36 Burst results for "Adhd"

Fresh update on "adhd" discussed on The Morgan Zegers Show

The Morgan Zegers Show

02:11 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "adhd" discussed on The Morgan Zegers Show

"I don't know. I think they're a little bit more. Would you ever wonder what is going on at a school, a public school that makes it so miserable that a kid needs to have a day off for mental reasons. I get it if it's maybe a personal family thing, like maybe a death of the family, something like that at work. But it's training them to think that, hey, if your day at school is so stressful, then it's okay to take a day off. Well, it's not teaching kids to persevere at all. Like, when things get tough, sometimes you just have to suck it up and go. We had recharge days, they were called the weekend. It was our recharge days. Here's my thing. And I say this knowing that obviously it gets to a point where some people need help. I get this. Is anxiety a bad thing? Anxiety and natural part of life that you have to learn to get over and achieve. You got to go give your presentation in front of the class. I've talked about this before. When I was a kid, the thought of speaking in front of people, I would be in the bathroom throwing up before because I would be so anxious to speak in front of 20 classmates. Is anxiety a bad thing? Is depression sometimes a bad thing? Depressed is something that happens. Your girlfriend dumps you. You're going to be depressed. But you learn to move on. These are things. And that's what I'm getting at. I'm not negating that there aren't people who have legit hormonal and chemical things that have overtaken to a point where they do need help. And I've got no problem with mental health. Seeking help for mental health and things like that. Absolutely not. But as Morgan is saying, we're treating things like it kind of goes back to the ADHD debate 20, 30 years ago. Oh, my kids got ADHD because he's running all over the house. No, that's a 6 year old boy and he's been in the house all day. Well, any typed up on sugar and processed foods and artificial colors and flavors. Red dye foods and things like that.

Depression Adhd Morgan
The Same Censorship on YouTube Exists at College Campuses

The Officer Tatum Show

01:37 min | Last week

The Same Censorship on YouTube Exists at College Campuses

"40% of students are uncomfortable, disagreeing with their professor and public are in writing assignments or written assignments. The three most difficult topics to discuss on campus or abortion, racial inequality, and COVID-19 vaccine mandates. Um. I wonder, how is that consistently something that's difficult to talk about on campus? And it's also the same thing that you can not talk on YouTube about. Maybe there's a connection. Maybe there's a bigger conspiracy than we may want to admit. Right now on YouTube, if you talk about abortion, they will age restrict your video. Although they can show transgender strip shows to little kids, and that's not age restricted. I made videos about it, right? Right, Nick, that's not age restricted. But if I talk about abortion based on an education only perspective, they will age restrict your material on YouTube. And what does that mean by age restricting? Don't let them lie to you. Asian restricted isn't just so young people under 18 can not watch your clips. What happens is when they age restrict you, anybody that's not actively logged into YouTube can not see your video, no matter what age they are. And even if you're logged into and your 18 flyer will pop up or pop up will pop up before your video and it'll say, this content is sensitive content, do you want to go from there? Now, knowing the mindset of most people who have the tension span of a net with ADHD will literally look at that clip and say, I don't want no parts of it. I'm going to the video that I could just view and stimulate my mind for 30 seconds and be on to something different.

