35 Burst results for "Addy"

"addy" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

Texas Titans Podcast

04:29 min | 2 months ago

"addy" Discussed on Texas Titans Podcast

"Ruining them and because they don't know that oh you shouldn't do that like your body's in an elementary state. You need to wait a couple of hours before you jump in the ice So for me out of the shower or the cold therapy session at night right before bed or mixed with like a sauna session and yeah it's it's really it's really crazy. Have you start using a red light therapy or anything. Like g of light or anything. Have you done any of that. Yes i actually have a job. I actually have the discount code. Forgive what l. Like everything that i use. Almost i have discount codes for actually sitting in the sauna right now. Nice okay. it's on one hundred. You see like some sweat beads. I've been doing a little session while we're talking i love that that's big greenfield. Ask of you right there. Discount codes for this i. I've gone. I've been doing this for such a long time. That's so many people ask. Because i so there's so many things i wanna say format last talk that you just said but but number one is so. Many people are asking me questions because like back win. Gosh back when. I first met genuine. I mean i was overweight. I weigh two hundred and eleven pounds a day. I gave birth fast. Go no way. I'd never known two hundred eleven pound meghan. that's crazy. no. I could show you. The driver's license approve it. Wouldn't you know in expired one month before i was doing. Wow that was back when you still had to go. Take a photo with nice pirates. Sounds like i'm asking for my drafted. Put my real weight right now. And they're like no this sucks so bad and it and it took me you know. It took me a while to lose the weight. I stuck around one. Eighty or these three years and i want wanna say that was the sickest i've ever been my migrants will horrible and and of course it three years because what addy was three when we started our journey and so i just started shedding the way like mike nuts. I mean how much weight lost from the time. I gave birth to her. I mean it's just astronomical. So i feel like.

meghan mike nuts addy
"addy" Discussed on Questlove Supreme

Questlove Supreme

02:57 min | 2 months ago

"addy" Discussed on Questlove Supreme

"I just thought about something you know the in the in the first part of your career you were on Acm records as well Which is a highly trusted label. However you made the move given and it's almost like i almost feel like we're in the same boat because if you're a non rock act often questions i got was like why even risk it going to a label really not built to promote you or whatnot. So what was what was the unusual choice of going to geffen records. Well you know. Honestly you're right. I started on. Ucf i did. Eleven records addy siham. Which travels i really loved. I will say travel alert us..

addy siham Ucf
"addy" Discussed on Little News Ears

Little News Ears

01:47 min | 3 months ago

"addy" Discussed on Little News Ears

"Hi i'm adam from australia. And i'll be anchoring manucher with little newsies in september could addy's little ease being news a little bit about me. I am ten years old in year for a primary school. I have four other siblings. I love outdoor sports such as democratic and jet. Skiing my feet chick. Corea go would be to work in politics. As i have always wanted to to try help change the world and the people in it if i can now about addy's little is beacon asia my life news at besides bef- regis segments such as well australia news. Climate change updates scope politics outdoor stories talent tapes for anyone in the world of entertainment at arts food. Prep and food ideas. I look forward to starting this new channel with little news is please check into stay. Updated may your sweetness shine and you colors. Glow fun facts did you. I'm a paycheck actress motto. Checkout lama hoodie. Commercial on youtube at lama australia subscribe now too. Little news. is youtube channel. Find little news is podcasts. Or join us..

addy australia Corea adam Skiing asia lama hoodie youtube lama
Q2-2021 Biotech Earnings, Commercial-Stage Biotech Suffers

Breaking Biotech

01:59 min | 3 months ago

Q2-2021 Biotech Earnings, Commercial-Stage Biotech Suffers

"And the first company. I want to talk about is by jin which is a real favorite of mine ticker symbol b. I believe and they're sitting at a fifty billion dollar market cap and what we heard is that they announced q to revenue of two point. Seven eight billion dollars and this is compared to twenty twenty cutie revenue of three point six eight billion so huge decline there and that is mostly due to a decrease in their ms revenue of twenty four percent year over year. And if you remember. When i went through the biogen episode i did. The majority of their revenue comes from their ms franchise and since the lawsuit against by jin was in favor of the generic companies including mylan they have launched generic versions of tech der which are now at risk because by genus filed an appeal. And what this means is that these generic companies are going to be able to sell their generic version of tech era at the risk of biogen winning on appeal in which case Going to be able to litigate against them for patent infringement. So during this time at which we don't know what the status of the appeal is gonna be biden's gonna start losing. Ms franchise market share pretty quickly to these generic companies. So we're starting to see this now with these abysmal. M s numbers now. The company did increase their guidance for the rest of the fiscal year. Only by about two hundred to three hundred million dollars so not a huge amount but they said that. This is due to better-than-expected ms sales. So who knows what's going on there but really the bulk of the call was the excitement around the addy home commercialization efforts and now just to say the amount of home revenue was only like one or two million dollars so very much a drop in the pan not very impressive so far. But it's because all of these infrastructure efforts need to take place in order to get hospitals up and running in order to treat patients

JIN Biogen Mylan Biden
Trusting the Gold

Tara Brach

02:09 min | 6 months ago

Trusting the Gold

"Welcome friends. It's fun to be able to see you appear on zoom and also to know you're here Listening on either livestream youtube or i'm cwc as well It does feel special to me to have you with me. This is the official first time exploring and celebrating the book coming out and really looking at some of the key themes together. I hope for those of you that have been with me. It feels really deeply familiar. these themes of trusting the goal. So i'll be including practices as we go and for some of you. You might wanna journal. I i'm finding more and more that if you do a practice and then just write down a little bit and i'll suggest some questions The practice goes deeper. So you might consider that if you wanna get a pad or have something to ride on nearby and we'll start with a short practise. We're not doing a full meditation at the beginning because i'll be weaving in a few practices. But let's take a moment and arrived together and as a way of beginning you might just check whatever posture in and inhabit the posture mothers. Really come into your body and make whatever of those slight adjustments. Help you so that you really feel that. You're sitting in a way that wake full that supports being alert and also addy's really at ease if it helps you closure is or let your gaze downcast to bring your attention inside. Please do so. Let's take a few full breasts together. Inhaling slow long deep in breath perhaps the counter four or five. Heal yourself feeling your chest and lungs.

Wanna Journal Youtube
"addy" Discussed on Spanish Proptech

Spanish Proptech

01:35 min | 7 months ago

"addy" Discussed on Spanish Proptech

"Addy npfl podcast this thing alfredo. Vs packing the mini those. I'll know these punished podcasts. Keep dial in mobile semi sonian. Martinez fail for another flexible places that format he get the aca studies even case. Do not have used me. And the truth is america's from him marketplace list pace adversaries in and the courthouse if donors promises people gas Finished with ovallis. Spanish flip boondoggles in an apple. Podcast a secret for mass they. I don't be books forecast. The animus us a make it look gus. Norway's convertible is in three different enemies those pointing past them. punish probably. it's the book cerro colorado. We have seen a spoon days. Put lethem being has. Have you know if it's an internal him was going to simply stop and pebbles.

Addy npfl alfredo aca Martinez america gus apple Norway colorado
I'm a Feminist but... I Love a Good Princess Costume

The Guilty Feminist

01:42 min | 8 months ago

I'm a Feminist but... I Love a Good Princess Costume

"I'm a feminist. This week. I sent my goddaughter for her birthday. A series of costumes some of which would gender-neutral including a lion a b. and a pirate which i deemed as gender neutral at set for boys and i thought nah. I'm not having raced. But i was most excited if i'm completely honest about the bell dress from beauty and the beast. I couldn't wait and her mother who also a feminist just sent me a picture of herself holding the bell dress up going wishing me ignored the lion costume the very neutral be the only one i go into the because gm because she's generation said and they want to save the world so to be so. I'm pretty sure she doesn't care about bell. She cares about bees now. I should be proud of her. And of course i am. She's only just turned three very proud that she loves b.'s. Mold princesses because princess is going to save the world. Lapine run for ages. I've done nothing towards it was notchers. Princess diana was always kicks land mines or something but but but red overall. Yeah do more. I mean there are queen bees. Maybe she says can kind of be where great like revenge stress you know. Listen i think stripes is always a revenge outfit sting like that. How is it not revenge or mealy yet. The poor base give the ultimate revenge. Don't they believe after. Arson your arm.

Lapine GM Bell Princess Diana
A Conversation About Section 230 and the Future of the Internet

