35 Burst results for "Adjunct Professor"

What I Wish I Knew Before Starting My First Adjunct Position

The Heather Monthie Podcast

02:26 min | Last month

What I Wish I Knew Before Starting My First Adjunct Position

"What i wish. I knew before i got my first adjunct teaching position as an it instructor so in this video. I wanted to share with you. One of the major things that i really wish i knew and understood before i took my first position as an adjunct instructor I think that teaching at colleges universities community colleges is a wonderful way to break into teaching. And i am very thankful to have had the opportunity that somebody gave me that opportunity and as i move forward in my career in higher education was able to give so many people their first chance at a teaching at the university level level vocational school level etc. And so what i wanted to do though is to share with you to sort of reflect back a little bit on my own career and share with you. What i just kinda wish i knew. And there's one big day. There's a lot of things that i wish that i knew. But there's a i guess one big thing so i guess i let's go back a little bit so i knew i was going to be a teacher. I've always enjoyed teaching. I love working with people and helping them achieve their goals. i i i Teaching gig was in two thousand. I actually became a certified flight instructor and You taught adults how to fly. I also taught junior junior achievement. And i taught second graders about You know finance economics that kind of stuff that was. Those are really sort of my first gigs. In teaching actually think flight instructing came a little bit later in two thousand and two And then i also started teaching online in two thousand thirteen. I started working with educators for teachers who were bringing technology into the classroom and so Obviously using technology to teach online. That was a fantastic thing to be able to bring all these things together. And then i started my phd in two thousand ten and i completed that in two thousand fourteen with the goal that i wanted to keep progressing in my career in education. What i really wanted to do was i really wanted to start my own school. I wanted to start a school that would help. People advanced their technology careers. Earn a very good income And to be able to change their lives in I was been very passionate about helping. People really just changed their financial situation and oftentimes You know having a larger income higher income really does help level up their financial

University Level Level Vocatio
Karim Sadjadpour Echoes Women's Rights Are Gone Under the Taliban

Mark Levin

01:43 min | Last month

Karim Sadjadpour Echoes Women's Rights Are Gone Under the Taliban

"There's a gentleman by the name of Karim Sadjadpour, senior fellow Carnegie, a Carnegie endowment. Adjunct professor Georgetown. I know nothing about the man. First question from Taliban to Al Jazeera female reporter asking about women's rights. Tabbouleh mujaheed spokes. Spokes barbarian. For the Taliban says women have rights as long as they follow Sharia law will be free speech. He says. This is exactly how the Ayatollah Khamenei answered questions when he first came to power quote. Quote. Freedom of speech. Human rights. And women's rights will all be protected in accordance with Islamic law. What That means with these barbarian throwbacks. Is, none of these rights will be protected. They learned From the Islam, a Nazi regime in Tehran. And now we have an Islamo Nazi regime in Kabul. And you know why I use that phrase Islamo Nazi regime to distinguish it from Reformed Islam, the type that Zewdie Jasur talks to us about and so many Muslims do practice. This is 7th 8th 9th century. Barbarism.

Karim Sadjadpour Tabbouleh Mujaheed Taliban Ayatollah Khamenei Al Jazeera Georgetown Tehran Kabul Zewdie Jasur
"adjunct professor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:01 min | 3 months ago

"adjunct professor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Adjunct professor of economics at William and Mary. He is with us on the phone from Pennsylvania. Peter before we move on a little bit. I do want to just continue with your writing about the coming age of scrutiny and How you talk specifically about what Ahead will be a third major betrayal in 20 years, and that specifically, it would be more than just a pause or a pullback. So what do you think investors or how do you see it that investors what they should be preparing themselves for? I think investors need to be prepared for far greater. Um, it re evaluation of risk both in the credit markets and in and especially in the equity market. Um you know, when Archie goes failed, the question was what would happen next? And you're starting to see it. Credit Suisse. It's pulling back its lending to other similar entrepreneurs, and and you know big investors. And I think that that sea change is likely to continue. And so investors who have taken great advantage of of ample liquidity and rising markets should should be prepared for a reversal of trends both on the equity and credit site. Does it happen when the Fed starts to unwind? You know, I think it happens. Almost independent of the said Okay, I I think that we we attribute far too much power to the Fed. And in many ways as policymakers, they react to the behavior of the crowd. And so I look at Fed action last week, for example, as really a lagging indicators where the crowd is moved. And their their attempt to keep up with that. Well and that I love that. You said that because I feel like some of the observations, Post Fed meeting is jest and I agree with it that the Fed was finally Acknowledging some of the concerns that were out there and by starting to talk to talk about it. Yeah, I think they had to, and I think the contrast in response was was significant versus what we saw earlier this spring in March, Powell was all but received a standing ovation from the press conference. And this response suggests that the policy makers are still not in sync with where the sentiment of the crowd is has moved. Having said that policy isn't something that they're just going to kind of of a certain rip. You know, pull a ripcord because that's just not how the Fed does it, whether it's the power fed or whether it's the Bernanke fed or or maybe more likely the Janet Yellen fed. I mean, They have gotten very good about indicating what's to come. You know, they recognize that narrative is far more important than needs this specific fact of the action. And so they're very careful and deliberately. And I think, rightfully so in what they say the challenges aligning it today with With narratives that are moving all over the place Because one day you have lumber up and the next day you have lumber down exactly, and we do it. We talk about it like it's a big change, but it just kind of goes back and forth. Having said that one of the narratives Peter of the Fed when it comes to the labour market coming back, and we still know that there's millions of jobs that need to be Um to come back before we get to this pre pandemic levels. But the Fed has talked about two about inclusion and making sure that when the jobs come back, it hits minorities as well that they also see jobs coming back. Do you think the Fed will be able to hold out if we start to see the labor market improved? Generally speaking the headline numbers, but we don't see the improvement may be among some of the minority communities. I think that well, I never expected the Fed to respond to the case shaped recovery the way it did when I started talking about it, but it is clear that that mandate is important to them. And I think it speaks to just how extreme the divide had become. And so I do think again and that's swinging of the pendulum that there is a far greater focus on the plight of those at the bottom. Recognizing that from a monetary and fiscal policy perspective there need to may need to be more sacrifice from those at the top. And you think the Fed gets it and that they will hold out because there is some concern. You know about the Fed that we know what their dual mandate is right. But if they start to see inflation concerns, and if those job gains aren't there Among you know, black communities, Latin American communities, the less served communities whether or not the Fed will continue to consider that to be a really important metric for them to meet. Yeah, And I think it puts them under the gun socially in terms of scrutiny of of their own mission. And so I think they have to be very careful here. Not to, um Not to lose sight of the hope that has been put in them by those at the bottom right because it's certainly carrying an awful lot of weight. Peter thank you so much always thoughtful and always keeps me on track by shooting me little messages and research to check out because it really takes us to places that we need to be having. Discussions about Peter Atwater, He's adjunct professor of economics at William and Mary on the phone from Pennsylvania. Just a quick recap of how we ended on this Monday. Pretty much finishing at our highs of the session when it comes to the equity trade 586 point at 1.7%. The Dow Jones industrial Average 33 8, 76 S and P at 1.4% and the NASDAQ again of 8/10 of 1% right now for a check on world and national News over to R 99 1 newsroom in the nation's capital and Nancy Lions dance..

Credit Suisse Peter Atwater Janet Yellen 1.7% Peter Bernanke Pennsylvania 20 years Powell last week 586 point 8/10 1.4% Fed Archie 1% two today William both
Voice in Education wit Juie Daniel Davis

The Future is Spoken

02:20 min | 4 months ago

Voice in Education wit Juie Daniel Davis

"I have a really really special guest judy. Down was will come really. Thank you for having me excited to be with you. Yeah it's our pleasure definitely so do they tell us about your background. Yeah so i actually have degrees in both accounting. An education had a full career in accounting and then decided. I wanted to be a teacher who taught accounting and honestly never had that opportunity. My first stocks that opened that were to teach computers. And that opened up a world to me that i've been riding ever since so for fifteen years. I was at the same school where children had gone to school. Or we're going to school. The time and i early retired from there last year with a the title director of instructional technology in innovation. Now i am an adjunct professor at the university of tennessee in chattanooga and i'm teaching educational technology courses to graduate level students and having just use technology in really good ways for classroom use and on in the midst of be the director of instructional technology and innovation. One of my roles was to really look at emerging technology and be aware of it. So that i could kind of be thinking through. What is this look like. Is this going to impact education or should it impacted education. So that's kind of how i got involved with. The voice industry was really interested in the fact that a device could connect to the world at such a low price point and i felt like that could really solve some equity issues for school systems. So as i started working bought my first advice tried it out in the middle school classroom and win no way. Am i speaking at busy. I'm a middle schoolers. And since then that was the very first tall cylinder alexa device since then just really been helping teachers intentionally use voice in ways to just support the learning. That's going on in their classroom.

Judy University Of Tennessee Chattanooga
More Than 500 Ex-Biden Staffers Urge President to Condemn Israel

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:38 min | 4 months ago

More Than 500 Ex-Biden Staffers Urge President to Condemn Israel

"Now we'll start in washington where over five hundred democratic party stuff as the written and led to the president. Joe biden calling him to do more to protect palestinians and hold israel accountable for its actions in gaza. Although a ceasefire currently holds two thirty palestinians were killed while twelve israelis died in. The recent conflict will join me on the line. Alison kaplan soma. A journalist for herat's and scott lucas adjunct professor at the clinton institute at university college done scott if we could start with you. What did this letter from the democrats say well. The democrats are calling for more of an emphasis as it were on the palestinian side of the equation. If you wanna it that use that term and that is that on the one hand you've got the question of us military eight israel. you've got senator bernie sanders who has introduced a measure to suspend almost eight hundred million dollars of american arms to israel until you can have a clear cessation of the violence in other words confirmation following last friday's ceasefire. And then secondly. I think that emphasis not only on reconstruction in gaza which is something that the biden administration is promoting including on secretary of state. Lincoln's visit to israel and palestine yesterday but also on the wider issues the issues of jerusalem. The issues of what the democrats these crafts would call an israeli occupation of the palestinian west bank and some time of true to negotiations for a palestinian state after those of effectively stalled since two thousand nine.

Alison Kaplan Scott Lucas Clinton Institute Israel Joe Biden Gaza Senator Bernie Sanders Herat Democratic Party University College Washington Biden Administration Scott United States Palestine Lincoln Jerusalem West Bank
Alison Levine: On the Edge

Leadership and Loyalty

02:41 min | 5 months ago

Alison Levine: On the Edge

"Our guest. Today is alison levine. Allison is a history making polar explorer and mountaineer. She served as team captain. The first american women's ever a sec edition and has completed the adventure grand slam which is climbing the highest peaks on every continent and skiing both the north and south pole feet. Which only twenty people in the world have achieved listen. Levin has spent four years as an adjunct professor of the united states military academy where she focuses on topic of leading teams in extreme environments. Currently she says on the board and faculty of leadership development group at west point one of the nation's premier executive leader development programs. She is the author of the new york times bestseller on the edge. Which is a compilation of the lessons. She's learned from climbing the world's highest peaks. She's also the founder of climb high foundation a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of jobless women in uganda training them to work as trekking guides for local mountains. Ladies and gentlemen please put your hands together and help me welcome retired. Deputy minister talk today me for a loop knowing what's bigger thing in there. Well done. Well do the research that was a while ago. Yeah it was back in two thousand and three. But i'll tell you i learned one of the best leadership lessons if i can. Just jump right in with joe. Leadership lessons from working for governor schwarzenegger and it was about treating every member of your team making sure that they know they are important to you as an individual. Not just as somebody in a job function. What i mean by that is For example when it was you know a few days into the campaign and arnold was walking by me in the hallway. And i'm sure you know there's a million people were gonna campaign an old buddy. you know. there's all these people that he's worked all these famous people at a worked in politics for years and years and years. He's political veterans. And i'm you know a a newbie. And he walks by me in the hallway and i work in campaign finance rights. Our jobs to raise the money for the ads spends and things like that and the events and he walks by me and he looked at me and he said Hey how's our mountain climber doing today.

