35 Burst results for "Adhd"

Trees Could Be a Mental, Physical and Climate Change Antidote

Environment: NPR

02:02 min | Last week

Trees Could Be a Mental, Physical and Climate Change Antidote

"Is well known. The trees help counter climate change by soaking up carbon dioxide. Now there is a growing body of research to point to many ways of dose of trees can improve our mental and physical health. Here's martha bebinger member station. W. b. you are on how and why the tiny sapling robin williams planted thirty years ago towers above her boston home. I raise this tree when i raised my children and look at this look at that. She says there's something about being near this tree. It makes everybody a little bit happy around here when you're looking for strength you can't do better than looking at a tree and there's evidence williams may will be gleaning any number of direct or associated health benefits a longer life. Bitter birth outcomes lower stress levels lower risk of heart disease. Dr howard lumpkin. Is it the university of washington school of public health. Lower risk of diabetes reduced symptoms of adhd proximity to trees is associated with a ridiculously broad range of health benefits. I wish we had pills. That were this good for health. A few countries notably japan and south korea have invested in a practice known as forest bathing which is spending time among trees as a preventive health measure but prescribing time in nature is still pretty far outside mainstream medicine in the. Us from can says that. Maybe because there's a lot we don't know what doses needed. Do you need to walk. Among trees is sufficient just to look at the trees from outside your window. Do you need big trees or do small trees do the trick we you know. We're not able to tease the forest from the trees. Peter james at harvard medical school aims to answer a lot of those questions. He's merging health data captured by phones. Real time surveys about wellbeing and mood and street. View mapping data to dig into. What's exactly within view. Is it trees. Is it flowers and how those things are related to help behaviors and health outcomes.

Martha Bebinger W. B Dr Howard Lumpkin University Of Washington Schoo Robin Williams Boston Heart Disease Williams Adhd South Korea Diabetes Japan Peter James Harvard Medical School United States
A Kid’s Dream Come True — Video Games as Medicine!

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

01:29 min | 3 weeks ago

A Kid’s Dream Come True — Video Games as Medicine!

"The age old. Mantra of parents won't let their kids have a gaming console too. Many video games hurts your brain but last summer. The fda approved the first ever prescription video game. It's endeavor rx and it's meant to help treat. Adhd in kids aged eight to twelve. It's not a standalone. It'll be prescribed along with other more traditional medication. Without insurance it costs about one hundred dollars a month a year later developers are just starting to reach out to doctors and potential patients. We spoke with ian bogus. He directs the film and media studies program at washington university in saint. Louis we asked him. What's a medicinal game. Even like it's kinda like any video game you've got a little character writing vehicle and you piloted through obstacles in order to reach a goal. That's interesting so it doesn't feel like you're taking your medicine. Yeah and you know. That's part of the appeal of games for any purpose for education or for politics or for for training. Or what have you is. Maybe you won't notice that you're doing this thing you don't want to do if it's in video game form but the creators of endeavor rx claim to have made technologies that are measuring and adapting to the player. Who would be an adhd patient who had been prescribed the game that according to them make alterations kind of customizing the experience to optimize the attention treatment

Ian Bogus Washington University In Saint FDA Louis
Herbal Support for ADD and ADHD

The Plant Path

02:15 min | 2 months ago

Herbal Support for ADD and ADHD

"Question number three comes from l. ing is asking about wondering if you can offer plant remedies and holistic practices for folks dealing with. Add gupta comes to mind and of course a mindfulness practice but i love to hear take on undressing this condition. Yeah great great question there yelling so it's interesting and i'm not sure if you ask that but i actually did a materia medica monthly webinar the other day and someone was asking about book copa for adhd in children and so i will kind of go off of that a little bit here. Yeah you know. it's i mean just maybe get on a soapbox a little bit. I think it's really unfortunate. That doctors are so quick to say that a child has a disease because they have a hard time paying attention in our very linear reduction aesthetic boxed in educational system that basically only works for certain certain learning types rate certain people that we learn well in standard school environment. But i think it's important to understand that different people learn in different ways right. Some people were very hands on tactile. Some people were more visual learners. Some people are more auditory learners. So it's it's unfortunate because basically create this box and say this is how you need to learn. This is what you need to learn. And if you don't fit in that box then you have a disease and we're going to put you on ritalin. You know and i've had family members and friends that were put on ritalin from a really young age and we're on it for a really long time and it really kind of messed them up you know and it took them a long time to overcome some of the problems that it created for them both physically and psychologically and emotionally as well so i think the more that we can a prevent kids from happening to get on those drugs the better because they really in the long run create a lot more problems than they do solve any problems

Gupta ING
How To Prevent Troubled Teen Years With Aaron Huey

Mindful Mama - Parenting with Mindfulness

02:03 min | 2 months ago

How To Prevent Troubled Teen Years With Aaron Huey

"My entire process my entire work. Now that i have this wonderful facility this amazing staff and this podcast to help educate parents who are dealing with teens at struggle as to now prevent someone ever needing to listen to my podcast or call my facility and so the the absolute number one is self care it is the absolute number one preventative measure because eight is teaching your child okay. Let's set aside all the personal benefits of self care being your priority that you feel better than that you have self concept that is that is based that is increasing self esteem and self worth right. They your concept of self is that you love it and you're gonna take care of it. The benefits of that you just being healthy and having long life and dealing with illness and sickness and emotional in such a way that reflects what someone who takes care of themselves but then the second thing is to then tend to your adult relationships you see. We have to put children third. If i don't have a support team erin hold on. you said. Put aside the idea that of all the benefits to yourself. What are the benefits to our kids. So that they're watching you prioritize health and that's the modeling that they're going to grow up with is that my health is a priority myself. Care is a priority. And then i will thank you for bringing me back to that. It would have. Adhd right past. But but i'm watching my daughter. Go through a struggle in her life. That is something that daddy can't go. She's twenty five. She's about to turn twenty six. I can't come in for the swoop. This is not for the rescue now. And i watch both my daughter. Who's twenty five my son. Who's twenty four. When life gets tough they immediately go to movement. My son is like i gotta go skateboarding. My daughter says. I gotta hit the gym. And i'm going to go to therapy and might like that's what my wife and i modeled

Erin
The Bright Side of the Serotonin Gene

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

02:45 min | 2 months ago

The Bright Side of the Serotonin Gene

"Why do some people get depressed under stress but not others. Many people have taken a stab at this question. But in two thousand and three psychologists abshalom caspi came upon a particularly eloquent answer. He and a team of researchers have been following a cohort of babies born in dunedin new zealand around nineteen seventy two. You may know it. As the dunedin multidisciplinary health and development study the one thousand and thirty seven children that took part in it have given us around three hundred papers on everything from heart disease to adhd but mainly. The study has focused on how the environment shapes a child's physical and mental health for years to come by the time of two thousand and three the human genome had just been mapped and talked to cassie was able to test. How a certain gene interacted with the environment to shape the development of depression that jane was the serotonin transporter gene also known as five. Hdtv slc success. Four or the cert. Gene we'll call it cert- in this podcast. The gene codes for the serotonin transporter which is a name. Implies helps transport serotonin back into the neuron. In the brain the gene comes in two major illegals a forms the short arm or esa salil and the long arm or l. Lille technically there is a third a some people have one of each eleo one s and one l. After dr caspi study they search. Jane would go on to be known as the gene for depression. but that's not exactly what he found dada caspi began by making a simple graph with all the data. He had gathered from the new zealanders on the bottom x. Xi's was a number of major life. Stressors they had been between h twenty one and twenty six and on the top. Y axis was the number of depressive. They endorsed when they were last interviewed at age. Twenty six as expected as the number of life stresses went up so did the number of depressive symptoms and the chance of a depressed episode an chance of a suicide attempt. Nothing surprising there. But then he split the sample into those with the short arm. S s cert- elliott and those with an long arm. The result was striking for people who experience no major stressors in their early twenties. The two groups had this same level of depression but as the number of stressors went up the level of depression worse too but only in the short arm s group. The long arms were unmoving. The level of depression did not rise even after four stressors. And we're not talking about everyday stressors like losing your wallet. These were big ones like getting fired from a job. Death of apparent becoming homeless

Abshalom Caspi Dunedin Multidisciplinary Heal Depression Dr Caspi Dunedin Dada Caspi Cassie Adhd Heart Disease New Zealand Lille Depressive Symptoms Jane XI Elliott
Pro Climber, Kai Lightner, Recounts The Beginnings of His Climbing Journey

Hurdle

02:24 min | 3 months ago

Pro Climber, Kai Lightner, Recounts The Beginnings of His Climbing Journey

"So you get into climbing and you said you got into the gym and you can't imagine your life without having taken. That big step talked me about your first. Few years in the gym i mean. Did you know from the get go that this is going to be something that you couldn't get enough of will funny enough. The thing that really got me into climbing that first day was the man of the front desk. I call him that shane. Shane put me on the ropes. And you put me on every angle. The walls on every wall in the gym. And i was getting all the way up. We put me on the steepest angle in. It was purple taped climb. And i wanted to get his hot but it was just a little bit too hard for me but i was too stubborn to come down and so i grabbed onto these two holes in the wall and i just cried and i wouldn't come down because you can sit atop so shaped like a fifteen minutes later. I'm sitting on his wall and change just like you're gonna come down and i'm like no i'm not going to do it. And so i may one or two more was in fell and i came back every day. That weeks had the top of that wall so always has been like competitive by nature and so chainsaw that in me in the hospital. Join the local team from there. I just started doing competitions. It's pretty impressive for you. Because i remember like i feel like many people go to summer camp. You climb a rock wall or like just a tall wall and then you go onto zip line to come down and climbing up. The wall didn't scare me by. I remember when. I was like seven years old at summer. Camp that climbed with the wall. And god's tops the platform where i was supposed to zip line down and i sat on that platform for like i don't know maybe an hour until it got dark and was literally forced to get off of it to go down. I mean it's crazy when you find that thing you're passionate or kids we this loud joined things so much but for me. I do climbing with special. Because i had. Adhd growing up. My mother putting me in a million other sports like basketball football baseball soccer. Like all of them. And i wasn't bad at them but they just didn't hold my attention. I couldn't carry out a play. Because i mean i. We get distracted. I sit outside in baseball and does pick grass. You know it is. I couldn't pay attention but for some reason like when i was in the common gym on the walls the one time. My mother did not have to worry. About what i was doing where i was. Because i was just fixated on what was in front of

Shane Baseball Basketball Soccer Football
Here’s What You Need To Know About Screen Time for Toddlers