The Vergecast

06:52 min | 9 months ago

A Conversation About Section 230 and the Future of the Internet

"Week. Senior reporter addie robertson. Who have heard on the broadcast many times before held an event about section two thirty. That's the law that says platforms aren't liable for their users publish. It is a critical lot. The internet also just turned twenty five years old last month. So addy held an event with a keynote by senator. Amy klobuchar democrat from minnesota is one of the sponsors of the tech act. That's an act that would reform section to thirty as well as a panel featuring michael chia. Who's the general counsel video sedan. Harry is a researcher writer. And a strategist human attack and amana keeping general counsel at wicca media which runs wikipedia. Talking about where section two thirty is where might go in the future. So we're going to run some highlights of that event for today addie and russell are gonna join talk about how it went and what they heard what they thought and as it happens here right now. Russell has done good. Love it addie. Congratulations on your event. It was a good one. Hey thank you so. Tell me how you think. The event went. And then i'm going to hand over the episode to you and we can listen to some highlights and talk it through. But how do you think of went. I thought it went well. One of the things i like about. Section two thirty is that. It's just a really weird conversation that people kept asking okay. What sides her can there are like fifty different sides and we had a really pretty interesting spread of perspectives and senator klobuchar speech was really good scene. Setter and i'm overall pretty happy. Yeah you know. What i thought was really interesting. Just as i watched the whole event senator klobuchar has some very strong perspectives. About what can be done in those perspectives. We're definitely not shared by the entire panel. In fact the safe tech act is it's it's always interesting to me to hear. Senators talked about their own legislation. 'cause they always make it seem so common sense but it's actually quite controversial. Some of the changes that she was proposing. Oh yeah absolutely well and also like you know. She addition to talk to thirty. She takes a pretty hard line on antitrust. I was actually surprised by how sort of enthusiastic she was about it. And i sort of imagine. The video guy is sitting there easter like. She's talking about breaking up google. He's like yeah. Okay a lot of the sort of civil society tech people which this is part of what we wanted to introduce the conversation like. They don't have a problem with antitrust. They are mostly hoping that section two thirty doesn't get changed in a way that makes it impossible to have wikipedia exist and then bringing up things like misinformation also just throws its own kind wrench into things because that's actually not largely problem that addressed with section two thirty and so you end up slipping weird stuff like first amendment reforming there. Yeah this was. I think is the panel went on the combination of we think facebook too big but if we changed to thirty to punish facebook we might end up punishing ourselves and then senator klobuchar talking about an inch. Just dead ahead. And even to some extent bringing up the idea of breakup as a potential remedy. All of that is a swirl and we've been talking on swirl for for some time and it was just really interesting to hear the spread of perspectives during this event. So at russell. I'm excited for this. Why don't you start and take us through this event and what we heard. Yeah absolutely. I think the one thing i want to start with this sort of like the chronological beginning. But like you know. I always like it when these things make a little news. And i think i was very interested to hear santa club. Stars line on antitrust. She sort of coming to the fore of like the democrats antitrust policy. She wrote a book called antitrust and is the chairman of the subcommittee on competition policy antitrust and consumer rights which is basically the senate home for antitrust policy so she's really sort of at the forefront of it and i thought it was interesting she a lot of time she gets gloucestershire's like this moderate voice but she was pretty harsh on facebook. Here we have. We have this clip at the root of this problem lies the ability of a few companies to act as gatekeepers and as we see when they dominate markets exclude rivals buy out their competitors. We've got a problem. In the emailed words of mark zuckerberg. These businesses are nascent but the networks established. The brands already meaningful. And if big go to a large scale could be very disruptive to us they could be very disruptive to us. I always about the tech industry was about disruption it's about disrupting the status quo and bringing in new good ideas that basically blow up the marketplace in a positive way we can't have monopoly stopping disruption so in a way the work i am doing is simply a reply to that email so the interesting thing so this was this was something that we had on the site like dual casey and nikolai byline. When the antitrust hearing happened he's talking about instagram and path so instagram they bought path proved not to be disruptive to facebook. I think it's fair to say but this is not a public statement. He meant to make. And i do think i don't know i mean do do we do. We hear this. And think like amy kluber. Shar is on team break-up facebook it feels like it will qualify that by saying at the very least it's team don't let facebook acquire anybody else. Yeah but team break-up facebook. I don't know it definitely seems like it's on the table ray. Which is very interesting so there have been on the left. A lot of really aggressive sort of pushes for stronger antitrust like we need some new like we need to empower the justice department. We need some new legislation that will enable us to kind of go after these businesses more heavily. And it's fairly recent that closure is trying to to kind of lead that i mean she just. She's only now coming to the to the lead on this committee. And i think because she ran in the democratic primary sort of as a moderate voice. She's been glossed as like. Well she's not in the end gonna like usher in this new era of trust busting but then elsewhere in the keynote. She's talking about well. You know it worked pretty well when we did this against. At and i mean. I don't know. I'm still kind of undecided. It's always hard to know how committed people are going. It's going to be a really politically difficult road to walk. If they move on. you know.

Senator Klobuchar Addie Robertson Addie Michael Chia Wicca Media Facebook Amy Klobuchar Russell Addy Santa Club Subcommittee On Competition Po Wikipedia Minnesota Harry Nikolai Byline Amy Kluber Google Mark Zuckerberg Senate
"addy" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

02:28 min | 11 months ago

"addy" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"New home for hip hop. D Addy. Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy What body Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi! Adi Body Crazy Curve. You waiting, Pete! Yeah! Wait! But crazy Kirby, waiting feet. Wait! Body idea! Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi. Hi, buddy. Hey, didn't open gave you pig look good, but they still wanna know we're making it. We like a barbecue, But you won't get your baby back to me in that dress, and he feels like he over pasted that. Remember meeting up. Hopefully okay. 321 to know one that had a shoe ain't never got to heat me yet from prison went up after speaking when I'm not there. Harlem Carrie kept a column Carol Best camp Body Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi. Yada yada yada yada yada yada yada yada yada yada yada yada yada yada bad crazy, curvy, wavy feet. Yeah. Wait, buddy. Crazy, Curvy, wavy Big weight. Body idea. Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi time I had ever need they click it. It hits me on my picture's been getting me through the corn team. Something everywhere must issue could tell. You need not be from years ago is sleeping by herself out. We took a trip on the real creep too. Yeah, number one is. Don't repeat that. Number two. If they all came with you. They'd better know what that means with became the Duke. Everybody Adi Adi! Adi Adi had the idea. Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Body Crazy, Curvy Wavy Pete, wait Crazy, Curvy, wavy Big way! Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi. Yada, yada yada the chemical reed's body. Look at the way second ratio also uncontrolled, that way, said there was that if I were me, and I would see myself out with help from your dream took me home. Give me long 80 with the pennies on foot the bill the house without a break I got in the lifetime trying to get them in the head too big to make that top. I'm not the one to play with, like to touch meat, not idiotic. Yeah. Any idea the idea, Body Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Body Crazy curve You wake your feet! Yeah! Wait by the crazy curve you waiting big, bold little weight Body idea. Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi. Big Boi's neighborhood and cation misted..

Adi Adi reed Big Boi Pete Kirby Harlem Carrie
"addy" Discussed on Z104

Z104

02:50 min | 11 months ago

"addy" Discussed on Z104

"Real kid. Three Mama, But this baby, I'm coming Well, here's something If you're on the fence about the covert vaccine you've got a lot of businesses are offering incentives for their workers to get the covert vaccine places like Trader Joe's Insta Card. Dollar general are offering perks like you know, a free few hours of paid with. Working just for getting the vaccine real hot brush and you beat love. You know, little truth maybe. Adi Adi adi adi adi adi adi adi adi, er, er, er, er, er, er, er, er, er, er, er, er, er, er, er er er er er er Daddy! Crazy curve. You waiting feet? Yeah. Wait, buddy. Crazy, Curvy, wavy Big weight body. Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi. Hi. Body dead I didn't open gave you baby. You look good, but they still wanna know we're making it like a barbecue. But you won't get your baby back to me in that dress, and he feels like he almost tasted that. Remember meeting up. Hopefully. Okay, 321. No one knows how to shoe ain't never got to heat me up from prison. Have been speaking when I'm not there column Every kid that column Carol Best hip body idea idea idea idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idea Idiotic body Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Everybody Crazy! Curvy, Wavy picture! Help! Wait! Funny, crazy, curvy, wavy Big way! Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi. Addy Addy Addy, Mama, had it been me They're gonna figure it is me on my picture's beginning me through the quarantine. Yeah, everywhere. Oh, my issue could sell you need not be from years ago, is beeping by herself. We took a trip on the real cream to number one is Don't repeat that. Repeat that number two If they all came with you, they'd better know exactly with came to D O d Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi. That's crazy care of you. Wave your feet. Yeah. Wait, buddy. Crazy curve you wait! You think? Yeah. Wait by the ideology. Adi Adi Adi! Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Chemical Lori's body. Forget the way a second everything You're so in control that way, said there was that if I were me, and I would see myself I would have loved you. Train Took me home. Give me long 80 with the Penny's home to build a house without a break. I've got Yeah, When the lifetime trying to get this high in the forehead too big. I could make that pop. I'm not the one to play with, like a touch meat. Not, er, er, er, er, er, er, er, er, er, er, er, er, er, er er er er er er er er er er crazy curvy, wavy speak Wait Crazy care of you waiting Big boat Wait Body Adi Adi Adi.

Adi Adi Adi Mama Addy Addy Addy Trader Joe Carol Best
UNHCR relocates first Ethiopian refugees to a new site in Sudan

UN News

01:21 min | 11 months ago

UNHCR relocates first Ethiopian refugees to a new site in Sudan

"A second refugee campus opened in sudan for people fleeing violence in ethiopia's tigray region carrying little more than the clothes on their backs the un said on tuesday. Nearly six hundred new residents are being taken to to nate camp. According to the un refugee agency unhcr. After nearly two months of ongoing conflict across the border in ethiopia between federal government troops and the tigray people's liberation front teepee l f. unhcr spokesperson andrea. Mitchell told journalists in geneva that it was impossible to gauge the level of fighting inside ethiopia amid continuing access restrictions. Right now we are unable to exit the border from the gop. Inside as i said refugees tell our staff when they arrived to saddam the Many of them traveled for days. Many of them have faced armed groups along the way many speakers violence many speak among the among them obviously women and girls have been mentioned sexual violence so this is what we know as to the intensity of the conflict inside copious tigray region. There is nothing i can help you. This stage around eight hundred people have crossed from ethiopia's tigray region into eastern sudan so far this year since addy november more than fifty six thousand ethiopian. Refugees fled the country

Ethiopia Nate Camp Tigray Unhcr UN Sudan Andrea Geneva Mitchell GOP Saddam
"addy" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"addy" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"Is correct way as a fat Joe a that down one number one for hip hop. I am thinking about food, actually Think about French toast. Hey, Freddy, what was on shadows? A 30 pulls out a 30 crazy waking everybody. Crazy, Crazy case study of the video. Daddy! Daddy! Daddy! Daddy, I can't stop jiggling now. Hey, Betty. Wanna know we're making it like, but you won't get your baby back to me. Yada yada yada yada yada yada yada yada yada yada yada yada yada Yadi body. Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Bat Crazy curfew waiting, Pete! Yeah! Wait, buddy. Crazy, Curvy, wavy big up. Wait, Body idea! Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi My every need taken Nikki Heat. Just me on my fingers Begin. You know Corentin everywhere My issue could tell he got from years ago, is sleeping by herself back. We took a trip on the real creep too. Yeah, Number one is Don't repeat that. Repeat that number two If they obtained with Children, they better know Is that what you came to the O body idea? Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy Addy crazy way Wait, Body Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi Adi categories body Look get the West second ratio also uncontrolled that way that way with me and I would see myself out will help W train took me home. Give me a date with the pennies on foot. The bill the house when I was a brick attack, Yeah, in the lifetime trying to get this in the head too big.