Covid Youtube Nick Adhd
Parenting Autistic Children  David Grant MBE - burst 2

stay first

30:43 min | Last week

Parenting Autistic Children David Grant MBE - burst 2

"This episode will be doing things a little bit differently, though, as I'll be interviewing my husband, yes, fellow broadcast a vocal coach and leadership coach and campaigner David grant. As we talk about our own experiences of raising four neurodivergent children, welcome to the show David. Wow, nice to be here, Gary. So for those people that don't know about our family, could you just give us a rundown of our kids? Okay, we have four children our eldest olive is an actor. Our and olive is 27. Next in line is Thailand, who is 20 and also an actor. Next in line is Arlo, who is 16 and at school. And next is in line is Nathan, who is 12. And supposed to be at school, but currently not in school. Yes, okay, so you just had a little bit of a hint towards their not in school. That's been a familiar experience for us with three out of the four children. Because you've named all of their ages in their names and stuff. But what about their diagnoses? Just run me by some of the diagnosis that our children have got. Okay, I will, but because this is like a pick and mix at which point I'm bound to forget some. Would you jump in if I forget any? Yes. Because you know them as well as I do. Olive, has a disparity. And ADHD, Thailand is on the autism spectrum. And Arlo, third is on the autism spectrum. And Nathan. Now I got a minute rewind rewind back up back up. Arlo is autistic and has ADHD. Of course, yes, I forgot all of it as a whole a whole suit of what coterie. Yeah, these disabilities, they're traveling gangs, don't they? And has ADHD. Nathan a 12 year old has ADHD DMDD. Probably dyslexia. Even though they're still working on a diagnosis, and yeah, we have, you know, at some point, if anybody does disability bingo, we jump up and say house. Yeah, well, it's interesting you say disability because I don't really think of them as being disabilities. I think of them as being just different. I don't think of them as there are any disabilities in the light of the fact that the world is so unaccepting. That's very true. I think that one of the things with an invisible disability so it's called is that, you know, if we what we have done in our family is to recognize that the reason why it's called a disability is because some people find it more challenging to do things that neurotypical people take for granted. On the other hand, without children, it's also proven to be a different ability, because so many of them are able in ways in so many ways that they might not otherwise be able. You know, the gifted in ways that they might otherwise not be gifted. They're different and see the world in ways that absolutely challenge a neurotypical vision of the world. Yeah, and that's what we love about them. So tell me what it was like when all of these diagnoses that you've just mentioned there started to pop up. How did that come about and what were your feelings? Well, it's interesting. I've spoken to so many parents because we run parent groups. And I spoke to so many parents about the initial diagnosis and the reactions have been very, very many in varied, you know, for some people, it's a bit of a shock for some people it's almost like a disappointment for others. It's a surprise for others. It's an explanation. And I would say for us, well, certainly for me, it was in part an explanation. And also, in part, a sort of a wake-up call that said to me, this journey isn't going to be anything that you might have imagined. It is going to be. We don't know what it's going to be, but what we do know is that it's going to, it's going to plow its own field and chart its own course when we first got the diagnosis of our second and third Thailand and Arlo, the ones who are now 2016, which we got the autism diagnosis on the same day. Tai was 7. Aloe was three. What was that like for you? I have to be honest. And there was absolutely no sort of like heightened emotion connected to it, concern or disappointment or what was there was, okay, I need to now discover what this means. What this means for them, what this means for us and how it makes things different. Is it going to make things different if it does? How is it going to make things different? Because it didn't change them in any way. They got in the car. You got given the diagnosis and then they just got in the car and they were still Tyler and Arlo, weren't they? They had to change. But with that bit of paper yeah, it didn't change them one dot. One shot. One bit. But what it did change was my awareness of who they were. What it did change is my awareness that they may see the world a different way. And I didn't know what that was going to be, because there are only 7 and three, but what I did know was that the carnage journey that you can prescribe and chart out and say that the raising of a child is likely to fall within these parameters. There may be anywhere from track a to track B but the train is going to run along these tracks in some way. That went completely out of the way. I didn't realize at the time just how far out of the window it was going to go. But I did think, okay, this changes things. And one of the, I mean, some people might call it exciting with the benefit of hindsight, but at the time slightly sort of slightly nerve wracking things was having no idea of what it meant was going to change as they grew and as they developed. And as they began to inhabit the fullness of their personhood and understand the fullness of their identities, what was going to change. Well, we didn't know. And I think that, you know, there's a saying that everyone to see person probably knows, which is even if you've met one autistic person, you've met one autistic person. And even with just having two children on the spectrum in the family, the presentation is so entirely different. Yeah, they are. If somebody said to me, when we got the diagnosis, this is what autism looked like. And used one of them as in illustration. It would have completely excluded the other. Because the other one wouldn't have got a diagnosis based on that. It's very, very good point. So you've talked about what it was like to kind of grow in your knowledge of them and who they might become and to understand them a little. But what about parenting? Have you changed as a parent? This was 2009 if I remember. So we've had a good few years since. Have you changed as a parent? As a parent, I am unrecognizable from the parent I was in 2009. Now let's be really honest about this. Anybody who has raised a child will say, well, yes, of course, the parent you are to a 16 year old and the same parent you are to three year old. So there's the natural evolution of your relationship that happens as your child grows and matures. But there's also, I think that certainly for me having children on the spectrum, it meant that I needed to really abandon everything I thought I knew about parenting. It meant that I had to discover and develop a bespoke style of parenting that fitted specifically the child that was in front of me rather than having a general sort of one size fits all approach because it absolutely didn't fit. And really, it's not to my credit that I think that I was quite resistant to that because of the way they don't fit the one size fits all. Then it's obviously because I'm not implementing the one size fits all with enough figure. So I need to I need to just retrain and double down on the one size fits all and it will work and the fact is it was never going to work. And it kind of I would say out of the two of us, I was you were the hair when it came to realizing that we needed to adapt and adopt a new parenting style and we need it to be fluid and I was very much the tortoise. There was a kind of rigidity of no this is how you do it. And you know, I think that with regard to parenting, having children on the autism spectrum has taught me and continues to teach me is teaching me to be a parent, I would otherwise never have been. And I think that had I never have been, I would have missed a lot. There's a lot of their growing up that I got by constantly having to reassess and reappraise and recognize who they are now. You know, not living on who they were last year or last week, even. You know, who are they now? Who are they today? And who do they need me to be today? Yeah. So you talked about the fact that it took you a little bit longer to describe yourself as the tortoise. So how was that then? Well, I made the tool to seem like St. Louis Hamilton. We got the diagnosis in 2009. Up until about 2012, I thought there's something wrong with these kids because they're really not getting my style of parenting. About 2012, I began to realize there was something wrong with me because I wasn't being the parent they needed me to be. And then I was all at sea. I think I took a little while to actually work out. If I've got autistic kids, I need to learn, it's not me teaching them and then learning how to be. It's actually me learning and I think that I think that when I kind of was humble enough to recognize that I didn't actually know, you know, sometimes you don't know what you don't know. But when you've got autistic children and they need you to be a parent, you have to learn what you don't know. You have to realize what you don't know and it is certainly in my case. I think I learned a lot from watching you, but I also learned a lot from realizing that I couldn't be you and I couldn't just be you the deeper voice that I actually had to change me. I couldn't just ape behavior that I saw it with someone else. I had to change the way my outlook and gosh, I would say that you're saying how long did it take to be? Well, the diagnosis arrived 13 years ago. And I consider myself still to be under construction, and a work in progress, because the dads that I was 5 years ago that they needed me to be 5 years ago isn't the dad they need me to be now. Because they've changed. Yeah. You talked a little bit there about you said this lovely phrase bespoke parenting. So just give me some examples of what you have bespoke. Bespoken. Okay, it's interesting because with, I was 16 year old, there was a rigidity of actions that isn't always, so it wasn't just a rigidity of thinking. So with Arlo, we have certain things. I am my face is a stress toy. I actually, I mean, I know I look like this, but you know, I think I would look about maybe 15 years younger, if not for all. All that has to excuse my face. And they always squeeze my face and there are certain things that we do. There are certain actions that we do. There are certain little dances we do. There are certain words that we say. I don't even understand your communication. I mean, you two are like a whole, you're like a double act. I know. It's all part of my being father to Arlo, is that we have loads of unspoken communication. That revolve around movement and actions and dances and laughing at the same thing that other people don't understand what's going on. I've had to learn that I've had to enter into our lives world and learn how that world works. On a practical thing, although loves to have drives, they want to have a drive once a day. It's part of a de stressor towards the end of the day. Some people read or watch TV or they're too young to have a drink, they go on a drive. They sit in the car and listening to music and we drive and 40 minutes later, half an hour, 40 minutes later, we arrive back home and they're in a different head space to the one they were when we left. And that's an important thing. So whatever the schedule will have my day. If I'm at home or if I'm coming home, I know I need to be out for that drive for Allah because that's an important part of parenting are there. And it's an interesting thing that to me, it's not even I don't even think of it as a chore or a stress. It's just part of being a dad. It's part of being their dad. Yeah. Because I actually think that, you know, speaking of bespoke parenting, I could quite probably be a rubbish dad to every other child in the world, but I've learned how to be the dad that the children I have need. Yeah. And that is bespoke. It is also humor. You have loads of humor, I would say, with Arlo. Yeah, yeah, we are a lot. Mostly at me, but often at all because Arlo is really funny at all that has learned to laugh at themselves in a way that they couldn't when they were younger. You know, in the early teens, they could not laugh at themselves because I think they felt such a level of low self worth and such a lack of confidence that to laugh with them at themselves would have been perceived to be laughing at them. And one of the ways that I can see that their confidence is growing and their belief that they have a place in the world is growing. Is for how much they laugh at themselves, how much of their humor is directed inwards. Yeah. I agree with you on that. Okay, so that's Arlo, who's our 16 year old. What about Tyler and katana is very different? What have you had to change very different? In your parenting of time and what's changed there for them? I think in my parenting style and what's changed is to listen to time. It's to really listen is to not be so ready to give advice, not be so ready to give an answer because even sometimes when ty says. I need to know what to do. I know that what will happen is that I'll be giving answers. And they'll be saying no, those aren't the answers. That's really bad advice. What I should be doing is this. So it's almost like they're using me as a sounding board. A classic example is when we run our way up to Holly oaks for their final audition. Time is one of the members of the cast of Holly oaks down. And it was their final audition and they were absolutely wrapped with nerves. And we're driving along the M1. And they're almost crying with us. And I thought this isn't good for them. It's really isn't good. And I said, you know what? I want you to know you don't have to do this. We can turn the car around and we can go back, and they said, so that's the worst thing you could have said. You can't say that. This is what you're supposed to say. I told you what they wanted to hear. And you know, it's a completely different kind of relationship to all that. And how we connect and how we relate is to share time together. Yes. And that's the wonderful thing we're tie. I mean, tiles say there's a box set that I've been watching and I really want you to watch it. So I'll sit and watch. And you know, maybe in the course of an hour, we'll say three or four sentences, but time. That's together time. That's valuable time. That's been our time. And you know, it'll be, I'll get a text with have a listen to this music or I'll send them some music. And tire listens and goes, yeah, I like this. I really like this. And then he'll put that on his playlist and that'll be and that will be a connection to the communication because what tie really loves. One of the things that I love is that feeling of being part of my heritage and my dad played this for me or my dad told me about this. And then what ty does then is to do the same for me. So I know you're like this. Have you heard of such and such? And it'll be somebody that I liked when I was 20 years old or something. And then we'll connect on that level, but it's a very, very different communication to our lows, but it's just as deep and it's just as valid, but it's entirely different. And if I was to switch and relate to time, like I do to other and relate to other, like I do to tie it, I would be completely disconnected from a couple of meltdowns going on there for sure. Yes. So you and I have run a parent support group. It has over a 180 parents, families, and we work with the families and with the children. That's been running for very long while. And over lockdown, you have run your weekly meeting online every single week for those parents. And I've been absolutely amazed and marvel at you and your consistency and the way that you love those parents is just wonderful. I love them too, by the way. But I love watching you talk to it to them. If there's parents of autistic children listening today or families of autistic children. What advice would you have? You know those parents when they join our group. What do they most need to hear? I think what most autistic superior will most parents of autistic children that join our group and need to hear is that they're not alone on this journey. I don't think that most people need parenting advice. Occasionally people will ask, look, this is a situation how would you approach this situation and ask the group? But generally, I mean, we're talking about super parents, parents who sacrifice everything and are willing to sacrifice everything. And by that, I'm not talking about money or material I'm talking about themselves. They're hopes aspirations, dreams, whatever they expected for themselves later on in life is just like that all of that gets put into a margin. That gets parked and everything is focused on the needs of their children. So what they need to hear generally is you're not alone on this journey. We've all walked this journey and so when you say something that to somebody else who isn't on this journey may sound outrageous about how you feel about what you're going through about how challenging or difficult or impossible you feel, how inadequate you feel to the task, it's fine to say it here because we've all felt it and we've all expressed it. And the other thing is having a space in your life where you can describe without having to explain, I think that so much energy is spent and wasted and exhausted by people feeling as though they have to explain their children. They have to explain their situation. They stand with a teacher. People say, wow, your child's your child's not that at all. Your child's like this. And they go, well, no, you don't know the whole picture. There is a different person at home to the one in school or the one not in school because they refuse to go into school. Or the one not sleeping because they're refused to go to bed or whatever. Just having a space where you can describe, but you don't have to explain because everybody else who is listening to you gets it. So is your advice that people link up with other parents? I think it's really important to do that. I think it's so important to do that because I think that in Albert Einstein said, if you measure the fish by how well it climbed a tree, you would think it was stupid. And quite often, all we get in terms of a metric for our own children is the yardstick of a kind of neurotypical world. And if the neurotypical world is the tree, our children may be the fastest swimmer in the ocean, but they're not going to climb the tree. So yes, I think it's really important to link up with other parents who are walking the same walk. Others who are in the same situation others who will be able to listen to you and not just sympathize and not just empathize but experientially understand. Yeah. No, I know for many of our families that we support theirs. There's quite a high percentage of their children and young people and we see this in the adults as well autistic adults might be struggling with their mental health, what have you learned about coming alongside our children in their mental health crises? Wow. I think I've learned more than anything that there's no quick fix. There are no easy answers and presents is everything. And that there's no guarantee that if you do a and B, you're going to get C that two and two are going to act a four. But what I do know is this that our children, even when they, we sometimes become The Rock against which they bash. And we feel bashed, but we're the only rocks they've got. And so the thing that I think is how important it is to be there and to listen and when possible to talk them down and when necessary to talk them up and also more than anything to also come alongside others so that we guard our own mental health. Because it's impossible to carry somebody if you're limping. You know, it's really so much harder. And yeah, our children's mental health is such a big deal. It's such a big deal. And it can turn on a sixpence. Everything can be going well. And then one thing, real or imagined, one thing can completely trans the picture. And so I think that most parents I know with autistic children live as such are a level of hyper vigilance that, if anything, yeah, do what you do and be there the way that you're there. But please remember your own mental health, remember your own need for support, remember your own need to be heard. Yeah, and to find voice. Just moving on to, I guess that thing of school and the workplace, how well or not well, our things set up for allowing our neurodivergent people to thrive. Wow. That's really interesting. It's an interesting question because the question in itself is it presupposes that any advanced society would recognize that there is more than one way of seeing the world and there is more than one way of thinking and therefore. An advanced society like ours would set things up that everybody, whatever that, not just the well-being of whether the neurological situation would be able to say, yeah, there's a space for me. There's a place for me. There's an opening for me. There's an acceptance of me. People are making the allowances I need made so that I can thrive, not just so that I can fit in and limp along, but so that I can thrive. But that doesn't really exist in any way like the number that it should. The number of employers who I think employers should be made to have a number of people who are on the autism spectrum, a number of people who have just had a neurodivergent. I think it's really important we get away from this cookie cutter one size fits all everyone has to look the same and replicate one another's strengths in order to fit in. And yeah, I suppose my answer so far suggests that I don't think that nearly enough is done. I don't think the nearly enough is being done. There's so much talent and there's so much ability there's so much intuition and knowledge and just being wasted being sidelined being overlooked being ignored. And if it wasn't overlooked, how much richer we'd be, the companies that actively seek out people on the spectrum because they have an attention to detail perhaps that others don't have or they have a skill set that I was specially interested, which means that they know their stuff almost as much as a PhD student would know just because they're taught themselves that kind of auto didactic skills that so many autistic people have, if only there was a recognition that these aren't just skills that come from a hobby. These are skills that become so deeply engraved. So knowledge based and so worthwhile that their valuable if we could find and be made to find ways to fully utilize the gifts and the talents that we have from people on the autism spectrum, the world would be a much richer place because so many of the things that enrich the modern world were devised or created developed or initiated by people on the autism spectrum. Yeah, which is exactly what all too kind of trying to do. That's absolutely you've just given their remit basically their davids. And we know that for Thailand, their workplace at hollyoaks has they've made all those kinds of adjustments four Thailand. So there is some good practice happening out there, isn't there, but there is. But probably not enough. And I do want to also about people even disclosing that they are artistic before they can even get to the needs that I might have. It is this sense of disclosure. How do we change perceptions out there, David? Gosh, I think that we change perceptions by I think drawing a line that delineates between our understanding of terminology and understanding that the term different and the term normal shouldn't actually be the opposite of one another. That your normal isn't my normal. And the your differences could complement my differences. The fact is that we've created an environment where two often people who are different in any way feel as though they have to underplay or deny their differences and create some kind of fake fake normal that fits with other people. And I don't think that that I don't think that that's right and I don't think it helps. But I can understand why. You know, somebody walked into a typical edition and started by saying, I'm autistic. They don't know they don't know the reaction they're going to get. They don't know whether the person sitting opposite is going to get, you know, yeah, fine. You almost want to go in and say, could you just tell me what you think is autistic looks like? Hear what they say and then

Arlo David Grant Nathan Thailand Adhd Gary Autism David Dyslexia Holly Oaks Tyler TY Aloe TAI St. Louis Katana Hamilton Albert Einstein
U.S. Army Recruitment Is Down 40%

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:16 min | 3 months ago

U.S. Army Recruitment Is Down 40%

"Numbers are so low. It's ridiculous and the army in particular, the numbers are down 40%. It's gotten to the point where some legislature are talking about drafting women for God's sakes, which is totally insane. I'll just say it flat out. I don't believe that women should be in combat. Think of what happens to man. Imagine how much worse that'll get with women and they're talking about allowing people with medical conditions asthma ADHD and whatever they got to do illegal immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as young children and this is all because the DoD is trying to make an excuse. They're saying it's a tight job market. They're blaming the lockdowns, which Democrats imposed, by the way, but the truth of the matter is it's messaging and no one wants to serve under this particular president. That's the truth. So we are building an army, God forgive me of metrosexuals and this needs to stop the CRT, the DEI, the SEL training of our troops. I know there's some good ones in there. I know there's plenty of good ones, but I'm telling you the left is doing a number on our military and is absolutely a shame. It's a shame of what's happening to our military.