The Mom Room

01:22 min | 4 months ago

Here’s What You Need To Know About Screen Time for Toddlers

"That looks at tv. It's not about like a having to see at one. Time announce something happened the rain. It's not that they look at daily long hours. So i think those researched by dmitry chris taxes and what he saw was that between each of which are still the critical years. If there's two or more hours per day every day than there are higher. Chances of attentional difficulties. Not adhd but attentional difficulties. But that's when it's very consistent and they don't look at the in between so going back to really looking at the studies you know if a parent especially now during the pandemic and you're like oh crap. I've been watching two hours a day. Like what's going to happen to my kid. It's a correlation. it's not a direct link and it's never too late to try to find ways to change it which will talk about but also what's happening in between if in between these two three hours a day you are sitting with your child. You guys are playing. You're chatting you're developing social skills. You're going outside. Then you're balancing things out but if it's seven hours a day of tv and you haven't tried to with your child and it's time for bed while i would say you know maybe reevaluate how you're using it and cutting it up a little bit or so. There are ways in these studies. Don't look at that but we have to be mindful of the

Dmitry Chris
ADHD with Dani Donovan

Mental Illness Happy Hour

02:23 min | 4 months ago

ADHD with Dani Donovan

"When did adhd. I come on your radar. And i love that. We're talking about. Adhd and not combining adhd with add. Because i think a lot of times they get lumped together. And i think it's important to to talk about the differences in fact maybe we could. We could start there with some of the differences between. Add adhd add is actually a term that is no longer being used In the dsm or anything it's adhd with hyperactivity or without arm so adhd or add was formerly known as is now called adhd without hyperactivity which is a mouthful. But i didn't. I didn't use to say no that either 'cause i definitely have people in my life. Who had been diagnosed with. Add and so. It's just one of the many. Jose tidbits that i have been learning because this is like a process for me to of self-discovery 'cause i don't have. I love psych in high school in college but My training is a visual communication design. So i do really get to learn so much myself. And about your. adhd general. But i can that was like a little side tangent. But like i can talk about the differences between the two kind of types if that might be useful so our and then combined type which is what i have and so adhd with hyperactivity not just has hyperactivity which can look different. Depending on the person for boys it might be a little mar- you know obvious which is why guys tend to get diagnosed younger because they might be the kid running over the place and climbing on stuff at the rest to climb on constantly fidgeting sort of thing and girls get missed a lot who might even have hyperactive type like because we tend to be much more. Chatty we're like very chatty distracting other people with like wanting to talk constantly fidgeting with our hair and it's it's a little more subtle ways that you wouldn't necessarily think of hyperactivity

Jose Adhd
Fasting for High Performance With Dr. Isaac Jones

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

02:16 min | 5 months ago

Fasting for High Performance With Dr. Isaac Jones

"Jones fasting transformation summit so much david dr soccer's really appreciate it. Thanks for the kind words at the same way but you your family and what you're up to is amazing. The summit is going to change transformed. Sorry people's lives. Yeah thanks so much and so how did you get started in performance in general like what attracted you to that role. It's an interesting story. I grew up a really healthy kid. But my migrants what they did know and A certain foods and doing certain things taking certain medications that religious decrease my brain function energy. My vitality ended up getting diagnosed with adhd and dyslexia then was on adderall and agitated. You're my actually in all these different medications and being honest cocktail of medications on top of the job is dealing with brought me down the spiral of of of even more issues like athletes buying shoes in got problems waking up stabbing pain in my guts and it wasn't until my i discovered a doctor actually very similar to you. That helped me. Underline understand the underlying causes of what was going on in my body. And you know. I i know i would have gotten faster results if i would have implemented fasting to the things that i that i had. I learned back then but needless to say over time because this process of hewing always takes time time. I completely did a one eighty. I was in special needs before take tests because of the adhd and dyslexia being so severe and literally six months later. I couldn't have even been diagnosed with dyslexia or adhd. Because of what happened. My product went through the roots. I was getting straight as in classes. In fact it was. Thanks to you that i ended up applying for academic scholarship at ended up winning this academic scholarship.

Dyslexia Soccer Jones Adhd David
FDA OKs first new ADHD drug in over a decade for children

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 6 months ago

FDA OKs first new ADHD drug in over a decade for children

"The food and drug administration approved the first new drug in over a decade for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder Calgary is for children ages six to seventeen with eighty HD it comes in a capsule and is taken daily it is not a stimulant or controlled substance making it harder to abuse than older drugs nearly all ADHD treatments like Ritalin contain the stimulants amphetamine or methylphenidate Calvary does carry a warning of potential for suicidal thoughts and behavior it happened in fewer than one percent of volunteers in studies of the drug a study funded by the maker of Calvary shows inattention and hyperactivity symptoms were reduced by about fifty percent in children ages six to eleven who took the drug for six weeks at Donahue Washington

Food And Drug Administration Calgary Adhd Washington
What is ADHD?

Parenting Great Kids with Dr. Meg Meeker

01:53 min | 6 months ago

What is ADHD?

"Adhd is of course divided into two parts. There's the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder attention deficit in my experiences more frequent girls. Now i don't know if the literature supports that but i would imagine it. Was these the young girls who can't focus on their work. They can't concentrate. They're not necessarily hyperactive. Hyperactivity with attention issues on the other hand. I see more commonly in boys but adhd is a common neurobiological condition. And as i said it's characterized by developmentally inappropriate levels of being distracted being. Hyperactive being impulsive. It can occur at home at school in social settings and usually in all of the settings in kids have really pretty severe. Adhd i wanted to say right at the outset. One of the most brilliant adolescent and adult psychiatrist. That i know is dr sandra wetstein. He was on my podcast Earlier and he did a podcast on anxiety and kids. Which is fabulous. And you need to listen to it. But he's responsible for most of the information that i'm gonna talk about today in our adhd. So i wanted to give full credit to him. Because he's taught me so much over the years about kids and adolescent psychiatry. So adhd again. It's characterized by a developmentally inappropriate levels of all of these different things. Distractibility and impulsive hyperactivity. It's so forth. If you look at brain scans of children and adults with adhd you can actually see a difference between normal brain. Scans and adhd brain.

Adhd Dr Sandra Wetstein
Supporting pupils with ADHD in the blended learning environment with Ellis Seddon

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

09:54 min | 7 months ago

Supporting pupils with ADHD in the blended learning environment with Ellis Seddon

"Today i'm joined by ellison who's a student teacher on our secondary religious education program. Hi l. s. that thomas. Thanks for coming today. You've carried out a piece of literature based research for your lead partnership school who we can't name because of the terms of the ethic approval for the research project but this school and they gave you a topic to look into because of interest to them for their own kind of school development. So what was that topic that the school gave you said topic was an kind of split into three parts. They gave us a choice of either looking at vulnerable learners. And whatever that might be whether it's saw or more able and talented excetera ben. They said we could do a study on blended learning on how we teach in a blended learning environment or the third option was to combine those two together. So how do you help. Specific categories of vulnerable learners within a blended learning environment. And given the time that we're in to me that was the one of most interested. That's the one. I counted -able so vulnerable learners in the blended environment. And did you need to narrow that down tool anymore to make it manageable. Did you come from a subject tangled. Did you have to do anything with that topic. Once he picked option three from the hat yes exactly yeah so we had to narrow it much further because obviously vulnerable learners and such a white category and we a recommended that we could narrow that down to a a subject specific points of view a religious education point of view in my perspective in my work in my literature review after a loft inspiration. I actually didn't do that because going through the research i felt like it was applicable from what i knew to a wide range of topics so i didn't feel like bringing it down to a religious education spending was going to bring it was going to enhance it that much more but what i did do was never the butler winning side of things down to adhd specifically and. I did that in all honesty. Because i had an interest in learning more by. Adhd i'm really have a worked with many students with adhd. I didn't know too much about it. So i thought this was going to be a prime community within my sinement to try and understand. Adhd a little bit more given so pregnant and use it. Mapping it onto not blended learning environment saint tyne fascinating. Okay so you got your choice of adhd you justify your choice of looking beyond your subjects harry so then you were able to go out and search for literature and you had to pick six sources that will kind of help get a handle on that topic area so it might be a bit of a bit of a big question to ask but can you talk a street the six sources that you ended up with and so broad sense of what they were saying yes absolutely each so the one thing i should really mention i is that when i started this literature review trying to marry up trying to find resources which spoke about adhd within blended learning environment. There was next to nothing if not nothing at all and so it was a bit of panic. Could bit of a worry at the beginning. But i pushed through. I decided to do in. The end was focused on a selection of literature which focused on adhd specific late at some literature which focused on blended learning specifically. and then. i drew my own conclusions between those two. I'm using a variety of websites and sources as well to try in a match up in a meaningful way and i started by actually looking at the. Adhd you k charity website and there was a really interesting on on quite lamesa. Statistics on eighty nine percent of teachers teach or have taught students with adhd and yet sixty three percents of teachers feel that that training and of understanding adhd on supporting adhd students is a par inadequate So that was quite alarming statistics. So i started from that before. I took a deep dive into more literature. Adhd and blended learning specifically. That was loads of resources. When i looked at them separately. But i'll try and go through on now. My six down spitball. I'll just say best that. I looked into these articles mainly online because of the situation wherein they were mainly searches. Either through google laura our our learning platform at cardiff matt and i prioritized terms. Which article twits mentioned engagement mentioned. Adhd additional learning leads blended learning online learning hybrid learning excetera and the scope for narrowing down. Those obstacles was quite slim. Because as i said the amount of articles that looked at them together that what many of them so narrowing down was quite slim but i prioritized any which kinda did mention allen's on blended learning in one with was the best the easiest way to get more of a focus on my first article which i came across was by how graham relatively recent to the two thousand seventeen on it was titled learner engagement in a blended learning environment and it was a conceptual framework. And this what date. It had a huge skype through research. It had a thousand dollars. Coups chapters and other articles of engagement instruments have engagement. And what they really really. Interestingly came up with they spoke about the inconsistencies at the term engagement itself and then how that gets even more complicated when you transfer into online learning but they came up with indicators of engagements and that was what was really fascinating about this obstacle. We talk and teaching about. How can we. How can we facilitating gauge. How can we increase engagement. A little bit better argument was actually before we do any of that you need to know what the indicators aw. When do you know when your students are engaged. So that was what was really tickly interesting about this. And why recommended it to my league partnership school. They came up. With a whole framework within not they had six indicators of cognitive engagement and seven indicators emotional engagement which i thought were particular interests but within the cognitive engagement. One was based on attention. Which obviously i ate pricked my ears up because oh is robert. Because it was specific to eighty can be specific trade hd and what they aim to do is show you. What the indicates attention within within cognitive engagement by might look like and what you can do about it to understand it and enhance a little bit more now. Within this article on some of the things i thought were a little bit etched. Maybe for example under the intention indicator they said about how you might want to track rain whites or movement and it's not really sure that's going to be possibly the most affluent secondary schools around the country. But the undestanding is that you need to know when your students are engaged. Not indicated first before you can change your teaching style to enhance that facilitated and so it was my suggestion that maybe we could look at using. That's marks of teams with google cross. Rooms trying see when they are most engaged. See what the data. It's like really take a deep dive into that than students are engaged to take up over the second article most cattle again. It was a twenty seventeen obstacle a written. Interestingly was all about the motivations of adhd students so it was titled what motivates individuals they hd it was a qualitative analysis specifically for the adolescents. Point to the so what they did. They hypothesized that there are qualitative differences between motivation attitudes between students with adhd and their typically developing peers. And so they did this study which was largely in a more clinical environment. And that was one of my Concerns i suppose one of my hesitations about the article because they students were interviewed. Sorry the children were intimate in a psychology clinic. That was seven all those order. Which from a psychology background. So my argument was that if you brought in somebody from a different background to maybe the confidence in having no analysis response by us we may have a little bit more confident. That was different backgrounds. Connecticut election is still a valuable valuable. Be such an what they found was the rule. The motivation axe cheats. And this is interest. Day-today life it's not necessarily at school but additional attitudes between students with adhd and students non adhd rudely of very very similar. But there were two very distinct difference is which were really interesting. Adhd perspective the first one was the students with with adhd had a very specific aversion to the slow passing of time to time going slowly was just an absolute. No no for them. They just couldn't stand it on the second one was that students who didn't tough. Adhd also cased venue in having familiar and predictable tasks to toss it. They've done before they know how they works. They know what's expected of them. That value did not appear in students with