Daddy Nikki Heat Freddy Joe Betty Pete
"addy" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"addy" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Okay to do that, right? You could still do it. Yeah. A lot of people does that the last leaf clean up because there's still a few leaf fell down. So the shooters all clean and don't walk him along when the grass is frozen accident a little later because all see this way stepped on the long you broke the crash. Lady. You see all brown footsteps on the long to stay off the lawn. If the grass of frozen Addy wait till about lunchtime in the grass all soft unless it's heavy shape that sometimes the stay frozen all day. Have it. Wait till the grasses softball before you go on there and get the last leaves off with the fertilizer down. If you did not do it, and quite a few people also have a lot of Martian. The law now You could still for the Mars Max. There's a more skill of you still put that down. Have a debt If you put it down, you have toward anything right after they put it down, not the heavy water in this alive, Ordering after you put it down. She also people they coming now that got all kinds of weeds in the long he's too late to kill the weeds Now is too cold that we killed is not gonna work anymore. Unless you get a whole week in December that the 60 degrees again and I don't really see that coming. So you have to live with the weeds now until the springtime till of warm job, And then you can use that we'd be did all throughout the speed zone. But in the moment this, don't worry about the weeds. It is garden sense. And the number here is 807 to 16003. And you can make a note of that because.

Addy
"addy" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"addy" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"And then I had an interview and From a station in Boston and There was supposed to be 10 minutes and I'll be in a half An hour is always on accident. I'm not doing any more in the morning before the program. I'm giving that up. Got to do it, but lots lots going on in the sense trauma. From an election standpoint, I don't know how many of you stayed up. I did and sold the swearing in of any Tony Barrett stayed up. Watch that and her her speech was absolutely amazing. President Trump's speech was absolutely amazing. Very presidential Wasn't it good to hear a speech where there was no politics. There's no politics, even mentioned or talked about our campaign stuff. It was just It was just kind of Ah, breath of fresh air. It was like You were, so we're still nice, and she was just amazing in her speech, and I couldn't help think about all the Teenage and young girls that were, I hope watching that, or we'll watch that. And if you're a parent of some junior high and high school girls, you know, just just let him hear that help explain to him what it all means and how important it is and how powerful it is. That this is somebody Seven Children. Um, you know, she's the first justice to ever have school aged Children. On the court and as he's just Amazing person, and it should be an encouragement. To so many of Our young people. Two of her kids are adopted. Yes. In Haiti. I found that very interesting. You talk a lot about being able to judge someone's character around that single issue voter about abortion and how they feel about it. Just think of me as a human life, and I just think it's really notable that Sheik near so much about life in general that she's not into raised two Children that weren't her own. Yeah. I mean, what a blessing and You know, you see her kids, President, Trump said last night, you said, you know, your Children are our Heroes or something to that effect. You know, everybody. Everybody watched them during the hearing coming, Addy Addy keep those especially the younger ones, you know, so still and so quiet. That's enough during others hearings. And I was surprised they weren't there, but obviously they were. They were home in Indiana and couldn't couldn't be there. But It is. It is amazing. T see that and it does characters everything, and we just keep losing that. I mean, I mean, think about somebody said to me Yesterday. About what I was doing was it wasn't CBN. It was some. Maybe it wass. But somebody talked about character. And, you know, I said, Well, you know, how can we do this? We're gonna have a president United States that that I mean, if buy more to get elected, that hasn't disputed one thing. The evidence out there is now overwhelming. Of what is what is going on, and the mainstream media ignores it. It is it is a horrible I mean, I don't know anybody that would want to be a journalist and think that's some sort of credible job..

President Trump Sheik President Addy Addy Boston Tony Barrett Haiti Indiana CBN United States
Interview with Franky Wah

Back To Back

04:21 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Franky Wah

"Crewman, how're you doing first of all? Do you know what my I'm really really good. Things happening right now ace and downs weekend radio one this week in which I'm performing fall, which is a privileged coming on that line hopeful amongst call call some black coffee and. Full TAT silo just be amongst those names is incredible and the we've just announced at greenfields? Twenty one. And I've been announced. You know was her. Headliners. Along with every wanted, you can imagine from chess those who Pete Tong to by SAP. So it's got gotta be a critical viewing Yeah Yup definitely Gino. I don't think I'll ever get used to it. So see my name. In with all all the people that you aspire to be as big as good as i. certainly don't think I'll ever get used to it so. Good though man I think if you ever do start to get used her, that's maybe awarding side. I think. So I think so and I think that my my opinion on the always will I do genuinely believe it will stay. The same as were the finish line right from the start and not just we do this for the logo passion. So nothing should change on along the road rarely should shouldn't. Yes. No, you're absolutely right I mean I think that's a great attitude to have from the outset of it. I mean it's interesting hearing you talk about the the BBC weekend and all that because I think you know here in America that's like that's a reference. I think a lot of Americans, don't really have because we don't have an entity like BBC radio Y. Yeah Yeah especially for for what we do for dance music you know yeah and did you did you grow up listening to radio? One? Absolutely an Adams. Things have happened this year like I was. Really just locked into animal and eight. Song. I mean now, Daddy Howard EMESA. Jaren. Everyone bought. Impede Song you know he is a house music royalty isn't a you now the name goes back as far as you can kinda remember I've even got my cousin is easy. Even sent me that just this week actually. So all tape recordings of Pete Pete Tong sets I think from around ninety three, ninety goal which I'm gonNA check our on a cassette player next week I'm GonNa never really saw dig insulin see see what we daily. I mean, I was two years old then. bought you know certain things I add certain aspirations and dreams and goals when South is. This journey and A site. Initially, it was just a guess on played by somewhere addy Michael and nine this year I've been Pete, Songs Future Star and managed the anti nights always record in the world and and he's shooting of the week and. I don't know you. Now you're a producer and DJ cell. He try and comprehend you kind of call. It just doesn't sink any. He's a great feeling. Yeah. It's really really strange when people you've kind of looked up to as almost like it's almost like they're not even human, right? It's like these sort of icons and then when you sort of end up equalizing with them or getting in contact with them or even just them noticing what you're doing it is a really strange moment is is just said, no, you name and so of acknowledged aries and crazy feelin and then. I feel like for you you're probably getting to the point now where people are starting to look at you that way have you had. I wasn't gonNA say now you. Hike. Things happen now. Certain things that they say that don't even realize the saying it makes you wounded what sort of experiences that may have had over people that are in your position because i. What you so nice you. Know why? Yeah. Why would it be any different? You.

Pete Pete Tong Daddy Howard Emesa America Greenfields BBC Chess SAP Producer Pete Michael
"addy" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"addy" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"The devil Love that's been made. And this Addy LaRue is the woman who's lived since 17 92 in the Goes back and forth between 17 92 18. I mean, all these different time periods in them modern right now. It sounds crazy. I know. It sounds really good. Here's the problem. I have that when I get books like that, and I reading before bed. I stay up till like, two AM reading and the O Well, which I will do here. Yeah, but it's just funny. Do you read before bed and you find out when it's really good? You can't put it down or no, I know I can fall asleep, Okay? It's kind of Yeah. I could fall asleep right now, Right? Yeah, I've but I will do it like I will. Probably one of these days. What? Look more haggard than normal And you'll be like Britney. Oh, my gosh. So it's awesome. Yeah. What else is go? I thought that create the most unbelievable. Um, phone call from My sister and we don't We don't see eye to eye politically OK, I think that said the same in a lot of a lot of family a lot of families, but, um I We were talking about a couple other things, and then you know the thing came up about, you know. The New York Times I know on trump and everything, and I mean, I just was like, like, livid because I mean, I pay so much tax. I know you and I and right, we pay more tech. I mean, they gotta fix the tax code. If that's is somebody with that much money compete that little tax but Um, I was trying to make a point with my sister. I said don't you remember how much trouble we would get in with Dad when we lied? Yeah. And she say He had a sane I go. Yeah. Let me remind you of it. If you lie, you'll cheat. If you cheat, you'll steal. And if you steal, you'll harm somebody. And my dad just like that was the big thing. So all the biggest sin that we could ever do when we were kids. His light or parents about whether or not we did or didn't do something to push kids you're always like, and that was like the big thing that my dad was just like No lying. Lying was like the way people look at marijuana for Gateway drugs for you for. Yeah, Yeah, it was like, because one thing leads to the other. And, you know, my sister just said to me. I don't know what you're trying to save him. Lana. I said, Happy Sunday Sister and no, we I mean, we know we've in different like for for a long time on that we just kind of laugh about it. But anyway was I did see something really great, though, And I know everybody is divided in this. I did see something funny, And it was like, at least we know Melania isn't a gold digger. There you go believing that I was laughing. Oh, yeah. All right, Listen, we come back. It's our story. We can't get enough of it involves one of our favorite divas. Nothing but good times. Getting up with Jason and Alexis would.

Addy LaRue Melania Britney marijuana The New York Times Lana Jason Alexis
The Great Lego Scam

The Indicator from Planet Money

01:56 min | 1 year ago

The Great Lego Scam

"There's a massive scam going on, but this GAM isn't about the coronavirus or vaccines it's is about Lego. Tom. Glasgow lives in Dayton Ohio and he got scabbed he has three kids, seven eleven and sixteen, and they all love go, which is how he got into trouble. He'd been looking for a Lego X ray resistance fighter for his son that's the spaceship that Luke Skywalker an RTD to fly in star wars and so perusing facebook one day I saw an ad for it for what seemed to be a low but maybe not a too low of a price. and I thought Oh good. Let's grab that real. Quick Tom's is at the time x wings were going for about sixty or seventy dollars but the addy clicked on facebook listed it for a lot less the X. Wing was half price just thirty bucks but when the box arrived in the mail and Tom opened it, he found out that this great praise it came with a big catch. The pieces weren't the same quality they were. They were marsh more flimsy and they didn't have the same tolerances. They didn't go together quite as nicely as regular legos. The. Helmets for some of the mini figures weren't dual mode molded with a transparent pieces and solid pieces. They were just all solid and painted over yellow. Transparent Tom had bought what turned out to be a knockoff Lego set a counterfeit. He admits he may not have paid as much attention to the ads as he should have. But you know like it was this great deal and he trusted that in AD online would just be Like a group, the company that makes Lego in Denmark it more than five and a half billion dollars in sales. Last year like Oh is a huge business but this is not just a toy. Lego is an investment. The company retires it's kits after wild stops making them. So if you buy and hold something really popular and the price goes up, you could make a lot of money.

