37 Burst results for "Administrator"

NBC News Edits Audio to Smear Parents Standing Against Critical Race Theory

Mark Levin

01:22 min | 12 hrs ago

NBC News Edits Audio to Smear Parents Standing Against Critical Race Theory

"But our friends at news busters NBC ignores loudon rapes smears parents supposed to critical race theory and edits audio The corrupt meeting in America And by the way of the networks of the networks NBC is the worst For months now NBC has been assailing the concerned parents of south Lake Texas Because they've been standing up to the tide of critical race theory being crammed down the throats of their children And yesterday despite new details in the already outrageous loudon county high school rape story NBC nightly news continued their assault on the community that has had enough of liberal propaganda They even deceptively edited audio to make it seem as though the parents were in support of the Holocaust Continuing their smears suggesting the town was made up of rabid racists Looking to drive minorities out of their community anchor Lester fairness is overrated holt Try to the town for being the center of a firestorm over diversity and inclusion efforts Now secretly recorded comments he said from a top administrator about books on the Holocaust are sparking no outrage That's right NBC wanted to claim the town was now either made up of Holocaust deniers or Nazi sympathizers

NBC Loudon County High School Loudon South Lake America Texas Lester Holt
Fresh update on "administrator" discussed on AP News Radio

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "administrator" discussed on AP News Radio

"U. S. health officials are setting the stage for a national covert 19 vaccination campaign for younger children Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine is currently being given to people as young as 12 over the next 3 weeks federal officials will discuss making smaller dose versions available to children ages 5 to 11 some 28000000 across the nation states can pre order doses starting next week to help them prepare the centers for disease control and prevention has sent out a 7 page planning guide it notes pharmacies can give covered 19 shots to children but clarifies that only doses prepared and packaged specifically for children are to be used it does not speak to some thornier questions such as how much school based clinics should be relied on or whether kids should be required to get backs needed to attend school in person I'm Ben Thomas

Centers For Disease Control An Pfizer Ben Thomas
Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen Is Building an Army of IRS Auditors

Mark Levin

01:45 min | 2 d ago

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen Is Building an Army of IRS Auditors

"Ladies and gentlemen they don't need 85,000 new auditors to get billionaires and millionaires There aren't enough billionaires and millionaires for $85,000 It aimed at you and I'll prove it to you again Because they want every transaction involving $600 to be monitored by the Internal Revenue Service That's not the case right now $600 Well you're not going to catch tax cheats with a $600 transaction This is just a way to get the foot in the door so they can spy on you and threaten you That's what we're talking about So here's Janet Yellen on CBS evening news last evening And she's asked about this by Nora O'Donnell Let's go to cut 8 Go You want banks to report transactions of $600 or more That's what the IRS wants Does this mean that the government is trying to peak into our pocketbooks If you want to look at $600 transactions Absolutely not I think this proposal has been seriously mischaracterized The proposal involves no reporting of individual transactions of any individual Look yes it does What are you talking about Yes it does A $600 transaction They want to be able to Monitor it And the banks have to report it What is she talking about These people on this administrator they lie worse than your typical American Marxist

Janet Yellen IRS Nora O'donnell CBS Government
Fresh "Administrator" from The Dan Bongino Show

The Dan Bongino Show

00:35 sec | 18 hrs ago

Fresh "Administrator" from The Dan Bongino Show

"Dan bungie When my officials release new Halloween guidelines news is next but first your weather channel forecast overcast out there We may see some rain has limited 60s 44 for a low tide is gonna get cold Saturday mainly sunny high 59 then we'll be in the mid 60s with sunshine on Sunday We're 68 O'Hare 63 at midway and 64° the lakefront got issues with youth or high school sports positive coaching alliance can help PCA a national nonprofit offers more than a thousand free online resources for youth in high school sports coaches parents students and administrators visit PCA dev zone data work It will make public health officials want it to be a safe Halloween as young children remain unvaccinated The department.

Dan Bungie PCA
A Message to Attorney General Merrick Garland

Mark Levin

01:54 min | Last week

A Message to Attorney General Merrick Garland

"And the message for Merrick Garland the putative attorney general of the United States We the American people we parents and taxpayers We're not going to be intimidated by you We're not going anywhere We will continue to attend school board meetings hopefully by the millions We will make demands of our elected officials who use our tax dollars and have our children in their classrooms We are not servants of the national education association the American federation of teachers We are not servants Of school board administrators and superintendents We're not servants of the Democrat party in the radical American marxists who push their crap Their critical race theory Their gender ism And their attacks on the founding of this nation are economic system to brainwash our children We wrongly surrendered our colleges and universities and we need to claw them back too But we will be damned Damn If we're gonna pay for the demise of our own family our own faith in our own country We're paying for suppose a professionals to teach our children mathematics Literature English perhaps another language Science technology We're not paying confiscatory salaries pensions and medical benefits And providing tenure damn near a lifetime jobs to individuals who seek to bring their politics the politics of this administration into the classroom We will not tolerate this

Merrick Garland American Federation Of Teacher National Education Association Democrat Party United States
Attorney General Seems to Think Concerned Parents Are the New 'Domestic Terrorists'

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:05 min | Last week

Attorney General Seems to Think Concerned Parents Are the New 'Domestic Terrorists'

"Attorney general. United states merit garland announced this week. The f. b. i. will take the lead on the law enforcement response to what garland called a disturbing spike and harassment intimidation and threats of violence against school administrators board members teachers and staff essentially after school. Board members likened parents complaining about mask mandates in critical race theory to domestic terrorists. The attorney general said. He's going to see him by getting the f. b. i. Involved and people are furious. Parents are furious when you start telling parents. They have no say in their child's curriculum. And then you double down by criminalising your objection to what your children are experienced in the classroom. Americans won't stand for that. This has got to stop.

Garland United States
The Baseless Letter by the National School Boards Association

Mark Levin

01:48 min | Last week

The Baseless Letter by the National School Boards Association

"They wrote this letter to the president of the United States Joe Biden on September 29 and 5 days later Including the weekend we get a memo from the attorney general of the United States dated yesterday To the director of the FBI the director of the executive officer U.S. attorneys the assistant attorney general criminal division It states in recent months there's been a disturbing spike in harassment intimidation and threats of violence against school administrators board members teachers and staff who participate in the vital work of running our nation's public schools While spirited debate about policy matters is protected under a constitution that protection does not extend the threats of violence or efforts to intimidate individuals based on their views to intimidate individuals based on their views What does that mean It means nothing There's no federal law that says quote unquote you can't intimidate individuals based on their views It's done all the time That's exactly why media matters has been set up That's exactly why all these crazy ass left wing groups are chasing down politicians Intimidate individuals based on their views What does that mean Threats are violence If there's a threat of violence first of all what does that mean There are threats of violence and then there are threats of violence And if there are threats of violence state and local law is what addresses it Not federal law

United States Joe Biden FBI
Education Secretary Cardona Says Parents Are Not Primary Stakeholders in Education

Mark Levin

01:27 min | 2 weeks ago

Education Secretary Cardona Says Parents Are Not Primary Stakeholders in Education

"And this is what goes on In school district after school district in this country I think there's about 14,000 school systems It's highly political And the left runs these schools Say the candidate now for governor of Virginia who says parents don't get to make these decisions about their students All you get to do is pay massive confiscatory property taxes like all of us do they have kids in school or not And you leave it to the Democrats because that's what the NEA and the AFT are all about You leave it to the Democrats You leave it the sink offense on school boards You leave it to the so called administrators who are all over And your kid to have with your kid And the secretary of education essentially said the same thing At a hearing today Listen to this cut 13 go Do you think parents should be in charge of their child's education as the primary stakeholder I believe parents are important stakeholders but I also believe educators have a role in determining educational programming And I think that's going to be a little out of focus what I think you're going to find across all elements of education since they pay the bills They raise the kids They probably need to be the primary spokespeople for their own kids good education This is how you view America

NEA Virginia America
Student surveillance and privacy protection dilemma in the modern age

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:27 min | 2 weeks ago

Student surveillance and privacy protection dilemma in the modern age

"New technologies are expanding school's ability to keep students under surveillance inside and outside the classroom during the school year and after it ends. Schools have moved quickly to adopt a dizzying array of new tools. These include digital learning products that capture and store student data anonymous tip lines encouraging students to report on each other and software that monitors students emails and social media posts even when they are written from home. Steadily growing numbers of police officers stationed in schools can access this information. Compounding the technologies power advocates of these schools argue that they improve student safety and learning outcomes but this article reveals that the evidence for this argument is in fact quite sin. Moreover policymakers have failed to consider important countervailing considerations most notably student privacy and its significance for child development unequal impact particularly for poor black and lgbtq youth and potential liability for school administrators using north carolina's public schools. As a case study this article that makes three contributions to the burgeoning literature on the surveillance state i. It provides a comprehensive typology that shows the full range of students surveillance. Second it identifies key procedural substantial objections to students surveillance that should be but are not taken into account. By policymakers third it proposes principles to guide the selection implementation and oversight of student surveillance. I'm gonna stop there. This is a very lengthy. Pdf document that goes well into all sorts of things that were not going to be able to have time to talk about this evening. How ever. I want to mention the first thing i noticed was there was no statement following the last statement that i just read which was third. It proposes principles to guide the selection implementation oversight students surveillance. I expected as a human being to read another line that said fourth. We have recommendations for this not to be implemented at all but of course that is mysteriously missing.