Excetera Ben Ellison Adhd Thomas Butler Harry Google Skype Matt Graham Allen Robert Connecticut
The Truth About Needle Fear with Amy Baxter, Founder & CEO at Pain Care Labs

Outcomes Rocket

04:41 min | 7 months ago

The Truth About Needle Fear with Amy Baxter, Founder & CEO at Pain Care Labs

"Hey everybody saw marquez's here and welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Today i have the privilege of hosting dr. Amy baxter once again. If you haven't heard our podcast interviews with her one of my favorite guests that we've had on the show episode four twenty six or. She talks about the work that she's doing with her company biber cooled. The product is phenomenal buzzy. Another one episode for twenty six and also at the soda. Five twenty where she goes deep on covid nineteen and some of the things that we should be thinking about just a ton of really good content. Check those out if you haven't already. But she founded paintcare labs in two thousand six to eliminate unnecessary pain. She invented fiber cool. Vibrational cryotherapy for tendonitis and to decrease opioid use and her buzzy device as blocked needle pain for over thirty five million procedures. This is key and what we're going to talk about today around. Kovic vaccination after yale and emory medical school trained in pediatrics. Child abuse and emergency pediatrics. Federally funded for needle. Pain and fear opioid use and neuro modulation research. She publishes and lectures on needles. A needle fear sedation and pain. Scientific contributions include hypnotic enzyme algorithm to time child abuse creating and validating the barf nausea scale for kids with cancer identifying the cause of the needle phobia increase amd buzzy and cool. She spoken on ted man. She's done ted talks bottom line. She's phenomenal and we're gonna talk about some really great things today around cove nineteen needle fear and a lot of her research that he's actually doing and has done and is helping our nation with day with The vaccination so amy welcome back thaw and i feel so. Adhd listening to that list. Well you got a lot on your plate you. You're certainly always keep things interesting. And i appreciate you for that and the listeners. Appreciate you for that so talk to us a little bit about what you've got going on a you know we. We sort of got reconnected. With this topic of neil fear. So why don't you introduce your work. There and the relevance today sarah sure will you know for anybody who's here before the story thus far was that i invented a device that used mechanical vibration to block needle pain got a grant for it found founded. It also decreased other pain. Kinda did some work with needle. Fear needle pain and founded. Americans really didn't care that much. So that's why did the ted talks. That's why did the techs is to raise awareness of the fact that the way we are vaccinated kids causes adults to stay afraid of needles. But because i've got this company in this product i moved on to vibrate wall opioid stuff and all of a sudden needle. Pain is relevant again. Yeah well it is and It's a big deal today because we've got to vaccines available as of now. We've got one more coming with jay and more and more people are getting the vaccine. Many are not and so talk to us a little bit about your research love to hear more about it and how it is impacting people's willingness to get vaccinated sure. Well the go thing is that. I've actually been asked to testify or the art celts. New and services on needle. Fear and needle pain. It had never been an issue before enter. Probably wouldn't have been an issue if the strains of covid nineteen stayed the way they were if the are not if that transmissibility number was at two or even two point five we only would of needed sixty percent of the population to be vaccinated with the v. One one seven with the south african variants all of a sudden. Now you're talking about needing seventy percent seventy five percent of the relation to vaccinated the issue with that is it. Twenty percent of people said they're not getting a vaccine anyway know-how and this means that you need to start working on those people that may get one that not get the second one said. That's where all the sudden it became important to really look at needle. Fear needle dread fainting anxiety. Pain all these issues that may be enough of barrier to someone that they're not gonna get that second vaccine then they're only fifty percent covered or for the people who are gonna freak out and don't get the first vaccine not because they think there's conspiracy or not because they're afraid of the immune system in their body being co opted by space aliens lasers but because they just can't bring themselves to stand gang that

Amy Baxter Paintcare Labs Kovic Yale And Emory Medical School TED Marquez Nausea AMY Neil Cancer Sarah JAY
How to Help and Support Your ADHD Child

Mama, Take Heart

03:56 min | 7 months ago

How to Help and Support Your ADHD Child

"Talk a little bit about the strategies talking about combined forces so some of the strategies parents can do at home draft so my first and foremost suggestion would be to learn as much as you can about. Adhd kind. Of like how you and i just be that sponge just read read read. I'm and i have some good sources for for parents so there is A magazine called attitude magazine. So it's add okay you've heard of out Add attitude magazine There's a website that is just attitude. Mag dot com. This is an excellent excellent source For very relatable articles for parents for adults For anybody with adhd are really recommend that And to be leery because there's a lot of information out there on adhd and a lot of it can be so. There are three people that i would recommend anything you see by these people you can trust. So why does doctor russ soul barkley. As second is dr ned halloween. L. and third is dr thomas brown. Those are three very well very well known names in. adhd community. Anything you see by them. You know you can trust so so first and foremost learn as much as you can about. Adhd the second is and some people are gonna balk at this but the second is to lower your expectations of your child and not to compare them to their peers. And let me tell you that. So hard to do. Even as an adhd coach. I would catch myself. How well gosh look at look at his friend. Why can't he do that. And i got you know i catch myself and i'd have to remind myself note. Nope you can't compare on so to understand that your child is going to be anywhere. From three to five years behind his peers in many of the executive functions as well as maturity both emotionally and mentally. So when you look at your child's age subtract three to five years and then that's what i mean by lower your expectations so take three to five years off in. That's what you should be expecting of your child Agree with that. Yes and also just so you all know. I will put all of this information of resources in the show notes. Part home but yes. I agree with the lawyer expectations. I remember cus. My daughter was high functioning on the honor. Roll and that sort of thing And then but when my son when he got on a roll we just flipped our leads. We just size our honor. What happened had one time and we were just so. We're like wow. This is an even with our daughter was like this is this is like gum. It wasn't like how a lot of other people like. Oh well yeah. This is what they do. We were just so excited because we're like. We know the effort that they had to put in to get there and so we were just like you know for us. it wasn't. We did not take that for granted. We were like really worked hard for this. We want them to know you. We know you work hard and this did not come easy so let me tell you you're blessed that you had kids with. Adhd at the honor roll. Because that isn't very common. Actually they are usually they usually functions a low their intelligence gig of the delay their executive functions.

Russ Soul Barkley Dr Ned Dr Thomas Brown Adhd
Fresh Take: Dr. Edward Hallowell on Renaming and Reframing ADHD

What Fresh Hell: Laughing in the Face of Motherhood

04:05 min | 8 months ago

Fresh Take: Dr. Edward Hallowell on Renaming and Reframing ADHD

"Book is all about sort of what's new in the field. Just the first thing. That's new in the book. Is we give the condition a new name. the name when i first learned about it in nineteen eighty one was called attention deficit disorder and then in the nineties. They threw in the eight so then it became attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. And you know those are all out of the medical model which is rooted in pathology. You know you go to the doctor not because you feel well but because you feel bad. So it only stands to reason that medically based conditions would have a pathology slanted name so and that's fine but when it comes to this condition it's totally inaccurate and it also conveys a kind of stigma kind of shame kind of feeling less than and those are very damaging so it's more than just cosmetic it's more than just a semantics really gets right to the heart and mean you get this diagnosis. You're told you or your child has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. And you feel like you've just been punched in the gut. You don't really know what it means but you know it's bad sounds bad so it must be. Yeah exactly and so the fact is the description is inaccurate. We have the condition myself. So i say we don't have a deficit of attention quite the opposite. We have an abundance of attention. Our problem is to control it and then the disorder. I don't see it as a disorder you know. I went to harvard college and medical school. I've written twenty one books. I've been married thirty one years. I've got three wonderful kids. That i don't have a disorder. I have a brain difference. And so i see it as a trait. If you manage it properly it becomes an asset. If you don't yes it can ruin your life so it has the potential to be a disorder but it also has the potential to be a superpower and so we've renamed it very abol attention stimulus trait vast via st and. I think it's a whole lot better to be told that your son or daughter or you have vast because it does imply the vast nature of this condition which is all encompassing and does not convey a sense of shame in pathology the way. Adhd does so and attention and stimulus of sort of the two key elements. you know. Our attention is always moving and so we have variable attention and then stimulus were always looking for high stimulation. we're always looking for something to pump. Up the volume. So variable attention. Stimulus trait vast. And we offer that as a way of for parents to convey to their kids they have avast mind. They have vast potential. They have vast opportunity all of which is true. And then the challenge to turn this. Trait asset is to learn to control attention stimulation so the first item in the book that we offer. That's new is the very word itself. Very term itself the acronym via st. I think it also brings us past what i think. Amy and i probably grew up with learning this term. Add and it's become this kind of major catchall for every range of behavior and then a lot of the discussions around are kind of like. Oh that's an. Add moment or everyone's medicating what used to be called childhood and those kind of discussions. That i think are not useful for anybody because they demonize kids who have maybe need help functioning and then they kind of lump everybody together in like this used to be childhood now. Everyone's just medicating zombies not true right. Not true at all and also as you say when it's used casually it's never complimentary exactly when you say he's so. Add he so creative original interesting and dynamic. You mean he's a pain in the butt you know and so you know we want to take it out of that stigmatized round where it does not deserve to be in. The fact of the matter is most of the people who are the game changers in this world have vast or adhd.

Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Harvard College And Medical Sc AMY
Riot Games: Brandon Beck and Marc Merrill

How I Built This

07:44 min | 10 months ago

Riot Games: Brandon Beck and Marc Merrill

"Guy roz on the show. Today to avid gamers fended off reluctant. Investors may saying experts and their own self doubt to build riot games an order the most successful video games ever created league of legends in two thousand six. A video game company called bethesda. software works. Tried out an experiment at the time. But as the had a popular video game called oblivion in that year it decided to offer its users an extra feature horse armor not armor virtual armor that you could use in the game and bethesda offered it up for two dollars fifty cents. It was an incredibly controversial decision and most players reacted badly. They didn't like it but enough gamers decided to try it out and bought the armor and it proved a theory that company had that you could create an entire revenue stream through what became known as microtransactions. Still almost no game developers chose to pursue this business bottle that same year. Two friends brandon beck and mark merrill pitched an idea to investors. They wanted to build free video games but offer up things like in game currency and weapons and characters and skill points. I price brandon and mark believed that if the game was good enough players would happily spend a few dollars each week to buy virtual products that might enhance the gaming experience not surprisingly most investors. Turn them down and thought it was a crazy idea. The question mark and brandon getting was. Who's gonna spend money on virtual things things that have no value in the real world and these were fair questions. And it's why it was so hard from arkan brandon to get right games up and running but the game they eventually built league of legends became one of the most popular video games of all time and a game that helped to pioneer the business model now known as the free to play model this year the global video game industry will hit more than a hundred and sixty billion dollars in revenue. That makes it four times bigger than the global film and tv industry and three times bigger than all the music sold around the world and twenty twenty. according to forbes video games will earn more than three hundred billion dollars by twenty twenty five and a growing percentage of that revenue comes from gamers who spend small amounts of money buying skins or costumes for their virtual characters or buying access to locked rooms and imaginary worlds huge gaming tournaments attract millions of viewers with players. Earning millions of dollars a year. It's a massive business and a big part of it has to do with the model that brandon marks company riot games helped. Pioneer and brandon both grew up in southern california. They met as teenagers at a summer leadership camp shortly before college. Here's how marc remembers it. I remember meeting brandon and mike. Oh you're from los angeles awesome it like video games. What's up in so we just kinda instantly hit it off. And then as i got to know him i also just really thought he had a infectious personality at that. It really interesting. Way of looking at the world that was sort of commentary from values perspective to mind in the edge just this incredibly entrepreneurial kind of business oriented mind. That kind of inspired me where i'm like. Wow i've never seen i've never encountered a person that's also younger me that felt so vibrant and dynamic and it's interesting way and so because of the shared love of games so they could hop on the modem play starcraft warcraft two or or duke nukem three d or if i mean we could go on and on about the titles that we all knew and connected about. Yeah so you meet this like leadership program and then you both go back to l. a. And and you you stay in touch or or did you kind of lose touch. Yeah i mean we. We stayed in touch and we call each other every once in a while we. We'd play some games. I remember one of those phone calls. Mark told me a really to see the matrix. What does that. he's like. You'll see ended up blowing my mind. My favorite movie of all time and mark. You headed to usc to start college and brandon did that. I know eventually you would also go to. Usc was was the fact that mark was there to that. Influence your decision to go. There was just just happened to be the place where you decide to go. It was a total coincidence. But it certainly made me more excited about it. I even visited mark when he was at school and hung out within the dorms. Where he he had a bunch of gaming buddies and they would they play games together. And i wasn't a very good student i had. Adhd in a variety of learning differences in wasn't pretty tough competitive school environment. And and i. And i just. I was not the kind of student i was sort of supposed to be. But in the meantime i'm living in this world online. I wanted to spend every minute in my spare time. I would build scripts that would play my character for me wall. I had to be a school. So i would continue to make progress. Well that's pretty impressive. But i mean you did despite your struggles you did end up getting into usc and mark is already there and presumably like you guys. What like start to hang out. And i guess you already have like a friend at college and you get there. Yeah mark would take me under his wing bit and you know introduced me to his friends and show me around. So yeah it was. It was really great showing up and no one mark mark when you guys were in college did. Did you think you know what. I'm gonna start a business with this guy one day or was it just like fun. Conversations would have about. Hey you know maybe one day we should do this or that. Yeah no we we did. But it was sort of accidental. In some ways you know brandon. And i because of our shared passion games and then also our mutual interest in business we would strategize brainstorm or think about opportunities and and this is one of the reasons that i was attracted to brands because he was sort of the most entrepreneurial business minded friend that i had like brandon random music station at sc. You'd be thinking about events or got so we were playing games and we both loved online games and so we loved to like watch replays of really competitive players playing online and try to help inform how we could get better than that started us thinking about well. Maybe we could help. Create or run some gaming tournaments. Maybe we could do some stuff like that surround campus and actually. Maybe there's a opportunity create a league that we were going to call the g. l. ultimate gaming league so brandon. I went down to the basement. Alevi library late one night. We started working on this rough business plan. Neither of us really knew how to build a business plans. We're trying to figure out what that looked. Like what the but on paper and all this and we can never really went anywhere that business but nonetheless I just remember being really energized about the possibilities of the future and and again. That's that's something that an grant and really helped awaken. Was this ability to look at not the way the world is currently but the way that it could be and how we could potentially go help change

Brandon Guy Roz Bethesda Brandon Beck Mark Merrill Arkan Brandon Mark USC Southern California Pioneer Mark Mark Marc Los Angeles Mike Brandon Random
Clean Slate with Todd Harrison

The Bible Says What!?

05:40 min | 10 months ago

Clean Slate with Todd Harrison

"Hello this is todd. how can you hear me. Okay i can. I can welcome back. Mr todd harrison. How you doing man. I'm doing good. How about you fantastic fantastic and all surviving staying indoors. Yeah good for you. Yeah that was blocked at netflix and amazon. Or sky man. Yeah amazon's doing real well to absolutely a generics anyway. So let's see here last time we talked. I don't even remember what we talked about. Maybe a little postles maybe a little bit of what you believe Let's just go ahead and start fresh like nothing ever happened. Because i can't remember the word of event sounds good to me. Why don't you go ahead and start off by giving giving us a brief description on why you are a christian at this point in time and how you got to it okay. Sure well. I grew up in in nominal church That was more littered surgical and then then alive and so when as a teenager. I just rejected it locked away. God was irrelevant to me I i i wouldn't say totally disbelieve. But i i can't say i believed in god can't and in fact i i did try. I tried hard to To not believe i. I went into science and university and You know as young person that has a huge effect on you because you kind of that We used to say tabula rasa. You're a blank page. So you kind of go into that. So in my particular university was was kind of radical so at some of the radicals that got kicked out of the states in the late sixties and early early seventies ended up in regina my home home university. Yes so i. i thought it was leaning to marxism. I got involved in transcendental transcendental meditation to kind deal with anxiety And i was a science majors. So i was definitely evolutionist All of those things. All of those things. And so i said to my girlfriend. One time i said. I said you know we're just we just animals. You know we live we dying and that's it it's over right. And so she just burst she just burst into tears in in cried for a while and so i decided not to bring that up again. So anyway We kind of had a long term relationship Actually a number of years five and it kind of came to a point where we had to do something about it and I entered. I went into education i entered. I did not have a good internship. I didn't know it at the time. But i'm adhd and there was no such diagnosis in those days. So so now. As i've been an educator for almost forty years but Apart from god that would never happen. But anyway. my internship. Your your You can't think linearly your executive functions are limited But you have a great imagination. So i used to start my homework about midnight. Eleven o'clock till four in the morning then go to school. So that wasn't a good pattern but anyway that's all. I got to university. But i i walked out. I went back for my last semester. And i i walked. I was there two weeks. And i said i'm done with this I was three months short of a double degree. And i just packed in and walked out and i took a job. I said i'm going to get a real job. And i took a job in a on a seismic crew. If you know what that is that's oil exploration and I was stationed in the arctic on an island in the arctic ocean called island. Yes so i kinda jumped out of the front pan into the fire and Yeah that was really interesting. Yeah so so. I flew up. I'd had a couple of friends who've done it before. And they told me what to wear. And so what the by. So i was prepared but i tell you the guy got off the plane and i saw those guys out there. The wind was blowing. It was like fifty below february. And they're out there unloading the plane. And i'm going my god. How can you work in the eight o'clock the next morning up there. It was actually. It was a good experience. I actually did two seasons but what did happen Gonna had my girlfriend got mad. Because i never discussed it with her so after five years i should have talked about it. She got mad and she moved out. She said well i'm gonna move to. Though she moved out to the west coast of vancouver island she was a nurse and she took a job nursing there so so our plan in money up north. She's gonna earn money there then. We're going to backpack europe. Because you know it's the seventy so. That's you

Mr Todd Harrison Amazon Regina My Home Home University Netflix Todd Anxiety Adhd The Arctic Ocean Arctic Vancouver Island Europe
Creativity as a Mechanism to Win

Social Strength Founder's Podcast

06:28 min | 11 months ago

Creativity as a Mechanism to Win

"Creativity as a mechanism to win. What yes that's what. I'm talking about right now. I have been just in love with my own process lately and it involves a mindset as well as a time management hack and one. I'm talking about is i work on my money making projects as my core focus of my day. That has not changed. But what has changed. Is you know grinding. It out for four years plus on doing own gig. Sometimes i get stuck or frustrated or like burnt out for lack of a better word and rather than going. Okay send a day to quit. Seven o'clock tune out. Watch some netflix six. Instead of doing that. I have implemented something else which is far more satisfying and it is. I have a set of creative projects that i'm doing and allotting time for for myself and if i do it right i can also learn. New skill sets while satisfying the creative side of my soul. So it has professional benefits as well as sole benefits as well as productivity benefits like. It's just a whoop. It's an alignment so let me explain the for myself. It might be different for you but for me. One of One project. I can think of as i wanted to learn some harmonies and lay them down on audio software. Just for fun. Because i love harmonizing and with the pandemic it's hard to get together in person and harmonize with people So i just was like well elite. How my own tracks harmonized with myself. Because it's so enjoyable. And i did that. So he became more familiar with Recording software and how to to do what i needed to do with multiple tracks et cetera. So that was a skill that i'm building and singing is obviously the harmonizing is really enjoyable So that satisfies decreed site. And then i was like well. I want to be able to quickly make any audio files. That i produce into videos so i was like all right. Quick hack and learn that real quick check and then just keep going so. That's one and then another one i have is. Oh then. this is totally frivolous inhale. Larry is and that's why i love it. L. being in my creative project rotation is that i've set up in my library. A mike stand and on it is god a microphone. Obviously and then an audio processor with the gain and everything and i plug it right into my phone. Start taking video and my dream for the for. The project is to have gene. Eat some healthy snacks and do like little. Asmar videos because it's so funny. Like i would love for him to be tic tac famous. And i don't even know dog. Asmar is something people like because it might be actually disgusting. Like i don't care. So i'm not really looking at it as like oh i'm gonna make my career out of making dog. Asmar no it's more just hilarious to me the thought of it as genre but then it also gives me more experience with equipment and working with my dog in creating content from a totally different angle and also video editing and tiktok. It's fun So those are just some examples for me. So it's it's kind of amazing you can just be working on your money making projects and then if you get stuck or you get tired Rather than just being like. I'm done for the day. That's it you just switch gears and you activate the creative part of your brain and if you do it right you can also pick up new skills on the side just for fun teaching yourself a whole manner of things and this is in addition to taking master classes or learning from your favorite business. People like i love. Jay abraham so much and radio and sara blakely and barbara corcoran and mark cuban. Of course i'm very aligned with him on social justice as well as how he approaches his whole entire career so anyway that is super fun. I wanted to talk to you guys about that. L. creativity is a mechanism win. And when no if you're doing that is well. I know a lot of people like engineering types to have multiple interests. They kinda tend to do this naturally so they just go from thing to think to think especially if they're like adhd so yeah. I've just really taken a lot of joy in this approach because it makes me feel like instead of like i'm not enough. I didn't complete you know solving this problem. That i've wanted to solve for three days. You know instead of feeling like that feeling and going. I gotta call it a night and just go watch some amazon prime. You know some movie instead of doing that. It's like i'm to. I'm a shelf this for now. And i'm going to activate a different part of my brain know because some of us are both analytical and creative

