is social experimentation that we don't wanna play we want to give people the information they need and then allow them to make good decisions. Now, if they're not making good decisions, we can do things to increase, you know, their their decision making capacity. If necessary we can warn them as to you know, what the end result is if they don't do the precautions that they're being told that they need to take. But but the last thing we want to do is restrict their information because they're not smart enough to make the right decision while I wanted to just whether geeks of your listeners how many NASA administrators or congressmen have you heard talking about Mexico models and data assimilation and Aussies. Clearly. A NASA administrator in person that understands our community. So it's a pleasure to be to have the administrator on whether geeks. I want to shift back around to the NASA world now and kind of transition because NASA desert sciences, I again, I was a scientist at NASA Goddard Space white center for twelve years was involved in the global precipitation measurement or GPS mission. Would you say about Nasr's role in studying planet earth because there's some that say why is NASA doing that? Why is it? No are USGS doing that. What what's your response to people that say that? So that's in Nastase mission set, and it always has been and it always will be..

NASA Oklahoma NASA administrator NASA Goddard Space white cente United States Marshall USGS Nastase Nasr Bill congress Mexico scientist thirteen minutes twelve years ten minutes one hour
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And we are back on the weather. Geeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia. And I have the pleasure to be joined by the NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein, I wanna now this is weather geeks. This is a show powered by the Weather Channel. And we're let's talk a little weather. You many people may not realize this. But you were one of the most significant figures behind the weather research and forecasting innovation act along with colleagues. Why was weather so important to you that you push forward? One of the most significant pieces of major legislation and weather in the history of the country Marshall, I just want to say this. You're an amazing PR guy. We need to hire you, and I need to have you go everywhere I used to work there. But I'm quite happy in university world. But you know, I give credit where credit is due. And I'll I'll I'll poke and criticize where it is the duty as well. But this was a signal. I was the president Jim of the American meteorological society AM in two thousand thirteen. So there you go much involved in some of the as this was coming about. So I know it's difficult. So why why why was it so important you so I I was representing the first district of Oklahoma, which is Tulsa, Oklahoma. And every year, I was in congress. I had constituents that got killed in tornadoes every year except for one year, and in two thousand thirteen there was a a massive tornado in Moore, Oklahoma, which is not in my district, but not too far from my district and that tornado hit a school and it killed twenty one people, and it devastated, you know, lives are gonna forever be changed and not for the good because of that horrible horrible event. And I resolved at that point to try to figure out how do we move to a day where we? Have zero deaths from tornadoes in the United States of America. We have the technology. If you think about the airplanes, I used to fly we have in the nose of those airplanes, we have something called a phased array radar where we detect and track and eventually target aircraft on the horizon, a classified number of miles away. And then, you know, you take that same technology in the nose of an airplane, and you put it in you put it to work on a cloud. And so instead of detecting and tracking tiny little targets on the horizon, namely airplanes. Now, you detect and track.

Dr Marshall shepherd Oklahoma Jim Breitenstein NASA administrator university of Georgia congress United States Tulsa president Moore America one year
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And we are back on the weather. Geeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia. And I have the pleasure to be joined by the NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein, I wanna now this is weather geeks. This is a show powered by the Weather Channel. And we're let's talk a little weather. You many people may not realize this. But you were one of the most significant figures behind the weather research and forecasting innovation act along with colleagues. Why was weather so important to you that you push forward? One of the most significant pieces of major legislation and weather in the history of the country Marshall, I just want to say this. You're an amazing PR guy. We need to hire you, and I need to have you go everywhere I used to work there. But I'm quite happy in university world. But you know, I give credit where credit is due. And I'll I'll I'll poke and criticize where it is the duty as well. But this was a signal. I was the president Jim of the American meteorological society AM in two thousand thirteen. So there you go much involved in some of the as this was coming about. So I know it's difficult. So why why why was it so important you so I I was representing the first district of Oklahoma, which is Tulsa, Oklahoma. And every year, I was in congress. I had constituents that got killed in tornadoes every year except for one year, and in two thousand thirteen there was a a massive tornado in Moore, Oklahoma, which is not in my district, but not too far from my district and that tornado hit a school and it killed twenty one people, and it devastated, you know, lives are gonna forever be changed and not for the good because of that horrible horrible event. And I resolved at that point to try to figure out how do we move to a day where we? Have zero deaths from tornadoes in the United States of America. We have the technology. If you think about the airplanes, I used to fly we have in the nose of those airplanes, we have something called a phased array radar where we detect and track and eventually target aircraft on the horizon, a classified number of miles away. And then, you know, you take that same technology in the nose of an airplane, and you put it in you put it to work on a cloud. And so instead of detecting and tracking tiny little targets on the horizon, namely airplanes. Now, you detect and track.

