36 Burst results for "Adelaide"

Fresh update on "adelaide" discussed on Coronacast

Coronacast

03:31 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "adelaide" discussed on Coronacast

"Women's the twenty third of September and no one thinks. So looking pretty good in Australia now is seeing those guys numbers continuing to drop Victoria's really the only place at Scott significant case numbers now, and even there this much much lower than they were before and. We're starting to see places tentatively talking about opening up those internal borders again yes, and that's good news. So South Australia to New South Wales. Later on the week of there's no more community transmission Queensland's opening up to a series of local government areas in northern New South South Wales because it's been not transmission air. So common sense is starting to enter into it and Being open to South Australia for a while. The to advocate had assessment one, five, two landing in Adelaide, which is the. The high volume air traffic that's expected from act to South Australia. But seriously, it's all in a in the correct direction. So it's really good news and only Victoria is really hitting its targets in terms of the case numbers coming down there on track yes I mean there's a little a little bit of a blip yesterday but that seems to be a regular phenomenon choosy widened the spike perhaps because people aren't getting tested at the weekend you I. Assume that it's going to return to its downward track literally on the week. So Paul's asking about this actually are there any assumptions in Victoria to cases that aren't being picked up? That's the worry because testing numbers dropping and the question is are the numbers low because people aren't being tested or are they little because they're low we talked on current cast a little while ago about an antibody study that was done out of the National University. People undergoing elective surgery. According to those estimates on the basis of the first wave. The numbers were seven times higher than were actually being recorded by testing. We're still waiting on results of a study done at the Kirby institute I think, informally, they think the numbers the proportion not. Discovered by the routine testing is going to be lower than seven times maybe two to four times but we still got to see the results of that test. There will be more cases out there in Victoria van are being detected the questions with matters if you've caught community spread down to very low levels and I guess then once Victoria opens up and the. Internal borders just sort of come down again, a we USTRALIA is a bubble that is just doing our best and hoping it doesn't continue to come back from the rest of the world. So yeah. So we ideas that we open up as a nation and that's the big. Island and that's the series of little islands including one medium size island which. Tasmania. So essentially within our borders, we open up the external borders are another matter and it's a I. Think the first priority is bringing Australians back home the next priority would bring overseas students back into the country, and we could probably do that with some judicious rapid testing and some innovation around quarantine. But at the moment, let's just internal border Sorta don't. Maybe cause for cautious excitement. Yes. I think. We're going in the right direction. So teagan, you've been hearing about some research at the Florida Institute in Melbourne. That's right. So there's there's a big research paper that they've brought out today at the increased risk of Parkinson's disease from the covid pandemic, which you might not necessarily see the link straightaway Parkinson's disease, a neurodegenerative disease and. Is Not just a respiratory disease, but we think about it as that. But some of the.

Victoria South Australia New South South Wales Parkinson's Disease Australia Victoria Van South Wales Adelaide Neurodegenerative Disease Scott Kirby Institute Melbourne Teagan Paul National University Tasmania Florida Institute
Interview With RZA Of The Wu-Tang Clan

Toure Show

03:42 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With RZA Of The Wu-Tang Clan

"Tell me about this movie. Why? Why? Why this movie now cutthroat city to War Katrina Shamikh it the trailer is amazing. Tell me about this movie long. Hamas. Start talking about the movie without sandbox La Brother a long time acknowledging your hairstyle. Acknowledging each other's beards. Dante Very Long. I haven't cut anything in a while you have accrediting theater while. If you want to acknowledge you the first two time guest on this show. So I appreciate that Bongbong Quantity without grades I got breaks down so That's how we doing anyway a man's treasure to. Talk to you again but this film right here. This is like our this is me really conti myself down as a filmmaker. Based in New Orleans after. Noted with aftermath, of Hurricane Katrina. You Watch. These four young men who have always asked rations in charge of desperation. And desperation. Lead. US down the rabbit hole. Was We all know? And hopefully, the goal of the for me as a filmmaker is spire. Out The desperation what could be desperation? Trauma Nation. And that's kind of you know. Kind of summarize the. Trying to do here. That's what the film is aiming to show. I know you're a student of film. So what are the films that are most inspiring your vision of this one like it did you make a mood board or at least in your mind you're like I wanna take a piece of this piece of this a piece of this and make it my own like what is what is what are the fathers of this? And it is definitely I'll. Be, honest with you small struggle with no in class struggle as young black men in our neighborhood. Movie You saw the Cina. Right I experienced things that he trauma neighborhood apart unanimity and also experienced myself in A. Good Adelaide. And a lot of not getting out and so when I got screenplay got invite the screenplay was led by my buddy all. Ready. ACCOST Hurricane Katrina was a tragic thing for. Country, you know we have to your anniversary of the right now and it thanks don't seem to change much in this country right? A sense of. How fasteners? Post the black community or the community more, it hurts other communities because see right now the fan denic, right but even if this story was set. In Flint, Michigan would water was bad or Saturday Chicago is south bothers is going through the struggles. Or set right on Staten Island Faulk, hill either either place. Is destroyers relevant but this one is set a Katrina and and these guys may turn to that desperation. It becomes. A high school, it will lead the films that kind of. Inspired like you know like feelings I'll turn to. I think John Singleton Boys Hood was a great example of somebody trying to get out. Get the situation, the neighborhood itself what the situation was under holding a man I thought John Degree Job John. Nash Story. You Go back to F Gary Gray or set it off. You know what I'm. Trying. To figure out, you know

Hurricane Katrina Katrina Hamas Trauma Nation New Orleans Dante John Singleton Gary Gray Hood Staten Island Nash A. Good Adelaide Chicago Michigan Flint
Anchor is hosting pirated podcasts

podnews

02:40 min | Last month

Anchor is hosting pirated podcasts

"Anchor is hosting large number of pirated podcasts from other publishes. Today thirty percent of all the pod track talk twenty podcasts currently being pirated on anchor according to our searches the new podcast from the New York Times and cereal. Nice. White parents has a further five pirated copies hosted on anchor using the original artwork. None of those plays will be credited back to the original owner and ads will not earn the publishers revenue. You'll find more details in our show notes and newsletter today. PODCAST host Lipson has published some positive news if Larry Fantasy chief operating officer. We continue to report growing revenue numbers and profitable results in the second quarter during a period that was certainly very different than expected. The company posted good news total podcasting revenue up by ten point six percents in the second quarter. Laura Simms has been promoted to see. Oh and the company. Now how seventy four thousand PODCASTS podcast those transistors launched an API for developers. Captivate has addy Ghana as a destination. They claim it's India's number one audio platform and link with Paul Corn in their new resources sanction I'm on their advisory board. Booth Eight podcast studio based in Adelaide in South Australia has moved to larger premises and filmed the building process of their new studios willing to that from our show notes newsletter today, and also a link to house spotify revolutionized podcast discovery. It's an in depth look spotify is user experience comparing it to apple podcasts. Always have unveiled a set of new features to make podcast. -tising buying better they say including brand safety contextual targeting and add sequencing on awards hosted. The true crime podcast reveal snowball is to leave his day job as content director of Australian radio station triple. J He's to focus among other things on television drama series inspired by the podcast and Impalas News Sir. This is a Wendy's podcast. It's a new podcast from Wendy's US fast food retailer to bit of a weird listen it appears to consist of a sponsor message funded by the same offer read slightly differently. At the late seventies, early eighties, band talking heads. This must be talking heads is an album by album exploration on their work hosted by Rodney Gordon and. Fan of the seventies, early eighties, bands, talking heads, you talking talking heads to my talking heads is an album by album exploration of that work hosted by Comedians Adam Scott, and Scott or common, and

United States New York Times Spotify Wendy Adam Scott Rodney Gordon Addy Ghana Laura Simms Adelaide Lipson Chief Operating Officer India Larry Fantasy Apple Paul Corn Director South Australia Advisory Board
The Australian Wastewater Treatment Plant Powered By Leftover Beer

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

02:17 min | Last month

The Australian Wastewater Treatment Plant Powered By Leftover Beer

"When lockdown hit much of the world in March forcing bars and restaurants to close a lot of them were huge supplies of food and booze. They couldn't sell here New York City where bars are just put in big orders for Saint Patrick's Day. They released able to fulfil delivery and takeout orders for several weeks. Many bars added entire cases of beer at steep discount to their delivery menus. It was actually pretty awesome. But in Australia, they got even more creative in the state of South Australia local breweries sent millions of leaders of stale beer to the Glenn l wastewater treatment plants just west of Adelaide and that beer has been converted into renewable energy to power the plants quoting CNN the plant mixes organic industrial waste with sewage sludge to produce biogas, which is then turned into electricity to power. The whole facility usually generates enough bio-gas provide about eighty percent of its energy needs. But the recent influx of beer has boosted its energy generation to new levels reaching six hundred, fifty, four megawatt hours in a single month Lisa Hannigan manager of production treatment at Sa Water, said in a statement beer worked. Well for the plants digesters, hat said referring to the large sealed concrete tanks where sewage sludge is heated in an oxygen free environment and decomposed to produce methane rich bio gas. The booze is high calorific value. The amount of heat released during combustion makes perfect for anaerobic digestion process she added and quotes and add further said that the three hundred thousand, some odd cubic meters of bio gas being generated month now is enough to power twelve hundred houses and is also a joker saying in the statement quotes honorably, our thirsty digesters have been doing their bit for the environment by drinking themselves silly and was such a horrific diet. It's no wonder they produce so much gas and quotes. And this is just the latest example of people creatively innovating on what was previously thought of as waste beer is particularly difficult to dispose of in any environmentally friendly way. So finding a sustainable use for it like this is beyond awesome and I hope there is a way to make a continue even when breweries don't have as much extra beer line around as they did this past spring.

Lisa Hannigan New York City Saint Patrick Australia CNN South Australia Adelaide HAT Sa Water Glenn L
Trump shifts date of Oklahoma rally to 'respect' emancipation holiday

Red Eye Radio

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

Trump shifts date of Oklahoma rally to 'respect' emancipation holiday

"Corresponding Kerry shoemaker reports jump put Adelaide tweet to switch the date of his Tulsa Oklahoma campaign rally in a tweet sent late Friday president trump said out of respect for the Juneteenth holiday he would move his Oklahoma campaign rally from June nineteenth to June twentieth trump added he made the decision after many of his African American friends and supporters reached out to suggest to consider changing the

Donald Trump Kerry Shoemaker Adelaide Tulsa Oklahoma President Trump
The coronavirus may surge this Australian winter. Here's why

Coronacast

03:42 min | 4 months ago

The coronavirus may surge this Australian winter. Here's why

"Monday the first of June the first of winter. And give it is beginning of winter. Maybe we could talk about whether we can expect things to get worse as we come into the called a months. Do We know Norman? What effect it has? On covid nineteen transmission, the short answer to that question is that the experts think it probably will make a difference, but it depends in which environment you're in so in countries where you've got a rising epidemic, pandemic or very large numbers of cases, you probably won't notice the difference of winter, but you could in places like Australia in New Zealand where we've got very little virus around in a small increase could give you a significant blip. And essentially what we're talking about here is that we're indoors more more likely to transmit the virus to other people indoors. We've spoken about before is the high risk area it could be that the environment in winter favors the virus as well because it does other corona viruses, so you would expect it to get a little bit worse winter, but you might not notice it in amongst the noise in countries like the United States in the United Kingdom. You might notice it in Australia one of the things that we were sort of worried about. About, a few months ago is coming into winter. At the same time of these new pandemic was that perhaps it was going to coincide with the flu season, but everyone's staying harm. So is it a we? Is that still something that we're worried about? Or maybe? Is it going to be a good season for US hard to know? We are now coming back out of isolation, and maybe I'll be that seasonal flu remarriages, but there's also been quite a high uptake of influenza immunization, so it remains to be seen what we see about. Flu But you would expect seasonal flu to make a bit of a resurgence as we get out and about a bit more over the next few weeks. Another thing that we were hearing a bit more over the weekend about was this name that just won't go away. The Ruby Princess so passengers on board. The Ruby Princess cruise have have led to one of the biggest current of ours clusters, but there's been another health warning issued around that boat. A cream has been diagnosed with tuberculosis. Yes, you another reason not to call on crucial think, but you know just when you thought it was safe to go out here's somebody with Berko losses. The probably health artists are saying that the risk is low to other people on the ship, which it certainly lower than corona virus. Temecula losses can actually be quite infectious. Just remind you what this is this is. An inch a very very ancient disease. It's been around longer. Probably than humans have been around and was scourged, particularly in the nineteenth century, causes a lung disease, but can affects your kidneys can almost any part of your body, so it's pretty nasty and high high degree of fatality particularly if you're immune, compromised such as HIV AIDS. You can get clusters of tuberculosis. I covered the story a story a few years ago and outbreak of tuberculosis in Adelaide and when the traced back the outbreak, it was sprayed. It was a man on boss. He caught the bus each morning from the Adelaide hills down into the city, and he spread it to other people on the bus. So Tobacco can be infectious, but it's not as infectious as corona virus. Do We know given byes? Lung Diseases is they a people with take a at higher risk of complications from Iris very good question. Don't know the answer to it intuitively. You'd say yes, you've got. Got Pommery TB you would be you. You'd think that you're more susceptible. although TV does funny things to your immune system, and that may affect responses well to the corona virus, because sometimes the things going on in your lungs and the immune response, they are helped to dampen the immune response to covid nineteen, so it's complicated story, but I don't think anybody's published on that yet.

FLU United States Lung Diseases Australia Norman Adelaide Adelaide Hills United Kingdom Iris HIV New Zealand Aids
If we can mobilise around a pandemic, what next? Meet two revolutionaries already flouting the rules

Science Friction

08:06 min | 5 months ago

If we can mobilise around a pandemic, what next? Meet two revolutionaries already flouting the rules

"You've said at one point that you think. Weist is beautiful. This zero philosophy is in a sense in practice for you. Isn't it one thing really like my life is just one big experiment you know. We had all sorts of experience. Guy On knock Ou- out offcuts of Broccoli with given to a Guy. Campbell had crickets growing. And he's and he's building and and there was a transaction. We paid him for the crickets. And what did the cricket stay ate the Broccoli yes. I'm quite obsessed with a nutrient density as well so fat soluble vitamins. How do you get all your vitamins? And crickets are a great source of that. And then you know. There's a lot of food that can be composted what about intercepting it. Before it gets composted and getting the most out of out of them and yeah we had them on the menu and we roast them and look like really a little bit like prawns in a sense. It's whatever you garnish them with. So we had salt Bush dehydrated and then mixed with salt and pepper and then some kelp dehydrated. People loved it. Okay so almost no waste zero. Yeah I can honestly say that we had zero waste and even the table was made from reconstituted plastic that came from Adelaide which company that makes bump recycled bumper bars. And we Lebron's I love the fact that out rubbish bins because there wasn't a rubbish bin in the place that's right. Yeah was any of these economically viable. I mean when I think about the restaurant and food industry. It's all about cost cutting isn't it? Food costs a very low but me because very hard. Because you're making butter from scratch making your grinding your own flour to make bread. You were making money yet. We were and then headed the council respond to you. How did regulate is and the Health Department released on? Ta The interesting thing we saw was counseled loved it and support it but it was relying on an invisible imposter. A Korean investment compost machine which took one hundred kilos plus of waste a day and would through bacteria and hate. Turn that into ten percent of volume pretty much overnight so this is like a loop yes. I would take it back and put it on my phone and grow more food. That was that was the idea. Originally four really beans and my goal was to get all the surrounding cafes to supply as well. I wanted to get that whole line way. Basically organic waste free and at just over one hundred twenty miles. It went on for years and Indian I just had a full and then it just got to a point where the threaten the V. Cat and my lease was up and decided enough's enough is enough. I it needs to be on wheels because it's crown land so wheels on it but then you've got it on wheels but it's plugged into the wall so it's technically building just went on and on and on and people at the city will argue that. It's not the case but I went to so many meetings own it went on for so long the Iraqis at the best year yet so it was just a wonder two. We've got a very different men now. I wonder if I would open it today. I think sally would be very different. And make sure that the people down and it wasn't their fault. Either this is like a law. That's one hundred years old. You go at bureaucrats but food safety is a wonderful thing. I'm mighty glad that I don't risk my life. Well I probably do. But you know the bugs extensively. Don't get me and don't kill me thank penicillin for that or thank medicine for that. All thank food safety laws and regulations that so these things are set up to Cape as well and healthy as well. The for the right reasons. I mean the reason why faces in European killed people in the during the gold rush. The contaminated water was killed people. There's a reason why these laws exist. Yes if you want to go carbon and look out of your lovely hotel room that you're staying in at at the river flowing underneath and the kids playing in it and then guide hospital. You'll find out that about half the hospital. Bids are filled with children. Who have drunk the water and the system doesn't work what we call the great centralized system of taking water from well outside the city using it and getting the pathogens as far away from the people as possible has worked for a very long time. So it's a good system but it. It's not a sustainable system anymore. It was a great system when it was invented. It's no longer a great system. The laws about keeping the pathogens and the chemicals away from the people still great laws. Yeah we just have to reinvent here we do it so you want a radical rethink of how we think about waste about how we think about water. How we think about sewerage. What would you like to see done differently? And why I believe we could have enough water in the city for twenty five million people currently when we get to eight million. We're going to have to build a new diesel nation plant. We have taking salt water and making it. Fresh is very expensive way to do it and it. It perpetuates the model that we will go and find new water rather than fix up the water that we pollute every day and throw away. The problem is that we would need to exploit that. We would need to move to a distributed model. Not Unlike a an energy model an engine model would say we'll generate half my electricity in my house and it might not be the most efficient thing to do might do it at a precinct scale and dealing with wastewater is not something I would recommend the public does however at a precinct scale. We could create a new suburb was sustainable. In terms of its water us so we have a wastewater treatment plant and WOULDA treatment plant. That are the same thing so it would just be a water treatment plant. It would take at polluted. Water would take watering from sources. That may or may not be polluted and in Australia. We spent a lot of time protecting those sources but around the world on average we still use that model in the sources on predicted working Sarabhai or any new Asia with river that supplies the water for the city is twenty times more concentrated in wastewater than what we dispose of this wastewater. Wow here and yet die. Beehive as though it's a clean water source in terms of the purification process if they just accepted that distributed model it said it is polluted wastewater with clean it up as though it was wastewater. Let's do it properly. Let's produce gripe water in in actual fact. That city could change very radically if they try it as the centralized piece. It's very difficult. You've got to build huge sewage. You've got to build reservoirs you've got to build a whole range of things if you do it. As a distributed system you could actually stop tomorrow and so this model in a Harvard sense for a Melbourne. Where new suburbs could be like that but for other CDs with his saying. We're GONNA put in sewage system. I say why would we do that? I mean th th thinking about that Indonesian example. You climb that we can process. We produce water that is cleaner more pure in a sense than tap water if I look at the waters of the world and we do that for a living and I look at what we can produce out of recycled plant currently in Antarctica by any test chemical biological any taste. You WanNa do. We are far cleaner than any tap water in the world

Weist Campbell OU Broccoli Melbourne Lebron Penicillin Health Department Adelaide Australia Sally Cape
'Are we all going to die?' We answer kids' questions!