TOM Lego Facebook Glasgow Luke Skywalker Dayton Ohio Denmark
Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

The Vergecast

31:46 min | 1 year ago

Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

"Hey everybody seemingly from the verge cast really special interview episode this week yesterday the verge published feature package where calling capturing the police which was a months-long effort for almost everybody at the site to really interrogate the role of technology in the movement against police violence. The heart of the package is a feature where we talk to. People who had filmed the somewhat viral videos of police violence asking him why they did it. What happened next how they felt in the moment whether they would do it again, really contextualising these that we've seen over and over and over again we estimate videos. One is about a specific incidents with a specific set of men in Baytown Texas who filmed police violence and what happened next another one from the science team is about body cameras and police body cameras, and how they affect your perception. What's going on in some academic research that's come out about that. So I asked verge reporter, Steven and verge video producer, my calf, the two leaders of the site wide project To come on, say talk to me about the project what they learned in. Really I, keep thinking about this, the role that our phones are playing in changing our relationship to the and the government. I don't think any product manager or designer at a smartphone company ever thought that their products will be used in this way or create this moment. This is the direct intersection of technology and culture, which is something the virtuous. Investigate. So this is a really great conversation with John and Maria and a really big project. We're very proud of it that'd be read. Watch it here are John and Maria. Maria Abdul. John Steven Welcome to the virtuous easy doing well I. I'm doing great another beautiful day in. Quarantine Mario. How are you? I'm good. I'm very relieved that this really big thing that we have produced is out there. So now I get to. Take back and reflect de. So Youtube or the editorial leaders have big projects that four I would say two months we just called the police project I. Hope Everybody can see it on site. We're very proud of it in scope it looks at how people have been using technology to record the police record police behavior protests use technology and the tools to organizers protests to organize. The movement around police brutality, and then a lot of how those cameras in particular affect our relationship with the police. So it was a huge project and it looks like one big feature, a bunch of. Additional reports around that feature in two videos that my help produce. Let's start with where it came from. How did this project begin in? How did it take the shape that it ended up being on the site? That is very, very good question because. It was sort of such a big undertaking. We it started in a very different direction than it ended as I think a lot of large projects generally tend to. So it started with an idea, a sort of idea in the staff, one of our executive editor was like we should do something to capture the moment then it sort of fell on me to shape that idea. Which is, which is interesting sort of problem because I was very interested in. Working with the initial iteration of the of the project, but getting a chance to shape it meant that I had to think critically about sort of what what would fit the moment and what would capture the moment. Well, I would say so that's how we came came up with the idea of focusing on the people filming videos of police brutality because it felt like there was a section missing to the narrative that was Benjamin. Circulating around social media, which is to say, we don't really hear from those people like we hear a lot from from victims we hear from police officers, but we don't really hear from people who like the everyday people who are sort of in the line of fire and decide to make the very brave decision to pick up their phones and record and sh like shine light like shed light. On on this type of violence that really sort of goes undocumented because one of the things we police finances, it never really shows up police reports. Yeah. One thing that caught me is I say this a lot but this is a new way of using phones that fundamentally what's happening with with all of these if you look at our feature, we started at very intentionally with Rodney King. George holiday that the person who shot the Rodney King beating in the nineties using gigantic Sony eight millimeter cassette handicap which basically no one had those like some families WanNa had those. But the the that camera was present at that moment in time at one am on that corner to witness that thing was astoundingly improbable and as we've come to now, the presence of cameras is actually more likely than not in just the way people live their lives and so the decision to record seems at once. Easy simple. Everyone has a camera. It seems likely that everything will be recorded, but it also turns out to have dramatic consequences. Yeah. Yeah. I think one of the main threads which will I'm sure get into later is a lot of these people felt afraid of retaliation from the police because they posted on social media they sort of were indentifying themselves as targets, Samara and you pretty. Videos here how how did you pick the two together the verge video team did want in the verge science team did one how do we land in those two? So. At the first video and Ben Evita's. I initially saw the video on this very large like database of other videos, police brutality that had been collected, and that was being shared on twitter that we were using that we were looking through for this project, and when I first saw the video I serve noted it as something worthy. But because it had, it didn't happen at a protest. It wasn't the the video that I thought I was going to focus on but after just Justin Callum did the interview with Isaiah for the peace reporters feature in. Told me after he published the video, there had been an increased police surveillance in his life and that he was feeling a lot of anxiety and a Lotta paranoia since he published video. It just really struck me that he still even with all of the sphere and all this anxiety and what was happening he still wanted to talk to us because he had told Justin that he was interested in being part of the video project and so as soon as she told me that I spoke to him and as we sort of spoke, it was just. So clear that he understood the magnitude of recording and he understood the consequences that comes with it and yet still wanted to bring awareness to not only this moment but also what happens when you record the police? So that's how we landed on that video. So our second video on the role of body cams and capturing police brutality fell imperative that we would cover. It in that way given that it's not only bystander footage that is coming out of these recent protests. It's also a lot of body CAM footage in. So we thought it was important and imperative, and that verge science team thought it was imperative to also cover the role of camps and capturing police brutality, but also how they might actually influence how we perceive police. Violence. So it just added a different layer and a different impact to this larger piece. One thing that caught me about that and Addie has report that just is really stuck with me as we went through the project about how all these videos of protests and police violence are becoming a genre film, and as I read that and I watched the body cam video. It just occurred to me that we actually have to use of the formal language of film to describe what's happening here that the body cam is telling the story because it's one kind of camera it shows you one kind of it has a gaze and all these other cameras have another kind of perspective in it. I. Don't think we ever think about that as these videos is having maybe like that formal connection between what the cameras are doing and what you is the viewer perceived and that to me has been a very powerful through line of this whole project. Actually cameras are active participants in these stories and they shape the narrative. The same way that we we know this in every other situation where there's cameras camera shape the narrative, and they leave things out in a enhance other things and that to me I think there's going to be a big long cultural reckoning over the role of cameras in these moments because we don't really understand how that affects our blazing to the culture to the police to the state, and it's changing because the. Cameras Right now I mean it is ironic a little bit that this genre films started in Los Angeles. Well, that's the most cameras right and it's I mean like you know if you think about it that way it's like it makes sense that like Rodney, King beating was filmed by a person in Los Angeles and maybe not elsewhere but also I, think I think it's interesting that you bring up peace because i. I do think filmmakers understand this. And it is also I mean to to get not conspiratorial but to go a little bit off the rails which I still think it's in line but. The US government spends a not insignificant amount of money advising film makers were making films about the police and the military, and they do get some of these editorial. Editorial. Control some of the stuff. and. I think that perspective does shape the way that we see some of these institutions. Which is why I think it's very powerful that. People on the ground filming and they're making their own narratives about these institutions in real time. So let's start there. That's the that's the big feature. That's the piece reporters. It's eleven interviews with people who film police violence. I want to just immediately atop credit or creative director William troll and the engineer from the box media team Adler who built this thing it is beautiful is quite an experience to go through it. But the stories are actually of course, the most powerful thing. John, tell me about one thing you said to me at the very beginning of this project was this is the same story over and over again? Yes. And there's something about the volume of it that I think really brings it home feature came together and tell me hey, came to that realization and tell us what that story actually is. Yeah. So we interviewed a lot of people that was that was the hard part. One of the hardest parts of the projects was finding people who actually wanted to talk to us but I think we were using Greg sets list on twitter to find some of these people Shasta Greg I did actually interview him for. The you know that's a separate thing but yeah, I think I mean I. Think it's very it's interesting right because through these videos like they all have the same, the same beginning middle and end and. It's once you've see enough of them. It's very it's becomes predictable where the rising action in the falling action isn't purely film criticism terms I. Think the reason that we decided to go this route was because it adds context experience police violence like it's one of the things that like it really gives depth to what's going on and it's stuff that you don't normally see and the idea was to bring that sort of reality. Home to people reading, which is why the reason it's the same story every time and the reason that it's sort of like it was distracting actually at the beginning because I was like, okay, this is a different place. This is a different time. These are different people, but like chronicling the experience effective people in the same way, and that's why it was the same story every time because it's not every day that you see. Somebody who is like an officer? Who's who has sworn an oath to protect the public, just beating the shit out of. A peaceful protester and I think it's one of those things it sort of jars you out of complacency and I think for a lot of the people that we spoke to the interviews it seemed like these people were very sort of Shell. Shocked. They sort of knew the extent of the problem but a lot of them were just normal people who happen to be a protest and happened to be filming when stuff went down and so it was very strange reading these these. Reports from the ground like these eleven fourteen over and over again because. One of the reasons I think that it's important that we have the dateline like when it happened where it happened and like you know how many shares or whatever it, the the videos got was because it, it gave back some necessary context because again, if you're if you're reading this stuff in a vacuum if you're just reading reports. From. People who filmed the stuff it really does get eerily similar in for whatever it's worth videos are almost all at night. If they're usually chaotic and they all feel like are happening same place. Yeah. It's really strange and maybe they are I mean at least psychically speaking right like it's it is the same sort of mental place I think yeah and that was one of the notes as we were putting the thing together that we got from our editors was this we have to return some sense of place to it. So we we added that back in as you were kind of editing each of these individual vignettes. was there a theme that that really came out from each of the people? Was it? What what strikes me as as I watch all these videos there's just everyone has a phone out. Right like all the time it just seems like this instinct to have your phone out that to me is new. That's yeah. That's not how people thought ten years ago or twenty years ago I really do think that's in large part because of the power of social media because again, like the thing about social media, people dismiss it out of hand as like a bad and toxic place which a lot of the time it is like don't get me wrong. However, it is one of the only avenues for social change for people who are marginalized like it's a place where you can go to be heard. By by the institutions who would normally just have the power to ignore you and I think like police violence is one of those things where it is like it is sort of an abuse of power, right? It's one of these. It's like something that it won't show up on an incident report somebody like a cop like using their baton on a protester but if somebody films that and films like the circumstances where it where it happened how it happened like you you you you get a sense of whether or not this was justified and I think. A lot of the Times it's not and a lot of the Times that goes on reported and I think. People have seen that you can actually like get some measure of justice from these otherwise unaccountable institutions by sharing the stuff on social media because public pressure is still a thing and it's interesting that to go back to Isaiah Ben Evita's. He has video that officer fired like his him posting the video actually made a change at the very local level. In his town and I think I think that's a really important thing and I, that's that's sort of what's driving this stuff because again, institutions like the police were previously entirely unaccountable to the public. Mario I mean you, you are yourself filmmaker you talked to Isaiah how do you? How do you take that? That everyone is just instinctively pulling out their phone because they think it will lead to some some change down the road. I think what's interesting about Isiah specifically is that this video doesn't take place at a protest it. He was filming outside of a convenience store they were coming from a barbecue. They hadn't gone to protests recently, they were the at that moment they weren't planning necessarily planning on going to protest later that week however. In as the video begins, you hear him say I've got to get out and record this. You also hear his friends in the car say we've got a record this and yet when we interviewed them, it was the first time any of them had ever recorded police had ever been with other people who recording the police and I think that is largely part to seeing these videos. On twitter and on facebook of police violence being captured by by citizens being captured by civilians, and so they wanted to hold this police officer accountable and they also started recording him preemptively. They didn't start recording him the moment he started you know approaching them they started recording the minute they were pulling over in. So I think that really signifies to us at least to me that. Even. If you've never participated in a