Asthma Adhd Army DOD U.S.
"adhd" Discussed on The Manic Pixie Weirdo

The Manic Pixie Weirdo

03:03 min | 4 months ago

"adhd" Discussed on The Manic Pixie Weirdo

"It's kind of fun though to like learn about it. A little bit. I like that part. I don't really mind that part. The learning part. Yeah, that part doesn't bother me very much. And I know I can do it. I'll figure it out. I don't know. We'll figure it out together. It'll be fine. What else? Am I afraid of what this? I feel like this whole episode is like, it's fine, because the episode is about ADHD. So maybe give you a little bit of a peek behind the curtain there. Sorry, my voice is all gross now because I started crying. Goodness. See, and that's what I mean kind of like by emotional regulation. I wasn't able to. Like do that before. If that makes sense, like I wasn't really able to, I wasn't able to do that before. And I think that's good that I'm figuring that part out. Difficult to learn how to do. Especially when you feel things like the way that I do. Not that it's like special or anything because I do think that everybody feels things in varying degrees. And so, you know. Like for some people, it seems like even for myself, it seems a little bit ridiculous that I started crying there in earlier and that's okay because it was kind of ridiculous. And just what I mean by that is that it's not that bad. I will figure it out. I'm not doing this by myself. It's going to be hard. Yeah, it's going to be difficult and I'm going to have to be teachable, which I've never been very good at as being teachable. I have to teach myself. That's why I have to teach myself is because I've never been very good at just being teachable. I'm working on it. We're figuring that part out too. See, all these things I got to figure out. And that's why it's like, oh, now the list is just like so much longer. Just add that one more thing to the list. And it's. Yeah, it's just a whole situation..

ADHD
"adhd" Discussed on The Manic Pixie Weirdo

The Manic Pixie Weirdo

05:50 min | 4 months ago

"adhd" Discussed on The Manic Pixie Weirdo

"Because that's the part where it's like I don't even know where to begin. I don't really know where to start. With my diagnosis, other than just reading materials and articles and scientific papers and those kinds of things. It's just. With the ADHD. I tend to latch on to one idea and then I get, but then so once I latch onto this one idea, I want to understand everything about that one idea. Unfortunately, that one idea generally is comprised of a bunch of other ideas that are older and that means that I have to do more research, which means I get very distracted by that other research, and then I have to go back and forth and back and forth. Yeah, it's a whole thing. But we're learning. We're figuring it out. We're getting there. It's a, like I said. It's a slow process for me. It's. You know. I. Thought that I would feel lonely. Which is weird. I don't know why I thought that. I think that a lot of that stems from.

ADHD
Michael Phelps Weighs in on Trans Athletes

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:01 min | 8 months ago

Michael Phelps Weighs in on Trans Athletes

"So now Phelps is retired, he knows it's a very complicated situation. I'm just confused about the X transgender girlfriend. I had no idea. And what does that make Michael Phelps? Does that make him gay? Is that I'm just confused all of it is confusing to me. I need help. But he said something very simply sports should be played on an even playing field. So Chandler, his ex, was born intersex, which means she had male genitalia, no testicles, and a uterus, but no ovaries. That's. I don't know what to say. It's a very complicated situation there. But she doesn't like, Phelps. Her exes opinion. She said he doesn't understand the science fully. The advantages of disadvantages, he's a hypocrite for saying it should be a level playing field. And then she went on to say, why is she thinks he's a hypocrite? Because he's genetically superior, because he has a 6 foot 7 inch wingspan. Double jointed ankles and huge feet. She says, his chemical composition allows him to breathe in and fill his lungs and hold his breath longer than his competitors. So far, I don't see anything wrong with that. That's the way he was born. Then she said, he also experienced a chemical advantages of having ADHD attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, which comes with added strength and endurance. I don't particularly believe that. I really don't. And again, it has nothing to do with gender. Because females from us can have ADHD too. And when he was interviewed, Phelps compared competing as a trans athlete to those who dope to improve that from performances. And she said, even he said he never competed on a level playing field, inferring doping. And they still could not beat

Phelps Michael Phelps Chandler Adhd Attention Deficit Hyperac Adhd
Trees Could Be a Mental, Physical and Climate Change Antidote

Environment: NPR

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Trees Could Be a Mental, Physical and Climate Change Antidote

"Is well known. The trees help counter climate change by soaking up carbon dioxide. Now there is a growing body of research to point to many ways of dose of trees can improve our mental and physical health. Here's martha bebinger member station. W. b. you are on how and why the tiny sapling robin williams planted thirty years ago towers above her boston home. I raise this tree when i raised my children and look at this look at that. She says there's something about being near this tree. It makes everybody a little bit happy around here when you're looking for strength you can't do better than looking at a tree and there's evidence williams may will be gleaning any number of direct or associated health benefits a longer life. Bitter birth outcomes lower stress levels lower risk of heart disease. Dr howard lumpkin. Is it the university of washington school of public health. Lower risk of diabetes reduced symptoms of adhd proximity to trees is associated with a ridiculously broad range of health benefits. I wish we had pills. That were this good for health. A few countries notably japan and south korea have invested in a practice known as forest bathing which is spending time among trees as a preventive health measure but prescribing time in nature is still pretty far outside mainstream medicine in the. Us from can says that. Maybe because there's a lot we don't know what doses needed. Do you need to walk. Among trees is sufficient just to look at the trees from outside your window. Do you need big trees or do small trees do the trick we you know. We're not able to tease the forest from the trees. Peter james at harvard medical school aims to answer a lot of those questions. He's merging health data captured by phones. Real time surveys about wellbeing and mood and street. View mapping data to dig into. What's exactly within view. Is it trees. Is it flowers and how those things are related to help behaviors and health outcomes.

Martha Bebinger W. B Dr Howard Lumpkin University Of Washington Schoo Robin Williams Boston Heart Disease Williams Adhd South Korea Diabetes Japan Peter James Harvard Medical School United States
A Kid’s Dream Come True — Video Games as Medicine!

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

01:29 min | 1 year ago

A Kid’s Dream Come True — Video Games as Medicine!

"The age old. Mantra of parents won't let their kids have a gaming console too. Many video games hurts your brain but last summer. The fda approved the first ever prescription video game. It's endeavor rx and it's meant to help treat. Adhd in kids aged eight to twelve. It's not a standalone. It'll be prescribed along with other more traditional medication. Without insurance it costs about one hundred dollars a month a year later developers are just starting to reach out to doctors and potential patients. We spoke with ian bogus. He directs the film and media studies program at washington university in saint. Louis we asked him. What's a medicinal game. Even like it's kinda like any video game you've got a little character writing vehicle and you piloted through obstacles in order to reach a goal. That's interesting so it doesn't feel like you're taking your medicine. Yeah and you know. That's part of the appeal of games for any purpose for education or for politics or for for training. Or what have you is. Maybe you won't notice that you're doing this thing you don't want to do if it's in video game form but the creators of endeavor rx claim to have made technologies that are measuring and adapting to the player. Who would be an adhd patient who had been prescribed the game that according to them make alterations kind of customizing the experience to optimize the attention treatment

Ian Bogus Washington University In Saint FDA Louis
Herbal Support for ADD and ADHD

The Plant Path

02:15 min | 1 year ago

Herbal Support for ADD and ADHD

"Question number three comes from l. ing is asking about wondering if you can offer plant remedies and holistic practices for folks dealing with. Add gupta comes to mind and of course a mindfulness practice but i love to hear take on undressing this condition. Yeah great great question there yelling so it's interesting and i'm not sure if you ask that but i actually did a materia medica monthly webinar the other day and someone was asking about book copa for adhd in children and so i will kind of go off of that a little bit here. Yeah you know. it's i mean just maybe get on a soapbox a little bit. I think it's really unfortunate. That doctors are so quick to say that a child has a disease because they have a hard time paying attention in our very linear reduction aesthetic boxed in educational system that basically only works for certain certain learning types rate certain people that we learn well in standard school environment. But i think it's important to understand that different people learn in different ways right. Some people were very hands on tactile. Some people were more visual learners. Some people are more auditory learners. So it's it's unfortunate because basically create this box and say this is how you need to learn. This is what you need to learn. And if you don't fit in that box then you have a disease and we're going to put you on ritalin. You know and i've had family members and friends that were put on ritalin from a really young age and we're on it for a really long time and it really kind of messed them up you know and it took them a long time to overcome some of the problems that it created for them both physically and psychologically and emotionally as well so i think the more that we can a prevent kids from happening to get on those drugs the better because they really in the long run create a lot more problems than they do solve any problems

Gupta ING
How To Prevent Troubled Teen Years With Aaron Huey

Mindful Mama - Parenting with Mindfulness

02:03 min | 1 year ago

How To Prevent Troubled Teen Years With Aaron Huey

"My entire process my entire work. Now that i have this wonderful facility this amazing staff and this podcast to help educate parents who are dealing with teens at struggle as to now prevent someone ever needing to listen to my podcast or call my facility and so the the absolute number one is self care it is the absolute number one preventative measure because eight is teaching your child okay. Let's set aside all the personal benefits of self care being your priority that you feel better than that you have self concept that is that is based that is increasing self esteem and self worth right. They your concept of self is that you love it and you're gonna take care of it. The benefits of that you just being healthy and having long life and dealing with illness and sickness and emotional in such a way that reflects what someone who takes care of themselves but then the second thing is to then tend to your adult relationships you see. We have to put children third. If i don't have a support team erin hold on. you said. Put aside the idea that of all the benefits to yourself. What are the benefits to our kids. So that they're watching you prioritize health and that's the modeling that they're going to grow up with is that my health is a priority myself. Care is a priority. And then i will thank you for bringing me back to that. It would have. Adhd right past. But but i'm watching my daughter. Go through a struggle in her life. That is something that daddy can't go. She's twenty five. She's about to turn twenty six. I can't come in for the swoop. This is not for the rescue now. And i watch both my daughter. Who's twenty five my son. Who's twenty four. When life gets tough they immediately go to movement. My son is like i gotta go skateboarding. My daughter says. I gotta hit the gym. And i'm going to go to therapy and might like that's what my wife and i modeled

Erin
The Bright Side of the Serotonin Gene

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

02:45 min | 1 year ago

The Bright Side of the Serotonin Gene

"Why do some people get depressed under stress but not others. Many people have taken a stab at this question. But in two thousand and three psychologists abshalom caspi came upon a particularly eloquent answer. He and a team of researchers have been following a cohort of babies born in dunedin new zealand around nineteen seventy two. You may know it. As the dunedin multidisciplinary health and development study the one thousand and thirty seven children that took part in it have given us around three hundred papers on everything from heart disease to adhd but mainly. The study has focused on how the environment shapes a child's physical and mental health for years to come by the time of two thousand and three the human genome had just been mapped and talked to cassie was able to test. How a certain gene interacted with the environment to shape the development of depression that jane was the serotonin transporter gene also known as five. Hdtv slc success. Four or the cert. Gene we'll call it cert- in this podcast. The gene codes for the serotonin transporter which is a name. Implies helps transport serotonin back into the neuron. In the brain the gene comes in two major illegals a forms the short arm or esa salil and the long arm or l. Lille technically there is a third a some people have one of each eleo one s and one l. After dr caspi study they search. Jane would go on to be known as the gene for depression. but that's not exactly what he found dada caspi began by making a simple graph with all the data. He had gathered from the new zealanders on the bottom x. Xi's was a number of major life. Stressors they had been between h twenty one and twenty six and on the top. Y axis was the number of depressive. They endorsed when they were last interviewed at age. Twenty six as expected as the number of life stresses went up so did the number of depressive symptoms and the chance of a depressed episode an chance of a suicide attempt. Nothing surprising there. But then he split the sample into those with the short arm. S s cert- elliott and those with an long arm. The result was striking for people who experience no major stressors in their early twenties. The two groups had this same level of depression but as the number of stressors went up the level of depression worse too but only in the short arm s group. The long arms were unmoving. The level of depression did not rise even after four stressors. And we're not talking about everyday stressors like losing your wallet. These were big ones like getting fired from a job. Death of apparent becoming homeless