Dr Marshall shepherd Oklahoma Jim Breitenstein NASA administrator university of Georgia congress United States Tulsa president Moore America one year
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"The way we do whether prediction and understand climate the way we do national security and defense the way we do disaster relief banking regulate flows of power on the on the on the the power grid, all of it is dependent on space and and all of those capabilities are available because of a trail that was blazed by NASA and and for the very small budget that NASA has, we have enabled a a human condition that is far beyond. Anything anybody would have imagined agreed completely mass as one of the best invest investments that that citizens make for, you know, pennies dollars relatively speaking as are a no in the weather service and others as well. I have one more question before I do that quick update because I know I sat to is going to be going up soon. Everything going. Okay with that. Yeah, we're on. We're on schedule for for ice at two, and and it's a obviously a critically important mission for the United States to understand, you know, the the these sheets of ice in the Arctic that that people are concerned about, where are they going and understanding our hydrogen fear even even better than we already do. Yeah. No, we're looking for the final question. As I mentioned earlier, I spent twelve years at NASA and one of those years I actually did a detailed down at NASA headquarters. Gotta look at the agency from that perspective as well in your time at NASA so far, what has the prized you most about the agency? The people. They're the culture. I'll tell you the raw intellect, the smart people. There are the raw, like I'm working at an agency where I know that everybody here is smarter than me, and that's a, that's a good thing and and and and not only that, but they're all opinionated. And that's even better. There's there's no shortage of people here who are willing to speak their minds until the administrator exactly what they think the administrator needs to hear. And so that's a very positive thing for NASA and for our country. Yeah, that's the it is amazing. You know, in the science culture there, you know we can disagree and challenge each other and tell people how we feel, you know, at the end of the day we go and you know, shared drink across or do whatever we do. That's what I enjoy about the science culture. And particularly NASA administrator brightens. Now I really wanna thank you for joining us here on the weather podcast, and we wish you continued success in your current role in for your continued service. To this country. We thank you. Thank you, Dr. Separate I presented thank you very much, and that's the weather geese podcast. Thank you for joining us.

NASA NASA administrator administrator United States Dr. Separate Arctic twelve years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Yeah, that's, that's a good point. Are wh-what can you tell our listeners about Nasr's plans for the Mars and the moon? We're going back to Mars. Anytime soon we well, we we are. We've got a, we've got a a mission on its way to Mars right now insight. And in fact, we're gonna we're gonna use insight to understand Mars quakes. We're gonna try to get a three d. image of the interior of Mars so that we, you know, can understand not just whether or not you know how active the the geology is, but every time an asteroid impacts Mars, we're going to be able to detect it because yeah, so it's gonna have a size Mamata on there and. We're gonna understand that the temperature of Mars deep down. So all of these different instruments are on the insight project, and we're going to be landing insight on Mars thanksgiving, which is going to be a great day for NASA. This is interesting Marshall. There's only one nation on the face of the planet that's ever landed successfully on Mars one. And it's the United States of America, and we've done it seven times and this will be our eighth time you think about that achievement. I, it really is amazing that that that you know thing about NASA being created in nineteen fifty eight. And here we are all these years later sixty years later, and we're still the only country that can land on Mars and do it over and over again successfully is the point of pride for this country and for the world because NASA through all of its partnerships with international partners and many of these missions are actually in partnership with the other countries as well. I think it's NASA still is considered one of the. Sort of crown jewels of American. I know you're, you're proud, the lead that and I wanna use this last few minutes here to kind of get some big picture thoughts from you fast forward, twenty years from now, you look back on your time at NASA. What do you hope to accomplish? What? What do you hope had been accomplished at NASA under your tenure? That's a great question. Well, we wanna make sure we're heading back to the moon. I mean that that's happening. We're going to do it in a sustainable way. In other words, we're going to take advantage of reusable systems. We all have seen what happens when you re reuse rockets. The cost of access to space goes down the the access to space goes up for more people. When I say people, I mean hardware equipment and we want an entire architecture between earth and the moon to be reusable. Now, all of that. So so tugs to be reusable between earth orbit and lunar orbit Landers to be reasonable from from from moon. Orbit lunar orbit to the surface, the moon, we want, we want all of it to be reusable. We want it to be replicable Mars. We wanna take advantage of the hundreds of billions of tons of water ice that we now understand is on the surface of the moon. We wanna use use that not only for life support in other words, human activities on the surface of the moon. But also we want to use it for propulsion. Hydrogen and oxygen is in fact rocket propulsion. So all of that now is that going to happen in my time as the NASA administrator? No, but we want to do is we want to get that well underway so that in in in years in, you know, my children will grow up right now. There are kids graduating from high school knowing that their entire lives. We've had Americans living and working in space on the international space station. We wanna make sure that when my kids kids grow up there growing up in a world where there have been people living and working in orbit around the moon and on the surface of the moon. There. Tire lives. We want that sustainable architecture that uses our international partners use our commercial partners. That's what we want to develop. And it starts right now with the president space policy, directive one. And then the other thing that I hope I can accomplish a lot of America is still not aware of how dependent we are on space. Every single one of us everyday is dependent on space. The way we communicate the way we navigate the way we produce food the way we produce energy..