protest or never participated in filming the police, you now know that's an option for you. That's an option for you and that's an option for your community. It is I do think the third part that is going on said here. Is that like it is a protective thing too. You have evidence that maybe you weren't doing anything wrong even like, okay like you get pulled over by the cops and they sight probable cause like you're sitting there peacefully. You get to tell your story, view the camera to I think. These videos, I. Am sure are showing up in courts of law across the country. One thing that's really interesting about this. Again, I come back to that the piece from addy come back to the the body cam video from the science team. I was filming someone else he was at a remove right? It was his friend who is in in the encounter at the police. Most of the powerful videos we see the lead to change our are removed. They're not from the participants. How do you? How do you think that plays out in this larger? There's a lot of change in this country. Now, there's a lot of conflict actually WANNA talk we we published the piece yesterday there's been some criticism I wanNA talk about that. But right now we're we're seeing one sort of very clear perspective from a remove. How do you think that's that's playing I. think a big part of when you hear Isaiah speak about filming he talks about the fact that he constantly to remind himself to take a step back because he knew the moment that he engaged directly with these officer, the officer could come out for could come for him. You know he had he very much understood the power dynamics at play. Even, as him as the filmer, so he kept as the officer kept getting closer he kept moving back and he would ask you can hear in the learned the full twelve minute video this incident you continuously hear him ask the other officer in the video hayes it. Okay. If I'm standing here, is it okay if I'm standing here, he's very conscientious of his body and his proximity to the violence to the violence has been that's being enacted against his friends and when we interviewed him the reason that he did take a step back was because he knew that if they took him if he got arrested along with his friends that that video. Might, not like not not got published right? Like he might not get his phone back. These things might happen and he knew the power of that video and the power of what he was holding his hands and he wanted to share it with the world so that meant taking a step back so he do that and it doesn't mean that it didn't traumatize him every time he sees the video he gets. Traumatized by seeing his friends violated in this way however, he understood that the consequences would not have been possible. Had he not taken a step back and capture according? I also think. Just. Generally speaking like we tend to trust videos that come from outside sources or people who are around but not exactly involved. It adds another like an extra veneer of credibility. I think which is. Another reason that like some of the biggest videos that we see are not like it's not the body cam it's not the person on the ground being choked to death. At, somebody else. Who has has has had the same realization as as but. I think you know just subjectively with trust trust those perspectives more because they feel more objective. CVT camera just happened to capture the incident on on film. I would say with this specific incident like the group that was arrested. In Zambia. The was interested but his friends, Skyler Gilmore Phillips were they were all taking part in questioning this officer across the parking lot. So I don't think they were necessarily objective I. Don't I. Don't think they were I think they saw there being pulled over, they recognize the police officer there friend had just been with them at this barbecue and I think the fact that he was able to get the video out there in the fact that you can see the whole incident play out right? Like in our video we don't show the whole twelve minute video, but it's like five minutes. Of Not, much going on until the officer sort of approaches them. So I think the added quote unquote like credibility is that you see the beginning middle and end of that incident Isaiah did not stop recording until the police left Isaiah began filming before the police had even had even gotten out of their cars. So I think with this specific video, it's less about the eject objectively and more about the fact that he was able to capture all. How do you think that ties into one thing that we write about a lot surveillance where all being surveilled all the time you mentioned TV cameras. A on a different day in a different moment. The way our talks about like extremely prevalent C. T. V. Cameras is crap ring put a camera everywhere. Now we're being surveilled in the cops have access to this footage, right? At the same time what we've been talking about a lot is the presence of this camera at a remove actually serves a purpose is Asia. Taking that video from that remove sort of purpose. How should we think about this balance because I I personally right? Like you catch me in a different minute. I'm over here. I'm over there. Actually surveillance is good. No, I think the difference is it really depends on like the the institution that has the footage and what they want to do it. Right like the cops when they get ring footage and what I mean like it's not it's like the cops are using footage to incriminate and I think generally this is very generally speaking in very, very general terms like it's evidence, right? And you know when it's coming from people on the ground protests were filming. It's documentation it's like the same footage, but it can be used in very different ways depending on who's doing the asking. For, the footage like and where it's going I think I think that context is actually super important right? Because like in England, for example, there are cameras everywhere. There's just like municipal cameras run by the fucking. Like in London, for example, there's there's cameras run by the Metropolitan Police Department, and that's just that's just a fact of life. And I think it's interesting because like they I think they have like controls on how you can use that stuff whereas with ring networks here it's like sort of ad hoc private companies turning it over to the police whenever they feel like it. I don't know I guess I'm going on a little tangent here. I really do think that like it depends on who's asking for the footage and what they intend to do with it. I think you know people taking footage is as it's intended to sort of exonerate his friends and that they weren't doing anything wrong and this sort of an unjustified thing. And I think the intent really matters. So I think that it's not just about the presence of cameras and footage, but it's also about who has those cameras and this of act of pulling out your phone to question authority to question police officers is actually referred to as surveillance by scholars. It is the opposite of surveillance. Right surveillance is often reserved for those in power. It doesn't necessarily mean it's always the state surveilled someone but the moment that you begin to surveilled them, you were taking a bit away a bit of their agency away from them. You're taking a bit of their privacy away from them but soon, valence is this idea of challenging. Authority by trying to sort of disrupt this power dynamic by filming your oppressor by filming specifically in marginalized communities, the police, and so with surveillance, it is the idea of this is what we're talking about right like it's not mentioned one time in the videos nor is it mentioned in any of these pieces but all of this is what scholars refer to sue balance, which was coined by Steve Man, and it's all about looking from below. So you're not looking from below you're not the person who is above and the position of power. You are the person who's often surveilled right like with Isaiah and friends like they were they knew this officer they. They had never recorded this officer, but they not only knew of him. They had previously had seen incidences of him, and so I think by pulling out their phone, what they're doing is trying to challenge this authority figure to them that had represented sort of. Head oppressed in had sort of harassed or had allegedly harassed and targeted African Americans in their community. So they see this officer, they see their black friend being pulled over they understand this officer had allegedly been targeting and harassing African Americans they pull out their phone to begin to try to create a counter narrative, and before any of these things I think Bijon spoke about this earlier like when you start recording early on, you can sort of see the maybe there wasn't any probable cause and what you hear them saying the first few minutes of the video is, what's the probable cause? What's probable cause like why did you over in the officer officers aren't engaging right? and. So I think the role of that video in that moment is about who has it right? Like you can hear them. Surveillance video from above that's muted that can be distorted. It's about the person who got out of the car who started filming. Once they start one saw him started getting attacked the person who filmed at the very beginning and surveillance often doesn't involve you filming. Once you see the police officers sort of attacking someone but you film when you see a police officer because you want to challenge there are over you. Yeah. The when I say we're GONNA face a long period of cultural reckoning over this I don't think that we the surveillance scholarship is that it's very early stages right and it's not builds out. It's not complete. We're learning how it works and that to me is one of. You know when when the smartphone cameras invented I don't think people thought the people who invented the ship in the back of every smartphone thought we're going to have to have a conversation about surveillance when this is all said and done and that to me is. Right and that I think about that, all of the time like there are engineers and product managers and designers who make these products. and. Sometimes they have a guest of how they'll be used but this to me is one of the most surprising revolutionary uses of the technology right just fundamentally and I think this conversation about what does it mean for everyone to record the state? What does it mean for the state? Maybe record your back with a body camera or something else it's going to change the nature of our relationship with the people in power. It is interesting like one of the things that fascinates me about taking video protest specifically is like I think, a lot of police officers on the ground seat is violence when somebody holds a camera to them because it like it does challenger Authority, but it also like like it is a a thing creating a record in real time that they cannot control in a situation and I think it's just very strange because. Yeah I mean, the perspective really matters who's who's taking the video really really really matters. Let's talk about that for a minute in this conversation. In the feature, we have very intentionally chosen to highlight one perspective people filming the videos. We have almost no perspective from the police in return know perspective from the state in return as we are making this project I, you know the editor in chief ultimately I'm for everything I knew we were making that decision I felt comfortable with it. We do hear a lot from the police, but that notion that the camera is impeding the the police officers job that the police are themselves scared of violence they need to be protected that there are people with guns in the street Often fear for their lives how do you think that I mean the piece is almost yesterday right for many people liked it. Some people were critical of it. We appreciate the criticism and makes us better. But how do you how were you prepared for that criticism that there was no perspective from the police as after pieces published how did he react and where are you at now? That's a really I mean that's a really really good question I haven't seen much of that criticism. Charts to my filters I. Guess My. But it's I mean I think the larger question of like what police think is really interesting to me new I. Don't know if you know there's been a few years ago. I actually spent a year in Ohio reporting a story on cops there and like. Like this, this very, it was Liverpool East Liverpool Ohio, which is a very small town between it's like West Virginia Pennsylvania and Ohio. It's right on the border of those places and it was the site at one point of the like it had the worst heroin. Like heroin outbreak people were dying of overdoses every single day like the average was like one a day and the police department was like it largely fell on them to take care of the people and it was really interesting because I what I did was like I just spent like my time going on right alongside like. Suit up get my notebook get in the car and we drive around like I would smoke black and milds with this cop, and we would like He. He would pick people up and so I went to the county jail and like I saw the mechanisms of the state like from the passenger seat, which was very interesting because like the more time you spend with police officers, the more you understand that like. Seeing people seeing people's worst every day does something very bad to your brain. It puts you on extremely high alert. And it makes ordinary situation seem incredibly terrifying and I think. One of the things that goes unexplored is the trauma police officers sort of feel, and they just don't talk about it like all of these. There were seven people department all of them were very, very, very clearly traumatized. In a way that was not obvious to them, but very obvious to me is like an outside observer. And it was interesting because like the other thing that they did most of the time, it was just like social work they were just they knew all the people that were talking to they were involved in the community. Everybody knew them like I remember. The COP I was with like picked up this woman because she like had drugs on her. And he was like, why? Why? Like what happened like we talked about this I let you go last time because like you said, you were working on your raptor what happened to that and it was like one of these things where I was like Oh this guy actually really doesn't understand like where these people are coming from we ended up having to take her to the county. Jail because she didn't have money for bail is like one hundred bucks and he was like on the on the hour long ride back. He was fuming that she would have to spend this long in jail just because she didn't have hundred dollars and so it's one of these things I think like you know there are good cops. The police is fundamentally like disordered. I will say it's like. And I think both of those things are in conversation with each other because like again, there are days that are incredibly bad like this cop was telling me like the worst day of his life I ask offhandedly by the way never ask cop with the worst day of their life is. He Was Not prepared for the answer which was like he was like Oh. Yes. So I had to respond to a call this. This guy had kids who you know his his kids were friends with he locked them in the House and burn the house down because his wife was cheating on him and so this cop had to respond to the call and then go tell kids afterward what happened and it was I was just like that is just like outside. So outside of the scope of a normal person's life. That it's like did it requires examination right and I think that's the kind of trauma that these people are like seeing like one of those one of those events can scarred for life I don't necessarily think being police officer is as dangerous to save a firefighter like statistically speaking. But again, like these horrific incidents of violence really do change your perspective and I think a lot of this kind of trauma is invisible and goes unexamined and it's difficult because a protests which is a very ordinary event. There is A. There is some potential for stuff to go wrong and I think if you're on the lookout for that, like it makes it skews your perspective and you can't see what is happening objectively, which is I think why it's very important that people also film the police at these events because there is another record that is being created in real time.