Alison Levine Board And Faculty Of Leadershi Climb High Foundation United States Military Academy Allison Levin West Point SEC Skiing New York Times Uganda Schwarzenegger JOE Arnold
The History of Sound Art

Radio Survivor Podcast

01:44 min | 5 months ago

The History of Sound Art

"On the show were talking about sound art. Our guest judy. Dunaway is an artist and adjunct professor in the history of art department at massachusetts college of art and design. She recently published a fascinating article about the history of sound art which highlights important contributions by female artists. Thanks so much for joining us today. Judy thanks for having me. So i thought we would start with the basics and i was hoping you could explain to us what sound art is. Well i find definitions of sound art online. Reputable sources like oh the tate britain's website or oxford music online and things like that. I've been so interested in defining it as i have been interested in looking at the etymology of the term. How the term involved. I mean like what is a hamburger. Is it a beef patty or is it beef and pork. I mean it does say ham right does it doesn't require a bun to be called a hamburger so this time this type of thinking is is kind of circular and boring to me so because you know gaining control of a term has a certain exclusionary hierarchical power like a restaurant claiming to serve the original hamburger recipe. Are you know The original ray's pizza. If you ever been to new york there's like hundreds of restaurants that claimed to have the original. Ray's pizza i would rather look at how the term evolved into me that says more about it. So the history of the term makes these kind of power structures of all the out of people co-opting the term more

Massachusetts College Of Art Dunaway Judy Oxford Britain New York RAY
"adjunct professor" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:09 min | 7 months ago

"adjunct professor" Discussed on WGN Radio

"He is adjunct Professor Louis University Aviation and Meteorology. Rick. I want to ask you about our weather and the big thaw and that 42 degrees tomorrow high, But I just really quickly want to wrap this discussion up about the United Airlines flight because You mentioned that pilots know how to handle this kind of situation that the plane can fly in this situation and that that's built to do that sort of thing. That's all Well and good. But what should people take away from this? They're grounding the fleet. Is this just a freak incident? Do you think is there Something more systemic here. I mean, I know you're not the NTSB and they'll have their time to talk. But just generally, I can only speculate on what I know is, you know this is the second time that this particular Type of airplane, which is the 200 series Triple seven with the patent, Windy Pratt and Whitney 4000 series engine. This is the second time that engine has sailed. The other time was the flight. That was traveling. I believe itwas somewhere I think from the West Coast, but it was going to Hawaii on the same thing happened. The engine failed. I don't think there was an explosion or fire. But it was another thing where one of the fan blades snapped off. And most likely, you know was ingested into the engine. The engine failed. Pilots did the right thing. They turned it off and again because these planes can fly. Up to three hours on one engine, which is really remarkable, Anna. They were to let land that plane safely. You remember back in 1979 out of the DC 10? Remember that in Chicago? Who could forget my parents talked about it forever? Didn't want to travel in the wake of that, right? And at that point, they grounded all the sea Tens now not all 77. Grounded just the Triple Seven that had this particular engine. But with that incident coming out of O'Hare again catastrophic engine failure, but not only that the engine literally was completely removed from the left side of the airplanes and that the pilots of flying Not on one engine, but two engines. So all the thrust was going to the right side of the airplane, and that's what made the plane kind of dive off to the left and because it was literally in a dive. At that point, the pilots Did not have enough time to go back to the airport. They actually called the tower and said, We lost an engine. We want to come back, but they were just literally like maybe a 500. 2000 FT. Off the ground with this incident that happened yesterday that that plane was ready at 13,000 Ft. Which is all these 6000 ft. Above the ground Get remember, you're in the Rocky Mountains. But they had enough time and they had enough wherewithal and they had good weather from a wind standpoint and also whether standpoint at the airport where they were able to make it back safely. So Everything that could've went right with this outside of the engine blowing up went right. Yeah, I'll say I'm looking at that. No, I'm looking at the video right here. Did you describe before that 9 ft circular piece that sort of that cap on the engine That's on somebody's front doorstep that it landed right there front of their door somehow. Oh, my gosh. I mean, what? Everything going, right. Talk about everything going, right? How is that family feeling today? Right? And you think and by the way, the ring itself is about 12 ft. In diameter. The engine of the fan blades themselves about nine. But if you think about it, it actually hit the truck next to it and then bounced. Now that now the NTSB actually has an intact ring as opposed the one that you know it could have landed in the highway. It could have landed, you know, in a playground or something like that, so Yeah. When you shake of the head it I got a feeling that those people live in that house. Probably have ultimate free travel on United Airlines. Would you think so? What? You'd hope so you would my God just think about that, too. See it falling from the sky and the smoke behind it And right there in a residential neighborhood so happy, everybody's okay. And again, there's no snow on the ground, even though they had snow later. And even that wasn't much of a The pieces that they were able to found were able to, you know, find out I'm sure they're able to put together by the way. When they landed at airplane on runway. I believe it was 26 Day land on the north runway. They took off on the south runway, but win had shifted out of the North's about nine miles an hour 20 minutes later Denver airport experience a north wind of 20 miles an hour. I don't know how those pilots would enable the land that airplane on one engine with a 20 mile per hour wind. Four hours later, it was snowing so again, everything that could have gone right for the standpoint of all the things that could have gone wrong didn't so again one of those things where you count your lucky stars more than once or twice, right? No question. No question. Hey, let's talk about thinking about Count your lucky stars. I guess the thought brings with it some good news and bad news. But what can you tell us about what's on the way? Well, second day in a row of 37 degrees. I was talking with your producer Pete off the air. I don't think anybody remembers this four years ago. Today it was 68 degrees, and we're in the midst of Florida five days with temperatures close to 60. The reason even 70. Even though it was warming of any snow on the ground Now, any time you get about 35 40 degrees, you have a lot of snow mouth. Good thing. The icicle, which you see everywhere are beginning to loosen up a little bit. Don't try to loosen them up on yourself. Let him fall on their own. But it does look like another day, Probably close to 40 degrees tomorrow. Then it gets pretty chilly around here. Well, actually get a pretty stiff wind off the lake Wednesday afternoon. That'll drop temperatures along the lakefront into the low thirties, but we'll still be in that mid 30 rage. Dirty Day. The on Lee thing I see kind of Problematic here and a becoming Wednesday night into Thursday night and Friday is overnight lows will get back down into the mid teens. So whatever melts during the day, we'll re freeze at night so we can probably seeing something in the way of black ice on some of your suburban roads, and probably in some of the Farm or the forest preserves. But other than that, you know, loaded mid thirties during the day, the next couple days. This is about as as welcomed as you can get because we've been pretty. It's been pretty awful. If we would end the month of February. Today it will go down as the coldest.

Chicago Rick 9 ft 6000 ft Anna 68 degrees 42 degrees Today Wednesday afternoon 37 degrees Friday Hawaii five days 1979 Florida Wednesday night 13,000 Ft Thursday night Rocky Mountains two engines
International Salvation Army: Social Justice Strategy

Ending Human Trafficking Podcast

05:11 min | 8 months ago

International Salvation Army: Social Justice Strategy

"The issues. Be a voice and make a difference in ending human trafficking. Sandy you and i talk a lot about partnership on this podcast and we. It's been a central part of our work for many years. And one of the most important partners we have worked with over the years as the salvation army. And we're so glad to welcome a friend back to the show someone who's been a leader in the space were glad to have priscilla santos with us. Priscilla is the salvation army social justice commissions international coordinator for modern slavery and human trafficking response and priscilla is an adjunct professor at vanguard universities global center for women and justice where she courses on justice and holistic survivor care. She obtained a master's in intercultural studies specializing in international development and children at risk from fuller theological seminary priscilla. So glad to have you back on the show and you so much for having me. It's a joy to be here today. I was looking back to see when the last time you were a guest. It was in may two thousand fifteen and we recorded a podcast about mothers day and human trafficking and it was one of those podcasts. That just really grips your heart. So i recommend that those who have never met priscilla. Go back and listen to that. That's podcast number one. Oh one soper still. You're in a new role and your title is so long. I'm so glad. I already know you can just call you. Priscilla tell us what the international modern slavery and human trafficking. Response coordinator does us. So my new position is all of our international social justice commission office which is part of our international headquarters and our department is really to be the strategic advocacy voice for all things social justice into really lift voices from those on the margins and so within department now. They've created this role which is the international coordinator for monitoring slavery and human trafficking response and my primary function of my new role is to oversee the implementation of our international strategy to strengthen our response to trafficking all over the world. So let's get a little bit better picture of what you mean by all over the world. How many countries is salvation army in. Yeah so we are in over a hundred and thirty countries around the world. Wow wow what an amazing platform to have influence and voice in a hundred and thirty countries. That's amazing okay. So at salvation. Army has a very long and deep history in fighting slavery. And when i looked at the new strategy it's called fight for freedom. Tell us a little bit about how it was developed. Yeah so kinda like you mentions. Fighting and trying to end human trafficking is something that this ovation army has been a part of before. Even the term human trafficking was coins so for the listeners. That don't know the salvation army started an eighteen sixty five and actually. Our first encounter with advocating against trafficking happened in eighteen. Eighty five so very quickly after we started and it was where we advocated to change the law for the age of consent from sixteen to eighteen. It's one of our historical stories. Call the brinson maiden tribune. But i i think one of the things for us to realize. Is that the salvation army that this is a part of our dna. We have been doing this since the very beginning even before again. The the coin term was there for human trafficking so but more recently we have approved and launched this international strategy because throughout the hundreds of years that we have been working on the front lines. One of the things that could really strengthen is our coordinated approach and our centralized approach because one of the things that we realized was that we were doing so many amazing things all over the world. But perhaps we weren't really talking together. One side of the world didn't know what the other side was doing and so really to create some standards of care to create some promising practices among ourselves. We just launched. This is our international strategy. So it's the first time in our salvation army history that we have a strategy to help us all move forward together so it's very exciting.

Priscilla Salvation Army Priscilla Santos Salvation Army Social Justice Vanguard Universities Global C Fuller Theological Seminary Soper Sandy Brinson Maiden Tribune Army
The Robots Are Here  and They're Adorable

Business Wars Daily

02:58 min | 9 months ago

The Robots Are Here and They're Adorable

"Like the plot of a science fiction movie. Man invents robots robots are polite helpful and strong man loves robots robots take over the world. Only this time. They're dancing us in mission. Boston dynamics is making us fall in love with our future overlords all over again the robotics maker in which hyundai motor group acquired controlling interest last month recently released a product demo on youtube. But this wasn't your typical jargon laden laden tech talk. Instead for boston dynamics robots showed off their ability to cut a rug and fascinating and slightly unnerving style the video features spot. Boston dynamics yellow four legged robotic dog which is designed to navigate tough unstable and dangerous terrain to humanoid atlas robots in another robot named handle also had starring roles the robots deal to the nineteen. Sixty two hit single. You love me bopping and shimmying to the beat as the song lyrics direct. They can do the mashed potato and they can also do the twist. But they aren't the only robots angling for human heartstrings over japanese robotics maker groove x. The focus is on a cuddly pint-sized bought designed to make you cou love art is essentially a love robot. Tiny machine with quote big is a button nose and to flipper like arms. That wave around when it wants to dance be picked up or otherwise interact with its owners. According to in gadget sounds adorable. The many electronic companion was unveiled as a prototype at the massive consumer electronics trade show. Cas in two thousand nineteen but returned. Last year's a product available to consumers japan unlike boston robotics machine which are focused on the commercial market for now lovat is meant to live in your home almost like a pet. They can also respond to human touch in where tiny outfits unlike. A pet lot will never bark at the mailman. But what's the point of all this investment. No one really needs an industrial robot that can get down or inexpensive electronic pet with separation anxiety issues still a growing body of research and opinion finds that the key to overcoming human skepticism about robots is helping us find ways to bond with them as one wall street journal editorial put it quote as robots take on bigger roles. It's crucial that users. Both trust and like them. That can be tricky. Ken smooth dance. Moves and snugly droids. That effort depends on whom you ask when raises as an adjunct professor at stanford posted. The boston dynamics video on twitter. He tweeted that it was quote pretty awesome. How dancing makes robots less intimidating spacex. Founder elon. Musk tweeted back quote less after all. The one thing that boston dynamics video made crystal clear is that the same robots who can run faster lift more and processed information better than we can are now able to win a dance off with his two less intimidating

Hyundai Motor Group Boston Dynamics Boston Youtube Ken Smooth Japan Wall Street Journal Founder Elon Stanford Musk Twitter
How Taiwan is dealing with disinformation on Social Media

Correspondents Report

05:46 min | 10 months ago

How Taiwan is dealing with disinformation on Social Media

"Corona virus and disinformation are two of the big challenges that have demanded the world's attention in two thousand twenty in the last days of the year. The news about vaccines for covid. Nineteen seems fairly positive. Even though that news of course needs to be fact checked as well but it may be that. Fighting mass-scale disease is in fact more feasible than fighting mass-scale disinformation but foreign policy magazine has drawn attention to some innov- it's to tackle this information in taiwan including a collaborative fact checking bought created as part of a public private partnership between the taiwanese government and the owners of taiwan's most popular messaging app. Which is called line. Indeed the authors lang and do lay say that in american tech circles. Taiwan has become a model for the fight against disinformation laying a former social media manager and speechwriter for taiwanese president side on when and do on is a national security advisor to the institute for security and technology as well as being an adjunct professor of politics at the university of san francisco. And i'm very pleased to say that. They both join us now on sunday. Extra welcome libby and doer. Thank you for her. It's great to have you. Can i start by just asking you to give us a brief outline libby of what that app line is and why this information on the line out has been a particular concern so in taiwan line is essentially the messaging app more than ninety percent of the population has the app on their phone. It integrates a news platform. It has closed chat groups You can read comics on it really like anything you can think to do on tech app you can probably find a way to do online and i suppose the this information element is particularly important because while we often focus on things like facebook and twitter. It's the private messaging where a lot of this material is distributed. Does that ring true to you. Do one yeah. Domains of new innovation of this digital accountability. Project is that it embodies or would call Distributed of dictation and do is think about the volume of information we face on a daily basis in the information environment right. The volume is so massive we cannot to professional fact checking trying to balk. Wet the rising volume office information and to me. The most innovative side of the story is that let the users have access to fact checking as well as built a database of corrected information so people can easily access such information in a very distributed manner and to me like this kind of distributed authentication is only possible through recall public and private partnership because the skill is only possible when both sides of this equation or together tech companies have tried to solve this problem but essentially they don't have the right incentive structures to do it as long as they have no pr issues and to me. I think that's the main thing. No innovation that the taiwanese government was to crack the code on. Indonesia is also another example but few governments they may talk about triple. Ps but very few governments have been able to crack the code on it. We tend to look at the shiny object right. This bought fact checking infrastructure right but behind that invasion. I think there was a lot of like we. Wholesome political leadership absolutely and there are some really interesting things to explore there. There's the technology but then also the human interaction which you've rightly pointed to do on and the fact that it's done as as a public private partnership as well so let's let's dig into all of those three aspects. Starting paps with the technology libby laying line has a fact checker and fact. Checking is a concept. I think everyone's familiar with these days. But we tend to think of a sort of separate major organizational or unit that does sort of human research and publishes its results whereas online the line fact checker is what you've called collaborative fact checking bought which sounds very impressive. What it means. What is a collaborative fact checking bought. How does the line fact check work. So the basic concept is that this line bought anyone can add it as a friend and once you have it as a friend you can copy and paste any link to a news article or perhaps a paragraph that contains information. You're not quite sure about. And you can send this message to the bought. And then once the bought receives the message. It runs the content that you sent it against the existing database of fact checked information that it has and it kind of spits backout evaluation to you about whether the information is false whether it needs more information to be sure and it also provides related links. Like if you're asking a question about a certain topic and this has been fact checked before they might show you. Oh you might be interested in this factual story right and it's doing all that using in an automated way and the reason that it's collaborative in understanding this that it it's actually pulling more than one fact checking source together. Yes so it's actually with line and then it's with some different third party fact checking platforms As well as taiwanese government so it's cooling essentially these public and private resources together and then making this single that keeps all this information in one place

Taiwan Taiwanese Government Institute For Security And Tec University Of San Francisco Doer Lang Libby Twitter Facebook Indonesia
3 killed in Fort Worth, TX street racing crash, Dallas police say

Jim Bohannon

00:24 sec | 11 months ago

3 killed in Fort Worth, TX street racing crash, Dallas police say

"Worth Police are looking into a crash that took the lives of three people Thursday night. Ben and Meg Harbor of Fort Worth, were returning home from a date when they were struck by a vehicle that was racing another vehicle at high speeds. The name of the speeding driver who hit the couple has not been released. The arbors leave behind their four Children. Then worked a primary job and was an adjunct professor in theology at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary.