NASA America NASA administrator Nasr United States Mamata Marshall Landers president twenty years sixty years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"I'm still part of the NASA family in some ways masses willing to take those risks on a new radar that can measure thunderstorms in a hurricane or send a probe to the fun and and that that really is a little bit different than an operational mission. And I wanna I wanna pause here for one moment. And we are back on the weather spot cast with NASA administrator, Jim, Brian Stein. We're talking about sort of NASA and his evolution on climate, and he gave you some perspective on sort of some of the statements he made for about climate in the past. This gets me to something that you started talking about earlier in the podcast, and you know after NASA made this very important announcement of the new NASA astronaut corps, and that's so important. I want to talk a little bit about that. I saw people saying, oh, Nasr's back the space program is back, but I pushed back and said, well, it never went anywhere. We've got, you know, the Parker pro. We've got the GPS satellite got I set to coming up. What do you think that people just see NASA as the mand program, which is critical by the way? But why do you think we the citizens just see NASA and what we do is just the man to program. And yeah, yeah, I think it's because of the the drama around it and the. The prestige of it, it just seems to get more more attention. All that being said, you're absolutely right. NASA has amazing missions going on all the time. In fact, we recently launched, I think, you know when when you. The last time we launched American astronauts from American soil on American rockets was back in twenty eleven. And I think when when people remember the space shuttle's, they, it's, it's, it's nostalgic it people remember how impressive it was and the author of it and and I think because that is so emotional, that's, that's what people think of when they think of NASA. Right. And of course, people think of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landing on the moon and and the the five moon missions that came after that. So all of those all of those things are what people think about. Because I think that that that's the most salient piece of NASA, but you're absolutely right now does so much more than that when you think about the science mission directorate and planetary science and helium, physics and earth science, we, we do astrophysics deep space exploration. We do all. Kinds of things that aren't necessarily tied to human spaceflight and the people that the people that follow that, of course, the scientists and people that are enthusiastic about exploration, but not it doesn't get the drama on national television, the way human space..