North Carolina
Ida Deals New Blow to Louisiana Schools Struggling to Reopen

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last month

Ida Deals New Blow to Louisiana Schools Struggling to Reopen

"Hurricane ida deals a new blow to Louisiana schools struggling to reopen students were just getting back to class after a year and a half of Copa disruptions when I just drop now many of them are missing school again nearly a hundred and seventy thousand public school students statewide have no school to report two top administrators promised classrooms will be opened in a matter of weeks but that's not enough to keep many parents and educators from worrying about whether kids may fall behind the situation draws comparisons to hurricane Katrina that led to educational losses for hundreds of thousands of students I'm Julie Walker

Hurricane Ida Louisiana Hurricane Katrina Julie Walker
Who Are Ransomware Gangs Targeting?

Cyber Security Today

01:45 min | Last month

Who Are Ransomware Gangs Targeting?

"Which organizations are ransomware gangs looking to target. According to israeli cyber security firm kayla they primarily want firms based in the us canada. Australia and europe who on average earn more than one hundred million dollars in annual revenue and are not in the education health. Care government or nonprofit sectors. That's according to an analysis of forty five conversation threads on criminal forums. these forums are where initial access brokers claim to have hijacked into a company and are now selling that access to ransomware groups. Attackers are looking to buy specific types of access to victims so it and security administrators should pay attention to this. Highly desirable are companies. That have vulnerabilities in their microsoft remote. Desktop protocol set up which is used my employees for remote access as well as those with vulnerable virtual private networks setups using products from six palo. Alto networks vm-ware fortinet and cisco systems now in the last several months all of these products have issued patches for vulnerabilities. So you shouldn't be caught off guard for such access. Ransomware attackers are willing to pay up to one hundred thousand dollars and remember if your company earns less than a hundred million dollars a year. Don't be complacent. That's an average of the requirements of some attackers and only for messages seen during a narrow timeframe

Care Government Kayla Alto Networks Ware Fortinet Australia Europe Canada Cisco Systems Palo United States Microsoft
Razer Mouse Security Flaw Can Give Admin Access to Non-Admin PC Users

Firewalls Don't Stop Dragons Podcast

02:46 min | Last month

Razer Mouse Security Flaw Can Give Admin Access to Non-Admin PC Users

"There was a rather disturbing story about how this security researcher was able to take over. Someone's computer t- basically live plug in the right kind of mouse now. This case that happens to be a razor mouse And there was actually a steel series mouse. That turns out had the same problem. But the problem's not with these mice the problems with microsoft windows so. This is an article from. Tom's guide and realize that there was actually a previous article to this. But talk about both of them so chronologically. It's gonna feel weird but just hang with me in the article. Explain both of these cases as we go a day. After the world learned that razor gaming mice could be used to take over windows. Pc's there's news at the same trick. Works with steel series gaming keyboards. Mice headsets and even mouse pads as with the razor mice. It's actually the windows. Desktop application that causes the trouble. That's because it gets system wide privileges during installation without first asking for a system administrators permission. This flaw was discovered by security researcher. Lawrence amer who was inspired by the razor issue. A militias human using or mauer. That's already running on a windows ten. Pc and presumably this applies to windows. Eleven to as a low level user during the installation process can leverage this flock to gain full system control and cybersecurity terms. This is called privilege escalation or escalation elevation of privileges it's when processes or users gained powers. They shouldn't have however. This law isn't the fault of steel series or a razor. Those companies are just trying to get their software and stone quickly. This is instead of microsoft issue because windows isn't distinguishing between hardware drivers which normally don't need admin permissions to install and peripheral related desktop software which should need edmund permission microsoft needs to fix this privilege escalation situation before more problems like this pop up as they almost certainly will. So what can you do about this to avoid having your p. honed by gaming peripherals. Make sure you lock the screen of your workplace. Pc when you step away from your desk home. Bc's are under less threat from this kind of attack due to there being fewer potential users around. But you might want to shut off your pc when you've got a lot of company over to really make sure that this can't happen to your machine log. In as an administrator good system than settings and then about and click on the advanced system settings link this will spawn a box labeled system properties. Select the hardware tab and then click the button device installation settings in the pop up window that follows title. Do you want to automatically downloaded absent and custom icons available for devices. Select the radio button labeled no in apparently next to know in parentheses says your device might not work as expected as you might imagine taking this more severe route might make installing new hardware not just gaming mice and keyboards but also printers headphones. Even usb security keys a bit more arduous although not impossible

Lawrence Amer Microsoft Mauer TOM
Lawsuits Begin as Texas GOP Voting Bill Fight Moves to Court

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | Last month

Lawsuits Begin as Texas GOP Voting Bill Fight Moves to Court

"Lawsuits are filed against Texas news still pending election law even before governor Greg Abbott has signed it voting rights groups including the American civil liberties union filed two lawsuits in federal court in Texas challenging the state's recently passed election law which would further tighten the already strict voting regulations the suit claimed the soon to be law would violate the federal voting rights act by intentionally discriminating against minority voters the Harris county election administrator is among those suing the state that County which includes Houston has the state's largest population and is particularly targeted by the measure Texas is the latest of several Republican led states pushing through new voting restrictions in the name of election security after former president Donald Trump falsely claimed that last year's election was stolen from him I'm timid wire

Governor Greg Abbott Texas American Civil Liberties Union Harris County Houston Donald Trump
Ida's sweltering aftermath: No power, no water, no gasoline

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | Last month

Ida's sweltering aftermath: No power, no water, no gasoline

"Tens of thousands of utility repair people are trying to get the lights back on in New Orleans hurricane ida wrecked most of the power system providing electricity to New Orleans and its surrounding parishes Elgin green berry says he's worried about the meat that's in the freezer we got more and you know we could cook so they they're bad I gotta go get some ice to some you know what is this meeting yet because we have to figure it out but it needed to allow quick more than a million homes and businesses in Louisiana and Mississippi are without electricity and many could be so for many more days FEMA administrator D. N. Chris well please listen to your local officials please listen to when they tell you it's safe to come back home some four hundred forty thousand people in seventeen parishes are without water nearly three hundred twenty thousand are under boil water advisories I timid wire

New Orleans D. N. Chris Berry Louisiana Mississippi Fema
Biden Team Urges States to Quickly Distribute Rental Aid

Science Friday

00:51 sec | Last month

Biden Team Urges States to Quickly Distribute Rental Aid

"The Biden administration is urging state and local leaders to give tenants a chance to apply for rental assistance before evicting them. As NPR's Laura Wang's Lee reports, the move follows the Supreme Court's decision. Block continuation of the CDCs temporary eviction Ben in a letter cabinet officials call on governors, mayors, county executives and court administrators to take action to prevent what they call unnecessary evictions. Among their recommendations are local pauses on evictions and requiring landlords to apply for emergency rental assistance before they file evictions. Tenant advocates say the message is a powerful nudge too many states and counties. Evictions are handled at the state and local level. $25 billion is available in federal rental assistance. But in many places that money has been slow to reach the renters and property owners who are

Biden Administration Laura Wang NPR Supreme Court LEE Cabinet BEN
Voice Technology Provides the Near-Equivalent of a Hospital Room at Home

Project Voice - Healthcare Summit - 2021

01:04 min | Last month

Voice Technology Provides the Near-Equivalent of a Hospital Room at Home

"I'm so glad to be part of this opening message at the voice of healthcare to try connect the dogs across the voiced technology community and if your healthcare provider if you're a hospital administrator if you run an emergency department or physicians gruber perhaps an insurance payer. There are solutions now. That are ready now. They can work today. That can deliver the very near equivalent of a hospital room at home thinking that real time vinyls like you just saw ability to deliver virtual video telehealth solutions and if it's a real emergency with just their voice they can be connected to first responders can deliver them to the living museum within ten minutes for emergency triage to that is available now during the pandemic and we need our the voice communities partners on the event today and out there watching could be part of that solution so we hope to connect with you about amazing care

Gruber
Everyone Is Getting Their People out Except the U.S. Government

The Dan Bongino Show

01:40 min | 2 months ago

Everyone Is Getting Their People out Except the U.S. Government

"Folks. That was a video I saw On social media. But right before we got on the air of the French at their embassy, using buses, military vehicles, armored vehicles, non armored vehicles and basically everything. They had to go to their embassy and get their people out and get him to the airport for evacuation. The French are doing that. Why are we doing that? That's a real video. That's not just like we just pulled Jim getting sound the car exhausted, but you know, that's a real video. Granted. It's a radio show, but I just wanted you to hear it. Just wanted you to hear the sound of what it sounds like when people go into Kabul and get their people out and don't ask the people to take an uber to them. Yeah, just, you know, go up to the Taliban checkpoint. They'll let you go. The very nice people. You know, I did a checkpoint once when I work crowd control of the U. S open months at the Italian at the tennis Center in Flushing Meadow, Queens. You get to let people in if they have a badge of some kind of organized We didn't ask the Taliban to do that. Yeah, the Taliban. Listen. Let the tennis players and if they have a yellow badge, the Taliban be like what do we don't? Do We kill them. No, you don't kill them. No, No, You don't kill him. What do we do next? We take them as sex slaves. No, no, no, You don't do that, either. That's that's why we don't put the Taliban at those checkpoints. But the U. S government to Biden administrator thinks I'd say okay? They think that's just peachy. Taliban? Yeah, Yeah, Just go up there to just tell the Taliban you with America. They'd love to let you through. So your absence are let me get Let let let us through. Option A option B. I'm beheaded options. See, I'm taking hostage. Doesn't sound like an appetizing portfolio of options for me.