Meg Harbor Fort Worth BEN Southwestern Baptist Theologic
Learning with our Kids through Digital Play with OK Play App Co-founders Chris Ovitz and Dr. Colleen Russo Johnson

SuperMamas

07:53 min | 1 year ago

Learning with our Kids through Digital Play with OK Play App Co-founders Chris Ovitz and Dr. Colleen Russo Johnson

"Hi I'm probably next high embraced. The I'd were sisters, Fred Solders, wives, and business. And we're just falling three. We know. To be a better version of herself every day. All right and we're also. Welcomes. Sisterhood. Hi Emma what's up everybody? How are you? Do everybody I'm great. How are you? Yourself. Do I wanNA, introduce myself. Yes I do. Hi everybody. My name is Lena. I, am Bruce's sister. And I am a mom of three girls nine, six and three year old right now, and we're just trying to survive. who at you on the other side of the Mike. I am also your sister Duh. I am but he Lopez mother of two of a three month old and a fighter old little boy and my little girl who was just born three months ago. Just trying to be me being you know the best near can be embracing be. Husband. I had to have a high note shuttle the has. To the husband's Yeah I mean, we're just assist in women trying to be better rational results every day. If you're new to the show. Welcome to the Super Sisterhood, and if you are og longtime listener Sept- ladies, we love you. Also. Don't forget to follow us on our Social Media Instagram and twitter at underscore. So but Romance Facebook, Super Roma's podcasts, and on the Web Superman dot com, you can check out or previous episodes newsletter subscription newsletter all the articles that we have just check it out to romance dot COM If you WANNA, send us a note you can do it by sending us an email at hello at superman dot com or you can call us at four to four, three, two, six, three, seven, seven. End At the end of the show, we have our favorite favorite segment, the pick or tip of the week. So stay tuned for that. And my favorite segment mind theory subject to subject segment not subject my second subject to subject to name to. who do we have on the show this week? Today on the show this week we have two great very smart in a in a high achievers I would say On the today we have Chris over to is a president of the company called. Okay play. It's an APP that I started using that will come very much in handy these days of virtual learning. So again, we have Chris Hogan, who was President a dad on for your boy and Dr Colleen, Russo Johnson. PhD, and she is a chief scientists and Mama up two toddlers for for the okay company in the okay play APP, which is a little bit about Chris who is again the CO founder and President He is just a serial entrepreneur I mean like his bio I can go on and on and on. Angel investor he's invested in companies like beyond me and block renovation. When he is a member of terrorists next establishment list and graduated from Ucla with the history by just like a serial entrepreneur and Dr Combing Russo she is again hundred scientists in she is a de mental psychologist with expertise in children's media and technology who serves as an adjunct professor at Ryerson University in codger rector of Ryerson's children medialab She is a senior scholar for silly center for scholars and storytellers and the CO author bestselling Children's Book Dino Dana Dana Field Guide again she is like the. Best person to talk about what's happening right now with virtual learning and what did we talk about Alina? Love. This episode I love the APP. I think it will. It's first of all they launched this. This APP during the during a pandemic, which is in of itself. Amazing we talk about emotional learning. We talk also about how to choose right even a good app for your kids and what makes this APP different which is again, the emotion social emotional learning and. How these actually involves the parent lonely the children and how it translates from the APP in the device to outdoor play to more than play and I, love how they came up with the name any. To play with the kids. So we talk about that. We talk about perspective of screen time. What's good what's not good you know what what to do right now with the kids and how this APP has helped our families as well in many other families. So I'm excited for for this episode end for the APP. Awesome. So but before we get into that base, yeah, what's up with you? What's going on what's up with me? You know. With me like every day seems to be the same thing. I'm just trying to gain for routine with were in. You know just having a Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday schedule Northern, I actually took up a new wouldn't say my. was is that a hobby is. Added something we were routine which I really like he's in writing letters to his friends. Then he would aches and we're going to the post office like every other day I try not to do it every day, but he wants to go every day. here's a couple of letters and heap envelope and puts his postage stamp, and then just you know we go to the office in everything. That's pretty cool. That's kind of like the new thing we're doing here I bought him some stationary. We should be coming next week, which I'm so excited Abou-, he has going to have his own stationary. And the customized initials yes. It has his name I got I couldn't decide I couldn't decide on witch on which science. So I got him to design. I'm very site for people to receive a customer stationary and the baby. She's she's just living her best cuter every day Chubbier every day or she's those beautiful three months old like chummy legs and Chevy she eats them. As she started to mile a lot more and talk a lot more and. She's being like the Pistons such a great baby you know I can't really complain about her. She's awesome. Obviously still not sleep through the night actually migrated her bedroom I don't know if I share that already. Oh. Yes. She's been living. She's living in her bedroom for the past two weeks already. Like I actually moved into her bedroom before to turn three months. And she's been doing well, she's only waking up once usually runs for now. I, mean I'm just hoping that like continues

Chris Hogan Fred Solders Emma Super Sisterhood President Trump Facebook Twitter Lopez Ryerson University Bruce Mike Dino Dana Dana Dr Combing Russo Pistons Alina Abou Ryerson PHD
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 1 year ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Policy Technology Economics Science Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
"adjunct professor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:05 min | 1 year ago

"adjunct professor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Not so For those, and those that are not faring so well often are the have nots already in our world. He's back in today's business Week. Economics. Peer at order is adjunct professor of economics at William and Mary. He's now also talking about the age of illusion and the rise of another age, which he will get into. He joins us on the phone from Pennsylvania. Hey, Peter. Great to have you back with us. Thank you, Carol. Great to be back with the two of you. So talk to us a little bit first. I've got to ask you. I don't know how closely you followed J. Powell today, but I do wonder I've just got a touch on. You know your case shaped recovery because as we talked with you before, just so Really describes this world that we're in. Do you feel like it just becomes even increasingly more of a K shape based on kind of what we're seeing right now. I do. It's very frustrating. You know the fiscal stimulus that we would need to help those who are low. End of the economy is not forthcoming. And yet we continue to see support from the top down perspective, which you know, monetary support, enabling knows who are already well off. And I find it a little disingenuous to hear policy makers who rely on top down activity like that, like the Fed. Being sort of skirting around the issue of of inequity because you know when you I think of it almost sort of an oxygen mask strategy where they put the masks on the adult first, expecting that the mass will be passed to the Children and then those further down, but In a world of maximizing shareholder value. A lot gets diverted and doesn't trickle down. You know, Peter, we have increasingly seen what feels like a very fragile market. And if it's a recovery that were in it just it feels like it could just it's got summer and you know it could just disappear at any moment. Why do you think that is And how do we adjust to it? Well, I think that you know, I think some of these people are so isolated and self isolating that nobody has a really good feel for what's happening out in the real world. So you know, it enables people to fantasize about what what might be. And I think that level of uncertainty has people very, very tentative. I mean the focus on real time economic information. People are tracking things by the day. And and I think that some of it to is that this has been a cycle that has been filled with lots of banter and lots of You know what I what? I refer to his illusion. You know, there's been a lot of promotions. You know, we're going to blitz scale make things enormous and size. Um, and that that tends to lead to some fragility. Yeah, exactly. You know, it's interesting. As you said, you know, I was thinking about, you know, kind of real time Economics and I was in the office yesterday and just walking around a little bit in New York and just amazed at the store fronts. That have gone out of business, and it made me think, OK, it's not just a business. It's people behind that. Whether it was the owner of the business that people who work there and I'm talking about small and big economy, I mean small in big companies. So it just It makes me wonder about kind of where we're headed. Having said that I want to get into what you've been writing about as well. And you talk about the age of illusion. And you talk about the rise of the age of scrutiny and scrutiny is spelled S C r E w t A And why talk to me a little about this? Sure So, Aziz said. This this cycle was born out of despair and one of the things we know from history. If you go back and look, for example, in the Mid 18 hundreds or, you know, you'll see that that was the era of PT Barnum. So not surprising. You know, we've had this the greatest showman movie and this whole culture. Of showmanship in business in finance in politics. And I think a lot of it has to do with spectacle. And and one of the challenges of spectacle is trying to maintain Momenta MME. You know, the two headed lady has to become a three headed lady has to become a 5 10. You know, it's got to be bigger and bolder. And you see that in terms of capital being deployed, you know, it's not enough to raise a Spack. That's got 100 million. It's got to be 500 million. You know, it's got to be a billion. Everything is sort of super sized in this in this environment and And it's hard to them to feel that And so I I think of this as being there's a lot of illusion out there. Of what might be And and this week we saw that danger when illusion is Challenged and so easily challenge which we saw with with Nikola and the truck, you know, did it did it drive itself didn't get pushed down the hill and suddenly You see the skepticism? And illusion is binary either either the magic works or it doesn't You also when you talk about this, so I think about our audience. You know, these are informed people in business in the financial markets. You know, in the world at large leaders just got about a minute left here. Why is it that you think this is important that they're aware of this? Because Illusion. Others in on the magician's stage is deception. And so we have to be careful. That We don't end up in a situation where people really questions Is this Is this real right? Right now. I mean, it feels like we've lost the handle in some ways on way. Sort of in this topsy turvy world lost our bearings. That's really great insights there. Peter Atwater. Thank you so much great to catch up. The adjunct professor of economics. At William and Mary joining us on the phone from Pennsylvania. Carol, Listen, I feel like you know, this is a time and I think we're having this conversation. Certainly in our Bloomberg live platform on elsewhere and certainly on our air, You know, we need to have these deep conversations and figure out things because of the stresses that we're facing. We are saying disruption, innovation, which will hopefully get us to a better place. But There's some systemic problems that have to be dealt with. They're not new, but it's time that we stopped talking and actually do something, But, you know and figure it all out. Absolutely all right. We will continue our conversation about economics and talk about small businesses as well. Something you alluded to in that conversation. Carol first, Let's get down to D C.

Peter Atwater Carol adjunct professor Pennsylvania Fed Bloomberg J. Powell Aziz Mary Nikola New York
Vaccines and the Future of COVID  with Epidemiologist Dr. George Rutherford