Asmar Netflix Sara Blakely Larry Barbara Corcoran Jay Abraham Mark Cuban Adhd Amazon
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"Can <Speech_Music_Male> go to the Chuck <Speech_Music_Male> Norris of <Speech_Music_Male> one is <Speech_Music_Male> what is the local the Chuck <Speech_Music_Male> Norris of legal <Speech_Music_Male> products. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Female> can go find. <Speech_Male> A good one. <Speech_Music_Male> On a website <Speech_Music_Male> somewhere <SpeakerChange> I. didn't just <Speech_Music_Female> make it out but it's <Speech_Female> Mine. <Speech_Female> But yes, <Speech_Female> you're <Speech_Female> right. It's on our about page. <Speech_Female> I think. Yeah. <SpeakerChange> That was <Speech_Music_Female> a long time ago that I wrote <Speech_Music_Male> that. <Speech_Music_Male> Where's the <Speech_Female> was? <Speech_Female> The contract <Speech_Female> everywhere it's our handles. <Speech_Female> It's our <Speech_Female> domain name. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> You know our email <Speech_Female> like whatever it <Speech_Female> is. If you <Speech_Female> just roughly <Speech_Female> throw that out into <Speech_Music_Male> the Google cereal, <SpeakerChange> find <Speech_Music_Male> us. <Speech_Music_Male> And if you're looking for <Speech_Music_Male> somebody who can hold <Speech_Music_Male> your hand through the process <Speech_Music_Male> of <Speech_Music_Male> a service into <Speech_Music_Male> a product or learning <Speech_Music_Male> how to think outside of <Speech_Music_Male> the box as <Speech_Music_Male> a lawyer or as <Speech_Music_Male> a service provider <Speech_Music_Male> Christina. <Speech_Music_Male> Be a great person for <Speech_Music_Male> that too and so we'll put <Speech_Music_Male> Lincoln. <Speech_Music_Male> To <SpeakerChange> the owners <Speech_Male> inner circle. <Speech_Female> Yeah. That's just my <Speech_Female> yeah. That's the <Speech_Female> owners and <Speech_Female> DOT COM or <Speech_Female> money. <Speech_Female> So. That's our new <Speech_Female> project that we've been working <Speech_Female> on. So that's exciting. <Speech_Music_Female> But yes, thank you so <Speech_Female> much for having me in <Speech_Female> everything you're doing <Speech_Female> here and sharing <Speech_Female> about. <SpeakerChange> Just <Speech_Male> bringing attention to all <Speech_Music_Male> of this while <Speech_Male> it's my pleasure and. <Speech_Male> Good luck <Speech_Music_Male> sorting out Georgia versus <Speech_Music_Male> Colorado. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I have a have <Speech_Music_Male> an inkling <Speech_Music_Male> <hes> the west <Speech_Music_Male> will the <SpeakerChange> West will have <Speech_Music_Male> one here before too <Speech_Music_Female> long? <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I think you <Speech_Male> might be right. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> All the <Speech_Music_Male> best to you in all <Speech_Music_Male> of your endeavors <Speech_Music_Male> and thank you so much <Speech_Music_Male> Christina. <Speech_Male> thinking, Marshall. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Isn't Christina Aguilera <Speech_Music_Male> amazing. <Speech_Male> This is a woman <Speech_Male> whose drive <Speech_Male> and Wanderlust <Speech_Male> and creativity <Speech_Music_Male> clarity <Speech_Music_Male> and entrepreneurship <Speech_Music_Male> have driven her to <Speech_Music_Male> amazing <Speech_Music_Male> places humbling <Speech_Male> places, places that <Speech_Male> get me. So excited <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> what I love <Speech_Music_Male> most about her stories <Speech_Music_Male> is <Speech_Music_Male> her vulnerability <Speech_Music_Male> I. Love How <Speech_Music_Male> she shared with all <Speech_Music_Male> of us the <Speech_Music_Male> many bumps <Speech_Music_Male> along her path <Speech_Music_Male> and the bumps that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> she seen in other people's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> path <Speech_Music_Male> sometimes to <Speech_Music_Male> a really <Speech_Music_Male> devastating effect <Speech_Music_Male> and <hes> <Speech_Music_Male> I I <Speech_Music_Male> love that she shares <Speech_Music_Male> that she's failed <Speech_Music_Male> repeatedly that <Speech_Music_Male> she struggled with <Speech_Music_Male> mental and physical <Speech_Male> health issues <Speech_Male> some related to Adhd <Silence> and some not. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> She like a lot <Speech_Music_Male> of us was diagnosed with <Speech_Music_Male> adhd later in <Speech_Music_Male> her life and <Speech_Music_Male> she shared a <Silence> story with <Speech_Music_Male> us and <Speech_Music_Male> she told us <Speech_Music_Male> her story <Speech_Music_Male> about the many challenges <Speech_Music_Male> that she <Speech_Music_Male> was facing <Silence> before she got diagnosed. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> And through those struggles, <Speech_Music_Male> there <Speech_Music_Male> was this underlying <Speech_Music_Male> pulse of creation <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> and growth <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Silence> <Advertisement> malleability. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It's also <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> conspicuous <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> if you <Silence> <Advertisement> are paying attention. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> ADHD <Speech_Music_Male> and drive us all <Speech_Music_Male> to amazing <Speech_Music_Male> places <Speech_Music_Male> I'm glad that <Speech_Male> you're on this journey with <Speech_Music_Male> me, and if <Speech_Music_Male> you'd like to talk to me about <Speech_Music_Male> one on one coaching <Speech_Music_Male> for your Adhd <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and its impact <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on your practice <Speech_Male> or your life, <Speech_Music_Male> please <Speech_Music_Male> email me at <Speech_Music_Male> Marshall <Speech_Music_Male> at jd HD. <Silence> Dot? com. <Speech_Music_Male> We heard <Speech_Music_Male> Christina scholar <Speech_Music_Male> a talk about how getting <Speech_Music_Male> her adhd <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> under control changed <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> everything <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for her. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Back gives me <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> so much <Silence> <Advertisement> hope.

Chuck Adhd Christina Aguilera Google Georgia Marshall. Colorado.
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"Had observed in you that she'd been watching that sounded to her like Adhd, drinking coffee, of course, but we all do that. Yeah. Okay. So here is the biggest thing that I think tipped her off is I I was telling her like how hard it is for me to go grocery. And actually enjoy grocery shopping So I will go to the grocery store and I will race around to the point where like sometimes I'd knock into people's cards and like. I just had like this thing Zayed's that I was GonNa Forget something and I'm like, why do I care so much like it's just it's just groceries like you forget something go back where I'm at in Colorado I don't have like you can't order it online or anything it's very rural. So. Those out of the question. So anyway, that was a big tip tip-offs her because I have this anxiety about collecting everything that I need for the rosary trip to the point where it's affecting me and like my interactions with other people where she thinks if I just had like a neuro typical brain, you just the grocery store you have your lists you're not anxious about something you're in a forget from the list that's right in front of you. You tend to remember like where things are in your store whereas I'm going all over the store like back and forth back and forth and so that was like one of the things that she noticed in my daily life that was kind of the boss that I was like. trying to think of other things that she noticed. There were a lot of things that like as far as the overwhelmed goes that had to do with adhd basically. I was stuck in this cycle of feeling overwhelmed. So I wouldn't do anything and then because I didn't do anything I felt were overwhelmed and I felt more behind. So, that I would do less and then I would you know it just was horrible cycle that kept continuing? My sales were starting to plummet Obviously, my anxiety was through the roof like everything was not going well, and when it started to affect like my daily functioning my life, my business that's when she was like this is really serious like we do need to do something about it so. That tipped her off and I think it was just a lot of stories that I had told her along the way. About. Things that I did or didn't do in law school So.

Adhd Zayed Colorado
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"Two weeks in a row. Are you serious? Hey, thank you for being here I'm glad to be here. We're at two weeks in a row. It's awesome and a couple of things are really standing out to me. First of all, it's that some habits that I have really been laser focused on a really starting to pay off It has been a really. Important part of my life to focus on riding my bike every single day for at least thirty minutes a day. To Meditate And to it at least seven and a half hours of sleep at night now there are some other ones in there and the first who I've done really really well on and it's been really important and it feels really great and so I think that's part of why back and part of why I'm energized per why things feel Lake I've got new energy but I'll tell you there I have clients that are sharing their struggles with me. They have struggles that we all expect billing and timekeeping and processing their email. I have clients with real struggles in project planning and project management and priority management studying for law students I even have a client who's real catalyst for an amazing day is making sure that she takes a shower in the morning, and so we've been working on habits to ensure that it's really easy for her to remember to take a shower in the morning. adhd. Does come with some of these things that make a struggle, but it also comes with amazing superpowers. It comes with creativity and grit and Energy and entrepreneurship, and today's guest show is every single. One of those things She's content marketing guru. She's possibly the world's first equity photography contract Ninja which seems like couldn't be thing but. Listen up it's the thing. She's the host of the now shuttered world-famous podcasts elite diagnosed adhd woman lawyer with Adhd and Wanderlust, and a record of being a many time Internet entrepreneur. She all around kind thoughtful and insightful and generous gas. We had a great conversation both before I hit record and after and this episode I'm really proud of it and it's chock full of stories and tips about adhd their tips on marketing content creation and the unending drive to create beautiful things. I am Marshall Icky. She is Christina Scalia, and this is J. D. HD a podcast for lawyers with adhd. Listen Up. So Christina's GALERA. How are you?.

adhd marketing guru Christina Scalia Marshall Icky
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"The first go. There's an even worse outcome right? There's one outcome which is that just didn't feel right or fell crows uncomfortable I don't. WanNa. Go back. My experience and the experience of many people like me. This is particularly true for lawyers particularly true for people who have high Q. and door tends to be big within the legal industry they might go into of therapist or. or a traitor diagnosis or diagnosed her and say you know here's my background. Here's my social background in this was my experience I sat down with a psychologist she was I was referred to her she claimed have expertise in Adhd I had been trump suffering from anxiety I went into Roberta's office and she sat down, we did my social history and she said hold on let me get this right you graduate from college. Yeah. You went to law school. Yeah. You graduate from law school. Yeah. You took the bar. Exam. Did you pass the bars. Mya Did you practice as a lawyer? Yeah? You don't have adhd and then she kinda hold her nose as we did a little bit more work and inevitably, of course, what came back was a diagnosis of anxiety. But I've been treating for anxiety I had medication for anxiety and it wasn't doing a thing not one thing. and. That set me back a good half year and it wasn't until my son was diagnosed later that his doctor looked at me and my eye and said, one of the biggest challenges we have with treating young boys who have adhd is that a lot of times it's the blind leading the blind. We know it's highly heredity hereditary and that one parent probably has some of this and that if you're she has an undiagnosed, they're gonNA have a very hard time being useful to honor daughter who has adhd and he was looking me looking at me and said. Does. Does any of this resonate for anybody in your family and then looked at my wife and said I know you don't have adhd so. She was an active disincentivize her for me. It was not just a benign. This didn't feel it was an actively destructive experience in my journey and I remember walking out of their thinking well, my anxiety treatment isn't working and I don't have. adhd I am out of choices I don't know what?.