Officer Isaiah Ben Evita Twitter John Steven Rodney King Texas Metropolitan Police Department Youtube Product Manager Maria Abdul Reporter United States Los Angeles Engineer Heroin Isiah Justin Callum Producer
CDC abruptly changes position on when to get tested for COVID-19

NBC Nightly News

02:15 min | 1 year ago

CDC abruptly changes position on when to get tested for COVID-19

"A CDC, is sparking controversy by suddenly changing its testing guidelines there's an Thomson. Despite a thirty seven percent dropping cases nationwide since late July furious push back on the CDC's recommendation that people exposed to covert and have no symptoms no longer need to get tested the change igniting confusion among public health experts. That's an essential component of case, based interventions doing effective tracking and tracing New York's governor calling the move indefensible. You cannot justify that on any public health basis that's politics president trump in June suggested less testing so. I said to my people nor the testing down please today the Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees the CDC. Says there was no direction from the president or vice president on the new guidelines defending the change when pressed by reporters saying tests should now be focused and strategically done not for the sake of being tested. If we're not a lease people, they will infect others and the viral transmission and outbreak will get only worse over. A concern shared by Dr Anthony, fauci according to a statement. Tonight, he reviewed a draft of the guidelines but was not at the Task Force meeting where they were adopted because he was undergoing surgery Boston University believes more tests are better. It's built a covert lab on campus where eight robots helped more than a dozen people process up to six thousand Kobe tests. Day Part of be used massive effort to test undergraduate students twice a week and get results in twenty four hours. If someone is positive, we can call them and do contact tracing and got the. Isolated as quickly as possible putting students like junior catherine, Grabotski addy's I WANNA, keep everybody around me safer says I WANNA. Keep myself safe across the country outbreaks were students gathering large parties with few face coverings two, hundred, seven cases at Auburn six, hundred, Fifty, eight at University of North Carolina of fate bu hopes to avoid even if someone doesn't adhere those individuals safety practices and they're not keeping socially distance, we're gonNA catch them on our testing to keep students healthy and learning

CDC President Trump Dr Anthony Department Of Health And Human Thomson Vice President New York University Of North Carolina Grabotski Addy Auburn Catherine Task Force Boston University Fauci
What we'll remember from the 2020 Biden convention

Democracy Now! Audio

06:18 min | 1 year ago

What we'll remember from the 2020 Biden convention

"For more on Biden's speech. In this week's historic virtual Democratic convention we're joined by two guests in Massachusetts Dr. Cornel. West with a professor of the practice of public. Philosophy at Harvard. University author of numerous books including race matters and black prophetic fire. His new podcast called the tight rope in two thousand Seventeen Cornell Westwood's in Charlottesville with. Neo Nazis stormed the campus he and other clergy members were protected by anti-fascists from the mob white supremacists and in Baltimore Maryland were joined by Ben Jealous Precedent people for the American way former president of the ACP. He ran for governor of Maryland in two thousand eighteen we welcome you both to democracy. Now, Ben Jealous congratulations on your new position as head of people for the American way. Why don't you start off by responding to this week's Democratic convention your thoughts on. Where the two now nominees the. President not presidential nominee, Joe Biden and historic a selection of Kamla Harris, to be his running away their positions and how. They represent what you do or not. Theme this convention was really one of unity. This was a time. When we have to come together to defeat a president, who is the most evil the most corrupt than any of us have seen and That says a lot. It also was the time we saw two two nominees who we as progressives. No, we can work with. Kamla. Sister who introduced her Maya. The former head of the ACLU of northern. California. Kamo ran for D. A. and much more conservative time and yet did so as outspoken opponent of the death penalty who then held her ground early in term when she was tested, would an officer was killed an the entire liberal establishment northern California came down on her and she said the death penalty is wrong period. Tremendous Kirch and Joe Biden who Bernie himself said is poised to be the most progressive presidents since FDR. And so while it's not Bernie. And while maybe it's not somebody else someone hope for what we do know is that these are people that we can work with. These are people who their best represent our best values literally the daughter of civil rights activists, the sister of a civil rights lawyer who are self told me fifteen years ago she became a prosecutor because it wasn't enough to just fight the power. We also had to hold the POW. And I've seen her act courageously. So I'm I'm very hopeful and I have no doubt that we can work with. Joe. Like addy who spoke so beautifully, and that was the true highlight for me. I believe that we must move towards Medicare for all I also believe that Joe Biden will take us further in that direction certainly. Donald. Trump and frankly further than most presidents that that that we have an opportunity here to move things in the right direction again and as organizers. That's the most important thing to get out of any presidential election is a president that you can move in the right direction. and Professor Cornel West your reaction to this week in the positions of the Democratic candidates for president if I president. Day My points of reference really are the freedom dreams that we just heard from zoom commodores and genius Lionel Richie. Of Ella, Baker, who was invoked by brother Biden and the first sentence. Of his speech the Alabama who was a revolutionary L. A. Baker who was working on the mass party organizing committee would offer annoy the Great William Kuntsler for actually working for third parties because he thought, she thought that the two party system was so decrepit and then also to Curtis Mayfield that they've been playing over and over again, the move on up but you got to move on from poverty. And in order to do it, you gotTa Talk About Poverty. If you go move on from Wall Street greed and Wall Street crimes, you gotTa talk about, Wall Street Green Wall, street cry go move on up from the Pentagon militarism around the world you gotTa talk about it. Those are the taboo issues that we don't get serious wrestling with. So when you really. Talk about the soul of America, the battle for the soul of America much of that so has been evacuated by the Pentagon, cry greed and the Wall Street greed and the inability of the police and other institutions at treat black people and Brown people, Indigenous People as human beings so I agree with brother. Ben. In terms of being part of an anti fascist coalition. That I think we're forced to vote for buying, but we're not going to lie about buying. WE'RE NOT GONNA lie about Harris. We're going to tell the truth about their. Captivity and their. Refusal to hit Pentagon money spending and militarism around the world at Wall Street, green and. Speak substantively to issues of poverty you can have massive protests all around the country, the largest in the history of country, you can have brother Barbara. Assisted theorist talking about poverty, and then when you get to the convention, you get this spectacle that has nothing to do with wrestling with poverty. I think court breath corey was the only one that even talk about it for the most part none of the major figures did thank God that Bernie thank God LLC. Got A little ninety minutes as opposed Republic Ninety Second Major. Sometimes. Ninety seconds, Ninety seconds so that I you know I'm I'm with Ben in terms of we got the vote for Biden but never ever lying about him and not coming to terms with the fact that. This moment with the decline and fall of the American empire it looks as if the system is unable to generate enough energy to seriously reform itself, it remains sanitized superficial. We getting Lawrence Wealth bubbles rather than prince the revolution I want to go to the Princess Revolution Concert I walk fundamental change.