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:43 min | 1 year ago

Vaccines and the Future of COVID with Epidemiologist Dr. George Rutherford

"This isn't the same rehashed discussion of covert. This is. Well more worth listening to. This is stuff that you need to know. This is medicine we're still practicing. I'm building. Of course, I by friend and Co host zooming in Dr Steven. Tailback he's a quadruple board certified doctor of Internal Medicine Pulmonary Disease Critical Care and neuro critical care, and he continues to fight on the front lines of the covert battle here in California for which we are eternally grateful. Steve. How you doing? Hey Bill. Good to see you. And R various special guest Dr, George Rutherford. He is the internationally lauded head of infectious disease and global epidemiology at the UCSF School of Medicine. He is also UCSF's professor of pediatrics and adjunct. Professor School of Public Health at California Berkeley. I had a chance to print out Georgia's see. It's one hundred, twenty, six pages long with two hundred and twenty one published papers and so many important accolades. So I'm going to read the whole thing to you now. Only. Kidding. Dr Authored although socially distance. Thanks so much for joining real pleasure. So Professor of epidemiology and biostatistics director at the prevention and Public Health Group. What do you do? Well, I'm an academic. So I teach school right I do research and I provide advice. So the mission of anybody in Academic Vinnie academic medical entity is education research, clinical care and public service. So my clinical care is really the clinical practice of public. Health and I advise the City Health Department San Francisco Department of Public Health, the California Department of Health and some of the various health departments around the state on approaches to controlling the Kobe deputy hammock. You did mention that your research is partly funded by CDC. Yes. That's correct. Yeah. Hell is a bit about that and how that affects your work during these crazy days. So I've worked with CDC for decades and most recently. I've been doing predominantly HIV related work in developing countries as part of the Presidential Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief I, have a large competent, very competent research group that basically tries to help governments and occasionally universities but mostly governments CDC missions in developing countries to understand what's going on with their. HIV. Epidemics, how things are working to evaluate progress and to discover new ways to try and stop the spread of HIV and try and. Improve. Clinical outcomes of people who already have HIV. So cases per one million population worldwide is running at about three thousand, five, hundred cases per one million in the US is running at about nineteen thousand, three hundred. So did we screw up or do we have a population that's more difficult to manage? Yes and yes, we have six fold higher numbers of cases than we should have and other countries like India may eventually catch up. I think that the US mister major opportunity early on and that was the problem with not having up tests and having the wrong tests and having tested didn't work and trying to control tests and trying to restrict out tests were being used for whom they are being used. I think they've always been you know a whole myriad lack of policy leadership which the states. have taken over and I think first of all the bay area in which the six county health departments acted in concert to move to a shelter in place ordinance early on on March. Sixteenth, and there is a very good reason for March sixteenth it was the day before Saint Patrick's Day, and then later the state moved in the same direction. So I think California's really been a leader in this. Now, you wouldn't know it from the last two months or three months since mid June under there's a huge wave of new infection a disappointed but I think we still are leaders in this. We showed data today in medicine grand rounds at UCSF that looked at numbers of deaths per hundred cases and in New York ten percent in. San. Francisco, it's zero point, seven percent. So it's less than one percent in San Francisco and the next best in a big city is something I one and a half percent did we screw up as a country? Totally? Did we screw up regionally in the north in northern California I don't think. So we scrub stay somewhat I think we made the reopening little to easy S. Really Hindsight Wealth speak that hindsight just for a second I mean in New York they've had four hundred, forty, five, thousand cases in thirty, three, thousand deaths. So they got a hold of this thing long before we did but we've already exceeded the case we're up to seven, hundred, fifty, thousand cases almost eighty percent more than they've had, and we've had fourteen thousand deaths. Half of what they've had when you say that we as a country may have screwed up, do we have a hold of this thing now and how much of it is that the population is not wearing masks enough especially young people who've decided that they're not as susceptible what New York was bad luck and they had continuous importation from Europe and may have had who? knows. Thousands of cases imported from Europe each one of which starts a new chain of transmission. We in San Francisco we probably at tens coming from Asia and you know the first death care was on February six dot and that was diagnosed retrospectively. Womanhood attended a convention in Las Vegas choose living in Santa, Clara County near San Jose and that convention probably people from China. or at least in the in the hotel that's probably where she got it. If she'd come home and hit a large crowd event at the wrong time with very high levels of virus inter nose and throat and spread it around we could have been just as bad office New York but we weren't and that's really a question of luck. So New York at Bath Block. But guess what we do. This was coming since the thirty first of December. That's when the UBA provincial CDC notified the central Chinese CDC that Oh, by the way, we may have a little problem here the central Chinese CD setup team to Wuhan on December thirty first basically started began an immediate investigation started closed down and drain the whole thing under control. That was the starting Bell I. Mean there was basically two months lost now CDC will say, well, we were having we we developed tests. We did this. We did that. Yeah, that's true. But then the FDA threatened to decertify their laboratory that was producing testing. They produce tests in the hundreds, not in the tens of thousands which was what was needed thousands. Of people came from Europe to New York and it got spread around helped by a couple of super spreader events where people in fact, at one person they affect hundreds of people at the same

New York CDC California HIV Ucsf City Health Department San Fra Doctor Of Internal Medicine Pu Europe United States Professor School Of Public Hea Ucsf School Of Medicine San Francisco Dr Steven Professor Of Pediatrics Public Health Group California Berkeley George Rutherford California Department Of Healt
"adjunct professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"adjunct professor" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

Why Was a Doctor Once Ridiculed for Recommending Hand Washing?

BrainStuff

05:53 min | 1 year ago

Why Was a Doctor Once Ridiculed for Recommending Hand Washing?

"Even, when there isn't a pandemic gone, we all know were supposed to wash our hands especially before we eat or after we've touched something gross, but that wasn't always the case. As recently as the eighteen hundreds, a doctor was mocked for even suggesting that physicians wash their hands before working with patients, and that dear listener is how we begin the strange and sad story of Nets, some of ice, a nineteenth century doctor sometimes called the father of infection control. them vice was born in Hungary in eighteen, eighteen and graduating medical school. He started a job at Vienna. General Hospital in Austria in eighteen forty six there there. He became a gas to the mortality rate of new mothers in one of the hospitals wards. In this ward up to eighteen percent of new mothers were dying from what was then called child, bed, fever or pure berle fever. We know today that this is a fever caused by infection of the reproductive or urinary tract in new mothers? Yet another of the hospital's wards where midwives instead of doctors delivered all of the babies, only about two percent of mothers died of this then mysterious fever. similize vice began reasoning his way to the root of the problem. He considered climate and crowding, but eventually ruled those factors out in the end. The midwives themselves seems to be the only real difference between the two wards. Then Zuma vice had an epiphany one of the hospitals doctors, a pathologist accidentally nicked himself the scalpel that hit used during an autopsy of one of these unfortunate mothers. The doctor was sick and with child bed fever and he died. Zamel vice made the connection that doctors were performing autopsies on patients who died of child, had fever, and then immediately afterward going to deliver babies without stopping to wash their hands. He suspected that this was the source of the deadly problem. We spoke by with Dana Towards e eski philosophy professor at Purdue University whose name I hope I'm pronouncing correctly. She explained, basically has hypothesis here was that it was cadaveric matter from scalpels, the entered the pathologists blood, and caused the infection and same material could be transferred to the women on the hands of the doctors, because the doctors do autopsies, and then go straight to examine the women who had given birth without washing their hands, changing their clothes, or basically taking any hygienic measures at all, he then tested this hypothesis by requiring people who had performed autopsies to wash their hands with chloride of lime, a disinfectant before attending the weapon and this, the mortality rate in the first clinic fell to that of the second. You'd think that some of fellow doctors would have lauded him for this discovery, but you'd be wrong. You see in the eighteen forties. Germ theory hadn't been conceived yet. That's the theory that diseases are caused by organisms, not visible to the naked eye and people still suspected the diseases transferred from one person to another via toxic. Not Bacteria or viruses, this was called miasma theory in washing their hands. They probably wanted to be rid of whatever was causing a bad. Not to kill germs that might wreak havoc on them or someone else. We also spoke by email, but Michael Melanson, an adjunct professor of medicine at. University he said physicians of Vices. Time simply did not understand or believe that something microscopic could be wreaking such havoc on their patients. They literally believed their own is less. We feel too smug. Consider how many people currently embrace a lack of COVID, nineteen deaths among people like me geographically racially economically or otherwise as evidence that scientists are overestimating the pandemics risk. Better hand washing regimens dramatically improved death rates at the maternity ward, but some vices colleagues were at best miffed at the implication that their ignorance was killing their own patients, and perhaps implication that midwives were better at delivering babies than they were. It didn't help that Zimmer Vice essentially laid the deaths of the wards mothers at the feet of his superiors. His own supervisor countered that the hospitals new ventilation system must be the reason for the decline in maternity deaths. Also, Zimbabwe's was a Hungarian in Austria A. Working in country in the throes of xenophobia. So those doctors rejected his theories and some of ice himself as being inferior, they opted to stick with their miasma theory, and for good measure in eighteen, forty nine did not renews vices appointment. As vice eventually got a medical position in Budapest where he according to the British Medical Journal quote publicly harangued doctors nurses about hand, washing and reduced maternal mortality. He eventually published a book on the subject some fourteen years later, but it was poorly written and poorly received. Possibly, experiencing mental disorder or extreme stress from his rejection by the medical establishment, Zim of ice ended up a patient in an asylum in eighteen sixty five weeks later, he was dead of an infection from a wound that he received in the facility. She was just forty seven years old. similize left behind monumental legacy, but the tragedy of his story has made it Garner a few minutes. One of those being that demo vice was the first suggested theory about doctors transmitting germs. Kaletsky said he wasn't really a pioneer. Other people before Zamel vice had hit upon the idea that child bed fever could be transmitted from doctor or midwife to patient for example Alexander Gordon of Aberdeen showed in Seventeen Ninety. Five child had fever was almost always transmitted by doctors or midwives, and also that it was connected to a kind of streptococcal skin rash. He also thought that the best treatment was copious bleeding.

Fever Zimmer Vice Zamel Austria Vienna General Hospital Hungary Nets Zuma British Medical Journal Purdue University Kaletsky Zimbabwe Professor Garner Michael Melanson Berle Adjunct Professor Supervisor
"adjunct professor" Discussed on Kannaboomers | Cannabis for Wellness

Kannaboomers | Cannabis for Wellness

13:14 min | 1 year ago

"adjunct professor" Discussed on Kannaboomers | Cannabis for Wellness

"Hits Tom Welcome. Back to the cannon boomers podcast this week we have rob Megyn back. Originally we had rob on the show last year when we were talking about his book the Essential Cannabis Book interesting foreshadowing on that title. Now that cannabis is seen as essential during this pandemic. We'll talk about that and we're also talking about Rob's new position as an adjunct professor at Stockton University in New Jersey where he's now teaching a class on how to get an internship in the cannabis industry. He's coaching students on how to have conversations with people who might not be receptive to cannabis these telling them how to build a network and he's also giving webinars at Georgetown. Actually rob has his finger in many pies. He has a line of CBD infused condiments that he's bringing to market. He's representing graphic artists. Who specialize in cannabis. He's blogging elsewhere. So He's a guy who doesn't sit still. It's kind of amazing and we're glad to have him back. Enjoy the show and I want to remind you to sign up for our weekly newsletter five boom Friday. So you'll always know who the next guest is other tidbits. And leave us a review at Apple podcasts or stitcher wherever you listen and thanks again to Danny and Milwaukee for making a sound good. And here's rob this is let's talk about the Cannibal podcast. Cbd microdosing in all things related to medical cannabis for baby boomers from San Diego. Here's your host Thomas J. It's Tom we're welcoming back to the PODCAST ROB me. Hey Rob. How're you doing? Well Tom how are you pretty good hanging in there? During the early part of the pandemic I guess who knows how long this will go. But are you doing with social isolation? Well I suppose like everyone. It's a it's a challenge on a daily basis and there are things you just have to kind of muscle through sometimes and there's definitely waves of panic concern. Hopefulness it just it goes up and down on a day-to-day basis. Sometimes don't know what's going to come. I saw chart the other day about the use of unprecedented and it's at unprecedented levels. You're speaking about cannabis. I assume we got back on. Because you're doing something new. You are teaching cannabis to students. I am I have to say it's remarkable that I can refer to myself as a cannabis professor which I think is one of the coolest job titles ever. That's amazing. So where you teaching. I am teaching at Stockton University which is in southern New Jersey. It's relatively close to Atlantic city and it is a A four year state school we do have graduate programs. It is a research institution and it's a great place to teach. There is such a remarkable community and spirit there and I thoroughly enjoyed my time there. Boy that sounds ideal given the circumstances. Did you have a chance to be in the classroom or are you? Have you been all virtual to this point with the class started back in January and it was actually set up as what they call a hybrid. Course and so with a hybrid. Course you do meet in person but then you do a lot of the work online. So that actually was turned out to be fortuitous. I had no idea that having to plan out online activities would be so important Came to came to March so my basic schedule was. I would drive down there on Mondays on Monday. We would have a class. Class lasted roughly hour and a half and then during the week. They had assignments that they would have to complete and then we would go over those again on Monday. We would do in class quizzes. We would do. A little segment called this week in cannabis which was actually a lot of fun to keep the students up debate up to date on what is happening. In the cannabis world both domestically internationally. What'S HAPPENING IN NEW JERSEY? What's happening in the job market? So those are all the things we kind of covered so I had the opportunity to meet with the students about seven or eight times and then the schools closed and we went totally online. And so now I am becoming a zoom master. I bet well. I'm glad you got to meet them. I mean Certainly in person you can read. Body language in intuitively know student gets it or if you need to drill a little deeper. I'm sure there's there's challenges to online teaching. I bet there definitely are there. You can't read the room as easily and of course there's all kinds of different circumstances. Some students keep their camera on some keep their camera off some youth themselves. Some don't and so it really is kind of hard to see where they are although we do have an open little chat forum that we keep going during the class and I can always tell if things are going well because all see a bunch of chatter about either questions they have or someone will contribute something to somebody else's response or somebody will just say something so funny and clever that we actually do have some fun and you can tell at that point I think via the comments as to how engaged they are and unlike some mandatory courses. This is a course that I I imagine. People are very motivated and excited about. They are although I should back up a minute. Say that this is part of a canvas minor and so starting university was the very first university to actually put a minor in canvas studies in place and they did it in such an intelligent way. I've seen other schools that have cannabis education. Now there's roughly about twenty something schools that have jumped in but the thing that's unique about stockton is their minor in cannabis. Studies actually enhances any major. You have and so. I have students who are majoring in journalism English. Science Marketing Sustainable Studies. You name it. And their focus really is on that major but then the nice part is the minor which is comprised of five different courses including one internship. Either on site somewhere or remote. That really adds a Nice Flavor and enhances their major. So if you so if you're a good writer and you're an English major for example. Maybe you work on content work on updating website content there are just so many opportunities and having that minor that taps into what your major is in your the presumably your major passion. That really makes sense. Yeah that's a really interesting way to structure it. It's not straight chemistry or straight law or anything. But you're saying I mean you could major in Chemistry and then have this minor and be well positioned when you get out if you want it to go into the industry. That's exactly right and we actually have a lab on campus in so I do have a chemistry major and for the last couple of years. She has been involved in lab work and she's been testing potency of different. Cbd products so she's getting actual real hands on knowledge of lab protocol and safety and being able to use all the equipment and reporting and so that put her in such good shape. That I know she's going to have about five different job offers as soon as the semester is over. So is your class kind of cannabis one. Oh One do you get into the science of it or the business or is it? A kind of an overarching intro. My class is actually called preparation for cannabis internship and so and so basically what I do. I'm definitely very involved in trying to help them get jobs. So we do some of the nitty gritty of how to write a pitch letter. What to say in an email pitch to someone Let's shape your resume. Let's do some interview practice. We also talk about small business practices but the bulk of the class actually is introducing students to jobs that they don't think are out there so I think most students when they walk into class. They think well I can. I can work in a cultivation operation. I could work in processing slash lab or it can work in a dispensary and so part of my goal and part of what I do. Is I take individual weeks. And we do go over those three major parts of the employment market but then we also look at things like hospitality. We look at support. Things like Delivery installation of security cameras We look at international opportunity so so really. My goal is to have them walk in with a an idea of what they might want to do and when they walk out. Maybe that's affirmed or maybe they've decided. I really learned a lot about hospitality. And I now want to learn how to cook with cannabis for example and. I've had a couple of students that do that so I I really want to open them up to the idea that there are so many facets to the cannabis industry and where you should go is somewhere where you're passionate about it somewhere where it works with your major and that there definitely will be opportunities there. We also built up a community in the classroom. That really is our network said the first day look around these are people who are going to be your bosses your co employees the networks. That will help you get your first job. And so we really do do a lot of work with them. Teams and to really build up kind of cannabis community within our classroom boy. What a great opportunity for your students to have sort of that locational footing while they are learning about the industry. And I know there's a lot of interest in this among my downloads. I look at my analytics. And I had Andrew Ward author of cannabis jobs on a couple of months ago. And that's got a lot of downloads. It's in the top three so year in the hot spot. I mean there's a lot of interest right now there is. Actually what's interesting is I do have a bunch of guest speakers that come in and Andrew. Warde was one of my guest speakers. I actually use his book in my class along with the book that I wrote the essential cannabis book and so I had Andrew come in and talk to students and one thing that they particularly liked was Andrew had a good list of sources that you can tap into to keep up to date on what's happening in the canvas industry so he had a couple of people who were very good with blogs and policy for example. He had people who talked about medical yet. People talked about research. He listed a couple canvas publications so it was. It was sort of Nice at the end of the class. Students had list of about six seven eight really good resources to look at. If they want keep up-to-date and knowledgeable about what's happening in the cannabis industry and in addition sorry in addition to Andrew. I've also had local business. People come in who are starting dispensaries. I had a cannabis journalist come in An Ex Giants football player. Come in Amani toomer. Who's on. Who's on Diane Board for one of the local dispensaries here so we've really had the opportunity to have people come in who are working in the industry and who need employees and that forward-looking aspect too because it is moving fast in a changing fast? I had a recent guests to Andrea homes. Who's a organic chemist? And she was saying you know almost every day she is finding new science. What's is there a good definition because they keep finding new ones as we come out of this pandemic? Oh you know the interesting thing. It's essential knowledge cannabis has been recognized as essential that would have been unheard of two years ago and four to have come so far so fast is amazing and so your students are going to be very well positioned they will and the other thing. That's sort of strange. New Jersey has taken much longer to move their cannabis program forward than I thought. But it's actually kind of benefiting the students because right now we only have and where were a state that has a population of nine million right now? We have nine dispensaries that are open. That's it but we do have Eighteen licenses have been granted and so right now as we speak there are a number of big companies that are Pouring their cement slabs for their cultivation operations. They're setting up their labs they are setting up their dispensaries and all of them are gonNA need employees. And so it strange's if you took the total number of jobs in cannabis in New Jersey right now that is going to double or triple or even quadruple with the next about eighteen months so weirdly. The students that are getting out now with such challenging economy if they go into cannabis in New Jersey. It's probably the best job you could find other than maybe healthcare might be close but Yeah Cannabis is Really starting move here in New Jersey. Were also voting on adult use in November. And it's expected to pass the polls have favorability ratings of anywhere from sixty one to about sixty four percent depending on which poll you look at and if we vote that in that means there's going to be more and more opportunity writing. We seem to talk about this every show. There were hundred years of propaganda where we're told thinks that we're just untrue and as that rolls back and we take back the narrative. There's GonNa be a lot of growth in this industry as as people realize that this is not the devils lettuce. It's it's substance you can use every day. You don't have to get high if you don't want to. There's all kinds of benefits to it. That are coming to light day by day exactly we. We actually covered stigma and our very first class and I told them I said a couple of things. If you are in cannabis first of all you're in the compliance business because anybody who works canvas knows how many rules regulations and policies there are and how they might change day to day. So you you. You're in compliance and the compliance business. And then the second thing is. You're an advocate. If you work in the business you have a responsibility even within your local even within your family your community.