Taliban Flushing Meadow Kabul Tennis Center JIM U. S Government Queens Tennis Biden America
The Attica Prison Uprising

American Scandal

02:12 min | 2 months ago

The Attica Prison Uprising

"It's a timber ninth. Nine hundred seventy one and late morning at the attica correctional facility in western new york out in the prison yard richard x clark carries a heavy bundle of canned food as he heads to a table. Clark sets down the food and wipes sweat from his forehead is arms are sore and tired but for clark good feeling as he looks around he struck by the transformation. That's taken hold this maximum security prison. Rival gang members are working side by sign carrying supplies to medical tent and inmate. Disinfects a wound on another inmates left cheek. The prison yard has turned into a sprawling encampment a democratic village. That's run by the prisoners themselves. It's an incredible turn of events for years. The inmates have been treated like animals. They were beaten mercilessly never given proper food or medical care but then just a few hours ago. The inmates erupted in revolt. They drove back the guards and after taking several dozen of them hostage. They took control of the prison. The prisoners then banded together and developed a list of changes. They want to see inadequate to reach these goals. The inmates elected a small group of representatives including richard clark. A leader of the prisons black muslim community as clark walked through the yard. He feels optimistic that the prison administrators will meet their demands. But clark knows that as basic as these demands may be. The upcoming negotiations are going to be tense. There's a high pitched noise and clark turns looking outside of the prison where a man stands in the navy blue suit holding a megaphone side by side with several policemen morning. My name is vincent mancusi on the superintendent of attica. I'm here to talk with you now. Whoever's in charge please come over. I want to figure out a way to get past. This clark looks at several other inmates. I'll talk with them. And if you wanna com. You're free to join the men not and wielding baseball bats and football helmets. They began making their way over to mancusi as they get closer to. The superintendent holds his hand. All right all right stop. That's far

Attica Correctional Facility Richard X Clark Clark Richard Clark New York Vincent Mancusi Attica Navy Mancusi Baseball Football
Alan Dershowitz on How Colleges Have Become Propaganda Mills for the Hard Left

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:48 min | 2 months ago

Alan Dershowitz on How Colleges Have Become Propaganda Mills for the Hard Left

"I mean though a is simply that the people that are animated whether on the left or on the right or any of these issues there at least paying attention even if they're on the wrong side but but it strikes me that the moneyed classes don't seem to think that this affects them in other words. The reason we are where we are is because those people typically have stepped back. They think that everything's fine. There isn't a battle for fundamental freedoms in america. They're wrong because their children are going to college and college. Today has become a propaganda mill for the hard left. And today you cannot your mind in a class or if you're a faculty member many american universities if you express views that are not politically correct. You are threatened. You won't be promoted. You won't be giving classes to teach. You won't be hired by other universities. I've written a new book called the case against new sensors five censorship by big corporations universities each and there are small never people in universities who want speech want to have a very very. Don't think speech codes. Who want to make sure that professors and students can't express users Their views and the administrators aren't doing very much about it. They talk about free speech but when it comes down to it they don't do very much to protect it on many college campuses so the rich and the elite who was sending their kids to princeton and yale and harvard in chicago and then they really do have something to worry about because they're sending them into place where they're not getting educated. They're getting propaganda is they're not being too how to think that being told what the

America Princeton Yale Harvard Chicago
We Need Democrats To Fear the Penalty of Defying the Legislature

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:41 min | 2 months ago

We Need Democrats To Fear the Penalty of Defying the Legislature

"Unfortunate reality that you we all have to realize. Is that the democrats. They will not back down until they start to lose something. It doesn't matter if you pass a law for example in texas. It didn't matter that we told them that they would get arrested. They chartered a plane. All being vaccinated and mask list went to washington. Dc got infected. they're back in texas and finally in texas the the runaway legislatures just got past that they can indeed get arrested. That'll get their attention. Scottsdale unified school district and the democrat legislators in texas they after recognizing realize but they don't currently that they have to fear the price and the penalty of defying the will of the voters and the legislature. This is what happens when you control the media when you control every single mechanism of power in the country are like yeah. What are you gonna do to me. Well this is the it should work in scottsdale. There's a meeting coming up on august. Twenty fourth thousands of parents should show up every single one of the school board members that supports this nonsense to be removed and their funding needs to be cut and any teacher that enforces or administrator needs to be fired on demand. That's how you use political power. And that's what ron santa's doing in florida. It's not enough to pass good laws you have to enforce the law and you have to make the democrats realize that arizona's not new york city kids are going to be massless. They're gonna enjoy their life and you're guilty conscience is not going to narcissistic engineer. The future of the children of that school district or across the

Texas Scottsdale Unified School Dist Washington Legislature Ron Santa Scottsdale Florida Arizona New York City
"administrator" Discussed on Middle Market - Mergers and Acquisitions by Colonnade Advisors

Middle Market - Mergers and Acquisitions by Colonnade Advisors

07:01 min | 2 months ago

"administrator" Discussed on Middle Market - Mergers and Acquisitions by Colonnade Advisors

"And created a lot of synergies permanently. Capital is driving him in a activity across a number vertical in products is definitely one of those and as you said there are success stories dating back to to my memory. Two thousand six when h. I. g. bought into and then subsequently sold safeguard goldman and really since the mid twenty tens or so. There's been a lot of activity in your right. Folks are noticing that these are high growth high margin businesses with recurring cash flows and are sort of perfect four private equity investments and the success stories over recent years have proven that out and are driving. Increased interest in investment to the sector for shore so gina how are these companies valued. There's a little bit of secret sauce here in terms of looking at these companies thinking about the right metrics. What are you guys look at. It in. Terms of valuation administrators are valued typically not on gap but unmodified cash accounting. So what is modified cash accounting gap matches basically expenses in revenues with the value of the product with the life cycle of the product so under gap a vehicle service contract once again available service. Contract is three thousand dollars. The revenue of three thousand dollars will be recognized under gap pro rata over sixty months. The expenses for the reserve feature claims and other components will be recognized pro for sixty months under modified hash because these products are rolled into an auto loan. The administrator gets payment upfront. So jeff you buy the product and we're sitting here july second. I will get the funding from the auto finance company. That's financing your auto loan. I will get the funds here in july is a modified hash is recognizing the cash when it comes in so revenues recognized basically time a sale and the expense associated with reserve for future claims. And the clint all the contract related expenses are recognized at the time of sale. So essentially what you will see for a growing business that under modified cash earnings will be higher than under a gap business. So if i was telling one contract under one contract model under gap the contract would have won sixty of the earnings that would under modified cash so these companies are valued on a modified cash basis. Which gets complicated right. You have two sets of books that cfo's have to keep on these businesses by caches with debt and then the next question is the reinsurance funds in the trust to pay for future claims. Who owns that. If it's an add monopoly gore. There is real valley in those trusts because there is excess funds or putting chose trust than products lee structured to a certain loss ratio. The loss ratio is claims divided by the premiums remitted to the trust. Eight hundred dollars are going into. The trust was the expected claims for your off. A four is going to be four hundred dollars and these are not true to life numbers. These tina made up numbers. But that's a fifty percent loss ratio. But that means there's four hundred dollars in profits that are sitting there in that trust l. Becoming out that income from the trust should be included in the value of the company so we have different legal entities that are involved in considering how to value these companies. So that's a big complaint. The accounting what lynch tease involved and. Then what is driving value for these calms is it. A company with a narrow geographic reach Administrator own of texas or does it have a national rage do they have concentration and this is a big concentration with a dealer shipper. Most private aquifers will not invest in a company if greater than fifteen or twenty percent of its revenues. Come from a single source will single source isn't dealership rooftop but really a dealership grew so if an administrator has forty percent of revenues coming from one dealership crew there many may private equity firms that will not be able to invest in it and therefore it has a smaller university buyers. And we have as we've talked about many times on this podcast when fewer buyers that are potentially interested. It's going to try down. The bound so concentration is a big driver of value in this industry and then finally size matters once again. We always say this size matters. Bigger companies are worth more than the smaller bodies. That's for sure. Size definitely matters in this industry and i think we offer some guidelines to folks that we chat with certainly the big players you mentioned earlier trading for double digit multiples below a certain size. Say five million of earnings are probably not as marketable folks liaison broadscale. But they're still a large number of administrators that fall in the middle. There folks that are doing five to fifty million earnings that bill very valuable businesses and could be attractive to a large audience. Folks you've touched on strategic six private equity firms in right in the middle or the private equity back strategic folks that have already planted their flag like cornell did with spectrum and then followed with the number of strategic acquisitions so again lots of activity in the sector interesting dynamics. Colonnade has either been the sell side or buy. Side emanate advisor on many of the significant an products transactions. That have taken place over the last decade. These transactions are complex and require an investment banking team with deep industry knowledge. We have insider level mastery of drivers evaluation competitive positioning business trends relevant metrics and the right buyer universe enabling us to provide superior deal execution to our clients if you are an products company or a potential buyer of one of these businesses. And you're considering a transaction. Please contact us and we can help you think through your next steps. Thank you for joining us as we discussed one of colonnades areas of focus the sec administrators at colonnade we focus on emanate for financial services and business services companies. This podcast one. In a series of episodes discussing emanate trends in the sectors in which we are subject matter experts to learn more back. Colonnade the deals we've done in our thoughts on other emanate related topics. Please go to our website at c. o. l. ad dot com or join us on linked in..