Joe Biden President Trump Professor Cornel West BEN Bernie Kamla Harris Pentagon Harvard Massachusetts Maryland Professor Cornell Westwood California Aclu Lionel Richie Wrestling Charlottesville Baltimore America
Anchor is hosting pirated podcasts

podnews

02:40 min | 1 year ago

Anchor is hosting pirated podcasts

"Anchor is hosting large number of pirated podcasts from other publishes. Today thirty percent of all the pod track talk twenty podcasts currently being pirated on anchor according to our searches the new podcast from the New York Times and cereal. Nice. White parents has a further five pirated copies hosted on anchor using the original artwork. None of those plays will be credited back to the original owner and ads will not earn the publishers revenue. You'll find more details in our show notes and newsletter today. PODCAST host Lipson has published some positive news if Larry Fantasy chief operating officer. We continue to report growing revenue numbers and profitable results in the second quarter during a period that was certainly very different than expected. The company posted good news total podcasting revenue up by ten point six percents in the second quarter. Laura Simms has been promoted to see. Oh and the company. Now how seventy four thousand PODCASTS podcast those transistors launched an API for developers. Captivate has addy Ghana as a destination. They claim it's India's number one audio platform and link with Paul Corn in their new resources sanction I'm on their advisory board. Booth Eight podcast studio based in Adelaide in South Australia has moved to larger premises and filmed the building process of their new studios willing to that from our show notes newsletter today, and also a link to house spotify revolutionized podcast discovery. It's an in depth look spotify is user experience comparing it to apple podcasts. Always have unveiled a set of new features to make podcast. -tising buying better they say including brand safety contextual targeting and add sequencing on awards hosted. The true crime podcast reveal snowball is to leave his day job as content director of Australian radio station triple. J He's to focus among other things on television drama series inspired by the podcast and Impalas News Sir. This is a Wendy's podcast. It's a new podcast from Wendy's US fast food retailer to bit of a weird listen it appears to consist of a sponsor message funded by the same offer read slightly differently. At the late seventies, early eighties, band talking heads. This must be talking heads is an album by album exploration on their work hosted by Rodney Gordon and. Fan of the seventies, early eighties, bands, talking heads, you talking talking heads to my talking heads is an album by album exploration of that work hosted by Comedians Adam Scott, and Scott or common, and

United States New York Times Spotify Wendy Adam Scott Rodney Gordon Addy Ghana Laura Simms Adelaide Lipson Chief Operating Officer India Larry Fantasy Apple Paul Corn Director South Australia Advisory Board
The US government is considering a TikTok ban

The Vergecast

05:38 min | 1 year ago

The US government is considering a TikTok ban

"TIKTOK has a history in Congress now. Josh Holly has basically been the main guy out to get to talk, but okay, so for the past year year and a half Josh Holly has had some hearings. He's invited to talk to testify, and then he's done these like wrestling style like hyper wheels on twitter, where he just like shows like an empty tick tock chair and he's like. Where are they and it's like we're guitar music album. Is Our personal information being made less secure by big tech, because of their partnerships with some of these questionable receive. At least. This has happened. We've been waiting all this kind of happened when Mike pompeo like randomly one night on Fox, news. It's like yeah. We're thinking about banning TIKTOK. And that's basically all he said, and then, of course, everyone's like what is happening, so the government can't really do a want to ban tiktok addy. Our colleague here on the policy dusted a wonderful story talking about all the ways that they could kind of get around. Banning them, but the one thing the government can do is banned other people in government from using. On their devices so. This week the House of A Josh Holly Bill that would ban federal employees from using Tiktok on their devices, and then just yesterday earlier this week. It made it through the Senate committee, so all it needs now is vote on the Senate floor to be approved signature and Tiktok. His banned from Federal Devices Military Tiktok is not a small community. No, it's huge. It's huge. It's huge I watch a lot of fighter jets land on aircraft carriers. Somebody took a very bad dad. TIKTOK I'll go. Is Very different from mine, so federal employees banned from using it. Is there any further motion like? Their moves right. You could like you can say it's a Chinese company. We don't want them like. We did it to Weiwei right, but we. We basically banned companies from buying equipment. How would you? How would you do that with Tiktok? We have this problem all the time. With like what regulator deals with tech, no one has any idea or they want a piece of it, and then they fight over it, and it's a nightmare, so that's part of the problem. We don't have in federal agency that really organizes around Blake Tech Regulation at all, so it's not like you can just go knocking on the. The door. It'd be like excuse me. Chairman Simon's please ban. Tiktok you can't do that so in the same way that the FCC jeep pie can be like no money goes to while away and then here's some money to dig it up and get it out of your system like we don't have the infrastructure for that and I think that's primarily the biggest problem here I mean. There's a couple of things that you could do with like foreign, Investment Sifi's. Sifi's stuff. It's all incredibly Wonky, but it's an incredibly difficult, if not impossible to just ban an APP, and that would have to do with like talking to apple and Google and APP stores and having you know what I mean having to com- completely direct what how they operate in some way. We just got done with a huge discussion about how apple has monopoly on after being on the iphone Google doesn't on Android, but they might may as well for. For most intensive purposes, especially here in the US, so if they can strong-arm apple and Google just pulling them off the APP store. That like it's pretty close I mean they're like Donald. Trump is like one iphone tariffs right away right? I mean but like I. Don't know if anyone is gonNA. Pull it off now, Casey. One thing that strikes me is even on my extremely lame Dad Tiktok I see so many creator saying is getting banned following instagram. It's a trend all over the place, and obviously trump and sort of the republican side of the the world are like Tiktok Chinese. We hate it. trumpet is I, think particularly pissed because of the rally narrative run TIKTOK that's Russell singles last week. Also delivers a lot of information to people in young voters in particular in Opaque Algorithm feed like that. It feels like yours zone has bubbled up beyond just a bunch of noise for you. Yeah, I mean like this is a Ben Thompson. Point which is that China has been in an information war with the United States for twenty years, and Americans have just pretended. It doesn't exist right like the point makes over, and over again is China started this fight? A social networks are not allowed to operate in China, and so the fact that. Albert Mickley based feed that is totally opaque. That is operating insider. Reporters should raise at least some national security concerns right like the kind of. Threat you worry about. Is You know what if the Communist Party decides that? It just wants to push a lot of pro-trump propaganda in the run-up to the election. You know it just because it would. It would so some chaos, and it would benefit them regardless of how likely you think that is to happen. The fact is that it could happen and. Should the the country have some sort of response to that? How should think about that? And you can take different views on it but I do think the thinking about what Tiktok is and how it could be used has been unsophisticated because as with every social product when it first got started. We all look at it and we think this is fun. This is a toy. Nothing bad could ever come from teenagers doing dances. And fast forward to the two thousand sixteen election has no one ever watched footloose I mean come on yeah. Look what happened. What state will allow dancing in that town? Lot of people think happy story I. Don't think that that is a movie about how town was ruined through dancing.

Tiktok Federal Devices Military Tikto Josh Holly Apple Google Mike Pompeo Wrestling United States Twitter Josh Holly Bill Donald Trump Sifi China Congress FOX Senate Committee Weiwei Communist Party
The Skeptics Guide

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

08:32 min | 1 year ago

The Skeptics Guide

"Today is Wednesday June, twenty, four, th twenty twenty, and this is your host Steven Novella joining me this week or Bob Novella. Cara Santa Maria Addy Jada Villa Hey. Guys and Evan Bernstein good evening, folks. How is everyone doing? Well Steve Good question. Yeah I've realized now that I really know how well I'm doing. I'm trying to figure out like. What twenty twenty like I don't know. Should I talked to you about how? I'm feeling today or ninety eight point six? Yeah, Vega question. It is a big question because it's. Everything is so weird. You know it is yeah, it's not natural. For data, let's go over. The covert numbers is so here's the. Interesting thing because if you look at the curve for the world, we're still on the upswing. This this pandemic is is accelerating still. Yep, we haven't even crested the first wave. You know if you're looking at new daily cases worldwide that slope is still increasingly going up if Daily new cases, the greatest single number of new cases on June, nineteenth, one, hundred, eighty, two, thousand, one, hundred and eighty two cases June nineteenth. So you know that we have to keep that in mind. I think if you're on a part of the world that's past the crest of the wave. It feels like it's over, but it really isn't and the United. States is a microcosm of that right because the wave is going through the United States and the the. The northeast were four of the five of us live were passed the peak and we're on the downslope, but other than the northeast rest of the country and most states are still increasing. There's still pre crest. You know of that I believe we have like a weird thing where we were extended in California now it's like getting worse again like we thought we were on the other side of it, but then when we opened of course well, that's the other thing. Nope the opening, so it's kind of a by humped wave because we did manage to flatten up, and now it's turning, but we didn't really turn it down, but it did start in those in some states it was flat, and then they opened up cautiously, and that's good, and then some states opened up not so cautiously, and they're surging. They are spending Arizona is the worst right now, but Farda Florida. Yes, or then a bunch of other states are really spiking. You know so. We're not out of the woods yet. You know he's this again. This is the the the. This is the home stretch, but this is that part of the marathon where like you really gotta dig down and keep going? And that's challenging because. Everyone wants to be outside. We all WanNa be at the beach. We all want to be at parties and social gatherings. It's a normal time of year otherwise to do those sorts of things. But. We still have to be cautious and take all the precautions necessary so total cases worldwide nine point, five million total deaths, four, hundred and eighty, three thousand are approaching half a million in the US for a Ching one hundred twenty thousand deaths. That's what are the projection Steve? So it's really hard. Yes, we're. We're at at least one hundred nineteen thousand. They're saying in the US alone two point three million cases. This is almost certainly an underestimate underestimate. The states that are that are spiking the most South Carolina Florida, Texas Oklahoma and Idaho. Rope I've read. One model, one analysis that says that this I wave is probably gonNA, and with about two hundred thousand. That's about where we're going to land and then second waves. Anyone's guess right? It depends on what happened at that point, but given that we're at one hundred nineteen now and most states are still on the increase that seems like a reasonable estimate. But then you the farther out you go. Obviously, the more variables there are so becomes harder to predict and like there's still the big unknown of. When a vaccine is going to become available here, conflicting things so I think the experts are just making their best gas based upon where we are right now, but nobody could really say for sure, but that could be a game changer will see. This is getting a lot of variables there and don't forget. Some people estimate that or estimate that our numbers now one hundred nineteen thousand could be off by thirty fifty percent could be low by thirty. Really did yeah the. Be. Fifty one specific thing I wrote my my science based medicine blog this morning on this mess event held in Phoenix Mega Church. Because heard about this. Yeah, I was actually interviewed for inside edition which they would last night and I wrote about it today as well, and they're holding a trump rally. They're actually they did yesterday, right? But the the the owners of the Church said. We're good. We're okay because we've installed this special air ventilation air filtration system that will remove ninety nine percent ninety nine point nine percent of the covert virus within ten minutes. So everyone is saw every leasing. Why don't we have? Every plane if that works, yeah, the church is a massive complex, but it has a main auditorium that can hold several thousand people at one time, so it's it's bad. 'cause like this big kind of some somewhat circular auditorium. So you know I wrote an article basically breaking down why that claim that is total nonsense the idea that if you have an effective air filtration system. That you can mask either in side so a couple. Quick points hit. The highlights the idea that it removes ninety nine point nine percent of the virus that. Isolation is plausible because filters can do that, the question is how much time would it take to do that now? They said ten minutes, but that's based upon study of a small closed, sealed off room,