Coronacast

06:54 min | 6 months ago

'Are we all going to die?' We answer kids' questions!

"We heard there were lots of kids who had questions about crew Navarre's so we asked you to send them in and hundreds of you did. This episode is for them. Sorry if you have a little one in your life together have a listen and hopefully this will make things a little clearer. We're GonNa try and answer as many as we can today so let's get started. High analysts said that an Foia Zolt analysis can know what that the crying advised? Look like recurrent viruses is so tiny that you can't see it without a special microscope but if you look at it through that microscope it looks like a little bowl with spunky things will petrels coming out of it and the first scientists who looked at these viruses thought that they looked a bit like the outside layer of the sun which is cold. It's Khurana so in another language code. Latin Corona means crown. So if you look at the picture for this podcast you can get an idea of. What the corona virus might look if it was big enough to see it's like a spiky bowl hike earner cost my name is Quincy and. I am from Adelaide. My question is how do they test people for Corona virus? And how do they keep the people who are testing from getting it by two really good questions? Quincy how they do. Is they poodles swap out into knows that goes right down to the back of your throat as well. Because you news connects with your throat. And the swirl around a little bit to pick up secretions and then the test. Those secretions looking for the virus. Actually don't for the virus itself they actually look for the genes the genetic code on the virus they multiplied and if they find the genetic code for the virus they say that you're in fainted and how they keep people testing from getting the virus. They wear what's called personal protective equipment? So the they're waiting. Full gear gowns covering them masks and sometimes goggles and gloves. So that they don't get infected so the protect the people from getting the infection. Hi I'm rocket nine eleven. I'm from Ballantyne New South Wales and my question is why the neighbor was the corona of ours. And how do I know what's true and what's not people are worried? And sometimes when people are worried they share information trying to be helpful. But it's not always true and also there sometimes people out there who share fake stuff on purpose because they're trying to cause trouble and so the best way to figure out what's true and what's not is to figure out what sources you can trust and just into will raid them. The best sources are going to be based on what scientists are telling us through the research that they're doing so the best thing for you to do as a kid talk to. Your parents will talk to adults you trust and work out with them how to figure out what sources seem trustworthy and follow those. Hi I'm Lisa. I'm eight years old and I'd like to know how to scientists come up with vaccines for new viruses like curve in Nineteen Gordon. I was really frightened coming into this one. Teagan we get questions and sure enough. We are great question Lee. So maybe for everybody out just explain what. A vaccine is a vaccine fines. Apart of a germ that you can inject into people safe late. So they don't get the disease and that it stimulates your immune system which is a bit like an army and it stimulates this army to fight the infection when it comes in so the army remembers the infection from the vaccine and the army is ready to go and should the infection. Come in Jerem coming after that. The army marches to attack it and get rid of it now. The trouble with viruses is that it's it's hard sometimes to develop a vaccine which is safe which doesn't give you the infection itself. So what they do for covered nineteen whether recovered nineteen is finding different ways to marshal the army to get the army to remember the covered. Nineteen so this remembers covered nineteen so when it sees covered nineteen it goes and attacks and fires all the guns at it in a way that is safe so you're not going to get the infection so one way they're doing it in. Australia is find a little bit of the virus and hold it down as if they're holding it down with a set of tweezers. We're talking about things that are so small You'd need very special microscopes to see it and the hold it down and then the train the army against that little bit of the virus hoping that that little bit of the is enough to for the army to recognize the rest of it and the the general vaccine to that little bit of the S- called RN e in the viruses run former material. Another vaccine that they're developing overseas in Boston actually gets one of the messengers that takes messages cell from one part of the cell to the other to tell the army to generate an immune response and they're generating vaccine which puts in a messenger into the cells to tell the cells to generate an an immune response to covered nineteen virus when it comes in and they're all sorts of technologies like that which are really new technologies that have never been developed before really exciting and one or two of them are probably. GonNa turn up with a really good vaccine from brisk this. Why can't we have taught me to lenny? Everyone's doing the very best. They can to stop spreading germs. So as few people get sick as possible so we know that one of the why this virus spreads is through touching people who have it and sometimes people can be seen and not know it yet. So if you're living in the same house of someone and not seek its. Arcada have hugs with him. But if you're not living in the same house as someone that's why maybe just taking a break from having hugs with them for the moment. The good news is that this won't last forever. Scientists are working really hot to find a way to protect people from corona virus. And once they do. We can get back to hugging friends again. Hi I'm abby and I'm nine I have asked my like many other kids and I've heard deflategate current a virus when you have asthma. Your symptoms can be worth wise that abby. Good question to three things. I'll say so your age ten not to get very severe disease from from covered nineteen thousand. Don't tell you don't tend to get very sick. Says the first reassuring thing you can pass onto other people. So that's why we're trying to isolate everybody but you tend not to get to seek. So that's a that's good news and it's also good news for your Asmaa because if you're not going to get to seek in your asked me makes it a little bit. Worse is only a little bit worse off. You know a mild illness. Oh you wouldn't be too worried. I think older people. I'm talking about people at your grandparents age. They're more risk and if they've got severe asthma real problem for them but for everybody with asthma. You just gotta get your small under really good control now and I and I don't know what you're on but you people are sometimes on a blue puffer to help them before the take some exercise and there's sometimes on a brown kind of power which settles down the inflammation in your lungs. If you're taking too much of the blue puffer and you're using the blue puffer a lot during the day that's a sign

Army Corona Foia Navarre Quincy Adelaide Asthma Australia Ballantyne New South Wales Abby Boston Jerem LEE Lenny Arcada
Three tips on how to convince friends and family to stay home

Coronacast

09:50 min | 6 months ago

Three tips on how to convince friends and family to stay home

"I'm health reporting tyler. Journalists Daughter Norman Swan so norman. There's been a lot of talk recently about people not taking the pandemic seriously and people that interested to talk about how to talk about it with the people in their life. Who are still wondering around too much. Do you have any tips on how to convince that person who just doesn't want to seem to get the message yet road depends through the are probably more often than not but this preaches coming here being a younger person who feels that they're invincible and they'll just go out and get it and they'll be over it and after all they'll say isn't it just like the flu and so here's the argument one is that yes. It's true that younger people are not as likely as older people to die from it but there are plenty of younger people who die for from it. So if you think you're steel belted. You're actually not thirty to forty percent of intensive care. Unit beds are taken up with people who are relatively young and some of them die and there are no known risk. Factors for why those people died because it's not like elderly people with heart disease and diabetes and so on the no other particular risk factors so you are actually playing. Russian roulette by going out and doing it and the second reason you need to actually be serious about this is do you have family so parents and grandparents you're contributing to the spread to the community and actually could kill them and then the third thing is is when you were at school. Did you have friends that we're on to do nursing? Did you have friends who went on to mid soon or work in healthcare physios and so on because if this gets out of control they will actually die because twenty percent of people of healthcare professionals will get this. They'll get a big doors and many will get it severely and there are doctors and nurses dying of this. Is that what you want? If that isn't enough to convince people I think there's something wrong with them so I do it for yourself but also do it for the people around you people that you love. That's right because it's not guarantee you're going to get a mild dose of it so David's asking if we can clarify what the differences between nineteen and size cough to SARS. Cov too confusing SARS. Cov Two is the virus that causes covered so covered. Nine thousand nine. Is the disease so flu? Like symptoms runny nose fatigue loss of taste loss of smell sometimes diarrhea. That combination of symptoms is the disease and the disease can go for a week. And then you get better or can go for a week. And then after a week you fall off the cliff and you get really seriously ill. That's covered nineteen SARS Cov. Two is the virus that causes it and it's called SARS Cov too because this conversion over related virus to SARS which affected people about fifteen or more years ago in various countries of the world. So it's kind of a second version of the SARS virus not really. The SARS virus was the second version. People say it's the corona virus really what they should be saying. It SARS Cov Tube and the reason why you separate the two is that some people are infected with SARS Cov two and either have very very mild symptoms so mild. They don't know they've got it or totally is symptomatic and sixty percent of infections of SARS COV which leads to covered nineteen are from people who are asymmetrical very minor symptoms and therefore the don't know they're spreading around so speaking of spreading it. We're also getting a lot of questions about testing and testing kits and people are asking. Why can't we being Stra? Just manufacturer testing kits. If there's a shortage there are labs that can produce the reagents and which is the chemicals you need to analyze the genes on the virus. So we do have those reagents around and we can manufacture but we don't have many facilities left in Australia which actually can do that so over the years. We've lost industries in Australia. Which have the tooling which allows you to produce these kits at mass-scale so we can produce the kids but not in the quantities. That's required us as why we're having to import them but we do have some machines around which can actually do this. Sort of testing on mass. They're taken up with other work but we do have those machines to so we would have to create a manufacturing facility with over controls there that we just don't have at the moment so that's some questions from grownups but we're also getting heaps of questions from kids and we've covered a few over the last few episodes but let's keep doing that. Clara has sent this in from isolation at home she and her family have called symptoms. And they don't WanNa make other people seek Clara an league in Adelaide. Five two more. Why IS CORONA VIRUS? Started a really good question Clara and the reason. It's so bad. Is that first of all? It's very contagious. And by contagious. We mean how many people would spread to so if I've got the infection or let's say you had Clara. How many people could you infect around you and on average you in fact two or three people one for the time that you've got the virus that's actually quite a lot so if you've got the flu it's under twos maybe one and a half people but if it was a pretty mild infection then you wouldn't worry too much and eighty percent of people eight hundred ten people? It is actually fairly mild but in twenty percent of the people it gets severe. And that's because it locks into receptor in your long. That's a lock and key mechanism in your lung and can create a really bad lung disease. So it's not a smash a lung infection as your whole long reacts and almost go solid and you lose the ability to take air from the atmosphere breathe it in and get oxygen going into your bloodstream. And that's why people die of this. We have you feel better soon Clara. We've also got a question for six year old. Ezra get virus when you already have a different virus while we'll happen mix or something else. That's a really good question as a really clever question really no but if you were to get influenza if you were to get the flu at the same time as covered nineteen that's the disease caused by the virus. Sars virus then the likelihood is that they will add or multiply together and damage your lungs and damage your body much more than each individually and maybe much more than each so. It's not multiplying by to the effects could be multiplying by four or six. Because they work with each other to actually make your body worse. That's if you get the influenza or say the common cold it could make everything much worse with other things like say for example if you've got cancer diabetes and so on usually means that your immune system your ability to fight this office weaken so you're more likely to get an infection and more likely to be able to resist it very well and so your body if you like is distracted because it's taken up by fighting the cancer or fighting the diabetes then your body's distracted and you're more vulnerable more open to the infection. Hope that explains in language that Communicates Clearly Ezra but really good question. Sorry research groups all over the world looking for different ways to treat and KUA card. Nineteen and the W. H. O. The World Organization has just launched a mega trial of four of the most promising corona virus treatments. Norman what are they testing? So they're testing a variety of drugs testing this anti-malarial co Corcoran related drug called Haiku. Hydroxy chloroquine which may be a bit stronger. They're looking at HIV drugs which are anti viral anti retroviral drugs. Ones Le Vian routine over the has been some disappointing results. I think from those two. But they're going to have a look at them as well and maybe add an immune stimulant called Interferon Beta which helps to which helps to attack viruses. So in other words you might get three drugs working together which might affect the immune system and love noon system to attack. The virus in interferometer has got some nasty side effects which would probably have to monitor it. And then there's this other drug called Rim desert here which is a recent drought produced by a drug company called Gilead for another purpose for another virus and go to try that because they think they might get an effect with the SARS Cov too. So what they're going to do. It's it's not a randomized controlled trial they're gonNA allocate people to one or other of the drugs or the or usual care drug combinations registered as a trial and watch what happens to them as the go through so that it's not going to be a perfect trial but we don't have time for a perfect trial. We just go to be able to get people. On these study drugs we know on average. What percentage goes on to develop serious disease and needs to be ventilated and we know roughly what percentage will go onto dine. Can we developed from that and then we'll do comparisons between the different drug groups. How do they know that these drugs are ones that might work? The don't really so some of it is a bit theoretical but there have been some small pilot studies which suggests that there may be ineffective anti-malarial the not very good studies. But they're not good enough to say to everybody let's get onto Corcoran and there are side effects from from these drugs as well so you don't want to recommend them because it distracts from what might be the cure and your door to real mess out there. So you really want to know. Divided all up. There's some indications from small studies uncontrolled studies relatively uncontrolled studies. These drugs may have an effect. And I were GONNA do scale up the trial and see when you compare them in a reasonably scientific way which one standout if any because non may but we gotta get on and find out.

Influenza Clara Norman Swan Ezra Diabetes Australia Lung Disease Adelaide Corcoran David Le Vian Cancer Chloroquine W. H. O. The World Organizatio Stimulant Interferon
Sports on Hiatus - The Economic Fallout

ESPN Daily

09:06 min | 6 months ago

Sports on Hiatus - The Economic Fallout

"Where were you when you found out that the NBA was going on hiatus? And how did you feel? I was at work at the Kings game. It was around. Maybe nine ish when I heard about the NBA and it was actually a little devastating. Because I knew we would be out of work and if the NBA cancelled it would only be a trickle effect down to the rest of the major sports. How will not working for an extended period of time affect you personally? I mean it's GonNa Affect me a lot That's my only source of income. I don't know what's going to happen tomorrow. Where do you do you know? What do you do when something like this happened? This has never happened to us before. So it's hard to say I mean we don't know what the outcome's GonNa be with how long this is. GonNa be but I trust in my union and I trust and the company that I worked for that. They're going to work something out for on Wednesday night mark. Cuban is the owner of the Dallas Mavericks said he was trying to set up a program to help arena workers throughout this suspension. Are you hopeful that something similar might happen in Los Angeles yes? I'm very hopeful that that will happen. And I think that he's a classy owner for even saying that for even thinking about the workers you know nobody really thinks about the people that do all the behind the scenes to make everything run smoothly on any given event. It's about five thousand workers. Five to six thousand people working. We have security. We HAVE TICKET TAKERS. Cook Surburb Bartenders cashiers? Supervisor's what are you hearing from your other Co Workers? They're asking me about their health because I'm a shop steward for the Union. So they're asking me about their health insurance. Are they going to have health insurance in the timeframe that we're not working and I don't have those answers yet you know they're still working those things out so I'm not sure? How did you first start working at the staple center in the first place? A friend of mine told me that staple center with having a job fair and when I got there it was like so many people maybe about two or three thousand people there. I was thinking to myself. It's so many people here. There's no way I might get this job but I got hired here. I am fifteen years later. Do you like working there. I love working at Staples Center. It's the best job to be. It's a great atmosphere. I've met so many different people from so many different walks of life to laugh with those people. We've even cried at the Kobe. Memorial cried when the tragic incident with Kobe happened. Been happy with these people rejoiced with these people. I mean it's the greatest environment to be in in my opinion. What would you say to the NBA? Or I guess ask of the NBA as it attempts to navigate this crisis. I that a ensure that everyone is safe and to not just think about the money that they make that they also think about people that are out of work people. That don't have insurance doesn't matter if you're rich or you don't have money. People are people. So that's what I would say. Adelaide is one of many there are thousands of workers across America working at sports venues. Arenas and these folks are going to see their income hurt in the short term. Because they're not going to be able to work these events. That's Patrick Rish Director of the Sports Business Program at the Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis Patrick at this point. We don't know how many people in that includes athletes are going to have their health affected by this outbreak. But we know that event like this as a way of exposing to everyone the size and scope of an industry in its economic impact. There are many layers to that that I want to get into but I as pretty much all of sports goes on hiatus. How big is this industry in America? What mean it's pretty sizable. You talk about. The sports is one of the twenty largest industries in America. A billion dollar industry the service workers as we mentioned are really impacted in the short term and it does depend on whether these leagues are simply suspended or whether games are cancelled because it suspended and the Games are made up later in the summer. Then there's not as much of a hit but if there's a cancellation if this burns. Two months in the league's can't squeeze in their completion of their season by the end of the summer. Then you're gonNA find a real hit financially. These service workers on Wednesday night news broke that Utah. Jazz Senate rubare tested positive for the krona virus. Which stopped that game. It sort of kicked off a chain reaction around the NBA. That ultimately leads the League hitting pause at the same time. Mark Cuban the owner of the Dallas Mavericks was interviewed at his own game and talked about the workers about the old. Now that we're not playing games. What about all the people who work here analogy basis? You know we put. We'll put together a program for them but you so many things go through your head right. It's hard to know exactly. How vulnerable are these workers if something like this was to persist for a long period of time? They're very vulnerable because many of them working in this profession they don't necessarily have college degrees a lot of them. I can speak in. Saint Louis and I know this is true in other markets if somebody is bender expert medium for baseball game. They're going to be a vendor at the Enterprise Centre for Blues Game so where these folks again. Many of them be surprised if their annual incomes or any hired say maybe twenties to mid thirty thousand dollars a year so it's really very susceptible of course the lodging in the restaurant industry in these markets. They're hurt too. Certainly I again here in Saint Louis. We were supposed to host first second round the championships. That's not going to be here this year because of what's happened so certainly the hotels take a hit. A restaurant take a hit. In addition hearing from Cuban we also found out that Cavaliers Star Kevin love as planning to commit a hundred thousand dollars to help arena workers and support staff Patrick aside from personal generosity what can the NBA in its owners. Do to help these workers I think one thing they can do is in these communities they can use their own. Hr STABS with their teams to try to help them. Connect with temp agencies or other forms of means trying to find at least temporary employment opportunities to find work but just as the sports industry is getting hit with. What's going on here? This is widespread. There are several industries right now that feels somewhat frozen. There's a fear. Obviously that's on a mock nationally so this does have an impact on not just the sportsman the other businesses. So even if Mark Cuban or lake up or any of the other owners were to try to use their. Hr STABS to help their staff by physicians locally. That may be challenging right now right. You mentioned the cottage industry around Sports. The impact potentially on hotels and restaurants tourism. But normally you know win. There aren't sports other tourism steps in however I imagine everything is going to be impacted by this so it all just compounds no question in particular March madness and all the other. Ncaa's championships you know the big difference between the MTA championship bands. Whether it's basketball hockey wrestling is that these pods and regionals and final fours. Losing fours and the like a large percentage of the visitors are coming from outside of the community. You can't say that for the NBA in the NHL. Most of those games five or ten percent of the fans are coming from outside of the market so the hotels the restaurants really impacted but then how these other industries Meena instance thing. I'll just kinda bring it locally here since we're being impacted by this now. The local sports commission busted their tail to put a bid for this event and bring the event the Saint Louis all that time and effort that they put in. They don't see any of a commission on the back end. How about all the event production stabs and the sound and lighting engineers? And then. Of course you've got people like Uber and lift or people that operate. A A buddy that operates a video bending machine business here. So if people aren't coming then they're not going to restaurants. They're not playing his touch. Screeners Golden