reserve for future claims goldman gina jeff gore tina lynch lee texas sec
"administrator" Discussed on TechSperience

TechSperience

02:19 min | 10 months ago

"administrator" Discussed on TechSperience

"With that it's a wrap things again guys..

"administrator" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

10:29 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"A limited user account you can't sell software so now we're released is somewhat limited by that now there are some exceptions there are there's a kind of explains what we call these these are the the technologies that are used by malicious programs to impact you they're called exploits and there are exploits that do something cults privilege escalation which means the the malware can't without your typing in a password or anything else give itself administrator rights so that is not unusual there's another reason why you don't need it I think don't need to do this anymore I used to recommend in fact when I set up my my mom's windows two thousand machine way back when I gave her a limited user account and I said if you need to install something here's the password to the administrator account you'll have to log in as administrator to do that and that I think you know she never did get a virus or bug or any problem at all so that certainly helped at Microsoft improves the situation though with something you probably already seen user access controller you AC even if you're running as an administrator when you do something potentially risky you A. C. pops up that's that thing that you know the little the little the screen goes gray and the user account control window pops up and says you sure you want to do this and you have to agree to it that is in effect apple does the same thing that is in effect giving you the same benefits of running is a standard user so I nowadays I've amended my recommendation to mac and windows users that it's okay to run as administrator but when you see those pop ups don't just go yeah yeah yeah okay pay attention to them because something is trying to install on your system and you should make sure it's something you want installed in your system now having said all that if it gives you a comfort to run as a standard user I think it's a great idea it's a simple thing to do presuming the guys set up your service I gave you an account that's an administrator account you do have an administrator account right this was that was on a previous then I would all all systems that I just bought but the news you bought at your administrator Microsoft site re when you first set up to give you Mister so it's very simple you go to the control panel yeah and you can add a new user and make that user unlimited S. I think the cost standard user now and then just use that as your regular lock in you always still you need this administrator can you always want to take it's a great idea I wish people did this anyway whenever you get a new computer create a new account keep the administrator account separate because then if you mess up here dated they account even if it's an administrator account you always have a less you know it an unmodified user account you can go back to it it's not unusual in windows for instance to need that administrator account to fix things because your user account got messed up so it's always a good idea to have two accounts even if they're both the minister in this case just make that second account and and make it make it a limited user standard user so I would go into the account windows control panel accounts and users and add user million other users or something like that yeah it's a little you know Microsoft which I wish they had not done this they actually with this new you know there are two control panels now there's that stupid one and there is the one you're used to and the stupid one loads but is not as full featured as the old one and they've hidden the traditional user account the user can cricket creation and and control account and it's not it doesn't pop up as part of the control panel anymore so if you want if you want to use the one that you're used to you actually have to go and type the command in the command line and if you're in the mood to do that or not but it's a useful a command and now I'm trying to remember I think it is after member if you think it's you you hit come windows are to run a command and I think it's control user passwords to I think is what it is if I remember correctly that's the old user control panel and you'll be it'll be more familiar to you if you've used windows for some time and in that you could do what you really want to do which is make a a limited use you can do in either one so settings account other users at a user that's the modern way to do it but if you don't timer like I am I always do control you know it windows are to get a command line windows key and R. at the same time as the run command and type control space user passwords to and that will give you you'll recognize that one that's the old school I don't know why Microsoft did this I guess they decide somebody told him it's too hard to use a control panel okay we'll make a dumb one it's not so functional it's easy to use but I think it's confusing to have two separate kind of control pills a completely different looks feels and power and abilities that's just that's just weird to me but that's the way I am Microsoft does it so yeah and you know it's not a bad idea to have that extra cannot make a standard account if if it's some point it became feels hobbling to you you can always change it to administrator account but it's a really good idea to have a unused administrator account just sitting there in case you need it and use day to day a separate account your user account and make that a standard account that's fine just remember that there's no two things have changed one this privilege escalation mail where they could still if you're not you're not completely impervious anymore it's because this Mao where they can do a privilege escalation and secondarily user act user access control supposed to you know kind of prevent you from doing anything even as administrator that could be a dangerous control space user passwords to Krol space user passwords to always a good thing to know always nice to be able to go to the old school passwords user can one little one last question on this Microsoft servers do you consider this a tablet it just seems so much more than like your fifty year hundred dollar cap but that's the way it is in the way cost a lot more a lot more no it's not well here's what you're getting at first while you're getting a full desktop operating system you're getting windows on it you're also getting a beautiful screen and a lot of power there's a lot of horsepower they started eight gigabytes of ram there most Amer sixteen you're getting a moderate in most cases a source or tenth generation Intel processor they're nice machines they come out of a very odd time in Microsoft's life they were making windows you know kind of the old beige box PC's at and apple started to eat their lunch with the iPad and somebody freaked out in Redmond and said we got to do something with the iPad and since they no longer had a mobile platform these that windows phone they let you know that that failed they said well what we've we took our desktop platform and we do he we we shoehorned a tablet into it and that's when windows eight happened and it was a nightmare because it was a desktop but it was also a tablet it would do weird it was just weird over time they've honed down the rough edges of this windows ten still has that tablet anything and in fact if you detach your keyboard there's a tablet mode you can set it to automatically go to tablet mode you probably seen that now it's a tablet that's done it yeah that's a tablet touch the keyboard goes back to the desktop mode most of the time it looks like a normal computer instead of some weird hybrid thing so that that really comes from a time when Microsoft was very concerned about the future of desktop computing they've come down a little bit but they still put that feature and and they and it's interesting they're most popular computer effect it was their first computer is the surface which is the tablet it has an attachable keyboard looks a lot like an iPad the only difference is instead of having a mobile operating system is has this hybrid desktop slash tablet operating system called windows devices to get kind of the best of both worlds I think is that the service are very very nice yeah I'd like it but I'd like to so far so but anyway thank you for your pleasure yeah thanks for calling us you know it's a I always honor anybody who says look I wanna make my system more secure yeah that's the exact right instinct to specially if you're using windows exact right instinct I think you don't need to run as a standard user anymore but if it makes you feel better it certainly will add some benefit part of the problem with the UAC is that you know pops up and goes yeah yeah yeah whatever they don't we have a pop up fatigue we don't read them we don't pay any attention to them we just say yeah yeah yeah I get I just want to do what I want to do so if it does behoove you if you are running as administrator to pay attention to those UAC pop ups they're warning you you're doing what you're about to do something dangerous you sure you want to do that you know what you're doing here and and think about it take it even if you pause five seconds to say did I intend to install this software is it happening because I opened an email instead of you know that those are the questions you ask yourself that is a warning this window saying very Hey you watch out danger ahead here be dragons I'd be better you know what that's what Microsoft should say is to instead of you know your way would you sure you want to install this you say here be dragons you have entered the danger zone maybe play a little Top Gun plug into the danger zone that would what that would wake up people the first twelve times and then it so yeah okay okay okay our show today brought to you by remote PC were all working from home if we still have jobs I'm sorry if you don't own man but if you are working from home I want to tell you.