NASA NASA administrator Brian Stein Nasr Neil Armstrong Buzz Aldrin Jim
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"I'm sure you know this like right now in the United States, the average person who lives who lives in Oklahoma, the average person gets thirteen minutes of lead time on a tornado, right? That's not very much. Yes, not. And when you think about the fact that that's the average and has an improvement from what it used to be, but still probably not enough. It's absolutely not enough, especially if the average thirteen minutes that means half the people are getting less than less team that absolutely. And so you know, you think about the person's getting five or ten minutes of lead time and maybe they're not. They don't have the TV on or they're in a part of Oklahoma where they don't have sirens, you know the the, it, it, it becomes a very serious threat to their lives, and we should be well past that we should be giving. People over an hour of lead time based on technology that already exists. We just need to feel it. And part of fielding requires us to do these observations system simulation experiments. And so we put that in the Bill as well. What are we? What is your home? Sorry, I wanted to pick up for you. Move on the woods, your thought on some out there in our community and in the social sciences community that say that one hour lead time or too much lead time actually also has its problems too, because people be maybe let their guard down a bit too much. I'm curious about your thoughts on that. I think that is absolutely wrong. I mean, I can't tell you how wrong that hit. I'm gonna tell you from personal experience, more lead time is better. We have to understand people are smart. If people know an hour ahead of time, then they're going to do the right thing. And if they don't do the right thing, at least it's not because they didn't know. Right. And and and so we have an obligation to increase lead time, but you're absolutely right. I heard people tell me when I was a member of congress that we don't want to give people too much lead time because then they might play a video. Game and not and not move out of the way or might not take cover. And you know, I think that that is that is social experimentation that we don't wanna play. We want to give people the information they need and then allow them to make good decisions. Now, if they're not making good decisions, we can do things to increase, you know, their their decision making capacity if necessary. We can warn them as to, you know what the end result is. If they don't do the precautions that they're being told that they need to take. But but the last thing we want to do is restrict their information because they're not smart enough to make the right decision. While I wanted to just whether geeks of your listeners, how many NASA administrators, congressman. Have you heard talking about Mexico models and data assimilation and Aussie's clearly a NASA administrator in person and understands our community. So it's a pleasure to be to have the administrator on whether geeks I want to shift back around to the NASA wh. World now and kind of transition because NASA desert sciences. I again, I was a scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight center for twelve years involved in the global precipitation measurement or GPS mission. What would you say about Nasr's role in studying planet earth? Because there's some that say, will wise NASA doing that? Why is it? No. Are US GS doing that? What? What's your response to people that say that? So that's in Nasr's mission set, and it always has been and always will be. I mean, there's still so much. We don't know about our own planet and it's changing all the time. You know when I was a member of the house representatives. You're right. Some people suggested that I was a climate denier I, I heard that and and you know, all that stems from speech that I gave back in, oh, it was two thousand thirteen. In fact, it was after the Moore tornado, I, I had all these folks Twenty-one. Kids get killed in a tornado in Moore, Okla. Homa not just kids..

NASA Oklahoma NASA administrator Nasr NASA Goddard Space Flight cent United States Moore Bill congress congressman Mexico scientist thirteen minutes twelve years ten minutes one hour
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"But the the space weather is very critical because day-to-day activities on earth very much impact that it's just one of many examples of how Nastase program the breadth of it is really not only exploring and understanding, but also has practical benefit for citizens, and I'm gonna come back to more of that, but I want to just reflect on you for a while because when your name was put in nomination as an acid ministration as you well know, because you lived it. There is a lot of back and forth about of the qualified. He's the right person by the way I wrote in Forbes, and I very much thought you with the right person. So I was very supportive of that nomination. And I appreciate it. A navy fighter pilot for ten years, flying over nineteen hundred hours more than three hundred aircraft landings flew combat missions in Iraq and Afghanistan. You also flew f eighteen Hornets you know, trying to fight the drug war. How is all of that prepared you to, you know, be congressman and also lead the nascent space space agency, and I thank you for your service as well. Well, thank you. I, I appreciate you saying that. So you know when you when you think about what NASA is and what NASA does the first a and NASA is 'aeronautics. A lot of people forget about that and aeronautics is is critically important, not just for national security and defense. It's important for our economy. We we, you know, a lot of people don't realize when you go flying on an airliner, you are flying with NASA technology and capabilities and wing designs, and you know the the engine designs, all of those things are developed by NASA in an open. An open source kind of way so that industry can take advantage of it. And all two million helps the United States maintain its edge technologically and then maintain. It's it's, you know, a base of exports aviation for the United States of America is an expert. In fact, it's a net export. In other words, we export more than we import. And so when you think about the trade imbalance and a lot of people hear the president talk about the trade imbalance, a lot aviation is just the opposite. We have a trade surplus and and so it's an offset to that trade imbalance, although it's not big enough to offset it entirely obvious right, but, but all that is possible because NASA and the US government has made investments in aviation so and 'aeronautics. So that's, I think, a big, a big piece of it. The other thing is a member of congress. What I found is that when you start talking about things like the architecture for communications in space and as a member of congress, being a former warfighter, my. Itself I would. I would bring up things like, you know, we need, we need commercial satellite communications to be encrypted so that the warfighter can take advantage of it. We need those satellites to be able to frequency hop so that so that those signals can't be jammed by the enemy. In other words, we we have the warfighter can take advantage of commercial satellite communications for a whole host of different capabilities. And what you find is that you know, there's not a lot of members of congress that that speak in those terms. And so it kind of put me in a position where I could be the leader on these on these space issues and over the course of time, it kind of turned out that I was leading on space issues quite frequently. And then the the day came when when President Trump got elected and I got nominated to be the NASA administrator, and so you know, you never know how these things turn out. But I do think that whether it's my military pilot experience or my time in congress, it all adds up to to prepare me for this for this. Particular position? Sure, sure. And you also have a triple major in business administration, economics and psychology from Rice University, an MBA from Cornell, and you know, there were critics out there said, well, you know, he's, he's a former politician. He's a former congressman. He's not a scientist you, should he be running nasty, you know, I, as you mentioned earlier before we came on, I spent many years, twelve years at NASA, and I remember ministers like Sean O'Keefe and Michael Griffin and others as well. So you know, I didn't have as much of a problem with the background because we've had a variety of backgrounds. We had Charlie Bolden and astronaut the most recent..