NBA Mark Cuban League Union Dallas Mavericks America Kings Surburb Bartenders Staples Center Los Angeles Saint Louis Kobe Supervisor Patrick Rish Director Baseball Utah
"adelaide" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:02 min | 6 months ago

"adelaide" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"In Palo for Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia. Will Manica. If you're just tuning in for the first time here's the deal. We're telling the stories of women from throughout history and around the world who you may not know about but definitely should an honor of women's History Month. March is all about feminists women who fought for gender equity part of the reason. We decided to create encyclopedia. Manica was to rectify the fact that women were often missing from the pages of our history books growing up. That absence is also notable when it comes to public statues of two thousand eleven just eight percent of public outdoor statues in the US depicted women according to the Smithsonian American art museums. Art Inventories Catalog. The lack of such art exemplifies the fact that women's historical contributions are too often undervalued or ignored. Our feminist of the day worked to change that she was devoted to promoting gender equality and was known as the sculptor of the women's movement. Let's talk about Adelaide Johnson. Sarah Adeline Johnson was born in Eighteen fifty nine and Plymouth Illinois on her family's farm. She first began her artistic studies at the Saint. Louis School of design. She excelled there and her work was exhibited at the Saint Louis Exposition of eighteen. Seventy seven where? She won. Two prizes for woodcarvings. Sarah was unconventional in eighteen. Seventy eight. She changed her name from Sarah. Adeline to add lead a name. She thought had more dramatic flair. Adelaide moved to Chicago and supported herself with her art. In January of eighteen eighty. Two Adelaide suffered serious injury. She was hurrying to her studio when she slipped and fell twenty feet down an open elevator shaft. She sued the company at Fault and received fifteen thousand dollars. She used the money to fund further artistic study in Europe Athletes Sculpture in Dresden Germany and in Rome Italy and worked in cities including London New York and Washington by the Eighteen Ninety S. It was clear in her work that she was dedicated to the feminist movement in eighteen ninety three at the world's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. She exhibited individual busts of the most famous suffer. Just's her goal was to have those sculptures placed in the US Capitol building alongside the men who shaped the country. But the people with the power to make that happen. We're not into instead. The busts served a much different purpose in eighteen ninety six Adelaide married a British businessman. Eleven years her. Junior named Frederick Jenkins. The ceremony bucked tradition. The suffragettes busts served as Adelaide's brides means the minister was a woman. And Frederick took Adelaide's last name. He said he did so as the trip. You love pays to genius Fun Fact Adelaide. In Frederick were both Vegetarians. Still that wasn't enough to keep the marriage going and the couple divorced after twelve years Adelaide remained determined to get a statue honoring the suffragettes into the US Capitol. She received a commission from the National Woman's Party an organization founded by Alice. Paul will be covering later this month and Lucy Burns out of an eight ton slab of marble. Adelaide sculpted what she called memorial to the pioneers of the Women's suffrage movement. It's a statue of Lucretia Mott Elizabeth Katie Stanton and Susan B Anthony. The National Woman's party successfully fought for the piece to be dedicated at the capitol. Congress did so on Susan B. Anthonys Birthday February Fifteenth Nineteen Twenty One and held a reception honoring Adelaide. Despite the fanfare the sculpture was placed in the crypt of the Capitol building. For more than seventy years it was finally moved to the Rotunda in nineteen ninety seven. The completion of that piece was Adelaide's career apex afterwards. She struggled financially. She was picky about sales refusing to sell her art for less than what she thought it was worth. Adelaide also failed to pay taxes and was therefore evicted before moving out. She protested inviting members of the press to watch her disfigure. Her work truly strapped for cash. Adelaide even attempted to turn things around by competing on TV quiz show. Adelaide was a passionate talented artist and activist with a big personality. She frequently lied about her age going so far as to have a celebration for her one hundredth birthday when she was just eight. Adelaide died in nineteen fifty five. She was ninety six years old. She's buried at the Congressional cemetery in Washington. Dc All month. We're talking about feminists. We've covered feminists in everything. So far differentiates this month. Is that will be looking at women who were particularly important to the women's rights movement the suffrage movement and door modern feminism and feminist theory on Saturdays. We're talking about modern feminists brought to you by this month. Sponsor fiber on Sundays were highlighting favourite feminists. From past months chosen by other podcast hosts. We love for more on. Why we're doing what we're doing. Check out. Our New Encyclopedia were manteca newsletter. You can also follow us on facebook and Instagram at encyclopedia with Monica. And you can follow me directly on twitter at Jenny. Kaplan this month of Encyclopedia Manica is brought to you by fiber fibers an online digital services marketplace connecting businesses with women who are creating designing copywriting programming editing and more for women the ability to work flexibly on our own terms is highly valued five one of the rare platforms. Globally women are on average making nineteen percent more than men. That's something to celebrate this women's history month as we call for more industry leaders to join with fiber and make strides in closing the gap supporting women and Change in current stereotypes and the status quo fibers marketplace helps the world's feminists get more done with less take five and learn more about how five or celebrating International Women's Day by supporting the female talent on fivers platform at F. E. R. Dot Co Slash Women Special. Thanks to Liz Caplan. My favorite sister and co-creator Talk to you tomorrow..

Adelaide Adelaide Johnson US Sarah Adeline Johnson Jenny Kaplan Eighteen Ninety Frederick Jenkins F. E. R. Dot Co Slash Women Sp Manica Washington Palo Saint Louis Exposition Wonder Media Network twitter Louis School of design co-creator Lucretia Mott Elizabeth Katie Lucy Burns Plymouth Illinois
Racism at the school gate and education reclaimed (Part 2)

Science Friction

07:37 min | 7 months ago

Racism at the school gate and education reclaimed (Part 2)

"Aikido got You Butterfly Net Enhancement. Gravity Heaven and what she step. We're right next to the Bank of Torrens River on Ghani country in the heart of Adelaide plays. Don't fall in the torrents. Those of you that are not South. Straighten off a good ribbon polling today on the white out feeling very sorry. Try and start wipers water Do into the podcast of last week. Show if you've arrived at the dorms late because we're on camp here on science friction and it's going well. Everyone's getting on. This is the C. Syros Aboriginal Summa School for Excellence in technology and science and I'm living in with the nearly forty indigenous students from across the strategy here from Perth to the Torres Strait. They've come from far and wide and it's great to have you with us to on the Tesha Mitchell. You've caught an enormous something or dragonfly. It's huge thing. It was just innocent. Thought Maybe we could Kate Me Swan and then if we get any more or less just Alana line Patched candidate the University of Adelaide so working on parasitic wasps. My mission is to teach a bit more of an appreciation awareness of what's around which these kids have embraced wholeheartedly fishnet Connor Looking. It's camouflaged really. Yeah so as part of ABC's walking together. I'm bringing you powerful personal stories from three generations of indigenous. Australians today on racism in classrooms on triumphantly pushing past the low expectations others can have foyer and are knowing who you Would Hi this is a Science Camp Theresa? Let's get some of that good stuff at by the reba without insect. Nate's I love it because when I was little I used to do this in the backyard. I'll just for the fun of it. Like we did. Ones and lacked playful the bugs and stuff and Done things we went touches. The real big because that's scary. This is year eleven student Catherine. She's from Queensland. I've always had a interest in biodiversity because when I was lying about it in school I just found it fascinating the way things like adapted to the surroundings and how strong Some animals off. But do you think you might study in Uni? I definitely want medicine like the medicine. Science and even in science medicine side of it because on surf fascinated about the way humans like animals too but mostly humans alphabrain the actual workings about nerves and our nervous system and everything. I just find it so fascinating to fix people with your knowledge of that. It's just it's mind blowing to me. If you're ever original or Torres Strait islander you make up about three percent over strides population but just under two percent of all students enrolled at university are indigenous. That's growing by around half of a said over the last decade or side when it comes to Unical says in the natural and physical sciences. It and engineering. Less than one percent of students are indigenous for first year medicine. That's around two point. Four percent and of course completion rights alarm but this camp is about helping to change that. It's about road tasting university. Simon names macaroni. I'm an epidemiologist with. Csiro food and nutrition and things are about to get very real for the students right now. We're talking about their activities for the rest of the week and in particular their inquiry which is quite a lot of pressure for them. They'll need to spend a lot of their time thinking about the question that they want to investigate for the next few days and then they'll have to be ready to present it by next week. You asking them to do scientific experiment in two days scientific inquiry. That might be an experiment but it might be some other activities but yet in today's Yep they'll spend a lot of the allison a day. Doing it will be under a lot of pressure but based on previous years they do a great job so they've got to collect data definitely have to collect data they'd go to interpret data and they'll go to present it all of the precious situations for them so the pressure is on from pretty much all mice now not quite a couple of days. I think they'll feel it from tomorrow morning. Hitler research can be conceded. A A dirty word Saith West head is a young research scientist irregular mentor on these caves. He comes from Alaba Coal. And we're edgy. Country in these half miles research was something that was done on. Aboriginal people not with Aboriginal people and certainly not let by aboriginal people but as we get more aboriginal academics in high positions within the academy. This is where we can start to see a change of the culture so we need young people. All of the students present curious and inquisitive mind and from my perspective. That's all you need to be a scientist. The rest is just learning the specific language to answer the specific questions that you come up with and that's just a process. Anybody can do that. We really made more indigenous people in science. We've got so much work today. But we need more indigenous people everywhere. It's hard to access education for aboriginal people and are stolen papal. It's hard to walk to welds of wanting to preserve your own culture and sense of identity. Sometimes studying integrate main sacrificing culture identity and sometimes staying strong culture means sacrificing education. Perhaps no one knows these more than an ano education later. I made it a gathering by the five page of the Wheelchair Boarding House. Where all staying at Miami's Ruben and direct for education does P. Y. Yeah we didn't on almost for you know all the people it's our language and then another language as we had last week students from the remote traditional lands of the unindo people in South Australia. Come stay here. We'll check to go to high school in Adelaide. Now looking at you know dairies. To Wolves do peak will come together. You know the wisden world is really important that are now people need to get educated through sure school to get a job and money travel around you know speak language English and understand where there was an will come from and why why we see really important pulled in you know kids to university by his crowd. I need to build than me on the stand with coming from and you're not educated to vision. It's a big thing you know for

Torres Strait Adelaide C. Syros Aboriginal Summa Scho Torrens River University Of Adelaide Kate Me Swan Tesha Mitchell Csiro ABC Connor Queensland Wheelchair Boarding House Miami Nate Alaba Coal Research Scientist Alana Line Unical Scientist
The Dismantled Ferry Kalakala Still Has Stories to Tell

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:06 min | 7 months ago

The Dismantled Ferry Kalakala Still Has Stories to Tell

"I'm continuing my investigation into the world. So the paranormal metaphysical working with the idea. That goes whether we see them or psychic. Senses them are made up of energy and we'll be monitoring or following along the oldest active paranormal investigation team and the Washington State Ghosts Society to see what they have to say about an investigation into a ghostly or angry spirit will the story starts out with the fairy. It was the fastest ferry. Impute sound making eight round trips routine. Bremerton and Seattle every day at a brisk eighteen knots. It had room for a hundred and ten autos on her car. The remaining decks had room for two thousand passengers there were shower facilities for shipyard workers returning home a lunch counter. Three Observation Rooms Sun deck and Ladies Lounge. It became a hot nightspot lunch counter catered parties. The observation decks became ballroom. Sadly Nineteen Forty Adelaide. Bebr committed suicide in the ladies Lounes. She lost her father to suicide followed by the death of her brother. She was twenty nine years old and still unmarried in the Ladies Lounge. She committed suicide by shooting herself. Well that was one thousand nine hundred forty one thousand nine hundred sixty seven. The Kala Kala retired from service. A move to the Washington State Ferries Repair Facility in Eagle Harbor. A year later she was sold to a seafood processing company and towed to Alaska to work as a crab Cannery Kala was beached in Kodiak in nineteen seventy and use their to process shrimp. Finally she was moored and would spent her final years listing until one thousand nine hundred seventy five waiting to be scrapped but in two thousand and two the oldest active paranormal investigation team and the Washington State Ghost society toured the Kala Kala with the owner. Some of the sensitives in the grew felt drawn to the Ladies Lounge and a female psyche detected the spirit of a woman who did not like men other. Investigators brought devices that measured electromagnetic energy which detected energy readings in the Ladies Lounge. The investigators set up motion detection sensors and energy detectors connected to a computer that recorded all of the readings at the same time they left the lounge and investigated other locations on the ferry where they got more energy readings that coincided with the presence of that sad female spirit spoke of the beginning of this podcast when the psychic detected the spirit the meters around her went off as technicians move forward. The energy went down. The psychic moved following the spirit. The energy readings rose the psychic suggested that the skirt moved away because technicians were men and she did not them nearby when they returned to the Ladies Lounge. They had a surprising result. The motion detectors work by emitting level. Noises bounced off the walls if someone stepped in front of the Mirror the signal bounce back too soon telling the computer. Something has stepped inside the room. The motion detectors spiked several times while the investigators were away. Oddly the computer indicated one of the sounds took too long to bounce back from the wall. The only way this could have happened was if the walls of the caller caller had moved further away from the sensor. Ross Allison one of the ghost hunters speculated that the sound emitted by the sensor may have travelled out to the wall and back but pass through something that was not solid some form of energy. Unfortunately the team was not able to return for more investigations today. The Kala Kala is just a memory but one wonders if perhaps the ghost of Adelaide bebr might not have stepped off the old ferry that graving dock on the Blair waterway just before she was scrapped.