administrator
"administrator" Discussed on Your Online Coffee Break

Your Online Coffee Break

08:22 min | 1 year ago

"administrator" Discussed on Your Online Coffee Break

"It's a very political position. It is absolutely true that NASA is not partisan it's not but but it is it's parochial in nature. There's a lot of special interests There are people that have. They want funding to this area or funding to that area. When you have a twenty one billion dollar budget members of Congress and senators want. They want access to that for their districts so I spent a lot of time trying to make sure people understand why we're doing what we're doing what we're trying to accomplish. How it's good for the nation and then also working with members of Congress and Senators working with the Office of Management and Budget in the executive branch working with the National Space Council in the executive branch working With the vice president's office. He's the chairman of the National Space Council so All of these things Take a lot of time but but it but there are a lot of it is. It's a lot of political kind of activities that aren't partisan if that makes sense It's perfectly predictable. It's perfectly understandable But my goal has been to run NASA in an apolitical. Bipartisan Way. As much as possible. So that all of America can get behind what we're doing and I think you do that in a way. 'cause you enthusiasm really comes through good excites you. The most about all these incredible missions out there. Yeah is there anything that just huge arches? So I think there's two things number one. I'm the first NASA administrator. That doesn't have a memory of where he or she was. When we had people living on the Drew I wasn't alive. When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed on the moon I wasn't alive yet when Gene Cernan and Jack Schmitt left the moon in nineteen. Seventy two so We are now at a point and I'm forty four years old. We're at a point now where there's an entire generation of people that don't have a memory of it because we weren't alive yet right and so the president has said we need to go back to the moon sustainably and we WANNA program that's not gonNA We want generations from now people to look back on this moment and say we were doing the right things for the right reasons for generations to come now. The moon is the proving ground so I think that's one thing we have to do those stunning things where where people get enthusiastic about space exploration going to the moon is one of those stunning things but it is also true that the moon is the proving ground. It is not the destination we need to use the moon to learn how to sustain life on another world for long periods of time. How do we use the resources of the moon to live and work hundreds of millions of tons of water ice on the South Pole of the moon that's life support it's air debris that's water to drink it's hydrogen which is rocket fuel same rocket fuel that powered the space shuttle's hundreds of millions of tons of hydrogen on the South Pole How do we get access to it? How do we use it? How do we convert it into something? That is usable. So those are the things that we need to learn right out today. We need to build an architecture that sustainable for the long term driving down costs increasing access and then ultimately bringing in commercial partners and international partners so that we can all do war and have more access than ever before then. Finally remember what the destination is. The moon is the proving ground. The destination is Mars right. What we architect at. The moon has to as much as possible. Be Replicable at Mars. And and that's what we need to be striving for every day the question then becomes a wide. I need to go to Mars. We'll I'll tell you why we have found since the time I've been the NASA administrator. We have found complex organic compounds on Mars which are the building blocks for life. They don't exist on the moon at all none but they're all over Mars and of course they're all over there because we have a lot of life you're on this I'm not saying there's life on Mars I don't know but we should go find out We also know that the methane cycles on Mars are commensurate with the seasons of Mars to the probability of finding life is going up the plumes of methane that we find coming out of Mars are at the level where people are saying. It's it it may not be likely that that's geological in nature. In other words the probability of finding life keeps going up third. We have found liquid water twelve kilometers under the surface of Mars. Right liquid water. What we know about liquid water on earth wherever there's liquid water there's life Is that true on Mars? We don't know but it's twelve kilometers under the surface where it's protected from the radiation of deep space. So we need to go find life on another world and I think and I'm not saying it's there I don't know but we should go find out and if we find life on another world. I think it's just going to transform how how we think about space exploration. There's going to be so much thirst and so much desire to find out. What else is out there? The Moon of Jupiter Europa. It's IT'S A. It's a moon the size of our moon except it's pure water. It's all water rental. It's got an ice shell. We're now finding mass plumes of liquid water being spewed out of the ice shell of Europa We're doing a mission the Titan which is a a moon of Saturn and it's covered in organic compounds and we're GONNA fly a helicopter on Titan in fact Twenty twenty one. We're GONNA fly a helicopter on Mars and we're going to be flying a helicopter on another worm credible. So there's like you mentioned. There's a lot of missions going on. There's a lot of activities. There's a lot of excitement once. You're mentioning other worlds and one thing that I'm really impressed with just to close is Cluedo. Yeah I love her. You said Pluto is the Ninth Plan. Yeah Yeah Pluto has been abused by scientists now for years and We in my view. it was downgraded in two thousand six based on the definition of orbit clearing so as it goes around the sun. Does it clear the area around its own orbit and I think that's a really sloppy definition because by that definition none of the planets are planets but at the same time? Here's here's what we found out. In two thousand fifteen with the new horizons mission so Pluto was downgraded in two thousand six in two thousand fifteen. We found out that Pluto has its own ocean under the surface a liquid ocean we found out the Pluto has organic compounds on its surface. The building blocks for life. Pluto has a multilayer atmosphere. Pluto has an active geology. Pluto has five moons A lot of these things we discovered you know in two thousand fifteen so in my view that is not basically a dead rock going around the sun that is a that is a planet that is very interesting and I think view planets should be defined based on their intrinsic values. Not what or did they have around the sun because that orbit by the way is always changing and planets are always changing orbits. It's just the way it is so Basically you'RE GONNA have plants become planets. Plans get downgraded plant so we need to have in my view Planetary bodies need to be defined based on their intrinsic values and quite frankly their interest from a scientific perspective and I will tell you there is not there are not many planets more interesting than Pluto and we did not know that until two thousand fifteen so I think we ought to be really focused on it as fantastic Definitely exciting time on congratulate shoe and you're credible team for all they wonderful discoveries seen so far we can't wait to see what's next. Thank you for joining. Oh thank you. It's great to be with you. Thank you online coffee break while I really enjoyed speaking with Jim. And of course going to s headquarters was a real treat if you like to find out more about dosages go to their website at NASA Dot Gov. I WANNA thank Jim for inviting us out to NASA quarters and thank you for taking time today to join us. We really do appreciate it again if you can share this episode the friend. We'd love that. If you can rate us on your favorite podcasts application and gives a thumbs up if you're watching youtube we'd appreciate that as well but either way. Just thank you so much for taking time to join us today. We'll see you next time God bless..

NASA NASA administrator Congress National Space Council executive chairman Jim vice president Office of Management and Budge America Twenty twenty president Neil Armstrong Cluedo Gene Cernan Buzz Aldrin Jack Schmitt
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Everyday is dependent on space the way, we communicate the way we navigate the way we produce food the way we produce energy the way, we do whether prediction and understand climate the way we do national security and defense the way we do disaster relief banking regulate flows of power on the on the on the the power grid. All of it is dependent on space. And and all of those capabilities are available because of a trail that was blazed by NASA. And and for the very small budget that NASA has we have enabled a a human condition that is far beyond. Anything? Anybody would have imagined agreed completely mass as one of the best invest investments that that citizens make for you know, pennies and dollars relatively speaking. As are a no the weather service and others as well. I have one more question before I do that quick update. Because I know I set to is going to be going up soon. Everything going okay with that. Yeah. We're on. We're on schedule for for ice at two. And and it's a obviously a critically important mission for the United States to understand, you know, the the these sheets of ice in the Arctic that that people are concerned about where are they going and understanding our hydrogen fear, even even better than we already do. Yeah. No. We're looking forward to that. Final question. As I mentioned earlier, I spent twelve years at NASA and one of those years, I actually did a detailed down at NASA headquarters. And so got to look at the agency from that perspective as well. In your time at NASA, so far what has surprised you most about the agency the people there. The culture. I'll tell you the raw intellect. The smart people. There are the raw. And they're like I'm working in an agency where I know that everybody here is smarter than me. And that's a that's a good thing. And and I and not only that, but they're all opinionated. And that's even better. There's there's no shortage of people here who are willing to speak their minds and tell the administrator exactly what they think the administrator needs to hear. And so that's a very positive thing for NASA and for our country. Yeah. That that's the that's it is amazing. You know in the science culture there. You know, we can disagree and challenge each other and tell people how we feel, you know, at the end of the day, we go, and, you know, share drink across or do whatever we do. That's that's what I enjoy about the science culture and particularly NASA administrator brightens now, I really wanna thank you for joining us here on the weather podcast. And we wish you continued success in your current role in for your continued service to this country. We thank you. Thank you, Dr shepherd. I appreciate it. Thank you very much. And that's the way. Geese podcast. Thank you for joining us..