Abshalom Caspi Dunedin Multidisciplinary Heal Depression Dr Caspi Dunedin Dada Caspi Cassie Adhd Heart Disease New Zealand Lille Depressive Symptoms Jane XI Elliott
Pro Climber, Kai Lightner, Recounts The Beginnings of His Climbing Journey

Hurdle

02:24 min | 1 year ago

Pro Climber, Kai Lightner, Recounts The Beginnings of His Climbing Journey

"So you get into climbing and you said you got into the gym and you can't imagine your life without having taken. That big step talked me about your first. Few years in the gym i mean. Did you know from the get go that this is going to be something that you couldn't get enough of will funny enough. The thing that really got me into climbing that first day was the man of the front desk. I call him that shane. Shane put me on the ropes. And you put me on every angle. The walls on every wall in the gym. And i was getting all the way up. We put me on the steepest angle in. It was purple taped climb. And i wanted to get his hot but it was just a little bit too hard for me but i was too stubborn to come down and so i grabbed onto these two holes in the wall and i just cried and i wouldn't come down because you can sit atop so shaped like a fifteen minutes later. I'm sitting on his wall and change just like you're gonna come down and i'm like no i'm not going to do it. And so i may one or two more was in fell and i came back every day. That weeks had the top of that wall so always has been like competitive by nature and so chainsaw that in me in the hospital. Join the local team from there. I just started doing competitions. It's pretty impressive for you. Because i remember like i feel like many people go to summer camp. You climb a rock wall or like just a tall wall and then you go onto zip line to come down and climbing up. The wall didn't scare me by. I remember when. I was like seven years old at summer. Camp that climbed with the wall. And god's tops the platform where i was supposed to zip line down and i sat on that platform for like i don't know maybe an hour until it got dark and was literally forced to get off of it to go down. I mean it's crazy when you find that thing you're passionate or kids we this loud joined things so much but for me. I do climbing with special. Because i had. Adhd growing up. My mother putting me in a million other sports like basketball football baseball soccer. Like all of them. And i wasn't bad at them but they just didn't hold my attention. I couldn't carry out a play. Because i mean i. We get distracted. I sit outside in baseball and does pick grass. You know it is. I couldn't pay attention but for some reason like when i was in the common gym on the walls the one time. My mother did not have to worry. About what i was doing where i was. Because i was just fixated on what was in front of

Shane Baseball Basketball Soccer Football
Here’s What You Need To Know About Screen Time for Toddlers

The Mom Room

01:22 min | 1 year ago

Here’s What You Need To Know About Screen Time for Toddlers

"That looks at tv. It's not about like a having to see at one. Time announce something happened the rain. It's not that they look at daily long hours. So i think those researched by dmitry chris taxes and what he saw was that between each of which are still the critical years. If there's two or more hours per day every day than there are higher. Chances of attentional difficulties. Not adhd but attentional difficulties. But that's when it's very consistent and they don't look at the in between so going back to really looking at the studies you know if a parent especially now during the pandemic and you're like oh crap. I've been watching two hours a day. Like what's going to happen to my kid. It's a correlation. it's not a direct link and it's never too late to try to find ways to change it which will talk about but also what's happening in between if in between these two three hours a day you are sitting with your child. You guys are playing. You're chatting you're developing social skills. You're going outside. Then you're balancing things out but if it's seven hours a day of tv and you haven't tried to with your child and it's time for bed while i would say you know maybe reevaluate how you're using it and cutting it up a little bit or so. There are ways in these studies. Don't look at that but we have to be mindful of the

Dmitry Chris
ADHD with Dani Donovan

Mental Illness Happy Hour

02:23 min | 1 year ago

ADHD with Dani Donovan

"When did adhd. I come on your radar. And i love that. We're talking about. Adhd and not combining adhd with add. Because i think a lot of times they get lumped together. And i think it's important to to talk about the differences in fact maybe we could. We could start there with some of the differences between. Add adhd add is actually a term that is no longer being used In the dsm or anything it's adhd with hyperactivity or without arm so adhd or add was formerly known as is now called adhd without hyperactivity which is a mouthful. But i didn't. I didn't use to say no that either 'cause i definitely have people in my life. Who had been diagnosed with. Add and so. It's just one of the many. Jose tidbits that i have been learning because this is like a process for me to of self-discovery 'cause i don't have. I love psych in high school in college but My training is a visual communication design. So i do really get to learn so much myself. And about your. adhd general. But i can that was like a little side tangent. But like i can talk about the differences between the two kind of types if that might be useful so our and then combined type which is what i have and so adhd with hyperactivity not just has hyperactivity which can look different. Depending on the person for boys it might be a little mar- you know obvious which is why guys tend to get diagnosed younger because they might be the kid running over the place and climbing on stuff at the rest to climb on constantly fidgeting sort of thing and girls get missed a lot who might even have hyperactive type like because we tend to be much more. Chatty we're like very chatty distracting other people with like wanting to talk constantly fidgeting with our hair and it's it's a little more subtle ways that you wouldn't necessarily think of hyperactivity

Jose Adhd
Fasting for High Performance With Dr. Isaac Jones

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

02:16 min | 1 year ago

Fasting for High Performance With Dr. Isaac Jones

"Jones fasting transformation summit so much david dr soccer's really appreciate it. Thanks for the kind words at the same way but you your family and what you're up to is amazing. The summit is going to change transformed. Sorry people's lives. Yeah thanks so much and so how did you get started in performance in general like what attracted you to that role. It's an interesting story. I grew up a really healthy kid. But my migrants what they did know and A certain foods and doing certain things taking certain medications that religious decrease my brain function energy. My vitality ended up getting diagnosed with adhd and dyslexia then was on adderall and agitated. You're my actually in all these different medications and being honest cocktail of medications on top of the job is dealing with brought me down the spiral of of of even more issues like athletes buying shoes in got problems waking up stabbing pain in my guts and it wasn't until my i discovered a doctor actually very similar to you. That helped me. Underline understand the underlying causes of what was going on in my body. And you know. I i know i would have gotten faster results if i would have implemented fasting to the things that i that i had. I learned back then but needless to say over time because this process of hewing always takes time time. I completely did a one eighty. I was in special needs before take tests because of the adhd and dyslexia being so severe and literally six months later. I couldn't have even been diagnosed with dyslexia or adhd. Because of what happened. My product went through the roots. I was getting straight as in classes. In fact it was. Thanks to you that i ended up applying for academic scholarship at ended up winning this academic scholarship.

Dyslexia Soccer Jones Adhd David
FDA OKs first new ADHD drug in over a decade for children

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

FDA OKs first new ADHD drug in over a decade for children

"The food and drug administration approved the first new drug in over a decade for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder Calgary is for children ages six to seventeen with eighty HD it comes in a capsule and is taken daily it is not a stimulant or controlled substance making it harder to abuse than older drugs nearly all ADHD treatments like Ritalin contain the stimulants amphetamine or methylphenidate Calvary does carry a warning of potential for suicidal thoughts and behavior it happened in fewer than one percent of volunteers in studies of the drug a study funded by the maker of Calvary shows inattention and hyperactivity symptoms were reduced by about fifty percent in children ages six to eleven who took the drug for six weeks at Donahue Washington

Food And Drug Administration Calgary Adhd Washington
What is ADHD?

Parenting Great Kids with Dr. Meg Meeker

01:53 min | 1 year ago

What is ADHD?

"Adhd is of course divided into two parts. There's the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder attention deficit in my experiences more frequent girls. Now i don't know if the literature supports that but i would imagine it. Was these the young girls who can't focus on their work. They can't concentrate. They're not necessarily hyperactive. Hyperactivity with attention issues on the other hand. I see more commonly in boys but adhd is a common neurobiological condition. And as i said it's characterized by developmentally inappropriate levels of being distracted being. Hyperactive being impulsive. It can occur at home at school in social settings and usually in all of the settings in kids have really pretty severe. Adhd i wanted to say right at the outset. One of the most brilliant adolescent and adult psychiatrist. That i know is dr sandra wetstein. He was on my podcast Earlier and he did a podcast on anxiety and kids. Which is fabulous. And you need to listen to it. But he's responsible for most of the information that i'm gonna talk about today in our adhd. So i wanted to give full credit to him. Because he's taught me so much over the years about kids and adolescent psychiatry. So adhd again. It's characterized by a developmentally inappropriate levels of all of these different things. Distractibility and impulsive hyperactivity. It's so forth. If you look at brain scans of children and adults with adhd you can actually see a difference between normal brain. Scans and adhd brain.

Adhd Dr Sandra Wetstein
Supporting pupils with ADHD in the blended learning environment with Ellis Seddon

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

09:54 min | 1 year ago

Supporting pupils with ADHD in the blended learning environment with Ellis Seddon