cannabis New Jersey medical cannabis rob Tom Welcome rob Megyn Stockton University Milwaukee Rob Danny social isolation Georgetown Cbd adjunct professor San Diego Andrew Ward Science Marketing Sustainable stockton devils
Predict the Future with these Megatrends from Rohit Bhargava

The Small Business Radio Show

06:42 min | 1 year ago

Predict the Future with these Megatrends from Rohit Bhargava

"This is the time of year that I make my predictions for small a business having a good run for about five years in a row. I've been way off these last few years. My next guest. The person that's always knows what the next trend is reheat. bhargava is the founder of the Non Obvious Company and as an entertaining original and non boring keynoter on Innovation Trust. He previously spend and fifteen years in leadership roles at two renowned AD agencies. Lebron Ogilvy Rohe's Wall Street Journal bestselling author of six books and book by deliver rickie notes in thirty two countries around the world. He's a popular adjunct professor of storytelling at Georgetown University. His new book out this year is called. Non Obvious Mega trends real heat. Welcome back to the show thank you. It's always awesome to talk to you. It's been three and a half years. I looked it up. I know I can't believe leave it. I miss a lot of trends so every year you publish a book with the last nine years you published book on Non Obvious Trends but this year you say this is not Mba mega trends and visited last one. Why are you stopping after it selling so much? Well I think one reason is because I wanted to WHO Head out on top style like one of the big reasons so It was it was kind of time. You know it's been a decade. I've been working on this project for After ten years and every year I do neutra and predictions and it felt like twenty twenty was kind of a significant moment in all of our lives right. If we're doing things differently we're thinking about the world differently. Were kind of projecting forward. It was sort of a perfect time for me to think about how to write this a little bit differently. I'd say twenty twenty and last thing I turned around it was like the year. Two thousand is just crazy the on line that said Twenty twenty was twenty years ago but nineteen eighty was twenty years ago. Exactly exactly so I want to call it a couple of your mega trends. The one you talk about his `gendering you say that traditional gender divisions are replaced with more fluid understanding of gender identity forcing a reevaluation. How we see one another I think for those who are of my generation which is really you know the boomers? We have a hard time with this thing called engendering. Why isn't important in business? Gender used to be this pretty simple Sort of answer to a question right. It was either this or that. It was the second question or the question we asked on a form And and it straightforward and now it's become kind of a statement for a lot of people This is how I wanted to be seen in the world and so you know we we get hung up a lot on this idea of gender and I don't understand understand it and it seems kinda strange and thinking about it but if if we put it in terms of identity as in we all just want to be understood and addressed in the way that we see ourselves you know that makes sense wants to people like I get that you know and so I think for small business owners and for any of us one of the things that we need to think about is are we unintentionally driving people away by just assuming that they fit into the boxers that we put them in so is it another F- for small businesses. We think of as a another way to define persona a buyer's persona and now gender becomes a flower our or a non gender and becomes a factor. Yeah I mean that is that is one piece of it you know. It's the customer personas but the other is just these kind of Unintentional things we might do drive someone away right. I mean. How important is it really for you to ask that sort of question for example In an interaction right. I mean depending on what you're selling you may not necessarily need to know that like if somebody's interested in what you have to sell and you have a great product or you have a great service and you're trying to get in front of somebody buddy like don't lose their attention because you're unintentionally offending them. I thought it was really interesting when I think this with your lift or Uber where you go on and you can set your preferred pronouns so again that is more personalized service and the driver doesn't insult someone unintentionally. Yeah this basic sailed right. I mean anybody who's he's gone through. Sales trading is like oh address customer by name like asking their name and and use their name because everyone loves hearing their name and I think this is a reflection of that too like people want to be addressed with correct Pronoun and yeah. I've been getting emails from people who in their email signature says my preferred pronoun is and they tell you right and I know a lot of a lot of people say yeah well I just don't get it. I'm thinking to myself. It's not for you to get. It's the way they want to be identified and And I think that that that is a great is a great point right. I mean I I think we do kind of get hung up on this. I don't get it I don't understand it You don't have to necessarily understand if someone says my name is so and so you. You don't always know how to pronounce it right. So you ask you do your best and you move on right absolutely well. megatrend number three talk about instant knowledge as as we consume bite-size is knowledge on demand we benefit Hillary more quickly but risk for getting the value of mastery and wisdom. This scenario that I'm really concerned about that. People want instant knowledge but no one's is willing to go deep. has that really affect us. I think there's a couple of ways I mean it's A. It's a great example of a mega trend that it isn't inherently positive or negative. I mean look if I can go onto youtube and I can learn how to fix a leak in my toilet myself like that's awesome. I mean that's great. That's good for everybody What's bad is if all we have is that type type of knowledge and no one ever believes that? It's worth spending that extra time to become a master to become an expert. So how does it affect us in business as we're trying to attract customs that's one of the biggest things one of the biggest tenants of content marketing. You know which I know you talk about. Is We want to educate our customers. Because we're the ones providing the Education Gatien. We're building trust and building credibility and I think this fits perfectly into that because when people want instant knowledge like who do they get it from right. And if you've got for example a financial advisory refer and you're trying to educate your client what they should do with retirement and they're going online to watching videos from someone else. Educating them you know what are they gonNA think right. They're gonNA start thinking well. Why isn't the financial advisor? Educating me why do I feel dumb when I walk into that meeting with my adviser and I don't feel dumb after these videos. Maybe I should make a change. Do you think there's still a place to help people with mastering wisdom because there are some people in Emily that always want to go deeper. Of course yeah I mean I think that that the nice thing about instant knowledge. It's it can be a gateway to mastery and wisdom. Look I can go online and I can watch An acting class with Henry Winkler you know or I can learn how to play the Banjo. Which Steve Martin and those was a great man I'm GonNa but am? I going to be a professional banjo player. Maybe not but that's okay because I can start with that and if I do find something that I love something that I'm passionate about then I'll spend the time because because the thing with mastery and wisdom is for a lot of people we become masters and experts in the things we love it and that's not going to change because that's a human

Twenty Twenty Non Obvious Company Lebron Ogilvy Rohe Wall Street Journal Georgetown University Adjunct Professor Henry Winkler Innovation Trust Founder Rickie Steve Martin Youtube Emily Hillary Advisor
Predict the Future with these Megatrends from Rohit Bhargava