Adhd WanNa Roberta Mya
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

09:55 min | 1 year ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"And I'm proud of her team then proud of her company for doing things the way that do. I'll be meanwhile also love Mike whalen and we're GONNA talk to well. Mike I gotTa Tell You. Thanks for for coming on. Jd HD welcome. I am happy to be here and hang out with you. I am in my closet studio with blankets hanging over me. 'cause that's what professional podcasters. Do you sound amazing as usual. And what's funny to me? Is We've done this before. But frankly I know you best as prolific member of the twitter audie and so I feel like I know you in Short Biffi. Lovely sound bites rather than long-form interviews stuff. So I'm really excited to dive in with you. I'm on twitter a lot because I cannot afford a therapist so I just put it in there. I don't have to go pay for somebody. I'm sorry world okay. I'm just working through some stuff but happy to do it out loud with you guys on twitter. I love it. It's amazing well me. Twitter is a good segue to impulse control. Which is maybe a good segue into. Adhd in what? I Call J. D. H. D.'s. My understanding is that you are one. You're you're ADHD. I wasn't diagnosed during law school. Which is a whole story but yes so. I'm fascinated by that. We're going to get to law school in a second but I what did it feel? Like growing up with undiagnosed eighty. It felt like I got in trouble. Allot my my mom. We were at a family reunion recently. And my mom was telling my wife about my. It was my third grade teacher just called my mom in one day and said Your Son. Will Not stop talking. She was really about it like this was no matter what was going on in the classroom. I had a joke. I had a comment in and it's interesting because the joking became kind of coping mechanism and as I grew up. I didn't really realize that right. I just thought it was hilarious. And of course being hilarious comes with the negativity right. It's it's the feeling that you're supposed to be funny all the time and so you know half the time I was saying something funny and I took that praise and half the time I was saying something totally offensive in stupid and and I really internalize that negatively. So you know growing up. I had this feeling that was constantly with me that I could not achieve. I remember talking to one of my friends who I stayed in touch with on facebook. Who was one of my high school friends and I made a joke about the fact that I I hung around with all these overachievers and felt really out of place and he said to me Mike. You were one of the most over achieving people in our group. You just didn't play the part and thinking about you know the stuff that I accomplished in high school but all the negativity that came with it because I felt like I couldn't be on all the time I was constantly judging one of the most constant companions that I've found of my adhd especially when it was undiagnosed was this feeling of just not being qualified right. Just the shame of feeling like I was not an overachiever that I could not achieve. And that was probably the largest negative association. I had with a growing up. We hear a lot of people talk about imposter syndrome. And what I hear from you and certainly my experience to is. This isn't just imposter syndrome. This impostor syndrome like. Did you ever watch despicable meeting where they shot up with the stuff and they turn purple and into monsters this impostor syndrome with the Purple Monster? Despicable me thing where you're just like the Sheen it's not just maybe I don't belong here it's like I don't belong here and everything that I've done leading up to this moment is shameful if I just would have done something differently. Maybe I would belong here but I don't write and I've written a lot about shame as a concept and written about it in sort of a different context thinking about what somebody wants when they're getting divorced for example we've talked a lot in law about what they actually want is just unfinished processed. But in fact most of the time what I found is that someone wants to publicly shame. The other someone. There's some emotional. Need that I think is deeper than a process. And the reason is that anthropologically. We've always used shame. Shame as one of the major trainers of the next generation. And how they're supposed to behave how they fit in what? The expectations and roles are that are assigned to different people so shame as a social mechanism that were really hard wired with and you and I assume growing up that shameless purposely put on us right because the behavior that is most destructive in a school environment is standing out. It's not standing in line. It's making noise when you're not supposed to. And so the shame that became associated with standing out in any way was so heavy that it became just part of my identity. Like you said it was it was doped up imposter syndrome. It was a whole system was created to make me feel that shame and I was happy to comply so when I get back to that but before we do. Tell me about your diagnosis story. How did you come to a point where you went out and did the things necessary to get diagnosed with Adhd? So I went to law school when I was thirty and I had four kids in tow at the time and would not recommend that anyone but reflected my inability to commit to a track. I had you know after I I went on my mission to for two years An LBS mission. In Italy. I came back I went to. I worked in a trucking company. I worked at in management right. I was doing logistics in dispatching. Different things and then I moved over to Undergrad and I went out there thinking I was going to go to dental school and then I found out that you have to touch people and there were needles involved. There was no cool so I switched to Middle East Studies. Obviously because that's an obvious pivot from pre dental. Obviously and then my wife was really concerned. I had been accepted to a PhD program. My wife was really concerned that I wanted to be in school for the rest of my life. Sure School has this very cool thing that every semester you get to play in a totally different area right you get to set up your classes and it can be something totally different and the fact that I went from dental to Middle East studies to linguistics to history. Not only can change your class setup. You can change your major so for brain like mine to be able to just bounce around on subjects and play and and then hyper focus and then hyperfocused and you know when I did it. I was pretty damn good at each thing. Which sucks right. That's a terrible that so far being really pretty good at a lot of things and not great at something is a really hard state to be so my wife is like. I don't want you to go to school for the rest of forever we left. I didn't do the PhD program. And eventually I convinced her. We should go to law school. It is the best financial bet. So this is GONNA BE. What two thousand six or something? I went into law school in September of Eight and it was October when the banks collapsed. So we were literally the last people that didn't know and when I went to law school something that was new was I wasn't a genius anymore right dump liability to screw around and pull it off at the end. I'm now just normal right in law school I was just I went to Texas and Texas is an interesting school. It's not a yeller harb bracket but it's like in the twelve to fifteen whatever range and so you know their trust fund babies right there kids who've been successful their whole lives. They're studying for fourteen hours a day this stuff and we're on a curve and I'm freaking out right. I can't keep up. I've got a wife and kids at home. They've got demands and so I went and sought a diagnosis. And I gotTa tell you. It was disturbingly easy to get that diagnosis interesting. My experience with getting diagnosed was different but the lead up to the the sort of awareness of your intellectual. Frailty maybe or you know all of a sudden being level set when you come into a group of people who maybe have some intellectual ability but also have a long standing work ethic and ability to dive deep into all kinds of subjects regardless of whether there's a trigger to force them to do it I mean one of my experiences with my. Adhd is. I can do just about anything as long as I have. The equivalent of a death threat. If you don't do this something horrible is going to happen. I'm like Oh great I can knock that out. I'm knocking on all night long or do nights in a row if we need to. And so that's consistent with my experience too but tell me even in law school when you were getting diagnosed you were still doing the things that I associate with the superpowers of Adhd so you were entrepreneurial even back then you started the future small and Solo firm Attorney Group building community and things like that. You were also relational and meeting lawyers in out of the practice areas. That you were goofing around with. Tell me one thing that I'm really interested in. I want to transition into a little bit is you are the quintessential builder of communities. And you have some history with it but I think primarily you do it through vulnerability and so I want to bridge from your experience at Texas and that entrepreneurialism and building a future small and solo firm group and I want you to tell me about how that vulnerability and building a community I showed itself and in particular I.

Adhd twitter Mike whalen Texas Mike I Middle East Studies Short Biffi facebook Call J. D. H. D. Mike Italy Solo firm Attorney Group
"adhd" Discussed on Scattered, Focused, Done ��Reimagining Productivity with ADHD

Scattered, Focused, Done ��Reimagining Productivity with ADHD

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"adhd" Discussed on Scattered, Focused, Done ��Reimagining Productivity with ADHD

"The level of impairment. You experience is less so if you're currently experience a lot of stress and overwhelm because of your Adhd I can tell you for sure it can get better and the way it can get better is by getting the help you need and adopting tools and strategies that work for you and worked for your Adhd or rather with your adhd one of the ways that you could do this and that other successful adhd adults do. This is by crafting your environment in a way that works for you because now as an adult. You have more agency to do this than when you were a child. As a child you may have had to fit into a prescribed environment. Whether worked for your not of course this depends on the adults in your life but regardless of whether this was true for. You're not you don't have to do this anymore. You can decide how you want your environment to work including your work environment in your Home Environment. Who you hang out with in a way that relies more on your strengths and less on those characteristics. Adhd and other characteristics. You may have that you find challenging the other question I wanNA talk about in this first episode has to do with treatment because really when people are looking for information and this may be true for you to about Adhd. It's about so what's the treatment. What do I do to make things better? And so is the treatment the same for all adults is the treatment the same for adults and kids. Well esn no in the sense. The goal of treatment is the same for everyone right. The goal of treatment is to manage your symptoms so you can take advantage of those. Adhd symptoms that help you and minimize those you find challenging in order to operate better in your daily life that means better in your daily life means being able to do what is meaningful to you whether it's work or personal same with kits right the differences while there are a few differences one is your life is obviously lot more complicated now. I know you didn't need me to tell you that but it's true. Your Life is more complicated now. What that means though is that you have a lot more bouncing balls that you.

Adhd
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"When they stop working and if it doesn't feel like I have any end point who does it feel like I can shut things off then now. Technology is a as a deficit. There are two things there that I love one of them being proactive about shutting off technology algae are using it only when appropriate the other one that I love. Is this idea of building margin using tools and technology to give yourself space to not use technology or I do not work or to not do that thing and one thing that in my experience with Adhd and a lot of folks. That I've talked to their experience is just this. Life of hyper hyper inflammation. It is like your body is under siege. Because you're always reacting to something everything is an emergency everything needs to get done because because you've procrastinated or failed to start or you go home at night and you can't relax because you have an enormous amount of things going through all the stuff that you forgot to do or failed to do or should good starter might do or whatever and you literally never have a moment to breathe and using technology effectively in some of these other tactics can just start to to build a little bit of breathing room. So I'm talking about a couple of things that you've mentioned elsewhere and I'll I'll I'll just kind of kind of list through them You've talked about practicing meditation tation in mindfulness as as a powerful tool decluttering your space setting setting boundaries to maintain organization controlling your counter. Saying no I love the the idea of saying no like everyday try and say it every day at least a couple of times because you know as an attorney as a law student there are always going to be people who Ask You for things that you could provide if you said yes and bright being mindful about what you say no to. And why is I think really powerful there are some of those other Blocking and tackling and just taking care of our bodies things that can have profound impacts on. ADHD like sleep exercise diet nutrition. I know you've mentioned those in the book and I know you've also mentioned the book transforming Adhd and that's a resource that you rely on and recommended people. I do highly recommend that book. That's great practical suggestions and as well as if you want to deep dive into research. They've got the research in there too And it's one of those books where you don't have to read cover to cover can pick it up and.