NASA NASA administrator administrator United States Dr shepherd Arctic twelve years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Everyday is dependent on space the way, we communicate the way we navigate the way we produce food the way we produce energy the way, we do whether prediction and understand climate the way we do national security and defense the way we do disaster relief banking regulate flows of power on the on the on the the power grid. All of it is dependent on space. And and all of those capabilities are available because of a trail that was blazed by NASA. And and for the very small budget that NASA has we have enabled a a human condition that is far beyond. Anything? Anybody would have imagined agreed completely mass as one of the best invest investments that that citizens make for you know, pennies and dollars relatively speaking. As are a no the weather service and others as well. I have one more question before I do that quick update. Because I know I set to is going to be going up soon. Everything going okay with that. Yeah. We're on. We're on schedule for for ice at two. And and it's a obviously a critically important mission for the United States to understand, you know, the the these sheets of ice in the Arctic that that people are concerned about where are they going and understanding our hydrogen fear, even even better than we already do. Yeah. No. We're looking forward to that. Final question. As I mentioned earlier, I spent twelve years at NASA and one of those years, I actually did a detailed down at NASA headquarters. And so got to look at the agency from that perspective as well. In your time at NASA, so far what has surprised you most about the agency the people there. The culture. I'll tell you the raw intellect. The smart people. There are the raw. And they're like I'm working in an agency where I know that everybody here is smarter than me. And that's a that's a good thing. And and I and not only that, but they're all opinionated. And that's even better. There's there's no shortage of people here who are willing to speak their minds and tell the administrator exactly what they think the administrator needs to hear. And so that's a very positive thing for NASA and for our country. Yeah. That that's the that's it is amazing. You know in the science culture there. You know, we can disagree and challenge each other and tell people how we feel, you know, at the end of the day, we go, and, you know, share drink across or do whatever we do. That's that's what I enjoy about the science culture and particularly NASA administrator brightens now, I really wanna thank you for joining us here on the weather podcast. And we wish you continued success in your current role in for your continued service to this country. We thank you. Thank you, Dr shepherd. I appreciate it. Thank you very much. And that's the way. Geese podcast. Thank you for joining us..

NASA NASA administrator administrator United States Dr shepherd Arctic twelve years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"That that's a that's a good point. Are wh what can you tell our listeners about Nasr's plans for the Mars and the moon? We're going back to Mars anytime soon. We well. We we are we've got a we've got a emission on its way to Mars right now insight, and in fact, we're gonna we're gonna use insight to understand Mars quakes. We're going to try to get a three D image of the interior of Mars. So that we, you know can understand not just whether or not, you know, how active the the geology is. But every time an asteroid impacts Mars. We're going to be able to detect it because. Yeah. So it's going to have a size monitor on there. And we're gonna. Understand that the temperature of Mars deep down. So all of these different instruments are on the insight project, and we're going to be landing insight on Mars thanksgiving, which is going to be a great day for NASA. Yo this is interesting Marshall, there's only one nation on the face of the planet. That's ever landed successfully on Mars one and it's the United States of America. And we've done it seven times. And this will be our eighth time. You think about that achievement? I it really is amazing that that that, you know, think about NASA being created in nineteen fifty eight and here, we are all these years later, sixty years later, and we're still the only country that can land on Mars and do it over and over again, successfully is the point of pride for this country and for the world because NASA through all of its partnerships with international partners and many of these missions are actually in partnership with other countries as well. I think it's NASA still is considered one of the sort of. Crown jewels of American. I know you're you're proud the lead that and I wanna use this last few minutes here to kind of get some big picture thoughts from you fast forward twenty years from now you look back on your time at NASA. What do you hope to accomplish your what do you hope had been accomplished at NASA under your tenure? That's a great question. Well, we wanna make sure we're heading back to the moon that that's happening. We're going to do it in a sustainable way. In other words, we're going to take advantage of reusable systems. We all have seen. What happens when you re re rockets the cost of access to space goes down, the the access to space goes up for more people when I say people, I mean hardware equipment, and we want an entire architecture between earth and the moon to be reusable now is all of that. So so tugs to be reusable between earth orbit and lunar orbit Landers to be reasonable from from from moon orbit. Lunar orbit to the surface of the moon. We want we want all of it to be reasonable. We want it to be replicable at Mars. We want to take advantage of the hundreds of billions of tons of water ice that we now understand is on the surface of the moon. We wanna use use that not only for life support. In other words, human activities on the surface of the moon. But also we want to use it for propulsion hydrogen oxygen is in fact, rocket propulsion. So all of that. Now is that going to happen in my time as the NASA administrator? No, but well, we wanna do is. We want to get that well underway. So that in in in years in, you know, my children will grow up right now there are kids graduating from high school knowing that their entire lives. We've had Americans living and working in space on the international space station. We want to make sure that when my kids kids grow up there growing up in a world where there have been people living and working in orbit around the moon and on the surface of the moon their entire lives. We want that sustainable architecture that uses our international partners, use our commercial partners. That's what we want to develop. And it starts right now with the president space policy directive one, and then the other thing that I hope I can accomplish a lot of America is still not aware of how dependent we are on space every single one of us..

NASA America NASA administrator Nasr United States Marshall Landers president twenty years sixty years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"That that's a that's a good point. Are wh what can you tell our listeners about Nasr's plans for the Mars and the moon? We're going back to Mars anytime soon. We well. We we are we've got a we've got a emission on its way to Mars right now insight, and in fact, we're gonna we're gonna use insight to understand Mars quakes. We're going to try to get a three D image of the interior of Mars. So that we, you know can understand not just whether or not, you know, how active the the geology is. But every time an asteroid impacts Mars. We're going to be able to detect it because. Yeah. So it's going to have a size monitor on there. And we're gonna. Understand that the temperature of Mars deep down. So all of these different instruments are on the insight project, and we're going to be landing insight on Mars thanksgiving, which is going to be a great day for NASA. Yo this is interesting Marshall, there's only one nation on the face of the planet. That's ever landed successfully on Mars one and it's the United States of America. And we've done it seven times. And this will be our eighth time. You think about that achievement? I it really is amazing that that that, you know, think about NASA being created in nineteen fifty eight and here, we are all these years later, sixty years later, and we're still the only country that can land on Mars and do it over and over again, successfully is the point of pride for this country and for the world because NASA through all of its partnerships with international partners and many of these missions are actually in partnership with other countries as well. I think it's NASA still is considered one of the sort of. Crown jewels of American. I know you're you're proud the lead that and I wanna use this last few minutes here to kind of get some big picture thoughts from you fast forward twenty years from now you look back on your time at NASA. What do you hope to accomplish your what do you hope had been accomplished at NASA under your tenure? That's a great question. Well, we wanna make sure we're heading back to the moon that that's happening. We're going to do it in a sustainable way. In other words, we're going to take advantage of reusable systems. We all have seen. What happens when you re re rockets the cost of access to space goes down, the the access to space goes up for more people when I say people, I mean hardware equipment, and we want an entire architecture between earth and the moon to be reusable now is all of that. So so tugs to be reusable between earth orbit and lunar orbit Landers to be reasonable from from from moon orbit. Lunar orbit to the surface of the moon. We want we want all of it to be reasonable. We want it to be replicable at Mars. We want to take advantage of the hundreds of billions of tons of water ice that we now understand is on the surface of the moon. We wanna use use that not only for life support. In other words, human activities on the surface of the moon. But also we want to use it for propulsion hydrogen oxygen is in fact, rocket propulsion. So all of that. Now is that going to happen in my time as the NASA administrator? No, but well, we wanna do is. We want to get that well underway. So that in in in years in, you know, my children will grow up right now there are kids graduating from high school knowing that their entire lives. We've had Americans living and working in space on the international space station. We want to make sure that when my kids kids grow up there growing up in a world where there have been people living and working in orbit around the moon and on the surface of the moon their entire lives. We want that sustainable architecture that uses our international partners, use our commercial partners. That's what we want to develop. And it starts right now with the president space policy directive one, and then the other thing that I hope I can accomplish a lot of America is still not aware of how dependent we are on space every single one of us..

NASA America NASA administrator Nasr United States Marshall Landers president twenty years sixty years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And we are back on the weather beaks podcasts with NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein. We're talking about sort of NASA and his evolution on climate. And so he gave you some perspective on sort of some of the statements. He made for about climate in the past. This gets me to something that you started talking about earlier in the podcast. And you know, after NASA made this very important announcement of the new NASA, astronaut corps, and that's so important. I want to talk a little bit about that. I saw people saying oh Nastase back the space program is back. But I pushed back and said, well, it never went anywhere. We got the, you know, the Parker pro and we've got the GPS satellite. We got. I sat to coming up. What do you think that people just see NASA as the mand program, which is critical, by the way? But why do you think we the citizens just see NASA? And what we do is just the man to program, and yeah, yeah. I think it's because of the drama around it and the. The prestige of it. It just seems to get more more attention. All that being said, you're absolutely right. Nasa has amazing missions going on all the time. In fact, we recently launched I think, you know, when when you. The last time we launched American astronauts from American soil on American rockets was back in twenty eleven and I think when when people remember the space shuttle's, they it's it's it's nostalgic. It people remember how impressive it was. And the all of it. And and I think because that is so emotional. That's that's what people think of when they think of NASA. Right. And of course, people think of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landing on the moon, and and the the five moon missions that came after that. So all of those all of those things are what people think about because I think that that that's the most salient piece of NASA. But you're absolutely right nostril does so much more than that. When you think about the science mission directorate, and planetary science and helium physics and earth science. We we do astrophysics deep space exploration. We do all kinds. Of things that aren't necessarily tied to human spaceflight, and the people that the people that follow that. Of course, are the scientists and people that are enthusiastic about exploration. But not it's it doesn't get the drama on national television the way human space. Yeah..