"Today i'm joined by ellison who's a student teacher on our secondary religious education program. Hi l. s. that thomas. Thanks for coming today. You've carried out a piece of literature based research for your lead partnership school who we can't name because of the terms of the ethic approval for the research project but this school and they gave you a topic to look into because of interest to them for their own kind of school development. So what was that topic that the school gave you said topic was an kind of split into three parts. They gave us a choice of either looking at vulnerable learners. And whatever that might be whether it's saw or more able and talented excetera ben. They said we could do a study on blended learning on how we teach in a blended learning environment or the third option was to combine those two together. So how do you help. Specific categories of vulnerable learners within a blended learning environment. And given the time that we're in to me that was the one of most interested. That's the one. I counted -able so vulnerable learners in the blended environment. And did you need to narrow that down tool anymore to make it manageable. Did you come from a subject tangled. Did you have to do anything with that topic. Once he picked option three from the hat yes exactly yeah so we had to narrow it much further because obviously vulnerable learners and such a white category and we a recommended that we could narrow that down to a a subject specific points of view a religious education point of view in my perspective in my work in my literature review after a loft inspiration. I actually didn't do that because going through the research i felt like it was applicable from what i knew to a wide range of topics so i didn't feel like bringing it down to a religious education spending was going to bring it was going to enhance it that much more but what i did do was never the butler winning side of things down to adhd specifically and. I did that in all honesty. Because i had an interest in learning more by. Adhd i'm really have a worked with many students with adhd. I didn't know too much about it. So i thought this was going to be a prime community within my sinement to try and understand. Adhd a little bit more given so pregnant and use it. Mapping it onto not blended learning environment saint tyne fascinating. Okay so you got your choice of adhd you justify your choice of looking beyond your subjects harry so then you were able to go out and search for literature and you had to pick six sources that will kind of help get a handle on that topic area so it might be a bit of a bit of a big question to ask but can you talk a street the six sources that you ended up with and so broad sense of what they were saying yes absolutely each so the one thing i should really mention i is that when i started this literature review trying to marry up trying to find resources which spoke about adhd within blended learning environment. There was next to nothing if not nothing at all and so it was a bit of panic. Could bit of a worry at the beginning. But i pushed through. I decided to do in. The end was focused on a selection of literature which focused on adhd specific late at some literature which focused on blended learning specifically. and then. i drew my own conclusions between those two. I'm using a variety of websites and sources as well to try in a match up in a meaningful way and i started by actually looking at the. Adhd you k charity website and there was a really interesting on on quite lamesa. Statistics on eighty nine percent of teachers teach or have taught students with adhd and yet sixty three percents of teachers feel that that training and of understanding adhd on supporting adhd students is a par inadequate So that was quite alarming statistics. So i started from that before. I took a deep dive into more literature. Adhd and blended learning specifically. That was loads of resources. When i looked at them separately. But i'll try and go through on now. My six down spitball. I'll just say best that. I looked into these articles mainly online because of the situation wherein they were mainly searches. Either through google laura our our learning platform at cardiff matt and i prioritized terms. Which article twits mentioned engagement mentioned. Adhd additional learning leads blended learning online learning hybrid learning excetera and the scope for narrowing down. Those obstacles was quite slim. Because as i said the amount of articles that looked at them together that what many of them so narrowing down was quite slim but i prioritized any which kinda did mention allen's on blended learning in one with was the best the easiest way to get more of a focus on my first article which i came across was by how graham relatively recent to the two thousand seventeen on it was titled learner engagement in a blended learning environment and it was a conceptual framework. And this what date. It had a huge skype through research. It had a thousand dollars. Coups chapters and other articles of engagement instruments have engagement. And what they really really. Interestingly came up with they spoke about the inconsistencies at the term engagement itself and then how that gets even more complicated when you transfer into online learning but they came up with indicators of engagements and that was what was really fascinating about this obstacle. We talk and teaching about. How can we. How can we facilitating gauge. How can we increase engagement. A little bit better argument was actually before we do any of that you need to know what the indicators aw. When do you know when your students are engaged. So that was what was really tickly interesting about this. And why recommended it to my league partnership school. They came up. With a whole framework within not they had six indicators of cognitive engagement and seven indicators emotional engagement which i thought were particular interests but within the cognitive engagement. One was based on attention. Which obviously i ate pricked my ears up because oh is robert. Because it was specific to eighty can be specific trade hd and what they aim to do is show you. What the indicates attention within within cognitive engagement by might look like and what you can do about it to understand it and enhance a little bit more now. Within this article on some of the things i thought were a little bit etched. Maybe for example under the intention indicator they said about how you might want to track rain whites or movement and it's not really sure that's going to be possibly the most affluent secondary schools around the country. But the undestanding is that you need to know when your students are engaged. Not indicated first before you can change your teaching style to enhance that facilitated and so it was my suggestion that maybe we could look at using. That's marks of teams with google cross. Rooms trying see when they are most engaged. See what the data. It's like really take a deep dive into that than students are engaged to take up over the second article most cattle again. It was a twenty seventeen obstacle a written. Interestingly was all about the motivations of adhd students so it was titled what motivates individuals they hd it was a qualitative analysis specifically for the adolescents. Point to the so what they did. They hypothesized that there are qualitative differences between motivation attitudes between students with adhd and their typically developing peers. And so they did this study which was largely in a more clinical environment. And that was one of my Concerns i suppose one of my hesitations about the article because they students were interviewed. Sorry the children were intimate in a psychology clinic. That was seven all those order. Which from a psychology background. So my argument was that if you brought in somebody from a different background to maybe the confidence in having no analysis response by us we may have a little bit more confident. That was different backgrounds. Connecticut election is still a valuable valuable. Be such an what they found was the rule. The motivation axe cheats. And this is interest. Day-today life it's not necessarily at school but additional attitudes between students with adhd and students non adhd rudely of very very similar. But there were two very distinct difference is which were really interesting. Adhd perspective the first one was the students with with adhd had a very specific aversion to the slow passing of time to time going slowly was just an absolute. No no for them. They just couldn't stand it on the second one was that students who didn't tough. Adhd also cased venue in having familiar and predictable tasks to toss it. They've done before they know how they works. They know what's expected of them. That value did not appear in students with

Excetera Ben Ellison Adhd Thomas Butler Harry Google Skype Matt Graham Allen Robert Connecticut
The Truth About Needle Fear with Amy Baxter, Founder & CEO at Pain Care Labs

Outcomes Rocket

04:41 min | 1 year ago

The Truth About Needle Fear with Amy Baxter, Founder & CEO at Pain Care Labs

"Hey everybody saw marquez's here and welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Today i have the privilege of hosting dr. Amy baxter once again. If you haven't heard our podcast interviews with her one of my favorite guests that we've had on the show episode four twenty six or. She talks about the work that she's doing with her company biber cooled. The product is phenomenal buzzy. Another one episode for twenty six and also at the soda. Five twenty where she goes deep on covid nineteen and some of the things that we should be thinking about just a ton of really good content. Check those out if you haven't already. But she founded paintcare labs in two thousand six to eliminate unnecessary pain. She invented fiber cool. Vibrational cryotherapy for tendonitis and to decrease opioid use and her buzzy device as blocked needle pain for over thirty five million procedures. This is key and what we're going to talk about today around. Kovic vaccination after yale and emory medical school trained in pediatrics. Child abuse and emergency pediatrics. Federally funded for needle. Pain and fear opioid use and neuro modulation research. She publishes and lectures on needles. A needle fear sedation and pain. Scientific contributions include hypnotic enzyme algorithm to time child abuse creating and validating the barf nausea scale for kids with cancer identifying the cause of the needle phobia increase amd buzzy and cool. She spoken on ted man. She's done ted talks bottom line. She's phenomenal and we're gonna talk about some really great things today around cove nineteen needle fear and a lot of her research that he's actually doing and has done and is helping our nation with day with The vaccination so amy welcome back thaw and i feel so. Adhd listening to that list. Well you got a lot on your plate you. You're certainly always keep things interesting. And i appreciate you for that and the listeners. Appreciate you for that so talk to us a little bit about what you've got going on a you know we. We sort of got reconnected. With this topic of neil fear. So why don't you introduce your work. There and the relevance today sarah sure will you know for anybody who's here before the story thus far was that i invented a device that used mechanical vibration to block needle pain got a grant for it found founded. It also decreased other pain. Kinda did some work with needle. Fear needle pain and founded. Americans really didn't care that much. So that's why did the ted talks. That's why did the techs is to raise awareness of the fact that the way we are vaccinated kids causes adults to stay afraid of needles. But because i've got this company in this product i moved on to vibrate wall opioid stuff and all of a sudden needle. Pain is relevant again. Yeah well it is and It's a big deal today because we've got to vaccines available as of now. We've got one more coming with jay and more and more people are getting the vaccine. Many are not and so talk to us a little bit about your research love to hear more about it and how it is impacting people's willingness to get vaccinated sure. Well the go thing is that. I've actually been asked to testify or the art celts. New and services on needle. Fear and needle pain. It had never been an issue before enter. Probably wouldn't have been an issue if the strains of covid nineteen stayed the way they were if the are not if that transmissibility number was at two or even two point five we only would of needed sixty percent of the population to be vaccinated with the v. One one seven with the south african variants all of a sudden. Now you're talking about needing seventy percent seventy five percent of the relation to vaccinated the issue with that is it. Twenty percent of people said they're not getting a vaccine anyway know-how and this means that you need to start working on those people that may get one that not get the second one said. That's where all the sudden it became important to really look at needle. Fear needle dread fainting anxiety. Pain all these issues that may be enough of barrier to someone that they're not gonna get that second vaccine then they're only fifty percent covered or for the people who are gonna freak out and don't get the first vaccine not because they think there's conspiracy or not because they're afraid of the immune system in their body being co opted by space aliens lasers but because they just can't bring themselves to stand gang that

Amy Baxter Paintcare Labs Kovic Yale And Emory Medical School TED Marquez Nausea AMY Neil Cancer Sarah JAY
How to Help and Support Your ADHD Child

Mama, Take Heart

03:56 min | 1 year ago

How to Help and Support Your ADHD Child

"Talk a little bit about the strategies talking about combined forces so some of the strategies parents can do at home draft so my first and foremost suggestion would be to learn as much as you can about. Adhd kind. Of like how you and i just be that sponge just read read read. I'm and i have some good sources for for parents so there is A magazine called attitude magazine. So it's add okay you've heard of out Add attitude magazine There's a website that is just attitude. Mag dot com. This is an excellent excellent source For very relatable articles for parents for adults For anybody with adhd are really recommend that And to be leery because there's a lot of information out there on adhd and a lot of it can be so. There are three people that i would recommend anything you see by these people you can trust. So why does doctor russ soul barkley. As second is dr ned halloween. L. and third is dr thomas brown. Those are three very well very well known names in. adhd community. Anything you see by them. You know you can trust so so first and foremost learn as much as you can about. Adhd the second is and some people are gonna balk at this but the second is to lower your expectations of your child and not to compare them to their peers. And let me tell you that. So hard to do. Even as an adhd coach. I would catch myself. How well gosh look at look at his friend. Why can't he do that. And i got you know i catch myself and i'd have to remind myself note. Nope you can't compare on so to understand that your child is going to be anywhere. From three to five years behind his peers in many of the executive functions as well as maturity both emotionally and mentally. So when you look at your child's age subtract three to five years and then that's what i mean by lower your expectations so take three to five years off in. That's what you should be expecting of your child Agree with that. Yes and also just so you all know. I will put all of this information of resources in the show notes. Part home but yes. I agree with the lawyer expectations. I remember cus. My daughter was high functioning on the honor. Roll and that sort of thing And then but when my son when he got on a roll we just flipped our leads. We just size our honor. What happened had one time and we were just so. We're like wow. This is an even with our daughter was like this is this is like gum. It wasn't like how a lot of other people like. Oh well yeah. This is what they do. We were just so excited because we're like. We know the effort that they had to put in to get there and so we were just like you know for us. it wasn't. We did not take that for granted. We were like really worked hard for this. We want them to know you. We know you work hard and this did not come easy so let me tell you you're blessed that you had kids with. Adhd at the honor roll. Because that isn't very common. Actually they are usually they usually functions a low their intelligence gig of the delay their executive functions.