Kala Kala Ladies Lounge Cannery Kala Washington State Ghosts Societ Washington State Ferries Repai Washington State Ghost Society Bebr Bremerton Adelaide Ross Allison Alaska Eagle Harbor Seattle Lounes Kodiak
Turkey's Erdogan says Europe borders open as refugees gather

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:36 sec | 7 months ago

Turkey's Erdogan says Europe borders open as refugees gather

"News to Turkey where refugees are gathering along the border with Greece in an attempt to enter Europe Greek authorities firing tear gas today to read the scared reports Turkey is in the middle of two refugee crises in Syria's Idlib province hundreds of thousands of people are camping in the open hoping to cross Turkey's closed border to escape Russian bombs several children have died from exposure but Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan claims Turkey cannot host anyone else after an airstrike killed more than thirty Turkish troops in Adelaide this week Erdogan said Turkey would no longer stop refugees from moving on to

Turkey Greece Syria Idlib President Trump Adelaide Recep Tayyip Erdogan
A Tiny Satellite Revolution Is Afoot In Space

Short Wave

08:38 min | 8 months ago

A Tiny Satellite Revolution Is Afoot In Space

"Okay Joe we're talking. cubesats where shall we start. Well let me start by introducing you to Hannah Goldberg. She's a systems engineer at a company that makes cube sets but in nineteen ninety nine. She was an undergraduate at the University of Michigan Majoring in engineering. And she. She saw this flyer on a bus stop. That said want to build a satellite and so I joined a group that ended up making small satellite as part of a larger NASA program. Capanna says that This class that she took was a way for students to build a simple kind of satellite. Now this was pre cube set but clearly it would be valuable. We'll have young. Aerospace engineers have a chance to build something that was really intended to go into space and that hunger lead to something called the Cube set which was an idea idea from two engineers one at cal poly San Luis Obispo and the other at Stanford University to build this standardized platform for building space hardware. Okay Joe so. Let's get into this a little more. We've got this standardized platform now for cubesats. What makes cubesats cubes that well there's a manual and it just spells out all the details? I mean how big it'll be ten centimeters or four inches on aside at has to have this kind of screws of this kind of Wade has to have all kinds of specific things and then there are different form factors so it turns out at the Basic Cube. Said is called a one you but there's also a to you and at three U and six U is the one. That's the cereal box size. And what can you put inside Well a ham sandwich or no. You could put anything you like. But that's the brilliant part you can put any kind of scientific Communications technology kind of hardware in them. And you know these exactly GonNa fit and it's going to go into space that way. Okay so when I think of cubesats. They're like the legos of Satellite Adelaide. They're modular there customizable. They're small on smallest really key here because one of the things that makes the queue set program work is the people who build cube sense. Don't actually worry about how they're going to get into space. They hitch a ride with somebody else. WHO's already going into space? That's the real money saver because it's getting into spaces expensive all right. So how did the aerospace field respond to all these low-cost cubesats hitching a ride into space and embarking on this research. I think at first. They were kind of dismissive in the beginning. In the early days of cubesats they kind of had a bad reputation and more of the the classical aerospace. So people didn't think you could do much science or much much engineering benefit with them. So how'd cubes. That technology evolved to the point where it earned respect among scientists. Well there's an example of the technology that made made it possible probably in your pocket right now gum wrappers yes no actually gum purchase a great idea but no. I was thinking more of cell cellphone mobile phone. This is the evolution of the ability to miniature is electronics down to very small footprints. Very little wait and suddenly when when you had an impossibly small space to squeeze all your stuff into well it was possible now. So that's why people started paying attention to what you could put into a cube set. Gotcha Yeah I've I've read. There are hundreds of cubesats that have been launched over the years and I wanNA know about a few missions. That have caught your attention. Well we're really got me started on this story. Was the two thousand. Eighteen Cube set known as Marco. Actually Asari gone okay. You'll be a lot of fun in space ace Actually the word two of them. So you remember insight that was the mission. That's currently sitting on the surface of Mars. Well somebody had this idea that maybe they could could build cubesats that would act as really stations that would send signals back as insight was landing on Mars. It didn't have a strong enough Radio Antenna to send the single all the way back to Earth. So it send it back to these Marco satellites which sent it back to Earth and so for the first time ever there was real time telemetry ask has inside came the ground. It was all possible because this little tiny satellite was sent into deep space. So suddenly you're not just thinking about cubesats in Earth orbit you're thinking about cubes cubes heads in deep space. And so I think that's really cool very me. And when you say relaying Telemetry Marco was playing a role in telling people down on earth. What was happening on Mars with the insight mission? Is that what it is right inside saying. Hey I've just deployed my parachute or I've just got my Rye Retro Rockets on or I'm this far above the ground and all that information was coming back to Earth through Marco through this cube set very neat so the world of space exploration is clearly seeing these. cubesats keeps US useful yes a cube set can be very handy. It's a miniature spacecraft. That's actually the way we think about it. That was Barbara Cohen. She's a planetary scientist at NASA has Goddard Space Flight Center. She's part of a team. That's using one of these six you cubesats about the size of a cereal box that is for emission called lunar flashlight. I'm assuming this mission has something to do with the Moon. No it has to do with Luna Moth. No you're right. Is the moon lunar one. Yup that's true. Lunar flashlight is designed to look for exposed. Water Frost in the permanently shadowed regions of the moon so once lunar flashlight is in orbit around on the moon the spacecraft will shine a laser into those regions which are the South Pole of deep craters. That never see the sun so those are the places that that never see the sun so those are very very cold regions. They are as low as thirty five. Kelvin that's colder than the surface of Pluto. They want to know what what kind of stuff is down there. Maybe there's water or methane or mercury and they wanna know how it got. There and lunar flashlight is going to help. Tell them but to do. Its work once. It's deployed deployed. It actually has to adjust its orbit. Yeah how does something the size of a cereal box change orbit in space. Well again. This is the problem you have to news. Almost a third of the mass of this cube set for fuel so changing direction is the really expensive part of flying around in space in terms of weight because the fuel is very heavy. But there's one more cubes at mission. I want to tell you about. That has a really cool. Lightweight propulsion system called a solar sail. Deal oh I already loved the sound of this mission. Tell me about it okay instead. It tiffany Russell Lockett explain. This is actually her first coop set mission. She's an engineer. as-as Marshall Space Flight Center. A solar sail is a large thin-film reflective surface. Think of Like a sailboat route or a large kite but instead of using wind to propel itself is uses sunlight of. That's pretty brilliant. And that's how they're able to get the cube sat to change directions. I mean but how to sunlight propel cubes at well the Sun is always pushing out photons and that causes solar radiation pressure and that pressure is constantly constantly pushing against anything that happens to get in its way in this case. The lightweight material the solar sail and it acts like a sale. And that's how you get thrust and the sale by the way his square in shape and about each side of this sale is about the length of a school bus. And if you want to see a really amazing video go watch as this thing. They've they've unfurled at a couple of times and oh my goodness it's huge because it packs into this tiny little space and unfurled to this huge thing about the size of a tennis court actually more properly half a tennis court. This whole solar sail is packed inside. This cube sat amazing. And what's the mission for this. Solar sailed cubes. Well this one. What is going to head to a near Earth asteroid and take pictures and they want to learn more about this asteroid shape it size it how it rotates? What colored is what it's made of and to do that? We're planning on getting to within a kilometer of the asteroid for our closest Fly By and then we'll just keep going after that so this cube sat will fly off into the sunset on the power of the Sun. Well metaphorically I don't think we have sunsets in space. There's nothing I think for the sun to set over but I take your point. Joe Win. Are these missions likely to happen. Well that's an interesting question because the two last last ones I mentioned this lunar flashlight and the asteroid one are supposed to go on this project called artists one which is a rocket that's going to carry area capsule that's going to go around the moon and come back and that's been delayed and delayed and delayed so the cool thing. Is You get a free ride into space. If you're a cube set the bad thing thing is you've got to wait till your driver's ready to go

Cubesats Marco Joe Win Nasa Basic Cube University Of Michigan San Luis Obispo Goddard Space Flight Center Hannah Goldberg Systems Engineer Marshall Space Flight Center Stanford University Capanna Tennis Scientific Communications Wade
Netflix's 'Cheer' invites you to unlearn what you think you know about cheerleading

The Bobby Bones Show

06:47 min | 8 months ago

Netflix's 'Cheer' invites you to unlearn what you think you know about cheerleading

"I'm late on this one but many many people have said. Hey you've got to watch the show Cheer on Netflix. Amy lunchbox watched it. And it just wasn't for me. I don't WanNA cheerleading show. And it was up in the corner of the screen we times Netflix. Continue to watch it but the girl. I'm getting the greatest show and I was like all right. I'll watch it with the antenna going. It wasn't for me that way to hear about it anymore. I think it's my favorite show ever so good. Good down the the the whole to like. I know instagram like following all of them. It's so good and it's it's less like a reality show and more like a documentary. It's a little a bit reality a little bit but it's so much a like a Docu series. My favorite thing is because they are high level junior college cheerleaders. And what it's doing is watching them go from you know weeks out until the Daytona which is where they have their chilling championship and you kind of following. If they'll make it who makes the squad and again not so much about cheerleading. As it is following the characters involved but it's super high intensity like tumbling and flipping and so like a lot autumn. My friends that were cheerleaders and like ninth grade. I totally relate pictures of them up in their cheerleading uniform. It's like the same thing. It's not forbid six bits dollar our holiday. It's like hard core hard core. Now it's like a athleticism at its finest. It is a great show. It's a Ninety four percent positive tomato with critics ninety six on audience score and again. I didn't expect it and that was only watching it to say I didn't watch one episode and I was just GonNa Watch one and and and tell me yeah but I watched one. Oh I gotta see what happened in the second one after the second one I was I was in. It's only six episodes. They're an hour reach Navarro Texas and so it's according to Camp But Yeah No. It's it's it's really good. That's I mean I tried to make Daytona. I cried on average because I don't think I cried every episode but on average I cried one episode Thorson episode two times. I don't want to do any spoilers whatsoever. Because I didn't want to be spoiling it for me but there are times where I was like just completely moved a Monica the coach. Oh my gosh. She's an awesome right. Come like school us right now. She grew up in that small town. It wasn't like someone so I would encourage you to check it out it's on net flicks. I did not want to like it so I'm not sending over to a show that I was like I told you I'm kind of late to it. As far as I feel like I should be watching stuff early. Recommended the folks But it's really good. It's called cheer on Netflix. You're still talking a lot of people that haven't seen it. I mean aiming I said and we spilling the tee off like. WHO's your favorite? Oh yeah what do they do. You want to be friends with dairy. who my favorite was Morgan? Yeah well yeah cool can back stories or what gets me because she you know oh she had family that left her just left and she lived in a trailer. I thought of you into trailer by yourself the Camper Camper. Yeah but I was like Van. I totally I totally get that. It's good a lot of them. Have Great Stories Darius. Yeah they're all. Yeah it's and it a two helps you remember to look like I would look at a cheer team like me like. Oh my gosh look how super towns and look at them and their cheerleaders and they have this but everybody has something I'm going on. You don't know where people have come from or what they're trying to overcome in 'cause like each character. Yeah why because chillier is seen as like the happy the peppy the Whoo I could do a bit but there was an truly help. Change their life like some of them were on the course of destruction and they were given some structure and something to that'd be passionate about film. I mean just like any sport can do for people but this happened cheerleading. So don't think it's a show about cheerleader. It's much more than you're leading his part of it. Yeah about humans. Their back story overcoming working and my husband. Did you watch it Morgan. Yeah I'm on the third episode right now. Are you obsessed with it. Yes but I used to be a competitive cheerleader so competitive oh like I was on three different competitive teams. I started cheering when I was like six years told my mom started a competitive team. Okay so this is like you. Yes baskets everything. I was like When I was really young and in kindergarten pardon heard one of the teams that she helped run? Would like throw me in the air because I was so little and I would do baskets and stuff when I was so young. Wow Morgan's number. twos like cheer. She's also a really good athlete. Possibly the Best Adelaide on the show I pound for pound maybe the best athletes on the show. She's a lot she's five foot tall right and I think if we're fighting I'M GONNA win because I'm bigger but I think she's possibly the best athletes on the show. That's tough for me to say BR bride Here because I considered myself to be athletic but I'll get no credit. No credit and I was in cheerleader to maybe so you my senior year of High School Rau- Rodman like I couldn't even do it. Texas tea did you. I think of going to college. Oh Yeah I teared in high school I mean. I did all the steps of cheerleading. And I could probably still do some of my backflips and stuff. I really want to do. So Oh wow. It's the gymnastics cheerleading. This show it's not the cheerleaders you rarely see them. Go out and do cheers in the background. You'll see them do that. It's it's not a stunt guy. Basically gymnastic yeah gymnastics part of cheer wit stunts which stunts is where the stuff that gets really hard and tricky. Like I probably had two or three concussions concussions. When I was doing stunts and stuff that's wild? This is crazy like five concussions in the NFL you get if you can cut into your. You're done like you're GonNa be messed up your whole life so nervous like every time they would go into a new formation and went to like live like build the pyramid off his always like gripping at a UH. I don't know who's your favorite character. Jerry Jerry I wanted I need to channel more Jerry in my life. Because he's just so positive. Gosh he has like he had a rough like lost his mom and into lose your mom. It's such a young age and formative years and gosh she just still stayed so positive. Well we'll leave it with that for now but that show cheer is to me was way more than cheerleading. Because I don't that's not my thing to get interested in it's a really great. Docu knock you series a little bit of reality show. Mostly Docu series. What makes it a little bit of reality? Shows the camera watching them talk about stuff other than that. It's it's pretty

Netflix Morgan Daytona Jerry Jerry Amy Lunchbox Gymnastics Navarro Texas Thorson Monica BR VAN Texas High School Rau- Rodman NFL
The future of Podcasting with Minter Dial

The Practical Futurist Podcast

08:52 min | 8 months ago

The future of Podcasting with Minter Dial

"Welcome to the practical futurist podcast. My guest today is a return guest. MINTA doll thanks for being back on the show my pleasure. We're GonNa talk about something close to your heart and more recently close to my heart. The future of podcasting you'll first episode was November. Twenty ten. What got you into podcasting? Well at the time I just left Liau. And and like so many things things I I wanted to do what was digital and so I started blogging in two thousand and six while on the executive active committee worldwide and at the time it was considered illegal if not improper to self promote where they considered itself community company in a big company. Soon as soon as I left I'd been listening to Pud cosmic wine. I try this out and so in a very amateur manner. I started cussing. I actually believe my first ones were right after I left and we're done in French the time I was in Paris so I started podcasting and I wanted to explore what it's like and and and then little by little home not just the technical aspects but mind skills. I remember years ago in Adelaide. I was offered to be on the university radio station and ahead. A slaughter was three in the morning and I decline that but I always look back to think what would have happened. If I'd actually taken up the offer so now I get to do that. Because essentially podcasting is a radio show right. That's why I use first of all that would become might have become a night owl and secondly I used to start off a Pud cost. The word is seemed so Gauche Woodward came from. Well I think the law basically says it's it's The different senior broadcast and politics. And so so the PODCAST IPOD and that's probably came together. So what are you gonNA add. podcasting I so the very first and most important thing is I learn so I I seek out individuals. I think are interesting. Done something and they don't need to be grandiose people they just I think if you get your listening skills feels turned on everybody you can learn from so I I seek out people that I'm interested to hang out. With and by the nature of recording inevitably inevitably. The other person feels like they need to show up and so then in that moment you get to learn stuff there they you just not gonna come with your b-game. We don't WANNA come to be games because Zeros like everyone's going to hear what you're saying it's a you think podcasting is replaced blogging. Well I think the blogging certainly has come under pressure and so for having blog for so long I can see that the volume of of people listening in common reading and commenting has declined and so put customers competing with blogging in terms of getting our attention span will it. Has It replaced. No I think that there's still a place ace for writing and reading and commenting But I do think it's a really interesting avenue for individuals authors of course worse but also companies. What do you think now is the time to podcasting? I think it has been the time to put costs for quite a while I think that people are now becoming coming more accustomed to the idea podcasting. There have been certain podcast shows that have really generalized the ability like cereal in the United States or your pet show down in Australia. And so you've you've seen the major media companies creates more regular well produced. podcast shows that are consumable on your time. So that convenience factor the more seamless experience downloading it. That it's now come round as opposed to weigh. It wasn't the Beginnings Finance Asia has made it easier and yet there's still plenty more room to grow so now maybe because there's still plenty more to go yet I would say that you shouldn't just launch podcast for the sake of doing a podcast. which is what I did at the beginning? I because I was just in the experimental mode. If you podcast you you should be thinking about as is a long term engagement engagement just like blogging in the day. And you want to think about why you're doing it because by the way it takes energy efforts resources. Yeah and so. If you're going to do it you better be aware of why you're doing it. And that's going to help you get up and do it. Do you think podcasts will become the new influences when we've gone. We've got fatigue from these instagram influences and brands realized they don't get anything out of it. Do you think podcastone will step up to have that level of authority. I think it depends on the platform that you have. There's there's definitely really You know all the major Pud Kosters where you have thirty forty million people downloading it every week. Yeah that's that's that's significant influence getting on their shows by the way. Good luck really. Well of course because Joe Rogan's Harrison so yes you'd love to be on the a show but it's going to be difficult so much more selective and and they're much more aware of their influence now the beginning when you were an infant service sort of kind of fun. Oh I've got a million followers so it'd become much more sophisticated and much more demanding and ultimately the thing about podcasting. Which is interesting is that it's hard to hide? You can manicure a beautiful photograph on Instagram. You can cut and pastes deletes REEDIT A blog post I. But it's a whole lot harder for you as the podcast producer in this case to edit mentor. So what's coming out of my mouth with the IMO emotion. The intonations you as a listener are much more capable of detecting bullshit but I think also for the podcast. They are on show. If you're not an expert it'll come out and if you're having a conversation like we are and obviously nodding and saying that's nice next question without actually being involved in I think that's what draws people in because and the reason why I'm doing shy we'd guests rather than just made no one wants to my voice. I want as intro. These voices choices that need to be heard. Well that's kind and yet I think what's interesting. Andrew is the more you know as put coster it also can create a much better environment virement and conversation and so by the nature of the questions. You're asking you of course in my opinion demonstrate knowledge because near the end it also demonstrates who you ars individual they they get your vibe and by the way they're going to hire US speak they better wanted us into what you say but I think there's this This rawness to it that makes it in the in the intimacy of the ear a really interesting medium in order to vehicle messages you mentioned before about about what brands and companies can do. I've started to listen to a few branded podcasts. You think that's the next area that brands can really explore. It really depends on what they're trying to achieve Steve. So if in their strategic overview in imperatives they have a specific need maybe put costing his answer put. Custody is not necessarily early. What needs to be done and so if you feel that you have an engagement I was even in B.? Two B. is probably far more interesting and Abebe environment where you have specific shared expertise within the business that you're operating where you will get. Experts in the interest of long form in podcast can be real interest and yet on the other side. You know. There are various formats for podcasting whether it's bite-sized two to five minutes. Get fifty minute slot. You Got Twenty Minute Commute. Got The forty five minute jog. You got the one and a half to four hours. You know people who just like to spend their time in a constant Audio matter maybe while the ironing or doing other activities Anyway so many formats and so what are you trying to achieve the type of audience and I think the key point then is to think about it as a long term ambition because by the way at the beginning for the most part you're GonNa get very very few people listening getting people accustomed to you understand that type of audience them the different types of people you have on the show get them coming along on a regular basis. You need to do this regularly and have constant interesting compensation of course they do a weekly format. How does it work in terms of production time and effort even put into that all right so a my general idea is to have a thirty minute type of view when you add in the post production that the pre-roland the postal it? All ends is up to run about thirty five minutes. I never have to do the interview and then I have to listen to the whole interview at the end to make sure that it's all good so from the the time I find set up. Do the interview postproduction. I think every show takes around three hours because I also had the show notes and everything is