NASA congress President Trump United States NASA administrator congressman Charlie Bolden Hornets president Rice University navy Sean O'Keefe Cornell America Iraq Afghanistan Michael Griffin nineteen hundred hours twelve years ten years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"We're excited to welcome Yuli confirm NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein, Jim hails from Tulsa Oklahoma, where he became all too familiar with extreme weather. So he understands the importance of improving our forecast capabilities will discuss the major piece of legislation. He helped past port expansion of weather research and forecasting. Plus we'll hear about the Evelyn of his on climate change and how the work at NASA can further our understanding of its impact. If that's not enough, we'll also get Jim dots on the future space exploration could include a visit to Mars. It's all next on the weather Deeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia. Thank you for joining us. Well, thank you for having me. It's good to be here. I want to jump right in with some science because NASA just launched a. Really interesting mission. The types the sun. Why is that important? And why? Why should all Americans be excited about that? And why is it important for us as citizens? That's a great question, and it's an important one. And a lot of people don't realize just in fact how important it is. So when you think about the sun, the sun actually creates what we call solar wind. So the sun is actually very responsible for what we call space weather. And of course, people are familiar with solar flares. Some people are maybe not so familiar with what's called a coronal mass ejection. So what happens is inside the sun, you know, it's, it's a nuclear fusion going on inside the sun hydrogen fusion, and from that charged particles are released. And of course, in some cases, they're released in the form of a solar flare, which means you got charged particles moving at a at a high rate of speed and another cases you can have. It's called a coronal mass ejection, which means there's a whole lot of charged particles moving at, you know, at a very, very rapid speed, almost the speed of light if you will. And so in this particular case, what happens is the the, the, the solar radiation, the radiation that comes from the sun can be very damaging not only to humans and other words astronauts that could be in deep, split deep space or could be on the international space station and lower orbit, but also very damaging for our our satellites. So when you think about how important the satellites are to to to to us as a civilization, the way we predict whether the way we understand climate the way we do disaster relief and national security, the way we do communications, we've got, you know, an entire architecture in geostationary orbit for over the horizon communications. Fact, many of your viewers might be listening to this on a on a podcast. They might download it on the internet. They could have internet from space. They could be getting it. You know, from from that architecture for communications in in geostationary orbit, the way we do navigation. When you think about GPS and how important that GPS timing signal is all of these satellites and that that GPS timing signals important for banking, it's important for regulating flows on the power grid and a whole host of other infrastructure, critical pieces of infrastructure for the United States and for the world. So all of these things are dependent on space, and when we have a coronal mass ejection, those things all be, they can all be put at risk. In fact, they could ultimately go away. They could be permanently damaged. And of course it's not just that. But you know if the lights go out on earth or our cell phones, quit working things get really ugly, really quickly as. Ashley, if they don't come back very fast. So what the what Parker solar probe is doing. It's going to help us understand how the sun works so that we can better predict those solar flares and those coronal mass ojection ze. Yeah, this is important stuff. When you hear the term space weather when I often mentioned it to people, I think they think, oh, a thunderstorm on Mars or something..

Jim NASA Dr Marshall shepherd NASA administrator Jim dots Tulsa Oklahoma Jim Breitenstein United States Ashley university of Georgia