Russ Soul Barkley Dr Ned Dr Thomas Brown Adhd
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"Can <Speech_Music_Male> go to the Chuck <Speech_Music_Male> Norris of <Speech_Music_Male> one is <Speech_Music_Male> what is the local the Chuck <Speech_Music_Male> Norris of legal <Speech_Music_Male> products. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Female> can go find. <Speech_Male> A good one. <Speech_Music_Male> On a website <Speech_Music_Male> somewhere <SpeakerChange> I. didn't just <Speech_Music_Female> make it out but it's <Speech_Female> Mine. <Speech_Female> But yes, <Speech_Female> you're <Speech_Female> right. It's on our about page. <Speech_Female> I think. Yeah. <SpeakerChange> That was <Speech_Music_Female> a long time ago that I wrote <Speech_Music_Male> that. <Speech_Music_Male> Where's the <Speech_Female> was? <Speech_Female> The contract <Speech_Female> everywhere it's our handles. <Speech_Female> It's our <Speech_Female> domain name. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> You know our email <Speech_Female> like whatever it <Speech_Female> is. If you <Speech_Female> just roughly <Speech_Female> throw that out into <Speech_Music_Male> the Google cereal, <SpeakerChange> find <Speech_Music_Male> us. <Speech_Music_Male> And if you're looking for <Speech_Music_Male> somebody who can hold <Speech_Music_Male> your hand through the process <Speech_Music_Male> of <Speech_Music_Male> a service into <Speech_Music_Male> a product or learning <Speech_Music_Male> how to think outside of <Speech_Music_Male> the box as <Speech_Music_Male> a lawyer or as <Speech_Music_Male> a service provider <Speech_Music_Male> Christina. <Speech_Music_Male> Be a great person for <Speech_Music_Male> that too and so we'll put <Speech_Music_Male> Lincoln. <Speech_Music_Male> To <SpeakerChange> the owners <Speech_Male> inner circle. <Speech_Female> Yeah. That's just my <Speech_Female> yeah. That's the <Speech_Female> owners and <Speech_Female> DOT COM or <Speech_Female> money. <Speech_Female> So. That's our new <Speech_Female> project that we've been working <Speech_Female> on. So that's exciting. <Speech_Music_Female> But yes, thank you so <Speech_Female> much for having me in <Speech_Female> everything you're doing <Speech_Female> here and sharing <Speech_Female> about. <SpeakerChange> Just <Speech_Male> bringing attention to all <Speech_Music_Male> of this while <Speech_Male> it's my pleasure and. <Speech_Male> Good luck <Speech_Music_Male> sorting out Georgia versus <Speech_Music_Male> Colorado. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I have a have <Speech_Music_Male> an inkling <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> the west <Speech_Music_Male> will the <SpeakerChange> West will have <Speech_Music_Male> one here before too <Speech_Music_Female> long? <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I think you <Speech_Male> might be right. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> All the <Speech_Music_Male> best to you in all <Speech_Music_Male> of your endeavors <Speech_Music_Male> and thank you so much <Speech_Music_Male> Christina. <Speech_Male> thinking, Marshall. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Isn't Christina Aguilera <Speech_Music_Male> amazing. <Speech_Male> This is a woman <Speech_Male> whose drive <Speech_Male> and Wanderlust <Speech_Male> and creativity <Speech_Music_Male> clarity <Speech_Music_Male> and entrepreneurship <Speech_Music_Male> have driven her to <Speech_Music_Male> amazing <Speech_Music_Male> places humbling <Speech_Male> places, places that <Speech_Male> get me. So excited <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> what I love <Speech_Music_Male> most about her stories <Speech_Music_Male> is <Speech_Music_Male> her vulnerability <Speech_Music_Male> I. Love How <Speech_Music_Male> she shared with all <Speech_Music_Male> of us the <Speech_Music_Male> many bumps <Speech_Music_Male> along her path <Speech_Music_Male> and the bumps that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> she seen in other people's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> path <Speech_Music_Male> sometimes to <Speech_Music_Male> a really <Speech_Music_Male> devastating effect <Speech_Music_Male> and <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> I I <Speech_Music_Male> love that she shares <Speech_Music_Male> that she's failed <Speech_Music_Male> repeatedly that <Speech_Music_Male> she struggled with <Speech_Music_Male> mental and physical <Speech_Male> health issues <Speech_Male> some related to Adhd <Silence> and some not. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> She like a lot <Speech_Music_Male> of us was diagnosed with <Speech_Music_Male> adhd later in <Speech_Music_Male> her life and <Speech_Music_Male> she shared a <Silence> story with <Speech_Music_Male> us and <Speech_Music_Male> she told us <Speech_Music_Male> her story <Speech_Music_Male> about the many challenges <Speech_Music_Male> that she <Speech_Music_Male> was facing <Silence> before she got diagnosed. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> And through those struggles, <Speech_Music_Male> there <Speech_Music_Male> was this underlying <Speech_Music_Male> pulse of creation <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> and growth <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Silence> <Advertisement> malleability. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It's also <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> conspicuous <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> if you <Silence> <Advertisement> are paying attention. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> ADHD <Speech_Music_Male> and drive us all <Speech_Music_Male> to amazing <Speech_Music_Male> places <Speech_Music_Male> I'm glad that <Speech_Male> you're on this journey with <Speech_Music_Male> me, and if <Speech_Music_Male> you'd like to talk to me about <Speech_Music_Male> one on one coaching <Speech_Music_Male> for your Adhd <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and its impact <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on your practice <Speech_Male> or your life, <Speech_Music_Male> please <Speech_Music_Male> email me at <Speech_Music_Male> Marshall <Speech_Music_Male> at jd HD. <Silence> Dot? com. <Speech_Music_Male> We heard <Speech_Music_Male> Christina scholar <Speech_Music_Male> a talk about how getting <Speech_Music_Male> her adhd <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> under control changed <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> everything <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for her. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Back gives me <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> so much <Silence> <Advertisement> hope.

Chuck Adhd Christina Aguilera Google Georgia Marshall. Colorado.
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"I'm wondering if you're alluding to my story about my best friend. So I had a my best friend in law school died at twenty, seven, thirty one now. So we were he was a year older than I was anyway he died of an opioid overdose. It was published in all the papers in a witchery Salinas Sleep while nobody that's twenty seven I mean unless they have undiagnosed cardiac condition may be but. But yeah, I later found out it was an opioid addiction that he was hiding. Like he was just straight up hiding from moves people and not well. Were there. But I didn't know what the signs were. So he was getting a lot of staff sections which is not normal for a twenty seven year old. He was losing a ton of weight with told me. He was working out more. He seemed incredibly happy like happier than I ever known him to be. I had lunch with a month before he passed away and so. I just think that the OPIOID epidemic that we see in like quote unquote middle or rural America is heading lawyers to I'm this is actually I. Am I the girl who does my hair at her best friend was a lawyer same thing happened to her best friend when she was thirty seven she was a I can't remember convoy she was, but she overdosed as well. So I mean obviously, this is anecdotal but I just really encourage any of you. That thinks you have a friend that has substance abuse issues or any kind of opioid addiction My friend really liked to party and have A. Good time and I probably should have seen that as lake more than just normal law school partying and in hindsight it definitely was. So there was a there were a lot of warning signs but it's just really sad that I think he felt like he couldn't talk to people about it because it was like the up and coming lawyer in his unity and you know just really active really engage like not the picture of someone that you would think that would overdose on opioids twenty seven years old. So it happens You know this is someone who came from a very privileged middle to upper class background. Just, had everything in the world going for him like had nothing coming career had been featured as like a local artists like a musical artist just was going on tour with van a little bit her fun So just like a lot of. That were going for him and it just it can happen to anybody. So I just WANNA encourage anybody that. Might have some of these things that they're seeing their friends are losing weight they're. Getting Weird. STAPH infections or weird medical conditions for their age. That's the kind of stuff that you just have to pay attention to because he's very subtle signs that could help save their life hopefully. But yeah, I I definitely. Don't think there's enough done for lawyers and I think they just kind of sweep it under the rug and say like Oh lawyers. Are Prone to depression and suicide initially accepted thing but like I don't know why that so acceptable. I think that's right I and I really appreciate that and I appreciate that vulnerability lawyers with Adhd are ten times more likely to have substance abuse issues we are astronaut. More likely to have anxiety and depression alcoholism We have a whole cohort of stuff that if left unmanaged is really really difficult and potentially deadly and the worst part about it is that it isn't. It doesn't have to be that way. You know we are a community of lawyers shore but you know we are also a community of people and taking care of each other and building community and being open and honest with each other and being vulnerable to each other and trying to end some stigma around Adhd or anxiety, or depression, or substance abuse or alcoholism. Is. Part of the process of healing profession, and so I wanNA thank you for what you have done to make our profession more beautiful and creative and compassionate and I. WanNA encourage everybody that's listening to to do the same take care of each other and to get help you've gotta get your Oxygen Mask on before you can help help everybody else. Yeah for sure. I tell everybody that everybody should be in therapy. At the risk of sounding like I'm a crazy person in therapy I. I just don't care I just tell everybody should go to therapy just try it if you don't like it, you don't like that and if you don't like that Trek Coaching coaching.

depression Adhd STAPH America
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"Had observed in you that she'd been watching that sounded to her like Adhd, drinking coffee, of course, but we all do that. Yeah. Okay. So here is the biggest thing that I think tipped her off is I I was telling her like how hard it is for me to go grocery. And actually enjoy grocery shopping So I will go to the grocery store and I will race around to the point where like sometimes I'd knock into people's cards and like. I just had like this thing Zayed's that I was GonNa Forget something and I'm like, why do I care so much like it's just it's just groceries like you forget something go back where I'm at in Colorado I don't have like you can't order it online or anything it's very rural. So. Those out of the question. So anyway, that was a big tip tip-offs her because I have this anxiety about collecting everything that I need for the rosary trip to the point where it's affecting me and like my interactions with other people where she thinks if I just had like a neuro typical brain, you just the grocery store you have your lists you're not anxious about something you're in a forget from the list that's right in front of you. You tend to remember like where things are in your store whereas I'm going all over the store like back and forth back and forth and so that was like one of the things that she noticed in my daily life that was kind of the boss that I was like. trying to think of other things that she noticed. There were a lot of things that like as far as the overwhelmed goes that had to do with adhd basically. I was stuck in this cycle of feeling overwhelmed. So I wouldn't do anything and then because I didn't do anything I felt were overwhelmed and I felt more behind. So, that I would do less and then I would you know it just was horrible cycle that kept continuing? My sales were starting to plummet Obviously, my anxiety was through the roof like everything was not going well, and when it started to affect like my daily functioning my life, my business that's when she was like this is really serious like we do need to do something about it so. That tipped her off and I think it was just a lot of stories that I had told her along the way. About. Things that I did or didn't do in law school So.

Adhd Zayed Colorado
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"Two weeks in a row. Are you serious? Hey, thank you for being here I'm glad to be here. We're at two weeks in a row. It's awesome and a couple of things are really standing out to me. First of all, it's that some habits that I have really been laser focused on a really starting to pay off It has been a really. Important part of my life to focus on riding my bike every single day for at least thirty minutes a day. To Meditate And to it at least seven and a half hours of sleep at night now there are some other ones in there and the first who I've done really really well on and it's been really important and it feels really great and so I think that's part of why back and part of why I'm energized per why things feel Lake I've got new energy but I'll tell you there I have clients that are sharing their struggles with me. They have struggles that we all expect billing and timekeeping and processing their email. I have clients with real struggles in project planning and project management and priority management studying for law students I even have a client who's real catalyst for an amazing day is making sure that she takes a shower in the morning, and so we've been working on habits to ensure that it's really easy for her to remember to take a shower in the morning. adhd. Does come with some of these things that make a struggle, but it also comes with amazing superpowers. It comes with creativity and grit and Energy and entrepreneurship, and today's guest show is every single. One of those things She's content marketing guru. She's possibly the world's first equity photography contract Ninja which seems like couldn't be thing but. Listen up it's the thing. She's the host of the now shuttered world-famous podcasts elite diagnosed adhd woman lawyer with Adhd and Wanderlust, and a record of being a many time Internet entrepreneur. She all around kind thoughtful and insightful and generous gas. We had a great conversation both before I hit record and after and this episode I'm really proud of it and it's chock full of stories and tips about adhd their tips on marketing content creation and the unending drive to create beautiful things. I am Marshall Icky. She is Christina Scalia, and this is J. D. HD a podcast for lawyers with adhd. Listen Up. So Christina's GALERA. How are you?.

adhd marketing guru Christina Scalia Marshall Icky
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"The first go. There's an even worse outcome right? There's one outcome which is that just didn't feel right or fell crows uncomfortable I don't. WanNa. Go back. My experience and the experience of many people like me. This is particularly true for lawyers particularly true for people who have high Q. and door tends to be big within the legal industry they might go into of therapist or. or a traitor diagnosis or diagnosed her and say you know here's my background. Here's my social background in this was my experience I sat down with a psychologist she was I was referred to her she claimed have expertise in Adhd I had been trump suffering from anxiety I went into Roberta's office and she sat down, we did my social history and she said hold on let me get this right you graduate from college. Yeah. You went to law school. Yeah. You graduate from law school. Yeah. You took the bar. Exam. Did you pass the bars. Mya Did you practice as a lawyer? Yeah? You don't have adhd and then she kinda hold her nose as we did a little bit more work and inevitably, of course, what came back was a diagnosis of anxiety. But I've been treating for anxiety I had medication for anxiety and it wasn't doing a thing not one thing. and. That set me back a good half year and it wasn't until my son was diagnosed later that his doctor looked at me and my eye and said, one of the biggest challenges we have with treating young boys who have adhd is that a lot of times it's the blind leading the blind. We know it's highly heredity hereditary and that one parent probably has some of this and that if you're she has an undiagnosed, they're gonNA have a very hard time being useful to honor daughter who has adhd and he was looking me looking at me and said. Does. Does any of this resonate for anybody in your family and then looked at my wife and said I know you don't have adhd so. She was an active disincentivize her for me. It was not just a benign. This didn't feel it was an actively destructive experience in my journey and I remember walking out of their thinking well, my anxiety treatment isn't working and I don't have. adhd I am out of choices I don't know what?.