Pud Kosters Liau Executive Paris Instagram Gauche Woodward United States Adelaide Joe Rogan Australia Reedit Abebe Steve Andrew Coster Producer Harrison
Biodiversity must move up international agenda, following Australia bush fires

UN News

09:24 min | 9 months ago

Biodiversity must move up international agenda, following Australia bush fires

"Than one hundred. Wildfires are still raging across Australia with record-breaking temperatures and drought contributing to the loss of more than six million actors of land. There is home to some of the most unique plants and animals in the world. Some estimates suggest that around half a billion animals have burned to death in the state of New South Wales alone in an interview with you and use John Scanlon special envoy for the African Parks nonprofit orgnization in former secretary general of seats the UN Becht Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species said that increasing threats to biodiversity must be lift up the international agenda The australian-born Environment and conservation expert spoke to Julia Dean from our UN Information Centre enter in Canberra. These are tragedy tragedy for people. People have lost their lives They property livestock. And it's also uh-huh tragedy for wildlife. We've seen something like eleven million hectares lost and I've figures of Iran. One billion animals have been lost through the fires. And that's an instrument and some of these animals Quite unique habitats. So it's devastating and I think ministers recently coded holded an ecological catastrophe. And I. I think I'd adopt the same terms. Straight is a negative country. It has unique wildlife fan nowhere else on the planet other than the Stra and there are a number of species that have been put at great risk through the scale and extent of these flies on a personal night. Right you are from. And what is your reaction to what specifically happened on. Kangaroo loudon inside personally heartbreaking to see what's happening there entangle die die. I grew up in Adelaide as you said I visited. Kangaroo Island as a child with the family Went on a Ymca camp to Kangaroo Island When I was in legal practice actus I spend a lot of time there and when I was chief executive of Environment Heritage and Aboriginal Affairs obviously the National Parks on the until under our I watch and it's it's devastating to see the scale of the loss on kangaroo island such a beautiful? I mean fantastic community really strong community. They eh EH. Extraordinary wildlife fantastic landscapes beautiful produce to see the scale of the FIS hitting that island. What it's done for people uh property livestock and wildlife is just devastating Koalas in particular? What do you think is the man? Do you have any idea of what the actors in general in ruin is the population of animals. that a big hit so badly. The interesting thing. Koalas is that we introduced to kangaroo island really as a as a safe haven for them and they have. The population is growing significantly in. It's fantastic. It's clemency free population of Kuala a safe zone for Koala and and we hid. They've probably lost half of the population which is terrible if you think Animals dying in the FIS and getting injured through the FIS is and that such scale and the populations taken a huge hit not just On kangaroo island but across other parts of Australia so it's really Put the much more difficult position than than it's ever been before yet. Terrible and do you think there would be any role for the UN or other multilateral institutions institutions to get involved in helping to rebalance the unique flora and fauna of Australia wants the Pfizer at the United Nations is a large organization with many. The different components is united. We have some significant meetings coming up this year there will be the meeting the conference of the parties to the Convention on Biological School Diversity in Kunming in China and at this meeting countries of looking at what sort of by Vesey framework we should have between twenty twenty and twenty thirty thirty. So how should we deal with the loss of biodiversity that we're experiencing what sort of measures should be taken and certainly climate change is a very big part ought to that compensation along with all the other threats to diversity. So I think we have a chance to to recalibrate rethink recognized that at the threats threats to biodiversity including those coming from climate. Change Asa via and you know we have according to recent UN reports million species at risk of extinction over coming decades nights if we don't change course so quickly. That conference gives us an opportunity by globally and in the context of Australia to rethink where we are with biodiversity Are we on the right track. Are we taking the right measures to ensure that we're not losing it and also be the twenty meeting of the conference of the parties to did the comic convention and we'll be looking at the Paris Agreement and nationally determined contributions. There's also an opportunity there to look at. What sort of responses are being taken to climate? I'm a change. Not just in mitigation but also inadaptation and building resilience. which is such a big issue for Australia and other countries as well? How are we going to adapt to changing climate conditions? And just done that diversity has been at the forefront of the climate change discussion. No that's unfortunate. It and biodiversity has not been well enough recognized in the contribution that biodiversity makes in terms of being able to mitigate adapt build resilience to climate change but also the contribution that it makes people's personal health and wellbeing contribution it makes to development into generating people's jobs so we really need to leaked by the up the international agenda. And that's certainly what's being attempted this year. Not only to protect bottlers in the at sign right to recognize how inextricably linked to our response to climate change and to the way in which we develop an achieve achieve the UN sustainable development goals and you travel the globe extensively in your role as special envoy for African parks. What's been the reaction to the bush fires sized from people that you speak with? Yes I'm I'm currently based in In Switzerland And I think the scale and the intensity of the intensity intensity of these fires has really shocked everyone Discount applies impact the area covered by these. These are the two and a half times the size of Switzerland the country triomphe currently living in and I am receiving messages from people right across the globe every continent concern about the FIS asking me. If my family's a I asked me about what's happening and and the response in house drill is going to deal with say there's been an overwhelming response and not just in terms of expressions concern and goodwill but people are giving their asking. How can I support Australia? How could I contribute to these? Whether it's from relation to the impact on people property or livestock but may given my my job. I have a lot of people coming to me saying. How can we help the wildlife? The wildlife recover hat. Can we help injured animals news Be Treated so it's been an overwhelming response From everyone at the not being erected with across across the globe to this this crisis the destroyers being confronting through these bush fires and in your role as looking at things globally as you travel the the strategy bushfires are one part of a crosses in a particular country but there are other crises going on around the world. Do you think if you've got excludable knowledge and experience that we can make this challenge. Well I'm a bit of a born optimus. I do believe we can reach Matab challenges. I think one of the inspiring things sir looking at what's going on from a distance is the way. The Australian public has responded The volunteers support from firefighters through the victim. Marion's through to just members of the public who are giving contributing supporting through to the wealthiest Australians. We really are seeing Australia. Come together the to respond to this crisis and great international support. I do think we can respond. I think it's possibly a bit of a wake up. Call that we do have to be be better prepared. We do need to look at how we are able to respond to changing climate conditions. Howie Eh to build a build resilience within the system? So I really think it's It's really everybody up to say we. We really need to scale up our if it here. From an economic point of view in terms of the impact it has on the economy from a personal point of view the impact it has on peoples whose lives had their property the livelihoods but also in terms of Australia's unique wildlife and the impact. It's having because the bushfires has come on top of the draft they come on top of loss of habitat through various activities through invasive species cats foxes and other species. So you know L.. Watts really taking a hit and with this bushfire coming on top of everything else. It's really crisis time. And that's why it's good to see see this. Initial allocation fifty million from the Bush Fire Relief Fund being allocated to to live and see more.

Australia UN Kangaroo Island FIS Kangaroo Loudon Un Information Centre John Scanlon Julia Dean Environment Heritage And Abori Iran Switzerland Canberra Howie Eh Stra African Parks New South Wales Bush Fire Relief Fund
Biodiversity must move up international agenda, following Australia bush fires

UN News

09:24 min | 9 months ago

Biodiversity must move up international agenda, following Australia bush fires

"Than one hundred. Wildfires are still raging across Australia with record-breaking temperatures and drought contributing to the loss of more than six million actors of land. There is home to some of the most unique plants and animals in the world. Some estimates suggest that around half a billion animals have burned to death in the state of New South Wales alone in an interview with you and use John Scanlon special envoy for the African Parks nonprofit orgnization in former secretary general of seats the UN Becht Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species said that increasing threats to biodiversity must be lift up the international agenda The australian-born Environment and conservation expert spoke to Julia Dean from our UN Information Centre enter in Canberra. These are tragedy tragedy for people. People have lost their lives They property livestock. And it's also uh-huh tragedy for wildlife. We've seen something like eleven million hectares lost and I've figures of Iran. One billion animals have been lost through the fires. And that's an instrument and some of these animals Quite unique habitats. So it's devastating and I think ministers recently coded holded an ecological catastrophe. And I. I think I'd adopt the same terms. Straight is a negative country. It has unique wildlife fan nowhere else on the planet other than the Stra and there are a number of species that have been put at great risk through the scale and extent of these flies on a personal night. Right you are from. And what is your reaction to what specifically happened on. Kangaroo loudon inside personally heartbreaking to see what's happening there entangle die die. I grew up in Adelaide as you said I visited. Kangaroo Island as a child with the family Went on a Ymca camp to Kangaroo Island When I was in legal practice actus I spend a lot of time there and when I was chief executive of Environment Heritage and Aboriginal Affairs obviously the National Parks on the until under our I watch and it's it's devastating to see the scale of the loss on kangaroo island such a beautiful? I mean fantastic community really strong community. They eh EH. Extraordinary wildlife fantastic landscapes beautiful produce to see the scale of the FIS hitting that island. What it's done for people uh property livestock and wildlife is just devastating Koalas in particular? What do you think is the man? Do you have any idea of what the actors in general in ruin is the population of animals. that a big hit so badly. The interesting thing. Koalas is that we introduced to kangaroo island really as a as a safe haven for them and they have. The population is growing significantly in. It's fantastic. It's clemency free population of Kuala a safe zone for Koala and and we hid. They've probably lost half of the population which is terrible if you think Animals dying in the FIS and getting injured through the FIS is and that such scale and the populations taken a huge hit not just On kangaroo island but across other parts of Australia so it's really Put the much more difficult position than than it's ever been before yet. Terrible and do you think there would be any role for the UN or other multilateral institutions institutions to get involved in helping to rebalance the unique flora and fauna of Australia wants the Pfizer at the United Nations is a large organization with many. The different components is united. We have some significant meetings coming up this year there will be the meeting the conference of the parties to the Convention on Biological School Diversity in Kunming in China and at this meeting countries of looking at what sort of by Vesey framework we should have between twenty twenty and twenty thirty thirty. So how should we deal with the loss of biodiversity that we're experiencing what sort of measures should be taken and certainly climate change is a very big part ought to that compensation along with all the other threats to diversity. So I think we have a chance to to recalibrate rethink recognized that at the threats threats to biodiversity including those coming from climate. Change Asa via and you know we have according to recent UN reports million species at risk of extinction over coming decades nights if we don't change course so quickly. That conference gives us an opportunity by globally and in the context of Australia to rethink where we are with biodiversity Are we on the right track. Are we taking the right measures to ensure that we're not losing it and also be the twenty meeting of the conference of the parties to did the comic convention and we'll be looking at the Paris Agreement and nationally determined contributions. There's also an opportunity there to look at. What sort of responses are being taken to climate? I'm a change. Not just in mitigation but also inadaptation and building resilience. which is such a big issue for Australia and other countries as well? How are we going to adapt to changing climate conditions? And just done that diversity has been at the forefront of the climate change discussion. No that's unfortunate. It and biodiversity has not been well enough recognized in the contribution that biodiversity makes in terms of being able to mitigate adapt build resilience to climate change but also the contribution that it makes people's personal health and wellbeing contribution it makes to development into generating people's jobs so we really need to leaked by the up the international agenda. And that's certainly what's being attempted this year. Not only to protect bottlers in the at sign right to recognize how inextricably linked to our response to climate change and to the way in which we develop an achieve achieve the UN sustainable development goals and you travel the globe extensively in your role as special envoy for African parks. What's been the reaction to the bush fires sized from people that you speak with? Yes I'm I'm currently based in In Switzerland And I think the scale and the intensity of the intensity intensity of these fires has really shocked everyone Discount applies impact the area covered by these. These are the two and a half times the size of Switzerland the country triomphe currently living in and I am receiving messages from people right across the globe every continent concern about the FIS asking me. If my family's a I asked me about what's happening and and the response in house drill is going to deal with say there's been an overwhelming response and not just in terms of expressions concern and goodwill but people are giving their asking. How can I support Australia? How could I contribute to these? Whether it's from relation to the impact on people property or livestock but may given my my job. I have a lot of people coming to me saying. How can we help the wildlife? The wildlife recover hat. Can we help injured animals news Be Treated so it's been an overwhelming response From everyone at the not being erected with across across the globe to this this crisis the destroyers being confronting through these bush fires and in your role as looking at things globally as you travel the the strategy bushfires are one part of a crosses in a particular country but there are other crises going on around the world. Do you think if you've got excludable knowledge and experience that we can make this challenge. Well I'm a bit of a born optimus. I do believe we can reach Matab challenges. I think one of the inspiring things sir looking at what's going on from a distance is the way. The Australian public has responded The volunteers support from firefighters through the victim. Marion's through to just members of the public who are giving contributing supporting through to the wealthiest Australians. We really are seeing Australia. Come together the to respond to this crisis and great international support. I do think we can respond. I think it's possibly a bit of a wake up. Call that we do have to be be better prepared. We do need to look at how we are able to respond to changing climate conditions. Howie Eh to build a build resilience within the system? So I really think it's It's really everybody up to say we. We really need to scale up our if it here. From an economic point of view in terms of the impact it has on the economy from a personal point of view the impact it has on peoples whose lives had their property the livelihoods but also in terms of Australia's unique wildlife and the impact. It's having because the bushfires has come on top of the draft they come on top of loss of habitat through various activities through invasive species cats foxes and other species. So you know L.. Watts really taking a hit and with this bushfire coming on top of everything else. It's really crisis time. And that's why it's good to see see this. Initial allocation fifty million from the Bush Fire Relief Fund being allocated to to live and see more.

Carl Zimmer Explores the History of Our Understanding of Heredity

The Science Show

09:33 min | 9 months ago

Carl Zimmer Explores the History of Our Understanding of Heredity

"This is the side show coming today. From Adelaide Writer's festival beautifully placed in the park by the river and theme is feeble. Mindedness must must be the heat or your genes. The book is called. She has her mother's laugh and the author is famed. American science writer called Zimmer who is a Yale graduate and has written for the New York Times and National Geographic and we begin with a personal question. My first question to you call is. He's rather more personal one. Do you think there's a fair chance that I'm a moron. Definitively now you are a man of exceptional talents but a lot of people in your book who are of exceptional talent and the world ignored them and essentially essentially locked them up. The reason I ask about me is you can see in my family. I was the first born and my brother was five years. His later and my sister was ten years after myself and as we got older there was a brief period when I was growing up when we were quite well off where I had had to nannies. We lived in a posh apartment in Vienna and we went to restaurants and had holidays and then when I was eleven eleven no income not just low income but practically knowing come and you could see a graph of both my own mobility ability and education and attainment and wealth versus my brothers. He just about made over the brink and became an academic in France. My my sister ran away with the larger winters fifteen pregnant. I don't actually know where she is anymore. Now the first part of your book is about ways in which society changes how ordinary people Kano cannot succeed whether they've got the genes for all sorts of talents taught. Would you explain the first part looking at an experiment. Now if you imagine a person a man might have one family with the trollop in the pub. You know obviously lower class and from that we'll be dozens and dozens of offspring who you regard as feeble minded and then the test of that is. He has another relationship with someone of the upper classes. And you've got clear attainment could could you tell that story yeah well. In the nineteenth century there was a very powerful sense that the way to explain problems in society you like poverty or crime was largely through heredity. And this is long before anybody knew about DNA but people would point to certain families where you'd have generations ends upon generations of criminals narrative wells and they will talk about how this must be some sort of inheritance so most biblical sense of the sin being carried carried down from generation to generation and when genetics comes along in one thousand nine hundred suddenly people who have this biological justification for that more kind of moral explanation in the past say oh it must be genes. We don't know what those genes are. We don't even know what genes are period. But it's got to be their in the genes. There must be a gene for being a criminal for example or feeble minded so feeble minded in in the early nineteen hundreds would refer to. If you had down syndrome they might call you feel minded. If you were just trouble in school they might call you. People minded it was a very loose term but a very powerful one and in my book I actually talk about how the idea of people minus and heredity actually gave rise to some of the most toxic ideas of the twentieth a century. And I focus in on this home for the people minded in New Jersey actually not far from where I grew up where psychologists there discovered intelligence agents testing and began testing the children at this home and he found that he could predict roughly their intelligence based on some questions. uh-huh standardized intelligence testing and there were these group of children who seem to be slightly below average and he found them the most dangerous of all because they could pass that could go into into society and maybe they would pass down their bad genes to future generations to population exactly and even the name for them and so he went back to the Greek for fool and call them morons and the first moron that God really focused on was a girl named Emma Wolverton and he discovered he did some research John Her family and he wrote a book about her family and it was as you had described. It seemed to be a what he called a rigid experiment which was is that in the American revolutionary war her ancestor and he was a soldier who got drunk one night slept with Eagle minded tavern. Wench she then had if he minded a child who then produced generations upon generations of the feeble minded leading to Emma Wolverton. Then he sobered up met an upstanding woman they had upstanding children children and so on and so on till present day the early nineteen hundreds and you might think well this is ridiculous no one would take seriously but in fact it was a bestseller. It was the the subject of many newspaper articles. He was invited by the United States. Government to help setup immigration policy. Because they didn't want to let people minded the people into the country which is why we started to prevent people from Russia from Italy. Jews and someone from coming in great numbers because Goddard thought that they were overwhelmingly feeble minded. So if you're asking if you are a moron well I'm definitely more. And what was the family beginning with K.. That was invented as descriptors. That right so what did was he thought. He was protecting their privacy except he he by calling overton DEBORAH CALA CAC and the book was called the Catholic Family Calico guttered loved coining words from the Greek like Moron calicoes quotes from good and bad callous. And Kako so that you have this family whereas the good sign the bad side. The fact is a total fiction. The people who did the research all screwed up none of what I told you true but nobody really quite realized that for decades. Emma Wolverton paid the price in the sense that she was institutionalized for entire life for the entire life is buried on the grounds of the institution in New Jersey. She was perfectly competent. I mean it was ridiculous students visualize but honestly much worse outcomes came from this so in the United States and other prominent scientists lobbied for laws to sterilize the feeble minded and the US Supreme Court supported this. Tens of thousands of people were sterilized in the United States and then the Catholic family the very book Tuck was taken up by people in Nazi Germany. From Hitler on down they use it as evidence when they set up their hereditary courts when they began to sterilize realized people and began to exterminate them. And so this just shows you. How we can't just play around with heredity? Heredity is deadly serious subject. That is incredibly intimate to all of us as individuals but also has an incredible power over society at large one of the things. I find really amazing. Is that when they went back as you hinted and traced this John Overton they found out they got the guy and it wasn't true at all. Could you explain. Well what happened was that God would send out these field workers and he would tell them to interview the families of these students these children and they wanted wanted to see. Could we draw pedigree where people mindedness was showed to be inherited because that's actually very important for studying genetic diseases so Huntington's Huntington's disease for example you can see how gets carried down through the generations. That's a single gene. That's right so Huntington's disease is caused by a mutation and in a single gene and we each carry two copies of each gene if you have one bad copy of this gene called. At you will get Huntington's. There's no you negotiate on your way out of it and Henry Goddard was working actually with some of the scientists who were studying Huntington's and so people tend to think in the early nineteen hundreds words that you could explain a lot of who we are based on inheriting. Did you inherit this single gene. And so God are really thought that you could inherit a single gene for intelligence. I mean we know now that there are thousands upon thousands of genes that influence intelligence and that influences all mixed up with the environment. And also what you use. Your measurement of intelligence is way more complicated than that but to the point of Hubris. It was quite confident that you could just draw a family family tree and find the evidence and he wanted to find the evidence he sent out his field workers to find the evidence and guess what they found it even if they had to come back with breath fraudulent information. Think about you have these people going out to families and saying like so your father who's been dead for ten years. How intelligent will you say was? Oh Oh I don't know. Did he drink much. He stole a horse once feeble minded stealing a horse you rate it as feeble minded and so it was kind of an absurd certain episode but one that had huge