The Small Business Radio Show

08:15 min | 1 year ago

Predict the Future with these Megatrends from Rohit Bhargava

"This is the time of year that I make my predictions for small a business having a good run for about five years in a row. I've been way off these last few years. My next guest. The person that's always knows what the next trend is reheat. bhargava is the founder of the Non Obvious Company and as an entertaining original and non boring keynoter on Innovation Trust. He previously spend and fifteen years in leadership roles at two renowned AD agencies. Lebron Ogilvy Rohe's Wall Street Journal bestselling author of six books and book by deliver rickie notes in thirty two countries around the world. He's a popular adjunct professor of storytelling at Georgetown University. His new book out this year is called. Non Obvious Mega trends real heat. Welcome back to the show thank you. It's always awesome to talk to you. It's been three and a half years. I looked it up. I know I can't believe leave it. I miss a lot of trends so every year you publish a book with the last nine years you published book on non obvious trends but this year you say this is not MBA mega trends and visited last one. Why are you stopping after it selling so much? Well I think one reason is because I wanted to WHO Head out on top style like one of the big reasons so It was it was kind of time. You know it's been a decade. I've been working on this project for After ten years and every year I do neutra and predictions and it felt like twenty twenty was kind of a significant moment in all of our lives right. If we're doing things differently we're thinking about the world differently. Were kind of projecting forward. It was sort of a perfect time for me to think about how to write this a little bit differently. I'd say twenty twenty and last thing I turned around it was like the year. Two thousand is just crazy the on line that said Twenty twenty was twenty years ago but nineteen eighty was twenty years ago. Exactly exactly so I want to call it a couple of your mega trends. The one you talk about his `gendering you say that traditional gender divisions are replaced with more fluid understanding of gender identity forcing a reevaluation. How we see one another I think for those who are of my generation which is really you know the boomers? We have a hard time with this thing called engendering. Why isn't important in business? Gender used to be this pretty simple Sort of answer to a question right. It was either this or that. It was the second question or the question we asked on a form And and it straightforward and now it's become kind of a statement for a lot of people This is how I wanted to be seen in the world and so you know we we get hung up a lot on this idea of gender and I don't understand understand it and it seems kinda strange and thinking about it but if if we put it in terms of identity as in we all just want to be understood and addressed in the way that we see ourselves you know that makes sense wants to people like I get that you know and so I think for small business owners and for any of us one of the things that we need to think about is are we unintentionally driving people away by just assuming that they fit into the boxers that we put them in so is it another F- for small businesses. We think of as a another way to define persona a buyer's persona and now gender becomes a flower our or a non gender and becomes a factor. Yeah I mean that is that is one piece of it you know. It's the customer personas but the other is just these kind of Unintentional things we might do drive someone away right. I mean. How important is it really for you to ask that sort of question for example In an interaction right. I mean depending on what you're selling you may not necessarily need to know that like if somebody's interested in what you have to sell and you have a great product or you have a great service and you're trying to get in front of somebody buddy like don't lose their attention because you're unintentionally offending them. I thought it was really interesting when I think this with your lift or Uber where you go on and you can set your preferred pronouns so again that is more personalized service and the driver doesn't insult someone unintentionally. Yeah this basic sailed right. I mean anybody who's he's gone through. Sales trading is like oh address customer by name like asking their name and and use their name because everyone loves hearing their name and I think this is a reflection of that too like people want to be addressed with correct Pronoun and yeah. I've been getting emails from people who in their email signature says my preferred pronoun is and they tell you right and I know a lot of a lot of people say yeah well I just don't get it. I'm thinking to myself. It's not for you to get. It's the way they want to be identified and And I think that that that is a great is a great point right. I mean I I think we do kind of get hung up on this. I don't get it I don't understand it You don't have to necessarily understand if someone says my name is so and so you. You don't always know how to pronounce it right. So you ask you do your best and you move on right absolutely well. megatrend number three talk about instant knowledge as as we consume bite-size is knowledge on demand we benefit Hillary more quickly but risk for getting the value of mastery and wisdom. This scenario that I'm really concerned about that. People want instant knowledge but no one's is willing to go deep. has that really affect us. I think there's a couple of ways I mean it's A. It's a great example of a mega trend that it isn't inherently positive or negative. I mean look if I can go onto youtube and I can learn how to fix a leak in my toilet myself like that's awesome. I mean that's great. That's good for everybody What's bad is if all we have is that type type of knowledge and no one ever believes that? It's worth spending that extra time to become a master to become an expert. So how does it affect us in business as we're trying to attract customs that's one of the biggest things one of the biggest tenants of content marketing. You know which I know you talk about. Is We want to educate our customers. Because we're the ones providing the Education Gatien. We're building trust and building credibility and I think this fits perfectly into that because when people want instant knowledge like who do they get it from right. And if you've got for example a financial advisory refer and you're trying to educate your client what they should do with retirement and they're going online to watching videos from someone else. Educating them you know what are they gonNA think right. They're gonNA start thinking well. Why isn't the financial advisor? Educating me why do I feel dumb when I walk into that meeting with my adviser and I don't feel dumb after these videos. Maybe I should make a change. Do you think there's still a place to help people with mastering wisdom because there are some people in Emily that always want to go deeper. Of course yeah I mean I think that that the nice thing about instant knowledge. It's it can be a gateway to mastery and wisdom. Look I can go online and I can watch An acting class with Henry Winkler you know or I can learn how to play the Banjo. Which Steve Martin and those was a great man I'm GonNa but am? I going to be a professional banjo player. Maybe not but that's okay because I can start with that and if I do find something that I love something that I'm passionate about then I'll spend the time because because the thing with mastery and wisdom is for a lot of people we become masters and experts in the things we love it and that's not going to change because that's a human desire in centers in me. Because when I I used to own one thousand nine hundred ninety three Ford Falcon. It didn't have any seat belts in it because they weren't required at the Time Warner and drive it. I need to have seat belt so I go online. I'm thinking how am I going to solve these seatbelts. I wonder if anybody's nobody's ever done it. And of course there was probably six places where you could watch videos of install belt nine hundred sixty three or four falcon. It's like who would've known Yup because the thing about Expertise is and when we learn about things from people like that. They've become an expert because they're passionate about it and one of the things they WANNA do. They WANNA share that expertise Jason. That's really cool that we have instant access to that. I love your megatrend number four. You call revivalism overwhelmed by technology. Complexity people seek out a simpler experienced. I often established and remember more trustworthy. Time that's kind of like a complex statement. I think some people are looking for a place that is simpler but wasn't really more trustworthy the time or just only a couple of sources who were trusted. I think maybe a little of both And I think maybe we remember the past a little more romantically than and we should. But I think that revival isn't was a really interesting one because what it meant to me. And the implication for any small business was sometimes this thing that we consider to be bad this word that we consider it to be bad which has downgraded actually might be good because a lot of times what we think about when we think about downgrade is that it's less optimal but a downgraded experience for example is something that maybe is more humid. I mean there was a great story that I wrote about a grocery brand in the UK the created. Are

Twenty Twenty Non Obvious Company Lebron Ogilvy Rohe Wall Street Journal Georgetown University Adjunct Professor Founder Time Warner Innovation Trust Rickie Youtube Henry Winkler Steve Martin UK Falcon Hillary Advisor Emily Jason
"adjunct professor" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"adjunct professor" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"I've been called it a ship show and then it's nothing but bullshit from chef and that is his town hall great job dividing the country are let's get to our phones out let's say hi to Christopher in new joy easy Christopher hi how are you glad you called Sir hi my name is our next Christopher but any Iraqi political scientist I will go Democrat you will you'll process all yeah adjunct professor at the community college and a letter from shock to go ahead you'd be surprised so few real liberals are in college all progressives now it's a completely different ball completely double I got a look at liberalism progressivism it's sort of that the parties gone hard left but anyway what's on your mind today right right are you having trouble that stuff but so I'm a little Democrat I'm an academic and I oppose impeachment I'm against the beach for Arab as you might imagine the students are a problem for me the reason I'm against impeachment is I'm a I'm a political theorist and ari study history and the Roman Republic on which our constitution is based basically fell apart because of almost exactly the same situation we have now aren't aren't you like our institutions are more valuable than impeachment I also think that the evidence for impeachment is we are you know I'm not from supporter I would never in a million years offer from a Democrat but I do feel like you're we impeach him even if you don't get removed which will but I think the Republic won't recover from it because I'd stay there I want to find out I'm gonna put you on hold we'll talk to you on the other side and why is a liberal professor saw a political science why you are.

Christopher scientist adjunct professor professor
"adjunct professor" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"adjunct professor" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Well I've been called it ship show and then I was nothing but bullshit from chef and that is his town hall great job dividing the country all right let's get your phone's not let's say hi to Christopher into joy easy Christopher hi how are you glad you called Sir hi my name is Christopher but any Iraqi political scientist at a local Democrats you will you'll process all yes I will adjunct professor at the community college and hello Sir I'm shocked go ahead you'd be surprised if you reel will pull certain cultural progressives now it's a completely different ball completely double liberalism progressivism it's sort of the the parties gone hard left anyway what's on your mind today right right well I haven't heard all that stuff but so I'm a little Democrat I'm an academic and I oppose impeachment I'm against the beach and as you might imagine this is not a problem for me religious impeachment is I'm a I'm a political theorist and ari study history and the Roman Republic on which our constitution is based basically fell apart because of almost exactly the same situation we have now iron already feel like our institutions are more valuable than impeachment I also think that the evidence for impeachment is we are you know I'm not from supporter I would never in a million years vote for trump Democrat but I do feel like you're weird peach him even if he doesn't get remove what you want but I think the Republic won't recover from that because there are one find out I'm gonna put you on hold we'll talk to you on the other side and why is a liberal professor saw a political science why you are against the.

Christopher scientist professor adjunct professor
Reproducing Deep Learning Models

Data Skeptic

09:34 min | 2 years ago

Reproducing Deep Learning Models

"I'm Rajiv Shah I'm a data scientist within a robot I'm also an assistant adjunct professor the University of Illinois Chicago so we're going to the fields that study earthquakes and things like that my background doesn't overlap with any earthquake studies but I do have quite a bit of a variety of background where I started off is an engineering didn't WanNa do engineering wet and studied philosophy studied law ended up getting a communications PhD did research for a number of years as an academic back then later switched over into data science and of worked at places like State Farm Caterpillar and then my Kern employer is data robot in terms of like deep learning are there any particular I know it can be applied so many places do you have a particular affinity for applying it to any types of problems or industries or things like that you know there's so many as you can do with deep learning I've played around with deep learning for example applying it to motion data that comes out of the NBA where players move around the court lots of other cool things you can do with images with video as well for example the motion tracking of how you can watch how people's arms and legs move in those posed let's think are totally fascinating a cool so I'll ask a somewhat rhetorical question but is all this deep learning stuff for real is a smoke and mirrors a can this technology really things for us the power of deep learning has really enabled us to now build so much better predictive models when it comes to areas like images video so what's unlocked a lot but on the other hand it hasn't overtaken everything one of the things we often teach folks to do is we often start with a very simple model then go to a more complex model in the cases of areas like images and videos simple models just don't work that well compared to the more complex deep learning models makes sense so as you've pointed out we've seen some really amazing developments from this science but certainly it's not a miracle cure which kind of leads us into our primary discussion Paper came out in nature that caught your attention for those who may not have read it could you share a quick synopsis of what you read there this was a paper published in nature and it used deep learning to study aftershock patterns following large earthquakes and so the idea here was we had different data about earthquakes we wanted to be able to classify identify whether or not aftershocks are likely to happen so I don't have a sufficient background in that area to really kind of just it from first principles if someone said they were using deep learning to predict lottery numbers I can discount it immediately if they said they were using it to predict the stock market I'M GONNA scratch my head for a while what was your impression about the possibility of using deep learning to solve problems like this no I was very excited when I read the paper being able to take deep learning to be able to solve a very complex phenomena like earthquakes but what happened is as soon as I started taking a look kind of a careful look at the paper I noticed that although they jumped straight to using a six layer deep learning neural network they didn't include things that typically most data scientists include such as a baseline model that simple starting point and how much better their model is then that simple starting point and so that got me kind of scratching my head wondering how much value was the deep learning model adding in this case Gotcha so that process you're describing of start with the simple model seems like skipped ahead in this paper is that one way to look at it yeah exactly that's that's how I kind of read it when I didn't see any simple baselines or that one thing that doesn't I get asked about deep learning because it sort of purports to do feature engineering for you in a way but machine learning one of its the big challenges are big secrets to making it work in my experience has been very clever feature engineering did they do anything like that or do you have a sense even in general if someone working on a simple model what sorts of things is might they wanna know that would be helpful in predicting earthquakes so this is an area where I was out of my domain. I'm not earthquake researcher so having that local knowledge at subject matter expertise to be able to figure out what types of features to engineer for example to improve the performance of this was something outside of my scope okay so I think I'm trying to think of comparable problems I started thinking about the weather and it's you know it's apples to oranges in a way but if someone said predict the weather tomorrow I would give them a lot of plausibility if they said they could predict the weather on today's date ten years from now much harder hill the swallow can we explore the gravity of the claims made in the paper what exactly were they. Predicting the paper isn't just trying to predict the likelihood of an earth quake which you might see something like a weather event which might be very difficult to predict but they were looking at aftershock patterns after a large earthquake the business a bit more of a tractable problem to be able to use a predictive model for I've seen a lot of projects which are sort of they begin as copy and paste jobs right you take her has netter some established deep learning architecture and you throw it at a problem and maybe you volve it I'm not saying that's the right technique that's technique I often see followed did this six layer model that they were using did it follow any of those patterns that listeners might be familiar with so for someone inclined to use deep learning that the the approach that they use was not unexpected in terms of using tools like carris to build a neural network maybe repeatedly adding layers until got a suitably high performance Gotcha end what did they report that empirically in terms of the results they generated so there was a number of different results that they generated but with him was a metric for how accurate the model was with an a you see of about point eight five eight UC is one of those numbers that I know it's definition it kind of like a Pearson's are coefficient I never know sort of what context to put that in could you in layman's term say like the impressiveness of the model or something along those lines well I think the impressiveness always comes from when you have another benchmark to compare it so here the UC of point eight five was appeared to kind of a naive benchmark of a very simple physical model approach so not a machine learning model but a physical model approach that had a benchmark of about point five eight and you see for those folks that are unfamiliar with they you see the quick synopsis of it as you see goes between point five for random to one for we've completely predicted every instance correctly so that difference between point five eight two point eight five is a sizable jumping performance yeah absolutely in fact one that we don't often see without incremental jumps in my experience if I think of things like image net or whatnot so when they were reporting all those details you pointed out something that was especially interesting to me how did the training and test sets turn out in terms of performance after I read the paper I started to dig into it a little bit because I want to see could for example improve upon the performance of the model as I started digging into it one of the things I noticed is that when I built the models that the performance on my test said actually was much higher than the training set and this is the train test set that the authors had used now for those folks who have done machine learning for a while no that that performance the much higher on your tests that data which your algorithm hasn't seen before is much better than what you've trained on that's an issue that's kind of a very yellow red flag that there's something going on wrong with your model your models shouldn't be able to learn more than you've already taught it although I have found that uh-huh deep learning practitioners have a a bit of folk wisdom that especially I see this and the image recognition community that the network is sort of a louder expected to over fit just a little bit in the sense that maybe you know if you're doing some sort of face project with faces it's actually going to over fit slash memorize of those faces while at the same time learning the underlying manifold of of features if you will and so I don't know if you approve of that point of view but do you find that that's is common and if so would you give a certain amount of slack maybe not as much as the authors wanted to take but how much slack do you think before we get the yellow flag yeah ah that's a little bit of a different thing over fitting is when we learn and memorize training data but then when we try the new data it doesn't work as well here was the opposite when the model learned the trading data it actually did much better when we gave it new test data the reason for this is what we call leakage that there's been some information that has leaked between the training time over to the test time and that's what's causing a much higher performance the test set and are there any formal ways we can measure that leakage typically one of the techniques says we just look at that difference in performance I mean anytime your model Doug better on data hasn't seen before compared to the data it has been is a red flag

Rajiv Shah University Of Illinois Chicago Assistant Adjunct Professor Researcher Scientist Engineer Ten Years
"adjunct professor" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:21 min | 2 years ago