Adhd WanNa Roberta Mya
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

09:55 min | 2 years ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"And I'm proud of her team then proud of her company for doing things the way that do. I'll be meanwhile also love Mike whalen and we're GONNA talk to well. Mike I gotTa Tell You. Thanks for for coming on. Jd HD welcome. I am happy to be here and hang out with you. I am in my closet studio with blankets hanging over me. 'cause that's what professional podcasters. Do you sound amazing as usual. And what's funny to me? Is We've done this before. But frankly I know you best as prolific member of the twitter audie and so I feel like I know you in Short Biffi. Lovely sound bites rather than long-form interviews stuff. So I'm really excited to dive in with you. I'm on twitter a lot because I cannot afford a therapist so I just put it in there. I don't have to go pay for somebody. I'm sorry world okay. I'm just working through some stuff but happy to do it out loud with you guys on twitter. I love it. It's amazing well me. Twitter is a good segue to impulse control. Which is maybe a good segue into. Adhd in what? I Call J. D. H. D.'s. My understanding is that you are one. You're you're ADHD. I wasn't diagnosed during law school. Which is a whole story but yes so. I'm fascinated by that. We're going to get to law school in a second but I what did it feel? Like growing up with undiagnosed eighty. It felt like I got in trouble. Allot my my mom. We were at a family reunion recently. And my mom was telling my wife about my. It was my third grade teacher just called my mom in one day and said Your Son. Will Not stop talking. She was really about it like this was no matter what was going on in the classroom. I had a joke. I had a comment in and it's interesting because the joking became kind of coping mechanism and as I grew up. I didn't really realize that right. I just thought it was hilarious. And of course being hilarious comes with the negativity right. It's it's the feeling that you're supposed to be funny all the time and so you know half the time I was saying something funny and I took that praise and half the time I was saying something totally offensive in stupid and and I really internalize that negatively. So you know growing up. I had this feeling that was constantly with me that I could not achieve. I remember talking to one of my friends who I stayed in touch with on facebook. Who was one of my high school friends and I made a joke about the fact that I I hung around with all these overachievers and felt really out of place and he said to me Mike. You were one of the most over achieving people in our group. You just didn't play the part and thinking about you know the stuff that I accomplished in high school but all the negativity that came with it because I felt like I couldn't be on all the time I was constantly judging one of the most constant companions that I've found of my adhd especially when it was undiagnosed was this feeling of just not being qualified right. Just the shame of feeling like I was not an overachiever that I could not achieve. And that was probably the largest negative association. I had with a growing up. We hear a lot of people talk about imposter syndrome. And what I hear from you and certainly my experience to is. This isn't just imposter syndrome. This impostor syndrome like. Did you ever watch despicable meeting where they shot up with the stuff and they turn purple and into monsters this impostor syndrome with the Purple Monster? Despicable me thing where you're just like the Sheen it's not just maybe I don't belong here it's like I don't belong here and everything that I've done leading up to this moment is shameful if I just would have done something differently. Maybe I would belong here but I don't write and I've written a lot about shame as a concept and written about it in sort of a different context thinking about what somebody wants when they're getting divorced for example we've talked a lot in law about what they actually want is just unfinished processed. But in fact most of the time what I found is that someone wants to publicly shame. The other someone. There's some emotional. Need that I think is deeper than a process. And the reason is that anthropologically. We've always used shame. Shame as one of the major trainers of the next generation. And how they're supposed to behave how they fit in what? The expectations and roles are that are assigned to different people so shame as a social mechanism that were really hard wired with and you and I assume growing up that shameless purposely put on us right because the behavior that is most destructive in a school environment is standing out. It's not standing in line. It's making noise when you're not supposed to. And so the shame that became associated with standing out in any way was so heavy that it became just part of my identity. Like you said it was it was doped up imposter syndrome. It was a whole system was created to make me feel that shame and I was happy to comply so when I get back to that but before we do. Tell me about your diagnosis story. How did you come to a point where you went out and did the things necessary to get diagnosed with Adhd? So I went to law school when I was thirty and I had four kids in tow at the time and would not recommend that anyone but reflected my inability to commit to a track. I had you know after I I went on my mission to for two years An LBS mission. In Italy. I came back I went to. I worked in a trucking company. I worked at in management right. I was doing logistics in dispatching. Different things and then I moved over to Undergrad and I went out there thinking I was going to go to dental school and then I found out that you have to touch people and there were needles involved. There was no cool so I switched to Middle East Studies. Obviously because that's an obvious pivot from pre dental. Obviously and then my wife was really concerned. I had been accepted to a PhD program. My wife was really concerned that I wanted to be in school for the rest of my life. Sure School has this very cool thing that every semester you get to play in a totally different area right you get to set up your classes and it can be something totally different and the fact that I went from dental to Middle East studies to linguistics to history. Not only can change your class setup. You can change your major so for brain like mine to be able to just bounce around on subjects and play and and then hyper focus and then hyperfocused and you know when I did it. I was pretty damn good at each thing. Which sucks right. That's a terrible that so far being really pretty good at a lot of things and not great at something is a really hard state to be so my wife is like. I don't want you to go to school for the rest of forever we left. I didn't do the PhD program. And eventually I convinced her. We should go to law school. It is the best financial bet. So this is GONNA BE. What two thousand six or something? I went into law school in September of Eight and it was October when the banks collapsed. So we were literally the last people that didn't know and when I went to law school something that was new was I wasn't a genius anymore right dump liability to screw around and pull it off at the end. I'm now just normal right in law school I was just I went to Texas and Texas is an interesting school. It's not a yeller harb bracket but it's like in the twelve to fifteen whatever range and so you know their trust fund babies right there kids who've been successful their whole lives. They're studying for fourteen hours a day this stuff and we're on a curve and I'm freaking out right. I can't keep up. I've got a wife and kids at home. They've got demands and so I went and sought a diagnosis. And I gotTa tell you. It was disturbingly easy to get that diagnosis interesting. My experience with getting diagnosed was different but the lead up to the the sort of awareness of your intellectual. Frailty maybe or you know all of a sudden being level set when you come into a group of people who maybe have some intellectual ability but also have a long standing work ethic and ability to dive deep into all kinds of subjects regardless of whether there's a trigger to force them to do it I mean one of my experiences with my. Adhd is. I can do just about anything as long as I have. The equivalent of a death threat. If you don't do this something horrible is going to happen. I'm like Oh great I can knock that out. I'm knocking on all night long or do nights in a row if we need to. And so that's consistent with my experience too but tell me even in law school when you were getting diagnosed you were still doing the things that I associate with the superpowers of Adhd so you were entrepreneurial even back then you started the future small and Solo firm Attorney Group building community and things like that. You were also relational and meeting lawyers in out of the practice areas. That you were goofing around with. Tell me one thing that I'm really interested in. I want to transition into a little bit is you are the quintessential builder of communities. And you have some history with it but I think primarily you do it through vulnerability and so I want to bridge from your experience at Texas and that entrepreneurialism and building a future small and solo firm group and I want you to tell me about how that vulnerability and building a community I showed itself and in particular I.

Adhd twitter Mike whalen Texas Mike I Middle East Studies Short Biffi facebook Call J. D. H. D. Mike Italy Solo firm Attorney Group
"adhd" Discussed on Scattered, Focused, Done ��Reimagining Productivity with ADHD

Scattered, Focused, Done ��Reimagining Productivity with ADHD

06:58 min | 2 years ago

"adhd" Discussed on Scattered, Focused, Done ��Reimagining Productivity with ADHD

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"When they stop working and if it doesn't feel like I have any end point who does it feel like I can shut things off then now. Technology is a as a deficit. There are two things there that I love one of them being proactive about shutting off technology algae are using it only when appropriate the other one that I love. Is this idea of building margin using tools and technology to give yourself space to not use technology or I do not work or to not do that thing and one thing that in my experience with Adhd and a lot of folks. That I've talked to their experience is just this. Life of hyper hyper inflammation. It is like your body is under siege. Because you're always reacting to something everything is an emergency everything needs to get done because because you've procrastinated or failed to start or you go home at night and you can't relax because you have an enormous amount of things going through all the stuff that you forgot to do or failed to do or should good starter might do or whatever and you literally never have a moment to breathe and using technology effectively in some of these other tactics can just start to to build a little bit of breathing room. So I'm talking about a couple of things that you've mentioned elsewhere and I'll I'll I'll just kind of kind of list through them You've talked about practicing meditation tation in mindfulness as as a powerful tool decluttering your space setting setting boundaries to maintain organization controlling your counter. Saying no I love the the idea of saying no like everyday try and say it every day at least a couple of times because you know as an attorney as a law student there are always going to be people who Ask You for things that you could provide if you said yes and bright being mindful about what you say no to. And why is I think really powerful there are some of those other Blocking and tackling and just taking care of our bodies things that can have profound impacts on. ADHD like sleep exercise diet nutrition. I know you've mentioned those in the book and I know you've also mentioned the book transforming Adhd and that's a resource that you rely on and recommended people. I do highly recommend that book. That's great practical suggestions and as well as if you want to deep dive into research. They've got the research in there too And it's one of those books where you don't have to read cover to cover can pick it up and.