Adhd attorney
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"Not or hide it or SORTA compensate for it so that you're at the same level level. Is somebody else it's really about valuing what your abilities are and using them to your advantage because people with Adhd most of the time. The least the people that I'm talking to most of the time they see it as something that they struggle with something that needs a fix needs some solutions rarely but not not totally absent but rarely people talk about the advantages manages of ADHD in how because of Adhd. They're able to do things that other people struggle to do right and so that's often my encouragement arrangement people's to think holistically about your experience they the hd one thing that I sort of one seed that plan people's heads often as most those people struggles with ADHD have a lot to do with how your natural inclinations her abilities don't don't line up with your environment the expectations of that environment whether that's the physical environment the the demands of of the work. And so if you see it as a mismatch that's different than seeing yourself as lacking in some core way so that you can't succeed or you can't sort of accomplish what you want if you see it as a mismatch like those expectations weren't there you know if you didn't have a deadline bearing down on you or if you didn't have the requirement of needing to sit in front of a computer for.

Adhd
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"Get a diagnosis. They they start to understand those struggles differently. It's still really hard to shed that identity that oh I was told for so long that this is why I struggle and if if they've internalized that it's hard to then categorize that as a struggle with ADHD and. Here's the explanation. Here's some things you can do about got it can be. It can be both the diagnosis or it can be both helpful and sort of alarming in some ways. Yeah that that is consistent with my experience for shore I when I was diagnosed I remember having this sense of relief. Off and the sense of An explanation for some of the struggles in some of the patterns that I had noticed in myself sort of discrepancy between what I thought I I could do and what my track record actually proved that I could do which ended to be a bit more discrepant than I would have preferred But also that lands in saying in now that I have these tactics and tools and I use I I take medication and I have. ADHD coach. And I'm in an ADHD group group and You know I have built scaffolding around my experience but there is definitely still and in you know an emotional and psychological psychological part of this that is not about tactics. It's not about minimizing. I you know practical weaknesses that result from Adhd it is literally about working through already to some odd years of that sense that sensibility of that Delta discrepancy and that Shame and the voice that is in my head that his impostor syndrome but it's imposter syndrome on steroids. It's you know it's like Super Imposter Syndrome. And my wife calls it the the Itty bitty you should he committee because I've now gotten to the point where I'm comfortable telling her some of the voices that are going on in my head. She's like what are you I mean. Where's the evidence for that? It's all right here. They're telling me you know. The committee is in session and they are telling me just how Shitty I am. Don't that part the the the approaching from tactics and what can we can do is definitely part of it. There's also that emotional part that I think you're touching on their absolutely and.

ADHD
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"A monthly support group for Lawyers Boston's ADHD. And one of the most common comments. That I get in that group is. It's so good to talk talked to other people openly about this coming from the deep and weird and ADHD Marceau lick the neo cortex six this podcast for Boyer's with Adhd where we talk about finally getting stuff done we help you optimize Zuma practice your business your life and your we hyper focus on it. No tips and tricks every other they know they have it or not in the one. I am a lawyer and end up. Got ADHD and. I am so excited that you're here if you're new here Hello and welcome. I'm really excited to have you. Please don't be intimidated. I we're just getting started with this thing and so we We aren't deep in the weeds. We're still talking about a lot of stuff that is really applicable of people who have just discovered their ADHD St or who are curious about it so stick around and usually we talk a lot about paid hd and lawyers here but there are exceptions to everything and so despite being being negative one degree Fahrenheit outside in Minneapolis right now. Spring is in the air pitchers and catchers report. UNLV spring training and just a couple of days and my beloved Minnesota twins had made Nissen ear. Lash also this rated by the New York Yankees in the playoffs as usual and when I recorded this episode with my amazing guests from Boston we spent a little time talking about the stupid Yankees. The Red Sox twins and a mutual affection we talked about it a lot more than that it though and you know in his wisdom Mike guests took the time to talk about the emotional side of adhd and how our self perception plays a role in how we experience it notably. I started with a brand new therapist last week and I am excited that she's going to help me with my own. ADHD fueled emotional regulation which my wife Katie calls the Itty Bitty shitty committee my.

ADHD New York Yankees Red Sox Boyer Lash UNLV Katie Zuma Minneapolis Boston Minnesota Nissen Mike
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"Can help you. They probably can help you better than again so making sure that they feel comfortable and equipped to do that takes that takes place so we try to take Sort of unrelentingly positive approach to Adhd. And you believe that it's a superpower are and their strengths to be derived from it and I will stay true to that however I will also share that you have on occasion made me laugh out loud out with a text message or an email. Finish this sentence if you would so. I'm sitting outside the dentist's Office on the crew and I'm too embarrassed to go wait inside because I locked my keys in the car and I'm waiting for the locksmith and others. I mean that is you are all of us and there are parts of this condition that I think really are super powerful Our empathy our enthusiasm our creativity. Our for Entrepreneurialism our ability to handle stress in stressful situations You know I think all of those things are great great and sometimes you're embarrassed to go back into the waiting room where it would be more comfortable to wait after you yourself. Out of your car again I also love I love the idea of the ADHD tax which had kind of heard before. But now I'm literally. I actually literally created a document on which I am keeping track of the Adhd balance-sheet. So sometimes I write down. This was a net positive. This was a net negative. And I'm just trying to see if my adhd tax is outstripping my ability to earn ADHD revenue and offer. I actually don't keep track but so at Marshall's talking about is when I told him what I got locked out of my car. I had to call the locksmith. And it was like seventy nine bucks.

Adhd Marshall
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"Boundaries can be really tough for folks with ADHD. And it sounds like you've voluntarily set a boundary around your Monday mornings but you've also removed boundaries in other parts of your practice and have you struggle with the balance between the boundaries that you have in place and enforce and the ones that there are there but aren't enforced or really. Aren't there at all. Oh for sure I mean I'm really a bleeding heart care. Everybody and I want to help everybody and so I am learning the hard way that you can't. You can't help everybody. You can work around the clock for some people and it just you. You know if this case has bad backs the case as bad fax in. Let's just let's take a realistic approach instead of like you know it's GonNa be a hard one but we're five is hard to be honest. This is not. Let's not take this. It's not take this. What's a good analogy? I was GONNA take his horse to the race track. But let's not. Let's not even try because this is hard card and it's not gonNA work Or would I approach Prefer it's just like hey it's gonNa cost you this amount of money and you're still gonNA lose. Are you okay with that and most people will say. Now I want to say yes. Don't even mean it but Give them a couple of days so I I do have a difficult time with that though. With what what stuff is worth working through the night for and what stuff can we till tomorrow because if your client you've got one case in one case only usually and and it's important it's on your mind all the time I mean I've been on the other side I've been a client before it's the only thing you think about all the time. It's so much money that you're spending and it's all you can think guitar and so when you call the lawyer and they're in some other meeting like what he's working on right. How dare you not think is as important as I do? And it's it's important to remember that it's not that you're not as important. It's just that let's look at what has to absolutely absolutely stunning today. And why can wait and I'm still have that figured out. Still definitely working on it. But it's something trying trying to work work on trying to improve as I go and trying to set realistic expectations with clients. If you people don't respond to emails right away or else or clients. We'll start expecting. Yeah well I know my clients. Some of them need refunds right away and other ones they.

ADHD
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"Just diagnosed. So so. I know that you're objectively rockstar. So you take that That diagnosis and you do what are those rockstar elements of your your resume. The function of you just being pumped full of Medications no I didn't do any of those first year because I was Lost but I think those are the results of finding out that I can do amazing. Good when I I focus on what I want to do. And then focusing on it I guess letting myself obsessive about the things I care about and get involved to level that other people would mean. I discovered a secret about all those different groups and stuff that people talk about them but not actually wants to do worked for them to help you on the board to show up to organize the meetings and it's not actually hard you could just do it and people are really happy and grateful and it brings people together so that was really a really enriching part of my law. School life is being able to be involved in. That seems like a theme. We'll talk about more about the business that you're building right now Later but it seems that your entrepreneurial spirit and your willingness to be the one who takes the Mantle Oh and does the work and engages the people and builds the community. That's been consistent across all of these experiences and I think that's a that's one one of the things I love about. ADHD is I think folks who can get enthusiastic and can get energetic and can get creative about You know the way that we're approaching coaching. The things were involved in something. That's just absolutely missing from a lot of places particularly in the law and so I love. I love that at work. That's a really neat set of things that you've spent a bunch of time and energy on and I like to think and I am. I guess that's a question. How much of of that you think is unique to people who have ADHD and being able to approach these things and try new things and be excited and energized by new interesting things? Can you think it might have to to do with slight social awkwardness to where we don't realize like I just go ahead and say something and then I realized later that perhaps I should not have said that doc or so I think part of it is just do something and then later someone thinks. Oh my God did not and then I'm like wait. That's not a thing I can't just go start my own group.

ADHD
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"HD podcast for lawyers with ADHD. I'm so thankful you're here and I'm really excited about are episodes day with a woman who cracks me up. She is hilarious. in-kind for me she's been personally motivating and It also just a great supporter and encourage her. She's an entrepreneur. She has her own firm throat law school and her life she has. It's been a creator and a starter of things And she is one of the people who came to me so early on in my journey with JD HD and his been a a really a motivating factor for me people like. Liz are people who I want to shine in the world she has adhd she is out about her adhd and she has had her struggles with it that she will share with you. But I'll tell you behind those struggles. And when I talked to her and hear about her and hear her passion and her energy and her creativity. I know that people like Liz make our profession. Better her Her firm her existence the way that she supports people her team clients and when I think about how. JD HD can be in the world it is for people like Liz. She's a lawyer and a practitioner in North Carolina with an incredible resume with big firm stuff and a a wake forest law degree in some Vanderbilt Undergrad. She's been active in the bar and associations through law school and her lawyering ring career. She's organized legal Kalinic's she's submitted amicus briefs to the Supreme Court and has spoken and and she started a facebook group for ADHD lawyer. MOMS and I am so thankful for her vulnerability and the way that she has really just helped me feel alike. JD HD is important. So I'm excited for this interview with Liz Venom. The first ADHD lawyer other other than me that we've had on the podcast she's blazing new territory. And I hope you will hear in her voice. All of the things that I love about her was Benham and Liz Venom. Welcome to the JD HD podcast. I am really excited to have you here. Thanks Marshall I'm excited to be here. Yeah Yeah One of my favorite things about you right out of the gate is that you have an incredible ability to tell stories that resonate with me right in my soul. You share anecdotes and I'm Mike Up. She has me. She's my spirit animal. I think that the navy hd.