NASA NASA administrator Jim Breitenstein Neil Armstrong Buzz Aldrin
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And we are back on the weather beaks podcasts with NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein. We're talking about sort of NASA and his evolution on climate. And so he gave you some perspective on sort of some of the statements. He made for about climate in the past. This gets me to something that you started talking about earlier in the podcast. And you know, after NASA made this very important announcement of the new NASA, astronaut corps, and that's so important. I want to talk a little bit about that. I saw people saying oh Nastase back the space program is back. But I pushed back and said, well, it never went anywhere. We got the, you know, the Parker pro and we've got the GPS satellite. We got. I sat to coming up. What do you think that people just see NASA as the mand program, which is critical, by the way? But why do you think we the citizens just see NASA? And what we do is just the man to program, and yeah, yeah. I think it's because of the drama around it and the. The prestige of it. It just seems to get more more attention. All that being said, you're absolutely right. Nasa has amazing missions going on all the time. In fact, we recently launched I think, you know, when when you. The last time we launched American astronauts from American soil on American rockets was back in twenty eleven and I think when when people remember the space shuttle's, they it's it's it's nostalgic. It people remember how impressive it was. And the all of it. And and I think because that is so emotional. That's that's what people think of when they think of NASA. Right. And of course, people think of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landing on the moon, and and the the five moon missions that came after that. So all of those all of those things are what people think about because I think that that that's the most salient piece of NASA. But you're absolutely right nostril does so much more than that. When you think about the science mission directorate, and planetary science and helium physics and earth science. We we do astrophysics deep space exploration. We do all kinds. Of things that aren't necessarily tied to human spaceflight, and the people that the people that follow that. Of course, are the scientists and people that are enthusiastic about exploration. But not it's it doesn't get the drama on national television the way human space. Yeah..

NASA NASA administrator Jim Breitenstein Neil Armstrong Buzz Aldrin
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Here's the other thing that's important to note and Marshall, I'm sure, you know, this like right now in the United States, the average person who lives who lives in Oklahoma. The average person gets thirteen minutes of lead time on a tornado. Right. That's not very much. Yes. Not. And when you think about the fact that that's the average has an improvement from what it used to be. But still probably not enough. That's absolutely not enough, especially if the average is thirteen minutes that means half, the people are getting less than less team that absolutely. And so, you know, you think about the person's getting five or ten minutes of lead time, and maybe they're not they don't have the TV on or they're in a part of Oklahoma where they? Have sirens. You know, the the it it becomes a very serious threat to their lives, and we should be well past that we should be giving people over an hour of lead time based on technology that already exists. We just need to feel it and part of fielding requires us to do these observations system simulation experiments, and so we put that in the Bill as well. Are we what is your home? Sorry. I wanted to pick up before you move on the wooded share thought on some out there in our community and in the social sciences community that say that one hour lead time or too much lead time actually also has its problems too. Because people be maybe let their guard down a bit too much. I'm curious about your thoughts on that. I think that is absolutely wrong. I mean, I can't tell you how wrong the had a, and I'm gonna tell you from personal experience. More lead time is better. We have to understand people are smart, if if people know an hour ahead of time, then they're going to do the right thing. And if they don't do the right thing, at least, it's not because they didn't know. Right. And and and so we have an obligation. To increase that lead time. But you're absolutely right. I heard people tell me when I was a member of congress that we don't want to give people too much lead time because then they might play a video game and not and not move out of the way or might not take cover. And you know, I think that that is that is social experimentation that we don't wanna play we want to give people the information they need and then allow them to make good decisions. Now, if they're not making good decisions, we can do things to increase, you know, their their decision making capacity. If necessary we can warn them as to you know, what the end result is if they don't do the precautions that they're being told that they need to take. But but the last thing we want to do is restrict their information because they're not smart enough to make the right decision while I wanted to just whether geeks of your listeners how many NASA administrators or congressmen have you heard talking about Mexico models and data assimilation and Aussies. Clearly. A NASA administrator in person that understands our community. So it's a pleasure to be to have the administrator on whether geeks. I want to shift back around to the NASA world now and kind of transition because NASA desert sciences, I again, I was a scientist at NASA Goddard Space white center for twelve years was involved in the global precipitation measurement or GPS mission. Would you say about Nasr's role in studying planet earth because there's some that say why is NASA doing that? Why is it? No are USGS doing that. What what's your response to people that say that? So that's in Nastase mission set, and it always has been and it always will be..

NASA Oklahoma NASA administrator NASA Goddard Space white cente United States Marshall USGS Nastase Nasr Bill congress Mexico scientist thirteen minutes twelve years ten minutes one hour
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Here's the other thing that's important to note and Marshall, I'm sure, you know, this like right now in the United States, the average person who lives who lives in Oklahoma. The average person gets thirteen minutes of lead time on a tornado. Right. That's not very much. Yes. Not. And when you think about the fact that that's the average has an improvement from what it used to be. But still probably not enough. That's absolutely not enough, especially if the average is thirteen minutes that means half, the people are getting less than less team that absolutely. And so, you know, you think about the person's getting five or ten minutes of lead time, and maybe they're not they don't have the TV on or they're in a part of Oklahoma where they? Have sirens. You know, the the it it becomes a very serious threat to their lives, and we should be well past that we should be giving people over an hour of lead time based on technology that already exists. We just need to feel it and part of fielding requires us to do these observations system simulation experiments, and so we put that in the Bill as well. Are we what is your home? Sorry. I wanted to pick up before you move on the wooded share thought on some out there in our community and in the social sciences community that say that one hour lead time or too much lead time actually also has its problems too. Because people be maybe let their guard down a bit too much. I'm curious about your thoughts on that. I think that is absolutely wrong. I mean, I can't tell you how wrong the had a, and I'm gonna tell you from personal experience. More lead time is better. We have to understand people are smart, if if people know an hour ahead of time, then they're going to do the right thing. And if they don't do the right thing, at least, it's not because they didn't know. Right. And and and so we have an obligation. To increase that lead time. But you're absolutely right. I heard people tell me when I was a member of congress that we don't want to give people too much lead time because then they might play a video game and not and not move out of the way or might not take cover. And you know, I think that that is that is social experimentation that we don't wanna play we want to give people the information they need and then allow them to make good decisions. Now, if they're not making good decisions, we can do things to increase, you know, their their decision making capacity. If necessary we can warn them as to you know, what the end result is if they don't do the precautions that they're being told that they need to take. But but the last thing we want to do is restrict their information because they're not smart enough to make the right decision while I wanted to just whether geeks of your listeners how many NASA administrators or congressmen have you heard talking about Mexico models and data assimilation and Aussies. Clearly. A NASA administrator in person that understands our community. So it's a pleasure to be to have the administrator on whether geeks. I want to shift back around to the NASA world now and kind of transition because NASA desert sciences, I again, I was a scientist at NASA Goddard Space white center for twelve years was involved in the global precipitation measurement or GPS mission. Would you say about Nasr's role in studying planet earth because there's some that say why is NASA doing that? Why is it? No are USGS doing that. What what's your response to people that say that? So that's in Nastase mission set, and it always has been and it always will be..

NASA Oklahoma NASA administrator NASA Goddard Space white cente United States Marshall USGS Nastase Nasr Bill congress Mexico scientist thirteen minutes twelve years ten minutes one hour
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And we are back on the weather. Geeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia. And I have the pleasure to be joined by the NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein, I wanna now this is weather geeks. This is a show powered by the Weather Channel. And we're let's talk a little weather. You many people may not realize this. But you were one of the most significant figures behind the weather research and forecasting innovation act along with colleagues. Why was weather so important to you that you push forward? One of the most significant pieces of major legislation and weather in the history of the country Marshall, I just want to say this. You're an amazing PR guy. We need to hire you, and I need to have you go everywhere I used to work there. But I'm quite happy in university world. But you know, I give credit where credit is due. And I'll I'll I'll poke and criticize where it is the duty as well. But this was a signal. I was the president Jim of the American meteorological society AM in two thousand thirteen. So there you go much involved in some of the as this was coming about. So I know it's difficult. So why why why was it so important you so I I was representing the first district of Oklahoma, which is Tulsa, Oklahoma. And every year, I was in congress. I had constituents that got killed in tornadoes every year except for one year, and in two thousand thirteen there was a a massive tornado in Moore, Oklahoma, which is not in my district, but not too far from my district and that tornado hit a school and it killed twenty one people, and it devastated, you know, lives are gonna forever be changed and not for the good because of that horrible horrible event. And I resolved at that point to try to figure out how do we move to a day where we? Have zero deaths from tornadoes in the United States of America. We have the technology. If you think about the airplanes, I used to fly we have in the nose of those airplanes, we have something called a phased array radar where we detect and track and eventually target aircraft on the horizon, a classified number of miles away. And then, you know, you take that same technology in the nose of an airplane, and you put it in you put it to work on a cloud. And so instead of detecting and tracking tiny little targets on the horizon, namely airplanes. Now, you detect and track.