"adjunct professor" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"His talk radio Howard Rosen is an author attorney and expert an offshore asset protection planning he's an eighty V. related to turning in CPA we'll find out what that means it was an adjunct professor and lecturer as a law for twenty years at the university of Miami school of law and is frequently a guest speaker on programs like ours plus the Bar Association and professional organizations on the topic of asset protection planning which is a complete mystery to me so I'm just like my audience today I know nothing about this Howard welcome to the program. can you hear me. I can hear you now welcome to the program thank you very much. and I should mention your book is entitled asset protection a guide for professionals so what if you if you start at the very top what's the thing that most people clients readers of your book don't understand about asset protection planning you know at large so to speak. well a lot of people think that it may not be legal to DO asset protection planning and and and nothing could be further from the truth if and I underscore and italicized if if it's done properly by an experienced professional. when we talk about offshore asset to action you're exactly right what comes to mind is hiding assets. no seriously and will fully in a bad way from there to treatment of taxes against those assets right so that's correct so how how how do we approach this subject so we set it right for folks obviously there's a lot that goes into this to structure it right. correct we make sure that our clients understand from the very first telephone call that our structures are tax neutral and by that we mean that their income tax picture in the United States does not change as a result of implementing this type of planning whatever they were paying tax on before they will continue to pay tax on with our structure so if if they balk when we tell them that they're they're probably not going to become a client of ours because that's not what we're not looking to get in trouble or get anybody in trouble so you know we make sure that our clients understand this is fully tax compliance with United States tax laws for the purposes of illustration is there could you illustrate a scenario whereby you would be able to implement a plan for a legal and ethical taxation or asset protection I should say. well. we have a variety of clients who come to us for a variety of reasons very often it's a business person and the smart one will will maybe see that one of his or her friends was sued in and lost everything in a lawsuit and realized that it could happen to them so they come to us and we establish an offshore trust because trust have been used in our legal system for about a thousand years to protect assets that part is not new the way we do with today this of course different than it was it was a thousand years ago so they come to us we set up an asset protection trust we utilize a jurisdiction which has laws which are very favorable to the protection of assets in those trucks. okay. SO you structure of the trust is the legal entity in other words that young okay that's the cost of course go ahead you're going to continue please yeah and and and that that trust will usually also contained in fact always also contain the client's core estate planning provisions such as what happens when they died as a code to the children just go to charities the spouse what what have you the normal estate planning provisions would be included in the asset protection trust in in addition to typically the the trust is set up in the cook islands which is a country in the South Pacific which has very very favorable asset protection trust laws but the trust will open and hold its financial accounts cash and securities usually in a Swiss financial institution that's been around for a couple hundred years I just big picture that's the big guys that simple that's amazing for those of us who are not familiar with these structures it's a it's a lot to take in what happens in terms of the jurisdiction is this a benefit to them. to the to the to the cook I'll click yes to the islands in this instance you yeah that that this business rep this offshore trust business started in the cook islands in in nineteen eighty four and has and today probably represents about a Levin percent of their gross national product for that little country and by little I mean the total population might be fourteen fifteen thousand people right out over fifteen islands in the South Pacific. how fascinating well let me say this day for the echo the I've been doing trust for the entire time I've been a lawyer which is forty two years and for the last twenty five years I've only been doing cook islands trust but I will tell you that in all of my years of doing trust I've never dealt with more professional responsible and responsive trustee companies than the ones in the cook islands bar none that's that's that's remarkable how it is it is you structure these work with clients are the assets typically how do I ask the question are they cash generating assets or are they more static in nature give us examples of some of the types of assets that go into these trust if that's possible to do sure sure what was you know speaking about liquid assets which is cash and marketable securities the clients trust can hold anything from just cash or can have US securities just like you and I might have it at our our local brokerage firm it can have far in securities which you can't buy in the United States except through American depository receipts which is a. you know it it's not a an economically feasible way.

United States Howard Rosen Bar Association South Pacific university of Miami school of adjunct professor attorney lecturer trustee thousand years twenty five years forty two years hundred years twenty years
"adjunct professor" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

06:05 min | 2 years ago

"adjunct professor" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"For the entertainment spotlight with adjunct professor film at you W. M. Duane Dudek there were only a couple of movies that I was really excited about this past summer was alone were you alone I don't know how did you go to how many people were in they always say there's seven or eight I'm always the parts to maybe a week or two after some opens is never many people in the theater and it started out of the box office was down to percent last year any dollars how much is that about four point three billion dollars that's a lot of money yeah and there's a couple reasons I think there's a lot of competition from more sources of course streaming and TV are somewhat adult films really like working Bernadette one clicking and the overall quality of films people complain about it was down you know with films like ex man and that's a lot and stupor in men in black none of those in Somers were typically industry or forty percent of the box office what what do you think was the biggest hit of the summer or at least that well what do you think it was on yeah you're asking me you know what was it wasn't Toy Story I know but you're close to sing at the top for optimum flanking as number one in five hundred twelve million Toy Story four twenty seven a spider man which was made with Sonya marble but as well as Disney three hundred eighty billion and and the last at two hundred fifty three million bringing up the next grouping couple standalone we're honest the Jordan Peele a horror film hundred seventy five million and a one time in Hollywood with a hundred and twenty five million and then the top ten was finished out with a couple franchise films John wick sequel hundred seventy million Secret Life of pets hundred fifty seven million and fast and furious the hot and shot them with a hundred and that's pretty much it you know one film that didn't get counted this summer it was the Avengers engagement eight hundred fifty eight million dollars but it opened a week before the summer started were there any surprises I mean something that just sort of popped up that that they didn't seem to expect to be a hit on something like yesterday the musical locules drama company I guess you call it might have been one of those a small films that made it and you know there weren't a lot of this year and what about any big flops that the studio is expected to be hits well like I said Gonzalez Stuber men in black X. men really failed to draw audiences I don't know but super but the other three were either sequels or remakes what is that yeah we were and there were big budget special effects of so I I guess there's just no appetite for some things and and that the audience slips the studios now all right so we're on a summer now it's fall were usually you don't see the big productions out there what can movie goers expect orders run through real quick you know it's a lot of time on one of the award winning maybe adult films Oscar contenders appear although I you really have to wait until Christmas and thanksgiving for those like sky walk the red sky Walker the Star Wars films coming out at Christmas kicks off next week with it too a sequel to it another much anticipated clone the errors Joaquin Phoenix on October fourth at sort of the origin story kinda looks like a little looks really moody it looks more like taxi driver and taxi driver director or sinking at a much anticipated gangster film the Irishman with Robert De Niro Pacino working with Scorsese we we did you just say the film is called Irishman and you just name three Italian guys I know I I think that general may play an Irishman already made it out I don't know we'll find out I know it's not right and they will use another funny thing about it in they make dinner a lot younger Italy and he's played a mob hit man who may have helped labor leader Jimmy Hoffa disappear you know what's interesting about this is that that it could be in theaters on November first and on Netflix November twenty seventh we had a couple star struck at star studded space movies ad astra September twenty and Lucy in the sky with Natalie Portman this sounds interesting it's about an astronaut who's Sir correct after being in space and it's loosely based on the story of an astronaut accused of criminal activities surrounding romance with another astronaut you may recall that astronaut diaper astronaut and then a couple of worth mentioning you got frozen two on thanksgiving there's a new ramble last blood is Sylvester Stallone actually in this movie right here in this movie he's defending is home from attackers that may have something to do with his original movies site gas side beautiful day in the neighborhood there's an extreme different movie from ramble with Tom Hanks played Mister Rogers on twenty second out there that don't have the movie on September twentieth and then that's something you mentioned the two biopics no first of all Judy when a cell where previous the previous on that she looks amazingly like Judy Garland she spent two years preparing for this well they recorded a new song to song so they're gonna try to attempt to qualify for nasco if she's if she's singing or do they do I think it is her because they are recording in Tucson so I'm I'm things that September twenty seventh it's it's actually an interesting story it said a sold out night club performance in London as you look back at her life if and this takes place just the year before she died and the other one is about the freedom fighter Harriet Tubman now with Cynthia arable by Castilians with Janelle Monet and mostly older junior member first and that's just a quick look at some of the things coming up this fall enjoying will join us again tomorrow morning on Wisconsin's morning news I'm filling in with his fall TV preview of course you can always follow drain check out his.

W. M. Duane Dudek adjunct professor eight hundred fifty eight mill three billion dollars forty percent twenty second two years
How Does Henry Ford's Feud with the Dodge Brothers Affect Businesses Today?

BrainStuff

06:02 min | 2 years ago

How Does Henry Ford's Feud with the Dodge Brothers Affect Businesses Today?

"Today's episode of brain stuff is brought to you by AT and T, and it can wait eighty two percent of people admit to using their smartphone while they're driving were all used to seeing it. But ninety three percent of people don't approve of distracted driving. We feel awkward speaking up about it. And it's time that changed because it's not worth the risk a text alike, selfie, whatever it is when you're driving. It can wait. So the next time you see a friend family member or other human using their phone while they're driving. No that it's okay to say something distracted driving's, reckless. Take a pledge to end distracted driving at it can wait dot com. A message from AT and T. Welcome to brain stuff. A production of I heart radio. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vulva bomb here when it comes to great American feuds. There's Hamilton Burr Hatfield and McCoy, and of course, Cardi and Mickey which my coworkers shore me as a funny joke some of the most famous disputes in history have been settled in all kinds of ways with pistols murders. And yes, even rap battles. But the truly American way of handling big beefs is to hand them over to lawyers and drag them into the courts, which means that even the pettiest rivalries can have wide and long standing impacts on our society. The legal tussle that took place between Henry Ford and the brothers John and Horace dodge helped shape auto industry, as we know it the feud also laid the groundwork for how judges even today look at the relationships of businesses with their shareholders, employees and competitors. There is no Henry Ford without John and Horace dodge. And there is no dodge v Ford Motor Company if a once formidable partnership hadn't dissolved into infighting for a leg up on the burgeoning American automobile market. Ford and dodge are some of the most iconic names in US carmaking history. It turns out that the guys behind both brands started out on the same side. The dodge brothers and unruly pair known in Detroit for their drinking prowess and affinity for knocking people out cold in Barbara all's got started in the car business in nineteen hundred building Oldsmobile transmissions just a few years later. They were the chief supplier and outside machinists for Ford Motors bottle, a the companies I automobile, they also ponied up a large portion of the twenty eight thousand dollars that Henry Ford received from investors to get started that investment soon paid off Ford Motor turn to thirty-seven thousand dollar profit less than three months after selling the first bottle a but the dodgers had bigger plans. They used the dodge brothers Motor Company banner in nineteen fourteen to launch their own car. The model thirty thirty five the vehicle was intended to compete directly with the Ford model t. Henry Ford did not take kindly to this new competition. He made a pair of decisive moves to try to take the wind out of dodges sales Ford stopped paying dividends to the dodge brothers and other investors, then he slashed nearly two thirds of the price tag on his cars. We spoke with Mark Hodak an adjunct professor in New York university's business school. He explained that. While the dodge brothers were Ford's primary target, quote Ford didn't want any shareholders, he considered shareholders to be parasites the dodgers promptly sued Ford, claiming that he had priced his cars. Too low thereby cheating shareholders of potential income, by the way, their suit was filed the day after Henry's son's wedding. And the dodge brothers were guests at the reception. Anyway, the ensuing legal battle eventually found its way up to the US supreme court. The cases often described as a win for the dodges, but Hodak and some legal experts say that that's only half of the story. The court ordered Ford to pay a dividend to the dodge brothers and other shareholders in doing. So it rejected Ford's claim that he wanted to keep that money in order to reinvest it to bolster the company's production and boost workers wages. The decision is often cited for the legal theory of shareholders Premacy or that businesses. Maximize profits for the benefit of shareholders. Judge Russell Austin Dir wrote for the court a business corporation is organized and carried on primarily for the profit of the stockholders. The powers of the directors are to be employed for that end. But the court also acknowledged another important legal theory, commonly referred to as the business judgment rule that principle assumes the corporate directors generally act in the best interests of the company and have widely way to do. So as long as they're moves, a reasonable, the court cited this went up resolved. Another segment of the case it rejected the dodgers attempt to block Ford from expanding his factory. Australia wrote, the judges are not business experts is recognized the plans must often be made for a long future for expected competition for continuing as well as immediately profitable. Venture the experience of the Ford Motor Company is evidence of capable management of its affairs. Ford may have had that part of the decision in mind when he made his next move against the dodgers. After the court ruling Ford announced he was selling the company to his son. He also planted a rumor that he might start a new car business all of this drove down the value of the shares in Ford Motor Company that was enough to spook the dodgers and other investors who sold her shares back to the Ford family exactly what Ford had wanted in the first place. Today's episode was written by Chris offer and produced by Tyler claim brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's how stuff works for more in this. Lots of other topics involving the sick burns of history. Visit our home planet has works dot com and for more podcast. Iheartradio is I heart radio app, apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Are you following your passion? I'm Carla Marie the host of side Hustler's, join me as we hear the story in hustle of people following their passion outside of their regular job side. Hustlers. Listen and subscribe on the iheartradio app at apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Ford Motor Company Henry Ford Dodgers Dodge Brothers Motor Company Horace Dodge AT Dodge United States Dodges Mark Hodak Detroit Henry Iheartradio Judge Russell Austin Dir Carla Marie Hamilton Burr Hatfield Apple John New York University
"adjunct professor" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"adjunct professor" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"One by the name of Tammy alluvia, L U H A B Y. She's a senior writer at CNN is where she is. She's as an adjunct professor for Columbia journalism. And she writes Senator Warren, and now Kasey Cortez have very different ideas. And how to tax the rich is the Cortez wants to seventy percent on marginal tax rates over the ten million and first dollar. She says she'll get down to a million she'll get down to three hundred fifty thousand sooner rather than later. Am my point is is that the idea of what is rich will always come down because they have more things they want to fund in the idea. Fairness what what it was with Warren wants is a ultra rich tax ultra millionaire taxes. She calls it. I it's a wealth tax. You have ten million dollars in the Bank, you've already paid taxes on it. She wants to pay taxes on that ten million every single year keep paying taxes on it. Keep giving us keep giving us keep giving us in some level of of equality. So Tammy Libby rights at Senator Warren in Alexandria Cortez. Have very different ideas on how to tax the rich to which Representative Cortez retweets in Pocono, Los dos. Okay. A little bit of Spanish. What is what does that mean? Why not why not do both? Why don't you? Si, si. They're they're never satisfied. It's not one idea or another idea. It's let's do both. You have no right to what you have earned. It belongs to us. All your dollars are belong to us. They never are satisfied. When you vote for these people. They're not talking about, goodness or kindness. They're talking about theft and via the barrel of a gun, and there is a never ending number of ways tear. Okay, taking it. So what the hell are you doing when you vote for them? I didn't say we couldn't disagree about policy. I didn't say we couldn't disagree about healthcare. I couldn't disagree about a whole host of things. These people are fine with taking what is yours. And if you say to me, hey, Tony, I'm not the ultra rich and around ten million dollars in the Bank, and I don't have a yacht. And okay. In order to believe that you have to believe that the number doesn't come down because they never stop. They just showed you they're willing to do both to these people. Why would that not happen to people who've got fifty thousand dollars in the Bank? Why wouldn't that happen to all wealth? Why not what argument do they have against it? They've already shown you how they're willing to grow. How are willing to find ways to take what is yours? And after all what the hell. The Dan Snyder did anybody else other than give jobs if he broke the law charge him with the crime, the crime is being successful and wealthy. Holy crap..