Emma Wolverton Eagle Minded Tavern United States New Jersey Henry Goddard Huntington Adelaide Writer Writer New York Times Moron Calicoes France Zimmer Yale Vienna John Overton Us Supreme Court Russia Deborah Cala
"adelaide" Discussed on Last Podcast on the Left

Last Podcast on the Left

13:35 min | 1 year ago

"adelaide" Discussed on Last Podcast on the Left

"Against it like i haven't got too far into the book of but i did reads the first chapter and i'm not gonna run it forever i want people to redo this book i won't be able to buy this book and truck who again a sean few start city of evil shocking real story of adelaide strange and violent underbelly oh by apparently made new a tv series yes the book does have a little circle the ted as seen on tv on jimmy no it wasn't the bookers on tv it was made into a tv series like i say.

adelaide ted jimmy
"adelaide" Discussed on Adelaide Fringe Podcast

Adelaide Fringe Podcast

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"adelaide" Discussed on Adelaide Fringe Podcast

"Atalay themes Christopher. Potier that defines a city. Welcome to Adelaide fringe podcast where we take you behind the curtain of the largest arts festival in the southern hemisphere to help you navigate your best fringe experience in this episode, Heather crawl director. And CEO of the Adelaide fringe reveals some of the highlights from Adelaide fringe festival two thousand nineteen including the amazing statistics that demonstrate just how successful these. He is fringe has been today is our final episode for season one. We have absolutely loved sharing fringe two thousand nine teen excitement with you and look forward to more action and behind the scenes sneak peeks in season two at allayed fringe podcast is recorded on the traditional lands of the Ghana people with big thanks to Adelaide fringe principal partner. Bank say. Fringe two thousand nine finished with a bang now the dust has had time to set a little bit. There's regional tool is going on mount Gabby is just happened while is about to happen. But then we wanted to take some time to reflect and Luke how wall was so amazing at fringe in two thousand nineteen well, we've just had an absolutely bumper fringe it's beyond all expectations. Really? We grew ticket sales by seventeen and a half percent is never has happened in the history of fringe to grow. So might so I'm to see ticket growth like that in one year. I mean for the last ten years or so we've had constant growth between seven percent and ten percent every year, which is pretty phenomenal. But to C seventeen and a half percent growth in ticket sales in one year's amazing in the end result. Eight hundred twenty eight thousand five hundred sixty three tickets, so an incredible number. We've set ourselves a target. By twenty twenty two two. So a million tickets. We actually look like we're on track to do that. Now, so already now eight hundred twenty thousand plus this year worth nineteen and a half million dollars. What's really amazing about that box? Office figure is that we're not for profit the Adelaide fringe. So we are selling the tickets on behalf of the artists. And now those dollars all those dollars of ticket sales have now been paid out to the artists, and that's a massive injection into the arts industry direct from the customer pocket, you know, people voting with their feet and going to say shows to support artist. It's caught a phenomenal figure to look at. And we here to try and make sure that artists have the best possible fringe experience that they can have threes ago. We made a very brave decision to implement a whole new digital platform at the Adelaide fringe, a brand new ticketing service. We had to throw away what we'd been using for nearly twenty years. And when you do something as significant as that, it's it's very high risk. It was done at high speed lots of energy resources staff. Everything we threw everything at that China. It was one of the biggest changes the fringes implemented in in its history. And what we feeling now is that it was all worth it. It was very hard work. And now it's well what we've done is. We've created a platform that Mike's it really easy for people to find shows and bought tickets, and you can literally be walking along the straight on your my ball and think well, what's on right now abaya ticket and before you know, it you've got the ticket. You didn't need to print it you Desscan the code and in you went the fringe team is just so proud right now that we made those changes, and we took that risk, and we left off that cliff. The other things, of course, it was super proud of. We we did. Yeah. Which was they average projections on the river telling the Ghana stories, and the the sort of relationship of the Ghana people with the river and the flora and the foreigner in the beautiful animal stories and stories of the seasons and to hear people gasping when the water's great appeared was just wonderful. And we saw over two hundred thousand people come down and experience Yere. It's one of the biggest average inal. Art installations that Australia's ever saying, it becomes an extended not out in some ways because people will sort of gone too shy. And then add on a free experience at the projections as well with their families, and people of all ages came to see it was something that captured people's imaginations and shed on social media like something we've never really saying of that scou- before fringe and also people talked about it as a date cultural experience it. Really was something that changed people's hearts and minds and made the mall curious about Ghana stories, and culture, and that is something we just can't measure how how important that is. We also obviously the program this year was absolutely brilliant. So many amazing shows across all the different venues and the venues themselves are really responding. Well to co for Mike in themselves. More accessible, lots of great initiatives to make venues more accessible for people with any kind of disabilities. The venues took that challenge really well, and we are going to continue that work into the future. And in ease really Sacha collaboration fringe, you know, from your staff here at at fringe, then you'll volunteers and venues, and everyone, you know, how does it feel to bring sign many people together? And then of course, the the audiences it full the celebration of arts. Arts and culture. It's a true. Co creation the artists the venues the fringe team the fringe staff the audiences the people of Adelaide every single person is so critical in the ingredients of making this magical festival work to transform a CD for the entire month like that too. So Nelia million tickets year, this is grown organically over the decades every single person who's gone before. In the fringe has contributed to why we are now experiencing these magical success. And of course, we talk about the numbers. Of course, we talk about, you know, the number of cheats, because it's an important measure for us. But the stuff that's hey quickly. As important is the impact that we have on people's well-being people's happiness for the month, the fringe, and if we could just capture that fringe happiness in in bottles in sell it did I through the year we

Adelaide Ghana Mike Christopher mount Gabby CEO Heather director Luke twenty twenty Australia principal China Yere partner one year million dollars seven percent twenty years
"adelaide" Discussed on Adelaide Fringe Podcast

Adelaide Fringe Podcast

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"adelaide" Discussed on Adelaide Fringe Podcast

"Inspirations from Adelaide fringe. So we have a parade. We call it the pod Papa prayed, which is led by a local legend Gavin clock. And I think we see that had one hundred fifty participants in that parade and that was before anyone from the public jumped into the prayed as well. So it was huge this year. That's people from all walks of life from care homes to a community choir to the James Morrison jazz academy performers the city band dances for schools around the community and just anyone who wants to dress up and being vote. So that was a huge success. And then on the Saturday, we have main arts experience, and I was really proud of the programming that we had across the day in the cave gardens. We had three local curator's programming during the daytime. And then in the evening, we we had some amazing headline acts light yummy deluxe or squad after I was cabaret club zucchini clan. Yeah. We just had some amazing what visiting acts as a headline is. And then to see them side by side with regionally by Sada's that really held their own ole on the main stage in the cave garden. I think that's probably my biggest highlight. And so you've just wrapped up Twenty-nine teen twenty twenty is the next people want to get involved. How do they do that visit range of ways to get involved? In terms of like, the curated main stage and also roving performance capable out on our Facebook page, which is fringe met Gambia at the same time. We've really encouraging travelling artists to include Matt Gambier on the tour schedule, I guess to other presented ticketed show at one of a wonderful venues or or to potentially be part of curated main stage performances as well. So we hope to see more and more odyssey involved. You know, wonderful festival fantastic world. Thanks so much. Louise, it's been lovely talking to you. Thank you, be sure. To subscribe to the Adelaide fringe podcast and never miss an episode to get the most out of your Adelaide fringe experience. Visit WWW dot Adelaide fringe dot com. Dodi you would you can Brown shows by genre and location access fringe deals and a whole lot. More for regular fringe updates. Follow our social media channels all subscribe to a newsletter pedal aid, fringe podcast is produced by narrative marketing who believed that stories connecting visuals and that storytelling compulsively impact the world.

Adelaide fringe Adelaide Gavin clock James Morrison Papa Facebook Matt Gambier Gambia Sada Louise
"adelaide" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

Nerd On! The Podcast

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"adelaide" Discussed on Nerd On! The Podcast

"Yeah. And I liked the conversation. According I had at the very end was kind of like red might have left the underground and live her whole life. And I think to keep to keep confusion. Let's just go read the girl in the red for now. You know, it's the real so red go ahead. So just want to let them know who we're we're talking about. So I hold on. I'm going to confuse so red is the one who starts the uprising. She's the original Adelaide. So Adelaide Adelaide is the one we follow through film. So Adelaide escaped from this underbelly of society, a little girl that they're trapped in enslave to live in and through. That fact, she, you know, found a lifer self she learned how to speak. She learned how to dance she did all she maybe a little quirky. She may not fit in exactly right. Right. But she has children. She wants to protect your children. She knows the dangers of the people that she left behind. They arrive. Does that mean that she has a soul to the questions like they cloned flesh? But they were never able to clone a soul. But it's like is a sole something that's given or something that's grown. And so it's kinda also that thought too. Yeah. So and I like there's little has little giveaways throughout the film about how she's not quite right human. I mean, she is human right. She's not quite like, there's a there's an interesting thing that I always that was interesting in the it was interesting the trailer bug meals like that's not on time. And they kept it in the movie where she's getting time, and she snapping to all four beats which no one does anyone who knows music at all you click on the two in the four. But she's clapping offer them to all the beats. And it didn't occur to me until I was watching the movie that I was like, oh my God. It's because she's not from here. It's it's not something she grew up with you know, she learned to dance when she was younger, but it's not just a little. Idiosyncrasies not that are off. So not a soulful thing. Yeah. In the ways to she reacts of things or even when she says to to. What's her? What's her name? Tim Deckers Kate Kate. She's like don't talk it. She didn't say little phrases. She used instead of being like, oh, I'm not a big talker. She's just like, I don't talk. Yeah. And so the little things like that just were like really precious to me as far as character-building goes. So everyone at home listening to this or on your way to your worker listening at work just be weary of people who have no personalities because. This might be from underground. But yeah, I mean, we could go on and on about theories all day. I would love to hear our audiences theories. If you have some sentiment to us. Let us know what you think of ours. I also the last thing I want to say about as far as the the kind of speculative overall theory of everything goes is that there's also a an argument to say that they also represent a part of us that's lost as far as a prime side of us to conform with being on social media and doing all these things and losing connection with the part of ourselves. And throughout the film. We see the kids kind of throughout their own devices the daughters on her on the entire time the alcohol the Dinkal Berg family because that's the one you compare bekker's hijackers. They're having a complete automated house the backup generator with each other. With the bow the, you know, the two fucking development twins and like hate everyone. Yeah. And they have the the nice car, the flare gun all all the things that this other fan the the Wilson's want. Yeah. And it just kinda shows like what how that looks like. Yeah. So I think I think they could also represent that part of ourselves. That's lost within this age of like. I would almost call it an age of solitude, right? I said this to you guys when I got home, I was sitting in my wrote, the movie theater, and I looked to my left, and I looked to my right? And everyone's just in a screen..

Adelaide Adelaide Wilson Dinkal Berg Tim Deckers Kate Kate bekker
"adelaide" Discussed on Adelaide Fringe Podcast