Liz Venom JD HD adhd ADHD Liz Vanderbilt Undergrad North Carolina facebook Marshall Supreme Court Kalinic
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"It's such good news now. Don't get me wrong. I'm not saying there isn't a downside. God I just told you the downside. It's horrible it can. It can be on your life and just make life a living if you don't know what's going on. Aw that's so sad because this living hell is get out of -able you don't have to live in it you don't have you don't have to suffer get out of -able I like that. Let's make adhd easier law is hard enough. You've talked about treatment and and I think I think the way I want to wrap Mabel move into it shortly here but but before we do You've talked about treatment starting with education right. It is literally about the first building block is learning what this thing is and demystifying it so that you understand what those challenges that need to be overcome and overcome are so that you can unlock that potential and so Speak just very briefly about the when you get treated Does it tend and to start with someone like you. A psychiatrist can start anywhere else in the world. You're absolutely right. The first step is education in sometimes begins by reading one of my books. You know. Sometimes it doesn't begin with a professional at all. They read driven to distraction or delivered from distraction and they have an for this hundreds if not thousands of times they start crying they say my God. How does this person know me sessile as even living with me I mean you know yes because in those I really drill down into the granular details of everyday life and far more than the stupid list of symptoms in the Dsm non-state stupid but it's very reduction mystic and it doesn't get the need of at all and so in those books I really really flesh it out? In these people men women children see themselves so vividly and they see themselves is portrayed in such a sympathetic way with with answers attached. This is what to do and so often the treatment if you will begins simply simply got reading a book or talking to somebody who understands and I'm going to drop that was In the show notes I will promote them everywhere in the entire world because that has been the the experience that I have had and the experience of folks that I have spoken with about my adhd in about what it looks like to start getting treated for Adhd as an adult I will you know driven to distraction then. Delivered from distraction are two extraordinary books And and if you have hard time reading them listen to him on audio book. They're tailable there too. So we'll drop those in But I think doctor I want to be respectful of your time especially here on your birthday very thankful for you And I think maybe the best way to talk about All of the positives literally as to point people to your entire body of work Those books the writing that you've Don Online The new book. That is coming out because I know that you believe it in your core that this is a strength I do too and but I should I want I just want to add. Add to that which I really appreciate your saying but my even greater achievement if you WANNA call it an achievement You might as well is is the thirty year marriage that I've had to the most wonderful woman in the world couldn't have even begun to do any of it without her and the amazing three children when we. We've we've had lucy US thirty and the Jack Who's twenty seven Tucker who's twenty four They a all inherited my. Add and they all are thriving. And and I often tell people I have achieved my life's most cherished goal which which is with sue leading the way my wife to give our kids the happy childhood I didn't have and and it's just a it again. Today is special bags turning seventy but that that is the that is what I'm most proud of and I couldn't have done it without understanding standing my add. I couldn't have done it without knowing why I am the way I am and what to do about it. If I just relied on chance I would've flubbed ABDUC over and over and over while I have a quote sitting.

Adhd Mabel Tucker lucy US Jack Who
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"A little bit to talk about The folks that I talk to every day I talked to lawyers with. Adhd you and I talked to whereas with ADHD whether they know it or not. And I just WanNa feed you a little bit of information so that we can frame up The way that we talk about. Because there's there's data out there that that are important to this discussion you know. We know that lawyers have an extraordinarily high rate of anxiety and depression substance. It's abuse alcoholism addiction suicidal thoughts. Divorce a whole bunch of pathology we have done very little to explore this just like just like doctors by indeed and indeed and and that's why I think it's so fascinating to hear about you and your practice to hear about you and your. Adhd these are things that are real in our profession. We also have lawyers. Here's self identifying at twelve and a half percent of the the number of folks who self identifies having. ADHD that are lawyers as twelve and a half percent while not self self identifying so you could probably multiple that by three to get the real sure and that goes to the statistics that eighty percent or so of adults are not diagnosed with Adhd even though they're walking around and they have a bit complicated indeed by The fact that folks who are smart tend to be more difficult to diagnose because of their ability to cover up some executive dysfunctions options otherwise otherwise show. And so you know here. We are with this group of people with compulsive behaviors addictive behaviors and a whole bunch of things that make it hard hard to diagnose not to mention the stigma of licensing in the concerns about.

ADHD depression executive
"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

08:46 min | 2 years ago

"adhd" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"Sub sub topics related ideas from there and so on and so forth and as you branch out your branches get smaller and smaller and more detailed. It's a great way to capture your thoughts and ideas visually. It's a great way to bring bring ideas to life. It's a great plan things for me. Project planning really benefits from mine mapping when I write briefs or AH pitches strategy other kinds of meetings that I'm planning I can be a great tool because just helps me capture all of the inputs that might go into but then again it just helps you. Visualize what you're actually working on so you can see the ideas in a format that's different than a typical outline or in just a wall of words or letters that we sometimes use when were just drafting straight into like Microsoft word for example and then finally especially for ADHD. It's really really brain. Friendly's the super for simple way to capture ideas in a way that works for our brains so next why why would we use a tool when brainstorming works or taking notes or whatever works well first of all a prescription so for my son He was literally prescribed mind. Mapping here's a here's a screen shot of his actual diagnosis utilizing mind. Mapping academic settings may help Everett visually organize information allowing him to see relationships among pieces of a larger gestalt adult concept so in the center of a piece of paper. Write down the concept or the topic to be addressed in using images concepts and codes and symbols. Build the map so that he can visualize the topic so for us. It's a very real part of our kids eighty itchy. It's more effective than other brainstorming and linear note taking their memorable to create and share and review enjoyable to create and share and review. And they say that six times better remembering information than with words alone for folks with ADHD. It's great because it's intuitive. Mind mapping works the way that our brains do it links concepts naturally makes natural associations build together up you create more. Yes if people meaning and allows you to see the gaps in your reasoning or you're thinking or you're brainstorming which then prompts more thinking and prompts or research you can remember more you can solve problems more creatively you can capture your ideas and Organiz your thoughts and concepts develop and enhance answer. Creativity work faster juggle more complex projects and improve learning and memory. I tend to fifteen percent over traditional note taking so pretty compelling stuff. They're ADHD easier. It's hard enough. So how do we do it. Well we're looking at it right now. First of all use color connections and words and place your central image or word concept right in the center of the Mind Map actually helps your your brain literally see more of the page and it allows you to Be Creative when you push those ideas out to the edges of the paper so it's actually a physical reminder of the fact that your brain can go literally any ruth which I love at main branches to organize those ideas about your subject start with WHO. What when where why? How and then add more tail by adding smaller branches keywords from those main branches remember keep your keywords short not big long phrases and use color and images and pictures and screen shots throughout it errol show you how to use links so for us? Obviously you can go to budge. ADHD DOT COM or the JD HD DOT com slash. Ten Dash. Day Ed out of course you can include them in your mind map which makes it really helpful for later research or digging down on an idea that you had already put in the mind map so next time you stuck on a problem problem on to try. Turn your paper sideways though. The landscape format starting the center to give your brain permission to spread in every direction and then use an image or a picture for your central idea. The thinking is that curved lines not straight lines actually helps. I'm not sure how much but toy around with it. I like it looks beautiful and then just try some of those early branches. Who what why when where how it Cetera and then follow each thread down to its inclusion? All right so I'd like to take a look over here at when and do I do it well. I mentioned this a little bit before. I do it in all kinds of different scenarios My son and I have mind mapped the MLB Albee divisions the defense Leagues and then the different teams and their players through positions in things I love using it for note taking depositions. It's client meetings oral arguments on track to review. It helps me organize briefs brief writing it helps me with key strategy or studying a new subject building habits creating knowledge base ru brainstorming. A love it for groupings firming in fact I'm presenting an AC- Elliott very shortly and that's literally my whole purpose. It's to to help the group brainstorm in the very beginning of this Interactive presentations timelines marketing projects personal favorite of mine customer journey maps Ole goal setting et CETERA. So what about the tools. Well the very basic part is you can do anything you can do with a paper and pen. That's how my son and I typically we start doing it although you might decide that for you. That's not the ideal way to do it. So you could grab your tablet and writing APP on your tablet that lets you do some creative. It's catching or whatever. I use my tablet often but I actually have a software tool that. We're going to dive into shortly here. That helps me do it on my tablet or you can use the software tool so we'll dive into a few of them here. There are many and I've only a few. I have strong feelings that the one I'm using right now is awesome But that doesn't mean it's the best. It just means scrape for me. MIND NODE X mind. Wise Mapping Mind Omo Kogel Omni raffle Lucid Chart Microsoft physio is a great tool. Mind Meister and pop. `Let so And I have links to those in the youtube video and also have them in the show notes our website. ADHD DOT COM makes this podcast possible sign up for I completely completely free. E-mail course introducing you to Adhd for lawyers bad deeds ADHD dot com slash. Course I want to focus for just a second on my side note because that's the tool that I'm using right now I love it. It's it's really wonderful for me the way my mind works. Here's the link I it's Mac doc. Only it does cost money. I didn't find it prohibitively expensive At but it's beautiful. It has this focus mode that I've been showing you so you can go back here and and focus in here and will make sure that the whole screen focuses on what you want to see what you wanna focus on instead of. Maybe letting your mind get lost Austin entire mind map itself. It has what they call smart. Layouts you can share it in a variety of ways including a mind note file but also. PDF you can do it in an outline form and then you can track your progress. So I really love using Tracking progress you can tick off lists on ear to do list if you so choose. It's got this automatically out. You can use dark mode and you're thinking is is excellent and available across all of your different platforms particularly if you're in A MAC environment exclusively so I love my note. I think it's great and There are others out there. It I don't get there's no benefit from retelling. It's awesome but it's pretty awesome. So if you're thinking about twain around that might be a good place to start and then finally some other resources. mind mapping mind dash mapping dot org as a bunch of if Lovely Tulleson resources and a bunch of other things that you can goof around with. Twenty Bussan is The originator of the idea of mine map and actually he has a trademark on the word. Mind Map. He has a tedtalk that he did and the link is right here. Lawyers has a great bit on mind. Mapping as client communication tool and you can click on that link mind map. Art Is Gorgeous. A ton of beautiful drawings usually hand-drawn That are gorgeous and show a beautiful way to Do some mind. Fine Mapping And then how to mind map and then over here G to does mind map software ratings you could go there and check them out and see which ones are most highly rated by people like you and then finally map Yo dot com. So there it is that is really mind mapping in a nutshell and I just wanted to If you look at it because I use does it every day in my life and it has really improved my productivity and helps me think in a lot of cool ways so there you go mind mapping using mind node from the JD HD DOT COM. Thanks.

ADHD Everett Microsoft youtube Ed AC- Elliott Meister Austin twain