Dr Marshall shepherd Oklahoma Jim Breitenstein NASA administrator university of Georgia congress United States Tulsa president Moore America one year
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"And we are back on the weather. Geeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia. And I have the pleasure to be joined by the NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein, I wanna now this is weather geeks. This is a show powered by the Weather Channel. And we're let's talk a little weather. You many people may not realize this. But you were one of the most significant figures behind the weather research and forecasting innovation act along with colleagues. Why was weather so important to you that you push forward? One of the most significant pieces of major legislation and weather in the history of the country Marshall, I just want to say this. You're an amazing PR guy. We need to hire you, and I need to have you go everywhere I used to work there. But I'm quite happy in university world. But you know, I give credit where credit is due. And I'll I'll I'll poke and criticize where it is the duty as well. But this was a signal. I was the president Jim of the American meteorological society AM in two thousand thirteen. So there you go much involved in some of the as this was coming about. So I know it's difficult. So why why why was it so important you so I I was representing the first district of Oklahoma, which is Tulsa, Oklahoma. And every year, I was in congress. I had constituents that got killed in tornadoes every year except for one year, and in two thousand thirteen there was a a massive tornado in Moore, Oklahoma, which is not in my district, but not too far from my district and that tornado hit a school and it killed twenty one people, and it devastated, you know, lives are gonna forever be changed and not for the good because of that horrible horrible event. And I resolved at that point to try to figure out how do we move to a day where we? Have zero deaths from tornadoes in the United States of America. We have the technology. If you think about the airplanes, I used to fly we have in the nose of those airplanes, we have something called a phased array radar where we detect and track and eventually target aircraft on the horizon, a classified number of miles away. And then, you know, you take that same technology in the nose of an airplane, and you put it in you put it to work on a cloud. And so instead of detecting and tracking tiny little targets on the horizon, namely airplanes. Now, you detect and track.

Dr Marshall shepherd Oklahoma Jim Breitenstein NASA administrator university of Georgia congress United States Tulsa president Moore America one year
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"The way we do whether prediction and understand climate the way we do national security and defense the way we do disaster relief banking regulate flows of power on the on the on the the power grid, all of it is dependent on space and and all of those capabilities are available because of a trail that was blazed by NASA and and for the very small budget that NASA has, we have enabled a a human condition that is far beyond. Anything anybody would have imagined agreed completely mass as one of the best invest investments that that citizens make for, you know, pennies dollars relatively speaking as are a no in the weather service and others as well. I have one more question before I do that quick update because I know I sat to is going to be going up soon. Everything going. Okay with that. Yeah, we're on. We're on schedule for for ice at two, and and it's a obviously a critically important mission for the United States to understand, you know, the the these sheets of ice in the Arctic that that people are concerned about, where are they going and understanding our hydrogen fear even even better than we already do. Yeah. No, we're looking for the final question. As I mentioned earlier, I spent twelve years at NASA and one of those years I actually did a detailed down at NASA headquarters. Gotta look at the agency from that perspective as well in your time at NASA so far, what has the prized you most about the agency? The people. They're the culture. I'll tell you the raw intellect, the smart people. There are the raw, like I'm working at an agency where I know that everybody here is smarter than me, and that's a, that's a good thing and and and and not only that, but they're all opinionated. And that's even better. There's there's no shortage of people here who are willing to speak their minds until the administrator exactly what they think the administrator needs to hear. And so that's a very positive thing for NASA and for our country. Yeah, that's the it is amazing. You know, in the science culture there, you know we can disagree and challenge each other and tell people how we feel, you know, at the end of the day we go and you know, shared drink across or do whatever we do. That's what I enjoy about the science culture. And particularly NASA administrator brightens. Now I really wanna thank you for joining us here on the weather podcast, and we wish you continued success in your current role in for your continued service. To this country. We thank you. Thank you, Dr. Separate I presented thank you very much, and that's the weather geese podcast. Thank you for joining us.

NASA NASA administrator administrator United States Dr. Separate Arctic twelve years
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"I'm still part of the NASA family in some ways masses willing to take those risks on a new radar that can measure thunderstorms in a hurricane or send a probe to the fun and and that that really is a little bit different than an operational mission. And I wanna I wanna pause here for one moment. And we are back on the weather spot cast with NASA administrator, Jim, Brian Stein. We're talking about sort of NASA and his evolution on climate, and he gave you some perspective on sort of some of the statements he made for about climate in the past. This gets me to something that you started talking about earlier in the podcast, and you know after NASA made this very important announcement of the new NASA astronaut corps, and that's so important. I want to talk a little bit about that. I saw people saying, oh, Nasr's back the space program is back, but I pushed back and said, well, it never went anywhere. We've got, you know, the Parker pro. We've got the GPS satellite got I set to coming up. What do you think that people just see NASA as the mand program, which is critical by the way? But why do you think we the citizens just see NASA and what we do is just the man to program. And yeah, yeah, I think it's because of the the drama around it and the. The prestige of it, it just seems to get more more attention. All that being said, you're absolutely right. NASA has amazing missions going on all the time. In fact, we recently launched, I think, you know when when you. The last time we launched American astronauts from American soil on American rockets was back in twenty eleven. And I think when when people remember the space shuttle's, they, it's, it's, it's nostalgic it people remember how impressive it was and the author of it and and I think because that is so emotional, that's, that's what people think of when they think of NASA. Right. And of course, people think of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landing on the moon and and the the five moon missions that came after that. So all of those all of those things are what people think about. Because I think that that that's the most salient piece of NASA, but you're absolutely right now does so much more than that when you think about the science mission directorate and planetary science and helium, physics and earth science, we, we do astrophysics deep space exploration. We do all. Kinds of things that aren't necessarily tied to human spaceflight and the people that the people that follow that, of course, the scientists and people that are enthusiastic about exploration, but not it doesn't get the drama on national television, the way human space..

NASA NASA administrator Brian Stein Nasr Neil Armstrong Buzz Aldrin Jim
"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"We're excited to welcome Yuli confirm NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein, Jim hails from Tulsa Oklahoma, where he became all too familiar with extreme weather. So he understands the importance of improving our forecast capabilities will discuss the major piece of legislation. He helped past port expansion of weather research and forecasting. Plus we'll hear about the Evelyn of his on climate change and how the work at NASA can further our understanding of its impact. If that's not enough, we'll also get Jim dots on the future space exploration could include a visit to Mars. It's all next on the weather Deeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia. Thank you for joining us. Well, thank you for having me. It's good to be here. I want to jump right in with some science because NASA just launched a. Really interesting mission. The types the sun. Why is that important? And why? Why should all Americans be excited about that? And why is it important for us as citizens? That's a great question, and it's an important one. And a lot of people don't realize just in fact how important it is. So when you think about the sun, the sun actually creates what we call solar wind. So the sun is actually very responsible for what we call space weather. And of course, people are familiar with solar flares. Some people are maybe not so familiar with what's called a coronal mass ejection. So what happens is inside the sun, you know, it's, it's a nuclear fusion going on inside the sun hydrogen fusion, and from that charged particles are released. And of course, in some cases, they're released in the form of a solar flare, which means you got charged particles moving at a at a high rate of speed and another cases you can have. It's called a coronal mass ejection, which means there's a whole lot of charged particles moving at, you know, at a very, very rapid speed, almost the speed of light if you will. And so in this particular case, what happens is the the, the, the solar radiation, the radiation that comes from the sun can be very damaging not only to humans and other words astronauts that could be in deep, split deep space or could be on the international space station and lower orbit, but also very damaging for our our satellites. So when you think about how important the satellites are to to to to us as a civilization, the way we predict whether the way we understand climate the way we do disaster relief and national security, the way we do communications, we've got, you know, an entire architecture in geostationary orbit for over the horizon communications. Fact, many of your viewers might be listening to this on a on a podcast. They might download it on the internet. They could have internet from space. They could be getting it. You know, from from that architecture for communications in in geostationary orbit, the way we do navigation. When you think about GPS and how important that GPS timing signal is all of these satellites and that that GPS timing signals important for banking, it's important for regulating flows on the power grid and a whole host of other infrastructure, critical pieces of infrastructure for the United States and for the world. So all of these things are dependent on space, and when we have a coronal mass ejection, those things all be, they can all be put at risk. In fact, they could ultimately go away. They could be permanently damaged. And of course it's not just that. But you know if the lights go out on earth or our cell phones, quit working things get really ugly, really quickly as. Ashley, if they don't come back very fast. So what the what Parker solar probe is doing. It's going to help us understand how the sun works so that we can better predict those solar flares and those coronal mass ojection ze. Yeah, this is important stuff. When you hear the term space weather when I often mentioned it to people, I think they think, oh, a thunderstorm on Mars or something..

Jim NASA Dr Marshall shepherd NASA administrator Jim dots Tulsa Oklahoma Jim Breitenstein United States Ashley university of Georgia