Adelaide Fringe Podcast

16:52 min | 1 year ago

"adelaide" Discussed on Adelaide Fringe Podcast

"Atalay themes. The potty that defines a city. Welcome to Adelaide fringe podcast where we take you behind the curtain of the largest arts festival in the southern hemisphere to help you navigate you'll bist fringe experience Hans the boy wonder of Berlin has to a nationally and internationally during a career spanning more than a decade. He recently shot to a new level of fame when he reached the finals of America's got talent. Where absolutely delighted to have Hans as one of three fringe ambassadors for two thousand and nineteen. In today's episode Hans talks about the unique atmosphere of Adelaide fringe, he shares how he grew his audience and achieved international acclaim, plus dishes, some dirt about his America's got talent. Experience to book your fringe tickets head to the Adelaide fringe website via the Lincoln the show nights. Adelaide fringe podcast is recorded on the traditional lands of the Ghana people with big thanks to Adelaide fringe principal partner. Banking say. Hans welcome to the Motte. My gosh Hulo how Larry Hello to the tens of people listening to this while the pleasure what an aural feast this is. Eight is sorry fringe. It's all happening. How you feeling? Well, I'm a little bit sore. But that's okay. You know, fringes about pacing yourself. I never have one drop of alcohol during Mahal festival and then on the last night. I am planning to arrive at the awards like Kate Middleton and leaving like Kate moss. Honey, put it that way. Good imagery. You've got a Pisces south three fringe because he it's a month long of lots going on. Exactly. And if you're not performing you're you're seeing Pozzo your having meetings with people you're catching up with friends. So it's important to, you know, get sleep where you can. And don't sweat the small stuff. You know? I can see a lot of people on Facebook going off a bed. Oh this review or something that happened? I think you just have to deal with it. And then move on. I have a bit of a Naomi Campbell tantrum. And then it's over. Yeah. I mean, yeah. Have the moment. Feel the feel all Hanley. I'll have the moment I send the text. And then it's over. So Adelaide has become your adopted hyme. Can you tell us how that came about? It is my home Atalay by arrived here on an exchange program many many years ago, and I'm I've stayed for tax reasons. But you know, it's it's funny. I feel so at the home in that lead that you know, it's almost like I was born here and have never lived anywhere else. I don't know. It's it's we it's weird. How I feel that way. But being back in that layer is like, you know, it's like riding a bike. Isn't it overriding? One of those lime scooters. I'm not sure that seems complicated. That's very easy. I've yes, I've been trying one out. I love it. I love the limescale and I love the Jing senior citizens were strolling on the footpath. It's a new sport. I'm thinking about racing one in super loop adding much less noise. Tell me hands. You have been involved in Adelaide fringe for a long time. Yes. I have two thousand and four was my first of a fringe, and I was in the show code Berlin cabaret, and it was at a venue called the Weimar room which opened on Heine streets in a building that used to be downtown and used to be a mad Cade facility of the eighties and nineties roller rink as well. And it was transformed into a pop up venue for fringe festival, and it became so popular that they kept it open year round. So we did a show every Friday Michael Berlin cabaret with a troop of wonderful performers. I dunno. I will give you this exclusive a feeling though, some of them were putting on being German, which that kind of disgusts me. I mean, what sort of sick posts and pretends to be something, then I know what kind of state has its we. But. But that's what happened, and it was kind of it, not only open my eyes. It opened my mind and other parts of my body being in that show and from them, I kind of created my own shows put them into fringe put a little band together at some dances. Our very first fringes that I did is my own show. We used to do them at a community stat establishment, formerly known as the MAs by you. Remember it? Well. And they were so lovely to because they always gave me the venue for free, which as you can imagine as a fringe artist that is most of your costs. And it was a great time because you know, it gave me a chance to get the show together. I mean, I was always okay. But it was the band in the dances in they needed rehearsal. They needed a few years under their belt, but we kind of build an audience. And now look at me. I'm so up myself. I'm unstoppable. And internationally on. Because last year you had sold out shows at inbr- fringes will be yes, how is that? Tell us will use. I mean, we will playing in the blue crate in the middle of a street. So I mean, it's not like a solo that Comey hole. But it was still as whole that season in Edinburgh. And you know, what the Scottish people you thought Germans knew how to drink. My god. It's not a rumor it is not a room these Scottish people there on that. And Asha was on a ten PM at night. So you can imagine what was happening. It was a wild ride. It was a wild rod for me. So you're not you have traveled internationally if performed around the world. How does Adelaide fringe compare? You know, what I think what sets us apart is our unique atmosphere. You know, like, well, obviously, everybody knows the hubs like the garden gluttony RC, see. But I also think there's so many wonderful little venues in Adelaide Laba, William the club, the GC's amazing this standard of venues in Adelaide is much higher. I would say I I also think if for an audience member, obviously, the weather's better than it Umbro. But also, it's just the whole kind of, you know, meeting your friends finding something to do off the cuff. I like kind of going out on the night, not knowing what you're going to go see picking up a flyer and going let's just give it a go. If it's bad. It's usually only an hour if it's bad usually have a better story to tell at the end of it. If it's great Honey everyone's a winner. It is had to navigate fringe. You have created at least there's a Hans list is. Only internet. There's an I've got ten picks up there and go back picking tags. Exactly. That's what I'm saying. It's not an exhaustive list. So talk to your friends see what they're seeing get on Facebook. See what people are raving about read the reviews, maybe, but I mean reviews at just one person's opinion. I think you know, if you have a group of people whose opinion you trust trust them the links. That's what I say more than anything. Just go to masher. Yes. Of course, essential guys outside on the as many tickets left the goal gone belly. Tell us a little bit about your shar your performing again in this year's for India's on they must show is called like a German, darling. You get it. And you know, really, it is just a love of fun my show. I every every now, and then I think, oh, maybe I should do something intellectual. And then I think Honey don't we just need to switch off every now. And then so. So when you come to my show, I think it's it's less of a show. More of a potty people have been bringing a lot of children to my show this year, though. But I kinda like it. It's a bit of a history lesson for them. It's better than education lily insanity on the first night, we had the German ambassador to a stray Elliott turn back. My god. Did she have a confusing? And she brought the German ambassador to Poland talk about having your work cut out for you that as a a heavy Judy job, darling. It is and so you know, is is your content really aimed at children pavement bringing kids alone. You know, what it's it's not actually anything to full on and Hannis. They've all got the Netflix these days. I'm not saying anything that. They haven't heard of there are a couple of multi words, but nobody's left with their children halfway through the show in disgrace. Let me put them on the a lot of the jokes sh over the head. You know, and you've got a seven piece band is that he's a seven piece band this year. Yes. That called the ungrateful bastards, and let me tell you. They are the only musicians who wanted to work with me this festival. Yes. Put it that way you'd be hard to work with. How can we do? You wanna be a Davis? Sometimes you've gotta let one link. So did you learn all about divas in America's got talent? Honey, I I was pretty tame compared to some of the people over there. Yes. I was very easy to work work with. But I you might be referencing salmon coun- he is a bit of a diva himself special relationship is on. I come to find the tractive about him. You know that in the money. Then I can help. So you can you give us a little bit in your show. Obviously, I'm without spoiling team. But can you share a little bit of just give us a little bit of a was invited to go on the show because it's called America's compelling, but apparent be thousand? They imported me in the Alex. Yes. But the national superstar, of course, they take. You know, he's a businessman on the he knows how television ratings work, and they had a spike last year. What can I say, it's the hands factor? Spike on television last year this year. I'm the embezzler. What's happened with the ticket sales. Thank you. You're welcome in the world's various grandba-. Thank you next. The superstar palate is draw cadre gets a community service as well as well as I mean, I'm really the Mother Theresa refrains Bellingham giving. That's that's my biggest fault in left. Alex. I'm to giving. Maybe. Yes. I mean, can you believe I'm still single the only man texting me these days is Clive Palmer. But what can I say people have been put on this earth for charitable reasons? You know, I'm up there with ball. No, Bob Geldof except far less irritating. Sorry, Pete Agha's is gonna ask. This is a man who this is what happens. This is. What happens the miniature become a star coattails? They wanna ride on them thou wings. He has called his show. Look Manno, Hans he has used imagery. There is similar to mine. I attended the show on Sunday with my legal team. And we are drafting up a a subpoena as at the. Moment. It's been awhile since that man's had a subpoena and his next show. Let me just say Peter girls next fringe show will likely be called cease and desist. But don't they say imitation is the highest form until I saw the show. I thought that. Yes. Yes. Sorry. Then he is wearing one of my original costumes, though. I've again again, I give a donated the to him. Now back. I mean, it's. I need. It's been stretched beyond any sort of shape. I mean, well pays a shape, isn't it? I guess so tell me about your costumes, then well, Hannity, they're all handcrafted by my own mother. Yes, we have spent so much money at the K fabrics. She has sown so many sequins in her lifetime that you you know, she's getting a little bit. Well, how can Helen kill? I will say that the eyesight is not what it used to be. But it's a mother's love is in its mother's love. And you know, she's she's whipping up costumes that really only a mother could be proud of. I think on Nari. They're beautiful works. Well, I mean, you know, now you see them at the festivals. You see them everywhere. Do you have? Or does your mom have a favorite costume? Can you do that? Or is that? Favor favorite costs to am fickle. So it kinda changes from week to week darlings. But I will say when I get a new costume usually just wear it and wear it. And where like it's uniform like I really become attached to it. So I've your janey I sat in two thousand and four was that. How did you grow your you'll superstardom obviously all natural talent shines through? But what other things how do you grow an audience? You know, I did as many gigs as possible. I remember in the very early days we used to call every pub in we used to call nightclubs. We would say we're going to come and do ten minutes in the middle of the dance floor with turn up a Davar goes with a CD put the DJ on with do a few songs and then leave fly fly fly. So I just think get yourself out that as much as possible. I know a lot of artists say I don't want to work for free. I don't wanna do a free gig. But sometimes you know, what you will be. Pay the venture and the payment is your growing an audience. So I think that's kind of the thing that you just have to do infringe just put yourself at there as much as possible. I mean, Honey look at me. I'm practically Kim Kardashian of the fringe output put myself up on anything, and he is that just really going to have that commitment to a long time. I think so. Yep. I think you're going to build your mainland mailing list from people that are tickets. You can get the Email addresses. You've got to kind of cultivated over a long time. It's not going to happen overnight. But it will happen. Maybe she was born with it. Maybe it's maybe lean. Okay. You know, how important do you think having Adelaide fringe is for South Australia, end, the style? I think we should be celebrating more than we are. I think everybody in Adelaide knows what it is everybody in Adelaide knows. It's the time to be here. I think nationally we need to be tell getting the word out there more. Also, I think you don't really understand what the fringes until you saying that for yourself, you know, and then you tell your friends about it. Then you're all my God. We've got to go to Adelaide, and I think slowly people are starting to get the message that well at leads not the sleepy town. And you know, but I think we could do a lot more to kind of get the word out there. We know about it here. But I don't think people far away the way know about it as much as they should if you had to try and pinpoint what is it that you think is your favorite thing about fringe? Oh god. Oh my gosh. Have you pinpoint what is happening in a month? Whether so much happening down to one thing. It's just come be part of it. All yes, exactly. Don't waste it. It's the most wonderful time of the year. You know, the song? I'd say we'll say it's Christmas. It's not Inge. Well, thank you so much for joining us hand. Oh my God. Honey. Thank you, darling. Thank you to your listeners both of them. And our what a pleasure. This is the end darlings. I would not use this opportunity to be so crass and tacky to promote hands lack a German at six thirty in the author gone and gladly tickets available at Hans official dot com or Adelaide fringe dot com. That you I wouldn't do that. I would not use this opportunity. I just wanna use this opportunity to thank you for having me. And just to say what the pleasure it's been for you. Be sure to subscribe to the Adelaide fringe podcast and never miss an episode to get the most out of your Adelaide fringe experience. Visit WWW dot Adelaide fringe dot com. Dodi you would you can browse shows by genre and location access fringed deals and a whole lot. More full regular fringe updates. Follow our social media channels all subscribe to a newsletter paddle aid fringe plug. Const is produced by narrative marketing who believed that stories connect individuals and that storytelling compulsively impact the world.

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"adelaide" Discussed on Adelaide Fringe Podcast

Adelaide Fringe Podcast

20:06 min | 1 year ago

"adelaide" Discussed on Adelaide Fringe Podcast

"Atalay frames visible. Potier defines a city. Welcome to episode. One of the Adelaide fringe podcast bringing you the latest updates and insights to help you navigate your best fringe experience in season one we're covering all the action from fifteen to February two seventeenth of March. When Adelaide fringe is taking over Adelaide, South Australia. There's over thirteen hundred different shows so peaking which fringe event to attend can be overwhelming. I'm Heather crawl the Adelaide fringe director and see I and in today's episode all explain our new exciting website features and search functions designed to help you navigate the huge program in this house of fringe overview. I share my tips to make it easier for you to pick. What show is right for you. At laid fringe podcast was recorded on Ghana land and thanks to our principal partner Bank. You say. One of the big things about fringe is that there is so many things to say to which makes it great. But how do we pick? How do we pick? So we've created a lot of new functions on our website now and on my boss hot one of them is fringed favorites. So your log dean, you're searching, the fringe program on your fine or your computer, and you see in the top corner of every listing of a show. There's a little love heart. Now, if you've sat down over a few drinks with your friends and tap love hearts for your top twenty or top hundred from now on or you have to do is go back to your top one hundred and then you can send your favorites list at your friends. So you can post on Facebook. And encourage discussion he's my favorites. What are your favorites? Start to share it around. We've also asked lots of people around ad light and Australia to give us their fringe favorites. So a lot of them have provided us with their top ten. So the top ten is now going to start appearing when you go onto our website. You'll get some random top ten's popping up. We always try and help people get some inspiration to start narrowing down from the thirteen hundred down to their few favorites. Another thing that we've done these see is code Niimi now and so Niimi now is what starting in half. Now what starting in one hour in the vicinity of where you are. Right now are only want to know cabaret that's happening in this area in the next hour. And then the other thing that we've done now is if you know that you want to go out on a certain date, say Saturday, February sixteen and then you know, that you going out for dinner, so you not growing out till show to a non thirty. So then go on that website and in more filters. You can say I only wanna say the show is between nine and eleven PM. So then again, it reduces the number of shows that you'll see, and then you can say I only want to say shows that are in the day, or you know, you can start to really like narrow it. So. Okay. His ten shows will say that on in the right area at the right time slot that afri- wanna go out. Whereas before there was a lot of you had to really troll through and crosscheck on the dates. You saw show that you like the look then you have to cross check. If that was the date. So now, you can filter things through many different ways keywords are not to do with the show. So we've got this year some ostlund interpreted shows, and so if you want you can just put in the search function ostlund, and then it will show you only the shies that are always land interpreted during the whole fringe. So you don't need to go and like manually check each shy. We've also created these lists fringe lists. And those leasts are fringe in your neighborhood. So if you live in a certain council area, if you live in Port Adelaide, if you live in the Barossa if you live in west Horan's that will come up with what's on in that area. So you might not want to go out to town that not you might just want to stay in your local area. What's on in Marian? In the fringe what's on in the Quran. And the fringe, of course, blades out into all sorts of regional areas. I we've got fringe in Wisla in port Augusta in Goor in Gora up in the hills. So all those limits around the search function can help you. Discover what you looking for certain really is Tyler airing it for me it trying to and we've also got lucky dip things like what are you in the mood for I'm in the mood to you know, be inspired to make my brain think. Oh, I'm in the mood to you know, really have a belly laugh or and you'll seal those buttons on our website, and so start to tapping things like, okay, what's on this day? And I'm in the mood to make me think an are. You know, I'm in the mood to have a laugh or you start to sort of navigate your way through nearly fifteen hundred days over five hundred venues, I mean, it is a huge huge based. I love that. You've taken these surprise to really put the audience. You're not the center of how you can. Aleve out all these different Shari's. Can you talk a little bit about why? That's so important. It's something that we've spent many years on in the last three or four years, we've actually developed a feedback loop that instead of just saying on, you know, sorry about that. We've actually been taken that and said, let's make that our focus. How are we going to solve this exact person's problem while the time next year's fringe comes around? I think people will notice this year on the fringe sought that we've got so many more functions, and so many more search capabilities and a lot of them have been based on the problems and the pain points that customers reported to us last year the before and we want them to find what they're looking for with as we don't want them to spend lots of time on out whips out. We want them to spend lots of time at the fringe having fun. So, you know, we really want this the the platform and the website and the ticketing system to be almost an invisible process where they just think well that was easy. I bought these tickets. Let's go have fun you touched on ticketing bat this. Nothing really exciting coming to ticketing this year for fringe. Can you tell us about that? So this year, we've introduced e ticketing, paperless. Ticketing customers have been asking for it for years. And so what that means is that when you buy your ticket on your fine. You immediately have the ticket now instead of having to go to the box office and line up for your ticket, which might cause some angst and stress because you're thinking over I forgot to leave time to queue up for the box office and wait for the ticket. So instead of doing that you just go straight in and straight through your walking into wherever you're going, and they will scan your ticket on your telephone. And look a lot of people's do want their ticket, which is fine. You can always go and get your tickets. So click machines or everywhere around the city that has made picking up to gets a lot easier with that sad second-year. We've had that. Now, if you go to the books officer, and you see the self clicked machine, you can swap the credit card that you bought the ticket with and the tickets will speed out within two seconds. That's in Bank branches, it's in Rundle mall. It's at fringe corner at that all the it's at Westfield shopping centres. So there's there's self collects all over at laid. So you can still get you ticket because we know lots people's do you want that you get? But if you don't want to go and get your ticket, you can just use the one on your telephone fantastic. Art, k so you really are making sure that you know, you've covering simony different groups of people interests and ways that people want to experience range. So obviously people come at it from a different approach the ad light. Fringe is one of the only festivals in the world that really doesn't have any one demographic attending. So we we have loads of blunder ten we have loads of people between twenty and thirty. We have equally the same number from forty to fifty right up to between sort of sixty five seventy five up above eighty. I think it's to do with the accessibility of fringe. It's also to do with the fact that we're sixty years old. So a lot of people in light of grown up with free. Inge. They feel that it's the fringe. They feel that they belong there. Everybody is welcome at fringe. And you'll see three generations of fringe often attending together, you get the Gretzky's the parents and the kids coming along together. And that's the beauty of the fringe. There's no one aged demographic. And if you go to most festivals, you really notice that there is a strong clear aged demographic at that festival. You'll be able to look around and say, oh, this is a festival that mainly these sort of people attend. Whereas just don't think there is an age demographic at the Adelaide fringe everybody comes and so we we have to try and make sure that we serve as every single one of those age demographics. We probably sell about eighty percent of tickets online. But that twenty percent that we so through books offices and our call centers is just as important because we so seven hundred thousand hits. So that's about one hundred and fifty thousand tickets that we still sell face to face at the box office. So we try to. Make sure that we're serving the people that want those folks officers they can easily buy the ticket online like an easily walk into the show without needing to print a ticket. And if you want to go to a box office and get a ticket you can as well. Let's talk about Jabre tell us about this exciting new event in what's going on one thing. I'm really excited about at lead fringe this year as Yere gathering of light Yere is an amazing project. It's signature project of twenty nine thousand nine for the Adelaide fringe, it's a gun a storytelling project, we've been working with Couto for who is the co producer. And k storyteller for us on this project. It is telling stories of the gun a people's relationship to the river. It's down on the river banks. They're both sides of the river Torrens there a near the university footbridge we have inflatable lit up animals. So Bubis and snakes and also it's of animals that really used to live down by the river. And then we also have a huge water screen that comes up and projects telling stories about the the fish in the river, and we have projections of bird life on the trees. There's a lot of interactive soundscape. So if you walk into a certain area, suddenly your presence would trigger some sounds to co off maybe they might be kookaburras in the tree or it might be someone talking to you. We have these beautiful and says through faces in the trees talking to you this some areas that a bit more interactive. So some places where if you sit down some projection will start, but if someone else sits down with you and other beauty projection will start, and if three people sit down, then you get the whole story. And then there's another place at the boat shed where if you touch your hands onto a kiosk screen? It will start to. Project your hands onto the wall. So that you become part of the work yet or is going to be the biggest average projection project. This state has ever seen with so excited to bring it to Adelaide it's going to run every single not for thirty one knots. So from sunset so eight thirty until midnight every single not it'll be down by the river. This we're sort of encouraging people after you've seen a show come down and experience the soundscape the lie. Installations, the projections. The interactive artworks, it's not just a highly entertaining projection project. It's actually a cultural experience it's immersive. And we believe that people will come back more than once because if you come along together from the fromm street end compared to the king William street end compared to the LA unified bridge and you'll see different things and also different things happen at different times of the not. It's a great price to come back to an explore again. And again, and it's based on telling a lot about the six seasons of Ghana country, and people are going I think to walk away knowing a lot more about Ghana Kotra than they did before they went to Jabre we've been working on you ever since last fringe really because we knew that. That's when we will moving away from the north terrace projections and moving to the river projections and moving to making an entirely aboriginal lead project. It's you we can't underestimate how huge these he's for Adelaide, and we always have a signature project. Whether it's, you know, whether it was for some years the parade or whether it was the projections on north terrace, but this is now the first time we're doing a fully aboriginal lead signature project. And and we're extremely proud of it. So opening not is going to be amazing Friday fifteenth of February we'll be having a big opening night. Street party down woman. Oriole drive at the river. Torrens we asked people to enter woman. Moral drive from king William or frame dunk. Go Victoria drive because the university footbridge is not open on opening night where taking everyone down to a part of the river. That's not really the part of the river. The a lot of people go to very often. So it's not elder park with down for the towards the university footbridge in that beautiful curve of the river and all along there will be dozens of food stalls will have two stages. One of the movie the fringe caravan till it'll be fringe otters performing little spots everywhere that we roving Jarvis everywhere, lots of color and fun for the kids. Bring bring a little blanket and sit down and enjoy what's going on. You combine them Dina? There though be a big stage which is run by Musica say so fringe and music, we call it fruit Zik and at eight fifteen we ask everyone to come slot. Down onto the riverbank where we have sunset ceremony, absolutely magical. Experience led by Cao Tofa and yellow ker dances and the fire, and it's going to be absolutely beautiful. We asked how to officially open the Adelaide fringe for us with the sunset ceremony. It's a chance for us all to celebrate the living culture of the first nations and pay respect to the spirit of the land and give thanks to elders past in prison. And there's really nothing like the Tinto experience. It's just very magical. You can hear a pin drop when Cao talks us through it. He takes us through the sun going down. And as the sun goes down and darkness falls, the Jabre lots up. And that's when the projections come to live and on that opening not a very special moment will you'll say the. Fire sculptures of all the animals along the riverbank, and that will only happen once that's only on the opening not. So at around eight thirty you'll see the EMU the snake the kangaroo all sorts of fire sculptures that. We have in all law off along the river. And then we'll lead into the projections. Sorry, exciting things are coming back to Rundle mall. Rundle's Bena feature for a while. Now has an it is it Rundle mall is a great place. If you can't decide what to go and see you can go down to the Rundle mall stage and you'll see a little snippet of an artist doing a bit of their show. And then you think oh that looks like the show we want to see. So that's something that has worked really well for us now for a number of years out of skied down there. They just give you a little taste of what they show is about. So you can use it as a bit of an info booth in a way that goes on all month during the fringe. And so yeah, just get down to goal place and Rundle mall and you'll see little pieces of show is being performed. But you'll also see the. Info booth where you can talk to people, and they can give you some tips about the sorts of shows that you might like, how do you think people get their best out of fringe? I mean, that's a big question to answer because everybody's different. I think that the everybody has a different fringe experience. So we're seeing that more and more ad lead. People are telling us that they take it and you'll leave during fringe, and they just go and see show because literally is like going to another CD for a few. We've had more and more matinee show is coming now. So if you are looking to take a few days off work this fringe shows from early morning to late night. So this really something oh hours of the day. Some people have their favorite spots, and they visit them again. And again, but we always said we would take a risk try something you've never heard of go and have a look at that venue. That is down a little in a in a little laundry at or down in little alley and a pop-up basement for the month. Try something new and explore the nine sorry. We know the fringes just about to. Launch. How are you in the team feeling right now? And what makes this, you know, what's the lightest leg-spinning spinning to get it across the lawn will a lot of people are already arriving in town, which is really exciting. We've had a lot of artists that have already let us know that they've landed and over the next few days. Lots and lots of artists will be descending on Ed light. And of course, a lot of the artists are local as well. So they're already here. People frantically doing their final rehearsing z- getting ready and also you'll start to see people flying the streets, which is such a key part of fringe because people do buy tickets last minute, and that's the oddest on the street. I gonna try and hope convince you to buy the ticket to this at the moment at ticketing is sitting around thirty percent up compared to this time last year. So people have really got onto the early ticket buying idea, which we're really happy with and artists of feeling good about that as well. So add lead fringes open access, and what that means. Is that the artists and the venues are choosing to put their shows on the only way that they earn money is through ticket sales. So that they're taking all the risk to put the show on. So get out there and buy lots of tickets. There's loads of ways that you can get good deals on tickets. If you become a fringe member, you can get amazing deals on tickets. It'll pay for itself on the first not that you go out. So I would recommend people become a fringe member. It means that they get access to lots of special things that non-members can't get access to and they do get discounts membership deals growing every single day. So as fringe goes on you'll notice if you're a member you get in box office every day. So I saw an up is I pay to be a good fringe goer. The artists are up there show them some love and show them appreciation for getting up there, and entertaining you and also the one thing that's amazing about like fringes. Oddest will let you come and make them afterwards. They come outside, and they talk to the audience. That's really rare that you get that up close opportunity to make the, you know, shit some love with them, and, you know, buy them a drink after the show, or, you know, do something knives because they are he Mike in these festival. What it is. And it isn't an easy. It's not an easy thing to put together a fringe show and put on a fringe choice. I I just think share some love and kindness to the artists. Be sure to subscribe to the Adelaide fringe podcast and never miss an episode to get the most out of your Adelaide fringe experience. Visit WWW dot Adelaide fringe dot com. Dodi you would you can browse shows by genre and location access fringed deals and a whole lot. More for regular fringe updates. Follow our social media channels all subscribe to out a newsletter paddle aid fringe plug Constas produced by narrative marketing who believed that stories connecting visuals and that storytelling compulsively impact the world.