Adhd attorney
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"Catch up to the point where you left off in your work and not to mention other distractions were if my email again McKell. Maybe I'm going to read wait another email or or shoot off another email. Somebody else who. I didn't intend to do that right now. And so. That's a huge distraction of time shutting your email off scheduling in time in your calendar to check email throughout the day but not feeling like you have to have it up. All the time is again. That's just a constant distract. I love that one doctor. Dr moved to a schedule where I check my email twice a day during the work day and it. It made a huge difference in the other time blocking that I do now is phone calls. So he's a an automatic scheduling tool called the acuity and there there are many like it but using my my scheduling tool. I literally tell people. Listen here era. The Times I have available to have phone calls book in. Tell me what the topic is. And then we will sit and talk about it if I can respond to it by email beforehand and solve your problem great and if not by the time we get on the phone it's going to be very efficient in a block block of time that I have set out for that purpose. It won't be pulling me from other work that I'm trying to do. Deep work focused work etc creative work. It is literally sort of the blocking and tackling alling of just you know maintaining relationships and doing business work but in a way that is done on. You know with my priorities in mind and I can tell you emailing back and forth is so so far down my list of priorities that I I care not to mention it and old me spent a massive amount of time emailing ailing every day and taking emergency phone calls and doing doing things like ADHD easier. It's hard enough in the interest of time. I WANNA I wanNA have you found through a couple more and I'm Gonna I'm just GonNa you a couple of them. One of them is Kind of related needed to this using your calendar and blocking time It's the conflicting advice of US technology. But don't use -nology right Because for us that's a rabbit hole that can destroy everything and also there's useful technology that we can use to build that that scaffolding.

ADHD US
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"A monthly support group for Lawyers Boston's ADHD. And one of the most common comments. That I get in that group is. It's so good to talk talked to other people openly about this coming from the deep and weird and ADHD Marceau lick the neo cortex six this podcast for Boyer's with Adhd where we talk about finally getting stuff done we help you optimize Zuma practice your business your life and your we hyper focus on it. No tips and tricks every other they know they have it or not in the one. I am a lawyer and end up. Got ADHD and. I am so excited that you're here if you're new here Hello and welcome. I'm really excited to have you. Please don't be intimidated. I we're just getting started with this thing and so we We aren't deep in the weeds. We're still talking about a lot of stuff that is really applicable of people who have just discovered their ADHD St or who are curious about it so stick around and usually we talk a lot about paid hd and lawyers here but there are exceptions to everything and so despite being being negative one degree Fahrenheit outside in Minneapolis right now. Spring is in the air pitchers and catchers report. UNLV spring training and just a couple of days and my beloved Minnesota twins had made Nissen ear. Lash also this rated by the New York Yankees in the playoffs as usual and when I recorded this episode with my amazing guests from Boston we spent a little time talking about the stupid Yankees. The Red Sox twins and a mutual affection we talked about it a lot more than that it though and you know in his wisdom Mike guests took the time to talk about the emotional side of adhd and how our self perception plays a role in how we experience it notably. I started with a brand new therapist last week and I am excited that she's going to help me with my own. ADHD fueled emotional regulation which my wife Katie calls the Itty Bitty shitty committee my.

ADHD New York Yankees Red Sox Boyer Lash UNLV Katie Zuma Minneapolis Boston Minnesota Nissen Mike
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"Can help you. They probably can help you better than again so making sure that they feel comfortable and equipped to do that takes that takes place so we try to take Sort of unrelentingly positive approach to Adhd. And you believe that it's a superpower are and their strengths to be derived from it and I will stay true to that however I will also share that you have on occasion made me laugh out loud out with a text message or an email. Finish this sentence if you would so. I'm sitting outside the dentist's Office on the crew and I'm too embarrassed to go wait inside because I locked my keys in the car and I'm waiting for the locksmith and others. I mean that is you are all of us and there are parts of this condition that I think really are super powerful Our empathy our enthusiasm our creativity. Our for Entrepreneurialism our ability to handle stress in stressful situations You know I think all of those things are great great and sometimes you're embarrassed to go back into the waiting room where it would be more comfortable to wait after you yourself. Out of your car again I also love I love the idea of the ADHD tax which had kind of heard before. But now I'm literally. I actually literally created a document on which I am keeping track of the Adhd balance-sheet. So sometimes I write down. This was a net positive. This was a net negative. And I'm just trying to see if my adhd tax is outstripping my ability to earn ADHD revenue and offer. I actually don't keep track but so at Marshall's talking about is when I told him what I got locked out of my car. I had to call the locksmith. And it was like seventy nine bucks.

Adhd Marshall
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"Boundaries can be really tough for folks with ADHD. And it sounds like you've voluntarily set a boundary around your Monday mornings but you've also removed boundaries in other parts of your practice and have you struggle with the balance between the boundaries that you have in place and enforce and the ones that there are there but aren't enforced or really. Aren't there at all. Oh for sure I mean I'm really a bleeding heart care. Everybody and I want to help everybody and so I am learning the hard way that you can't. You can't help everybody. You can work around the clock for some people and it just you. You know if this case has bad backs the case as bad fax in. Let's just let's take a realistic approach instead of like you know it's GonNa be a hard one but we're five is hard to be honest. This is not. Let's not take this. It's not take this. What's a good analogy? I was GONNA take his horse to the race track. But let's not. Let's not even try because this is hard card and it's not gonNA work Or would I approach Prefer it's just like hey it's gonNa cost you this amount of money and you're still gonNA lose. Are you okay with that and most people will say. Now I want to say yes. Don't even mean it but Give them a couple of days so I I do have a difficult time with that though. With what what stuff is worth working through the night for and what stuff can we till tomorrow because if your client you've got one case in one case only usually and and it's important it's on your mind all the time I mean I've been on the other side I've been a client before it's the only thing you think about all the time. It's so much money that you're spending and it's all you can think guitar and so when you call the lawyer and they're in some other meeting like what he's working on right. How dare you not think is as important as I do? And it's it's important to remember that it's not that you're not as important. It's just that let's look at what has to absolutely absolutely stunning today. And why can wait and I'm still have that figured out. Still definitely working on it. But it's something trying trying to work work on trying to improve as I go and trying to set realistic expectations with clients. If you people don't respond to emails right away or else or clients. We'll start expecting. Yeah well I know my clients. Some of them need refunds right away and other ones they.

ADHD
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"Just diagnosed. So so. I know that you're objectively rockstar. So you take that That diagnosis and you do what are those rockstar elements of your your resume. The function of you just being pumped full of Medications no I didn't do any of those first year because I was Lost but I think those are the results of finding out that I can do amazing. Good when I I focus on what I want to do. And then focusing on it I guess letting myself obsessive about the things I care about and get involved to level that other people would mean. I discovered a secret about all those different groups and stuff that people talk about them but not actually wants to do worked for them to help you on the board to show up to organize the meetings and it's not actually hard you could just do it and people are really happy and grateful and it brings people together so that was really a really enriching part of my law. School life is being able to be involved in. That seems like a theme. We'll talk about more about the business that you're building right now Later but it seems that your entrepreneurial spirit and your willingness to be the one who takes the Mantle Oh and does the work and engages the people and builds the community. That's been consistent across all of these experiences and I think that's a that's one one of the things I love about. ADHD is I think folks who can get enthusiastic and can get energetic and can get creative about You know the way that we're approaching coaching. The things were involved in something. That's just absolutely missing from a lot of places particularly in the law and so I love. I love that at work. That's a really neat set of things that you've spent a bunch of time and energy on and I like to think and I am. I guess that's a question. How much of of that you think is unique to people who have ADHD and being able to approach these things and try new things and be excited and energized by new interesting things? Can you think it might have to to do with slight social awkwardness to where we don't realize like I just go ahead and say something and then I realized later that perhaps I should not have said that doc or so I think part of it is just do something and then later someone thinks. Oh my God did not and then I'm like wait. That's not a thing I can't just go start my own group.

ADHD
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"It's such good news now. Don't get me wrong. I'm not saying there isn't a downside. God I just told you the downside. It's horrible it can. It can be on your life and just make life a living if you don't know what's going on. Aw that's so sad because this living hell is get out of -able you don't have to live in it you don't have you don't have to suffer get out of -able I like that. Let's make adhd easier law is hard enough. You've talked about treatment and and I think I think the way I want to wrap Mabel move into it shortly here but but before we do You've talked about treatment starting with education right. It is literally about the first building block is learning what this thing is and demystifying it so that you understand what those challenges that need to be overcome and overcome are so that you can unlock that potential and so Speak just very briefly about the when you get treated Does it tend and to start with someone like you. A psychiatrist can start anywhere else in the world. You're absolutely right. The first step is education in sometimes begins by reading one of my books. You know. Sometimes it doesn't begin with a professional at all. They read driven to distraction or delivered from distraction and they have an for this hundreds if not thousands of times they start crying they say my God. How does this person know me sessile as even living with me I mean you know yes because in those I really drill down into the granular details of everyday life and far more than the stupid list of symptoms in the Dsm non-state stupid but it's very reduction mystic and it doesn't get the need of at all and so in those books I really really flesh it out? In these people men women children see themselves so vividly and they see themselves is portrayed in such a sympathetic way with with answers attached. This is what to do and so often the treatment if you will begins simply simply got reading a book or talking to somebody who understands and I'm going to drop that was In the show notes I will promote them everywhere in the entire world because that has been the the experience that I have had and the experience of folks that I have spoken with about my adhd in about what it looks like to start getting treated for Adhd as an adult I will you know driven to distraction then. Delivered from distraction are two extraordinary books And and if you have hard time reading them listen to him on audio book. They're tailable there too. So we'll drop those in But I think doctor I want to be respectful of your time especially here on your birthday very thankful for you And I think maybe the best way to talk about All of the positives literally as to point people to your entire body of work Those books the writing that you've Don Online The new book. That is coming out because I know that you believe it in your core that this is a strength I do too and but I should I want I just want to add. Add to that which I really appreciate your saying but my even greater achievement if you WANNA call it an achievement You might as well is is the thirty year marriage that I've had to the most wonderful woman in the world couldn't have even begun to do any of it without her and the amazing three children when we. We've we've had lucy US thirty and the Jack Who's twenty seven Tucker who's twenty four They a all inherited my. Add and they all are thriving. And and I often tell people I have achieved my life's most cherished goal which which is with sue leading the way my wife to give our kids the happy childhood I didn't have and and it's just a it again. Today is special bags turning seventy but that that is the that is what I'm most proud of and I couldn't have done it without understanding standing my add. I couldn't have done it without knowing why I am the way I am and what to do about it. If I just relied on chance I would've flubbed ABDUC over and over and over while I have a quote sitting.

Adhd Mabel Tucker lucy US Jack Who
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"A little bit to talk about The folks that I talk to every day I talked to lawyers with. Adhd you and I talked to whereas with ADHD whether they know it or not. And I just WanNa feed you a little bit of information so that we can frame up The way that we talk about. Because there's there's data out there that that are important to this discussion you know. We know that lawyers have an extraordinarily high rate of anxiety and depression substance. It's abuse alcoholism addiction suicidal thoughts. Divorce a whole bunch of pathology we have done very little to explore this just like just like doctors by indeed and indeed and and that's why I think it's so fascinating to hear about you and your practice to hear about you and your. Adhd these are things that are real in our profession. We also have lawyers. Here's self identifying at twelve and a half percent of the the number of folks who self identifies having. ADHD that are lawyers as twelve and a half percent while not self self identifying so you could probably multiple that by three to get the real sure and that goes to the statistics that eighty percent or so of adults are not diagnosed with Adhd even though they're walking around and they have a bit complicated indeed by The fact that folks who are smart tend to be more difficult to diagnose because of their ability to cover up some executive dysfunctions options otherwise otherwise show. And so you know here. We are with this group of people with compulsive behaviors addictive behaviors and a whole bunch of things that make it hard hard to diagnose not to mention the stigma of licensing in the concerns about.

ADHD depression executive