Senator Warren Tammy alluvia writer Kasey Cortez Representative Cortez Alexandria Cortez adjunct professor CNN Dan Snyder Tammy Libby theft Tony Pocono Los dos ten million dollars fifty thousand dollars seventy percent
"adjunct professor" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"adjunct professor" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"That can create stress and challenge in our lives. And that's why because I. Couldn't help the people I love, and I couldn't tell my sister. And because I thought that the challenges were sort of showing up for young people today, we should probably clarify since you're mentioned all these young people that you're socio with Dr fielding is a an adjunct professor at Pepperdine graduate school of education psychology, hence, all of the young people in her life and in my also in private practice. It just you know, my private practice was located right next to you. I was also providing at the time at UCLA forget I had a lot of referrals for college age or graduate school age teaching the graduate school, and I was being more college age my in my private practice. Backley? You mentioned be surprised by some of the things that these young people were struggling with can you can you share like one or two of the biggies that you see all the time. Now, definitely when I would start explore with my clients. Well, what what was going on at something familiar there with your family with your parents what I would. Here overnight right now, my parents like my best friend. I check it with them every single day. I can text the my tech multiple times per day or or they're on the phone with me, and they walk me through because that was one thing that I was curious about at first, and what that signals was that parents direction. I limit signaled was lowered distress tolerance. So we know a lot in the research that reassurance seeking is actually a symptom of a lot of diagnoses like compulsive disorder. But a lot of other ones, depression and anxiety as well. And when parents are always there, and again by proxy, the cell phone and digital media is always there scores of reassurance seeking their become less opportunity for learned distress tolerant to he that you can sit with this comfort, and the wave will come and go that was one of the primary themes that started to show up even when I I also specialize in Tyler behavioral therapy, which is. Was developed for for line personality disorder, even with really difficult problems. With emotion dysregulation, you can see that the environment that grew up in or their program as I call it isn't necessarily from bad things happening. It's just from the parents constantly trying to help them fix their difficult, emotions or growing, even the schools actually were quite guilty of this when we had our self esteem programs and everyone got a trophy, and no one was allowed to feel bad. And this isn't just me there's a lot of data to back this up. So that's sort of theme that started to see showing that doesn't mean that a lot of people don't a lot of difficulties with emotion. Regulation and transition into adulthood, gore more traditional reasons difficulties and their upbringing..

private practice Dr fielding Pepperdine adjunct professor
"adjunct professor" Discussed on Reasonable Doubt

Reasonable Doubt

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"adjunct professor" Discussed on Reasonable Doubt

"Some point at some, you know, the I've always found remember the Arizona case, which are where I couldn't get it public. I mean, literally had to we did everything we went all the way to the super Arezzo supreme court to get the tape out. And so, you know, it's a it's it always depends on whose ox is getting gored. Right. So the the homeless person walks into the pharmacy the ride Ed or Walgreens, sorry, we're not sure by appearances whether they're homeless are not correct. As a kind of first problem. Are so not. I'm not sure how you would know just by looking if somebody is gay. I the one person who's apparently transexual I'm not so sure either that that would be something that would be immediately obvious. Well, the argument would be any kind of prior experience he had with this person. So obviously, if I'm kung FU fighting Carl Douglas over here, I'm going to try to prove that there are other interactions like this guy came in multiple times, he said, hey, homo hurry up or get outta here. We don't want you in here. So obviously he's gonna look for any kind of interaction 'cause one with thank well, this is your turf, this is this is your this is the area you work. Right. I'm assuming he'd come into this Walgreens more than once over the past five months. You would assume that and so Mr. kung FU fight? Is probably going to try to prove that he knew him. He was familiar with him probably make some sort of claim that he made some sort of slur or something like that and that will establish he knew he was gay. And he knew he was homeless, exactly. Good. Southie? Former prosecutor adjunct professor at Loyola Law School, who by the way, you did you met one of your other fellow professors at Christmas. One of the funniest thing ever see is when Adam is sitting at Christmas dinner talking with the with professor Goldman who is a loyal law school, professor currently Adam as just an adjunct if that remember stands reaction when I said, hey here stand he's an adjunct professor, and he got very upset. Like calling him Paul blurt ball. Copper something if you refer to John professor, I. Cracks me up because I've had to episodes now in the lock and Yatta area. One is is I was getting out of my car at the animal lumber and a guy. So my piano tuning sign on the side of my car windows, piano. Tune that I had to tell them. I don't really do that. He was confused. And then later on Garrod's is house talk to law school, professor about what department I represented explain why don't do that. Either. Next year. I'm going to have Pollock nations of Forber of retired Rear Admiral to those for Christmas, and you can make it the try factor yourself. So I'm guessing that if there is no priors in terms of interactions with your client and the deceased then he Carl Douglas is gonna have a hard time pinning the gay part onto this. And maybe even the homeless part of it. I is calls as a civil case. So he's gonna just ride shotgun. So to speak excuse the pun on the DA's office, which is prosecuting this and the DA's office will go to preliminary hearing preliminary hearing is just a determination as to whether those a strong suspicion of guilt. Basically, my my favorite line. Now is the the judge holds anybody to answer on a preliminary hearing as long as the client is breathing. And so then it forces you go to trial, and then you're you know, we'll be once. Get in front of a jury because I will predict that no judge we'll have the guts to dismiss this thing beforehand. And once again, another murder case that the citizens in a jury will have to tell the prosecution. No you overreach. Just like the case that we had last month. Yeah. With the man was not speaking a manslaughter. So that was my next question. Do they go for murder and knock it down to murder two or manslaughter? Whatever they go for sort of the brass ring..

adjunct professor Carl Douglas Walgreens professor Goldman murder Arezzo Arizona Loyola Law School Ed professor Garrod Pollock Yatta Paul blurt ball prosecutor John Forber
"adjunct professor" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"adjunct professor" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Which one is this do i have this on the list okay this is a compilation of a bunch of teachers as to why they're out strike and we got a couple more clips and then i also wait tables and bartenders i'm a high school sports official literally coach another part time job as an uber driver forty eighth in the nation for pay sports i was an adjunct professor dj videography i on thank you worked at walgreens and worked at stein mart build a fence i can make a gate i have a teacher that this working out for us i saw her with their one time i said i didn't know you work here she said yeah i still get paid enough fighting this school after i finished teaching i go in and get my janitor cart tastes my clothes and clean the school our photographer on the side i've seen and they work your restaurants because they have a better chance of getting a good retirement in that job when they do being teacher five dogs sad i sell my own art i teach english online kids in china eyedropper over on the weekends sometimes it's good extra cash playing gigs can sound like homemade bombs and things like that five thousand dollars when i first started and having seen a nickel since as far as rates knows and i suppose or my fam that ain't right they had to steal anything i can to make ends meet but i'd love to teach him so the vice i'm willing to make.

walgreens stein mart official adjunct professor china five thousand dollars
"adjunct professor" Discussed on Side Hustle School

Side Hustle School

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"adjunct professor" Discussed on Side Hustle School

"Hello ingredients site us will school friends listeners so glad you're joining me today my name is chris caleb i am the host of the show and today's a special day for lots of reasons got a great story for you i'll tell you about that in a moment but today is also national girl metoo day one is national girl metoo day kind of like another version of national women's day national girl me today happening every year on april seventh recognizes the strength and endurance it women of all ages and there's an opportunity to show support for each other so first of all shout out today to all the women young women and girls listening to the show and anybody who's just in your life maybe let them know that you're them second in what seems to be a coincidence it's also national beer day and national coffee cake day so great day really we can celebrate the women in our lives we can enjoy a beer and a coffee cake and less it's end of the day or at least i'm gonna call it into the day myself this is not a national holiday this just happens to be my fortieth birthday as i say that i can hardly believe it myself i i would say i don't know where the last forty years went but it's more like the last thirty six years because i don't remember the first four after that i can remember a lot but i'm still not quite sure what happened just go to sleep one day all of a sudden you wake up and your forty years old and thank you for sharing this experience with me of course the show goes on even if i'm on my last legs here i'll be checking into the senior center pretty soon i'm sure but until then got a great story for you today it is about an adjunct professor who uploads his final college course to youtube then converts it into a unit course not sure what you to me is we'll stay tuned i'll tell you but here's the punchline in sixteen months just sixteen months he's reached over thirty five thousand students and made over one hundred thousand dollars that is one hundred.

adjunct professor chris caleb youtube sixteen months forty years one hundred thousand dollars thirty six years one day
"adjunct professor" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"adjunct professor" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Walk him to the president's inbox for podcast about the foreign policy challenges facing the united states i'm kim linzie director studies at the council formulations this week's topic is global health saturday this world helped with me this week to talk about global health as tomboy key tom is senior fellow for global health economics development at sea afar he is also an adjunct professor of law at georgetown university in two thousand fourteen tom directed the first cf are sponsored independent task force devoted to global health and development he was entitled emerging global health crisis noncommunicable diseases in low in middle income countries he has a book coming out this fall which is both incredibly interesting and also very provocative it's called plagues in the paradox of progress while the world is getting healthier in worrisome ways i highly recommend it i think it's doing the bookstores in september tom thanks for joining me my pleasure thanks for having me as i noted that start tom saturday is world health day president we should start out by saying what exactly is world health day in witter to come from world health day is an opportunity for the world health organization to focus the world's attention on a issue that's deserving of that attention it wasn't always on april seventh and it wasn't always didn't always have that focus it used to be about educating about the public about the world health organization and it was held on july twenty second to commemorate today that sixty one nations after world war to sign the world health organizations constitution but the member states pointed out to the who that school children were on holiday in july and may not be able to pay attention to this holiday so they moved it to april seven to commemorate today when the constitution came into force in nineteen forty eight which is why this is the seventieth world health day for any school age children that happen to be listening to this podcast instead of missing it to frolic.

president united states tom senior fellow georgetown university witter kim linzie director adjunct professor of law twenty second
"adjunct professor" Discussed on Reasonable Doubt

Reasonable Doubt

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"adjunct professor" Discussed on Reasonable Doubt

"Do the experiments to see if they can recreate what they think the defence argument is going to be no you they know what the defense argument is going to be because he made multiple statement so this still comes down to the prosecutors dropping the ball or drop in the gun because the prosecution has the duty beyond a reasonable doubt to prove the case so that you don't have the questions you have as a juror rights i would just go tell me exactly what your story laura i don't even care if it's a liar not just tell me what it is okay have residue on your hands 'cause you're shooting at seals earlier and then what you've got tired of shooting at siyassa who wanted to take a load off say sat down and he put it down on the ground on the peers anywhere survival of adelai lynnwood and that new kick it with your foot in it discharge okay so let's just go up this go ahead garner radio that now you can as a prosecutor and a you being a former prosecutor not an adjunct professor oil amiram out rare and henry apple so you can answer speight that you can have experts cohen tried a monkey around with that you can have the experts talk about how much would have had two of the gunshots roger and the price of pressure and everything else now that all would have good they're fit together for your theory and if you don't do that is a prosecutor the result is not guilty so the judge would not let the jer handle the gun this is what happens my guess i wasn't in the courtroom but i've been in enough to know or enough trials to know my guess is they've deliberated for a period of time the jury is obviously hung i think they were up for six days i read somewhere maybe five days in there obviously hung somebody's probably got the same kind of questions you do i want to touch the gun the evidence is closed of the case the judge i don't know if the prosecution asked to reopen it but i would be hard pressed to see any scenario where the judge would allow the prosecution to reopen the case but if you give the yomiuri auditor liberate were closed in.

siyassa adelai lynnwood prosecutor henry apple speight adjunct professor cohen yomiuri auditor five days six days
"adjunct professor" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

The $100 MBA Show

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"adjunct professor" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

"Welcome to 100 rba show where it's our business to help your business be the best that could be with our practical business lessons i'm your host your coach your teacher omar's at home i'm also the cofounder of the 100dollar nba and whether ninja and today's episode is a guest teacher episode today we have a very very special guest teacher good friend of the show and the corn i dory clark dora clark as an adjunct professor at duke university school of business she's also the best selling author of entrepreneurial you reinventing u n stand out which was named the number one leadership book four two thousand fifty by inc magazine besides being a fantastic entrepreneur herself she's a student of entrepreneurship and studies great entrepreneurs around her and on a personal note dory is a very sweet friend of ours one of the most generous entrepreneurs in our space and in today's episode doors going to teach you a very important lesson she's gonna give you practical steps to taking the leap into entrepreneurship i know a lot of you who listen to the show has been wanting to start a business for some time you have some great ideas you might have even jotted down these ideas and started working on them you just don't know how to take that leap how to take the steps to becoming an entrepreneur those steps of those tips that's what doors going to be talking about in today's episode it's a subject of her new book entrepreneurial you which comes out tomorrow so definitely check her out on amazon.

omar nba dora clark adjunct professor inc magazine amazon duke university school of busi 100dollar