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"adelaide" Discussed on Adelaide Fringe Podcast

Adelaide Fringe Podcast

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"adelaide" Discussed on Adelaide Fringe Podcast

"Atalay frames physical. Potier defines a city. Welcome to the allied fringe podcast from fifteen to February to the seventeenth of March two thousand nineteen Adelaide fringe will take over Adelaide South Australia in season. One of the Adelaide fringe podcast. We'll keep you informed on all the action from fringe two thousand and nineteen our podcast was recorded on Ghana lands with thanks to our principal partner. Bank has say. Artists and audience travel from all over the well to experience this unique festival. Unlike any other it's a menagerie of all the arts, whether it be music or dance or Fita comedy. It's just a mix of everything. And it's a lotta craziness crazy colorful fun exciting. Lots going on. You'll never have a moment. Chris festival. You can come to Adelaide. Fringe is the second biggest fringe festival in the world, the largest open access arts festival in the southern hemisphere and Australia's biggest ticket selling arts festival in this podcast. We'll take you behind the scenes to hear from French staff. Ambassadors and artists through weekly updates. You'll be some of the first to hear what's up which shows audiences are loving, and who's winning our weekly fringe awards will acquit you with all the details that you need to help. You navigate on mass. Fringe program. Adelaide fringe is a not for profit open access festival. We provide a way for artists across all disciplines to share their work with the world with free events groundbreaking work near talent innovative thinking and original voices with for everyone to put it simply way here to unleash the fun. It's unlike anything else, right entertaining. There's always ATF kids to say, especially. By the to get as possible gercy. The we'd shorts get out and experienced things outside of your company. We take over the whole of Adelaide and everywhere you look there's free. The rush of joy that you get when you go to bed lead-free. He's really great to get help. Fringe, this is in everybody's heart and its own by everyone. And that's what I love about it. Be sure to subscribe to the Adelaide fringe podcasts. And never miss an episode to get the most out of your Adelaide fringe experience. Visit WWW dot Adelaide fringe dot com. Dodi you where you can browse shows by genre and location access fringed deals and a whole lot. More for regular fringe updates. Follow our social media channels all subscribe to a newsletter. Adelaide fringe podcast is produced by narrative marketing who believed that stories connect individuals and that storytelling compulsively impact the world.

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"adelaide" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"adelaide" Discussed on Food Psych

"Now, I definitely have an idea of. Okay. Here's kind of a base set of of cooking and skills and tastes than I can kind of go from there to build outward. I guess. Yeah. That's huge. I feel like that's kind of a rare thing for people to have in this day and age, but it's so important, so helpful. Yeah. It's it's definitely one of those things that I many of my friends that are my age. Don't have that kind of like skill set. And I'm I'm really grateful for it. It gives me the ability to kind of play with food and create things that people usually like and are often may be different than what you might see kind of on a standard menu. I guess that's cool. So more creativity. It like, yeah. I think when you learn those basics of how to tell when something's done or how to know just like cooking, the basic components of something. It does give you a lot of freedom and creativity. So how did it evolve for you, then throughout your childhood and adolescence as you grew up in your relationship with food. I think for me in childhood in Adelaide essence, I started to I continue to enjoy the playing with it. And I really like took on baking with a lot of gusto and my Adelaide's science. It was definitely a bonding activity with my friends in middle school and in high school, and then I think on the flip side of it as those like sociocultural pressures around thinness and good and bad foods started to leak, and it definitely influenced my ability to enjoy the food that I was making in terms of all of the sudden for me as I became more aware of what was okay in our culture for like women to eat or to be seen eating than it became harder for me to maybe eat the things that I cooked. And so I still kind of. Maintained that creativity. But I definitely went through a period where I tried to like make the same awesome, creative food. But with like more, I guess diet focused ingredients to, you know, can I change this out for this and still have it tastes good? And there's definitely a time. When I convinced myself that my food was just as good with these kind of worse, substitute ingredients. But now with a different level of food acceptance that I have today, I can see how all like a it. It didn't taste as good. It wasn't as as fulfilling be just being able to like cook. Without those rules, you know, without trying to think about like, well what actually like without focusing on like a calorie content. Like, how do I limit the calorie content of the food, which is what where I definitely started taking things in a more disordered place in my adolescence, and young adulthood, but coming back to that. How do I recapture like this tastes like how do I make this chicken taste, exactly the way my grandma made? Did it taste or how do I take this macaroni and cheese recipe that I have from her and how do I make it actually even better?.

Adelaide
"adelaide" Discussed on Le Show

Le Show

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"adelaide" Discussed on Le Show

"Archbishop of adelaide philip wilson told a court that he knew a priest reverend jim fletcher had been sexually abusing young altar servers he knew because they told him he knew because they asked him for help now reports the washington post he's going to jail he'll get told some other things the roman catholic leader was convicted of failing to act on reports of child sex abuse abusive faces as much as two years in prison he's the most senior catholic leader at the age sixty seven to ever be charged with concealing abuse in the courtroom one witness testified that reverend jim fletcher made him strip and neil as he pleasure himself he was abused at age ten he said he told archbishop wilson about it in nineteen seventy six when he was fifteen actually wilson was a parish priest at the time another former altar boy said he brought his concerns to wilson as well fletcher was found guilty of multiple counts of sexual assault of boys in two thousand four died two years later in prison wilson has been diagnosed with alzheimer's disease he contradicted all of those claims saying he had never been told of the abuse but ultimately the judge sided with the those who testified the reliability of these people cannot be questioned or attacked judge robert stone said in his decision they were people who as a whole we're believable the decision comes as we've mentioned on this program trillion cardinal george pelvis soon stand trial for allegations of historic sexual abuse he is a top official in the church and a key ally.

jim fletcher archbishop wilson assault robert stone Archbishop of adelaide philip wilson washington neil wilson alzheimer's disease two years
"adelaide" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

Not So Standard Deviations

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"adelaide" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

"Down south yeah all right so i need your help with something important okay perfect this is a very you know this is i've been in australia for a while now right and we've done quite a bit of traveling in fact we've been to every state except for one which is south australia so i thought so the capital south australia's adelaide and we haven't really found a reason to go but i recently discovered something that actually i didn't know about shocked me actually about adelaide did you know that ronald fisher is buried there really is shocking now i come to you because you have experience in this kind of thing having been to the guinness brewery i have not into the guinness for you have a bit of the well i thought you know i did me gossip's grandson oh maybe it's great grandson right you bet is okay no i have not it's like it like tugs at my heart strings so just to give you a little context as we were just saying adelaide's like don't like an hour and a half flight from year or like a seven and a half seven hour drive and so do you think it is worth going just to visit the burial site of the fisher well first of all i mean first of all yes of course and then second of all it's not just for that it's also the can say you've been to every state that's trulia that is true yes so there's two that's like w i mean i would have said yes just for completion est if checking the box exactly yeah but no that's so cool i hadn't at why is he there that makes no sense i didn't notice apparently.

adelaide ronald fisher trulia australia seven hour
"adelaide" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"adelaide" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Yes there is such a thing that the chance of getting hit by something as less than that of being struck by lightning would you agree there will it is formally yes i mean that's based on the size of this thing how much will come down in the size of the impact crater it'll make runs the ground compared to the total amount of grounding could possibly come down in but we know that well to quota chinese philosopher strange events permit themselves the luxury of occurring you play the odds most of the time will come down and harmless but sooner or later one of these things is gonna come down of quantum empa over singapore of adelaide of a rare genero we do not know we might be with probably going to be lucky but we might be unlucky nobody can say at the moment so i wanna go back to the lab itself how in fact china lose control of it and is anyone tracking it now oh lots of people tracking it of the world particularly the united states military which has a vast network of of senses and telescopes and radars around the world because they want to keep an eye on everything in space and larger than the size of a chair they can see and then gonna know before so then looking at this tracking it's or as it decays as it gets lower and lower and lower it'll reenter on sunday but.

adelaide united states
"adelaide" Discussed on The Global Politico

The Global Politico

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"adelaide" Discussed on The Global Politico

"In addition a coalition government and we were getting closer finally and and the indiana coach had finally offered the uh the opposition some slots in this government but the opposition wasn't going to negotiate unless there was an a neutral observer and so we were trying to get the eu to come in and beat at neutral observer and they were indecisive and the moment was about to pass so in my private conversation out of frustration it wasn't a strategic frustration it was a tactical frustration i use this barn yard epitheton say let's use the un is the negotiator and then of course the russians tried to make that an indictment of us of of me too because we were frankly being to effective on the ground and they wanted to get us off the boards aids what's interesting right in hindsight well a in hindsight it seems kinda queen i mean these these adelaide adelaide barnard epa fit by now look at the language we use in public in our debates you know i was i was again ahead of my time right yeah no you were you were ahead of the curve but you know did we did we understand that that there's a pretty aggressive move by the russian debts you certainly they compile of that kind of information you knew that they've been doing that forever but on an american official right that was pretty aggressive at that moment in time yeah no i certainly knew that they were here in the conversation and frankly i thought it was a matter of transparency between ushering them right the ride anywhere fine with midwife a coalition which might have helped them to deescalate as well but too but to release it the way they did in an effort to.

eu official indiana adelaide adelaide barnard epa
"adelaide" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"adelaide" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"I hit the wrong button imagine ever gene i hit throwing barton by getting it on your game i ask you to my game thank you how 'bout adelaide in alabama adelaide hey jim thanks for all you do further home gamers out here and we are holen from the eagle for the laws of the land of the crimson tide your way to cut import if that is the case then we're gonna win linda's yum i'm looking around it all of us aging baby boomers than thinking about the need for replacement needs and bowel punched and everything like that things like the medical device grew is a good play on the hot healthcare sector jim what's your take on ticker symbol mdt medtronic gets about us i i wanted to throw in syria what you meant trying like i liked abbott and i liked e w edwards life sciences hey let's do a fourth let's through four because you're so kind to wish the eagle's good and that's intuitive circle i ask our jeep which you're so right your pieces white house smart hour more this new okay in increase in politics and with that as a shortterm brain but you can use it to trade some of the big tech stocks like apple all you want to just not my style i want to own and what take okay that's sometimes what you have to do it in person all mad tonight with the healthcare sector war empire can deliver a healthy returns rightness weakness hungry off the charts find out yeah special monday dish then is it plenty of bull pull world with news that trump administration's opposing tariffs on imported goods on sunday consider the company warp it stuck in the spin site.

barton adelaide linda syria abbott apple alabama
"adelaide" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"adelaide" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"A gunman home and and and and and a and b molding one then on surrounding oh man and then the who say i'm giving you dan luke maye then zoom loney and they go in and and got a job in adelaide cabinet nude you gotta go in and needed doze the you know big half as you now lacks nothing.

adelaide
"adelaide" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"adelaide" Discussed on RobinLynne

"A gunman home and and and and and a and b molding one then on surrounding oh man and then the who say i'm giving you dan luke maye then zoom loney and they go in and and got a job in adelaide cabinet nude you gotta go in and needed doze the you know big half as you now lacks nothing.

adelaide
"adelaide" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"adelaide" Discussed on The Science Show

"We not only recognize the treatments might themselves have damaging consequences but that the holy experience of a psychotic episode can carry such terror that he brings symptoms very similar to post traumatic stress he has sandy mcfarland professor of psychiatry at adelaide university my interest to rise when i treated a man who had been tortured and you'd become delirious and when people deliriously often develop polish nations in delusions is exactly the time as people with schizophrenia and this man had been tortured terribly over a period of two weeks and had come costuming killed now what was absolutely striking was the why did he was more troubled by his memories of his hallucinations and his delusions then he was of the reality of his experience a subsequently of traded a group of people have been in intensive care units after horrendous accidents where they may have again become delerious and had the audio for example there being kidnapped and tortured and the memories of those experiences are often far worse than having been in an extra we've had genetic broken legs broken your lungs ruptured so it really just for me absolutely brought home the horror of losing control of your mind and then from there have studies be made of connection linked to experience it well this economists by the name of catherine shore has interviewed one hundred patients and systematically tried to examine how many of these people have the same symptoms that people get who for example vein ripe to obey natural disaster or being tortured as a consequence of the experience of their psychosis and she found over fifty percent of people have developed this constellation of symptoms and memories and what's particularly interesting isn't parts of the experience which terrify them and it is the thoughts of losing control of your mind way you for example believed that the thoughts in your mind belonged to other people.

adelaide university schizophrenia catherine shore sandy mcfarland professor of psychiatry intensive care fifty percent two weeks