United States Steve Good Twenty Twenty Cara Santa Maria Addy Steven Novella Evan Bernstein Church Bob Novella California Arizona Wanna Farda Florida Phoenix Mega Church South Carolina Idaho Oklahoma Texas Florida
Haseeb Qureshi on the Unbelievable Story of the $25 Million Lendf.me Hack

Unconfirmed: Insights and Analysis From the Top Minds in Crypto

08:12 min | 1 year ago

Haseeb Qureshi on the Unbelievable Story of the $25 Million Lendf.me Hack

"So last weekend. A defy protocol was hacked De Force. Which is a Chinese defy protocol backs by Multi Coin Capital last twenty four point nine million dollars via its lending platform. Lend me and let's not talk about the significance of that name. What happens with the D. Force attack? So it's kind of a complicated story and there's a little bit of a back story understand what exactly happened so it was a busy weekend and defy the the story centers around this particular asset called I. Nbc which was the cause of this hack and actually another hack. That happened twenty four hours before this hack so Let me let me. Just do a little to setup so I am. Bcc is this is just token that's basically a BTC peg minted by this company. I am talking. Which is a Chinese Theory Mall? It's like the biggest theorem on the world and I can see is not an ear. See Twenty it's an ear. See Seven seven seven. Two seven is a new token standard. That's kind of an augmentation of your see. Twenty there's sort of fancier see twenty with a bunch of other bells and whistles and it turns out those bells and whistles that they added to this token standard makes it behave somewhat differently than the RC. Twenty and it's a little bit complicated. What exactly those augmentation are but long story short. What it lets you do is if the contract that integrates Twenty doesn't know that it's integrating with seven seven seven you can potentially do re entrance the attack. We interesting attack for those remembers the same attack that attacked the Dow The original massive attack that resulted in the three and four so twenty four hours before this Linda thing happened I am. Btc which isn't seven seven. Seven was drained In the swap liquidity pool for Ambi Devers. So basically somebody was able to take a little bit of his NBC and steal all the money in the unit swap pool. That was that was a balanced between east and ears An IBM PC. So now this was not UNICEF's fault because you just want anybody to create a pool so he was like well you know this is kind of is really unfortunate but You know the people who created this pool should have known that it was well known in advance at seven seven seven. Have this problem so twenty. Four hours later So you know this is really bad. Everybody's talking this weekend. Twenty four hours later it turns out that some attacker out there was scouring of defy looking for places where similar type of attacks might have been possible in terms out the biggest liquidity pool anywhere for NBC was in Linda. So what is lend lend? F is a Chinese defy compound clone. That was built by these two guys. In China Mendel Yang is a Chinese defined buster and Shoeshine. Who's the founder of Spur Pool? Which is one of the largest theory mining pools so there too you can think of them as like defy celebrities in China. So this was a very hot project is widely renowned in China as being like the wheel. Breakout defy project Because China doesn't really have any big defy contenders was cut their their Export to the defy ecosystem. And if you if you remember back a few months ago they were actually brought to some controversy because they copy compound V ones code And they were aggressively listing assets into their collateral pool addy's mutations as their business model it's a lot of people in the West. Were kind of pissed off at them as being a derivative project content V. One so they they also an older version of compound rights compound upgraded to combine the two since then And compound has this very careful listening process where they list only one time. They do a risk review. They do all the stuff and Linda was a lot more aggressive in all of the assets that the added and one of the assets they added was this. Did you see and the reality is that people knew about this. We entrance the attack since at least June last year. Actually I think opens Zeppelin security research firm actually published an open source version of this exploit. That could actually worked against SLOP. This is back in June last year. So people you talked to anybody security. They know that this is a problem. So what happened was on April. Eighteenth us what was attacked twenty four hours later almost the dot it attacker started draining the lendup contract okay. You can think about this. As though basically the attacker is fooling this compound like protocol into thinking that they have more and more collateral than they really have and so if they're putting a little bit of collateral they can sort of double or triple eight quadruplet and they keep doing that over and over again taking bigger and bigger loans until eventually they take out a loan the size of off the money in the pool and By the end of about four hours of repeatedly iterating on draining money out of the pool the entire pool of Linda was empty and the attacker made off with twenty five million. Yeah so for people who are not with that attack. I'll just describe it briefly and also I just wanted to say the swap hack From the day before was a loss of three hundred thousand dollars but essentially the way this reinsuring reinsurance seat attack works is that it's like if you were to go to a bank teller and say. I want to withdraw one hundred dollars and your account has one hundred and five dollars within it. Then they'll give you your hundred dollars and then normally they would give it to you and then update your balanced five dollars but in this case with this contract does is. It's able to interrupt the teller at that point and requests the one hundred dollars again and because the balance in your account hasn't been updated five dollars. The bank teller thinks that you still have one hundred dollars like enables you to take out one hundred dollars again in. That's essentially how the these funds were siphoned from the Dow and from Linda me and you know these other and UNICEF Bob It's just like a small amount every time but it just keeps going in the smart contracts like matic and it works very quickly so one thing that I wanted to ask you about also was if the reinsurance vulnerability was known about with your c seven seven's from a year back then. Why haven't all the different smart contracts that might be vulnerable upgraded like an also weirdly? Why would it take somebody so long to even exploited if it was known for all this time? It's that's a great question It's it's sort of you know. People have this kind of efficient market hypothesis. Thing in defy that like well everybody in the world can see all these contracts and all the information is out there therefore the moment. That's something vulnerable is on May net. It should get hacked. And of course we see that. That's not true right. It takes some time for somebody to kind of put all the pieces together so a year ago it was known and security experts everywhere note. Seven has this issue. But you know it's like okay. Maybe the nine months or ten months later. Nbc's in Europe seven seven seven and they list on their own unions while pool. It's not that big yet and not many people in the West know what. Nbc is right And so it sort of takes some time for these things to get remembered an integrated in the right way that people realize like. Oh yeah there. There was at attack from a year ago. The real question in my head was it took twenty four hours after the use while pack for Linda for somebody to put the pieces together. Like oh I can do this to lend up as well And Try to imagine you know. There are a bunch of people probably looking. For what else can I do? What sort of a copycat attack that I can. Do you remember the Bee ex HAC? We saw a copycat attack like just a day later doing the same fundamental kind of thing with fresh loans against the asks. The same thing we saw today but it took a whole day for that attack number two to happen and I have to imagine. Somebody was like practicing. They were playing around with it. They were making sure the attack wasn't exactly the same. There are some different details. In how exactly that you contracts are set up but the overall problem was the same that the contract did not the contract allowed itself to get interrupted mid execution with another contract call. And that's the fundamental issue of re entrance fee that you have to avoid to fix this

Linda NBC China West Bob It I. Nbc Spur Pool Unicef BTC Multi Coin Capital Ambi Devers Founder Mendel Yang Europe
Not enough VR headsets to meet demand. Thanks / no thanks, COVID-19.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:05 min | 1 year ago

Not enough VR headsets to meet demand. Thanks / no thanks, COVID-19.

"About a month ago when lots of people started working from home. I said I was surprised. Virtual reality hadn't become a bigger part of our work lives and our lives in general Ohio. The Times have changed always there. That is the sound of my son. Dodging bad guys in the living room on our new oculus quest which along with most other VR. Headsets are actually sold out these days. A combination of the need for entertainment at home and the release of a buzzy. New Game called half-life Alex that can only be played in biard. Let's dig into this in quality assurance where we take a second look at a big Tech Story Addy Robertson is a senior reporter with verge who follows virtual reality after Christmas. There weren't really many oculus quest. Everybody was kind of waiting for them to come back into stock. The same was true for other headsets. Like the index and then the corona virus hit right as they were supposed to be making new wave them so they've gotten smaller shipments But at the very moment when a bunch of people wanted to buy VR headsets they just had not recovered and had not started selling them and so now they're in a situation where we're lots of people are trying to buy them both because of the corona virus end because half life. Alex came out. And it's been really tough right. I bought one which I never thought I would do. I've seen a lot of people online talking about half life Alex and then just consuming other VR content. Do you have a sense that there is this? This kind of uptick in people actually wanting to buy these. I think it's really difficult to tell but I do think that Alex was a point. Where a lot of people who had not really thought that much about the are considered getting one anecdotally. There is lot of demand that there wasn't before if anecdotally there's all this demand. Finally but people can't headsets. Was this the moment for Vr to capitalize and instead they're going to miss the boat. I think this is kind of weird in the same way that a lot of corona virus recovery stories are weird in that. It's possible that these headset supplies recover. And that at some point everybody can play Alex and a bunch of people swarm on it and it gets a boost and what it lost it. Launch it kind of gains and word of mouth and everybody finally gets thing and it's great there's also a world where yeah just trying to lose this big opportunity at had for a bump and it's just not able to capitalize on this tastic. Opportunity has remind us again. Who are the big headset players? Like what are the devices that people are trying to buy right now? And can't so. There are basically three categories of headset and a few different brands inside them. The one we've been largely talking about is PC based VR. Headsets which are the ones you can play half life. Alex on and those are made by. Htc and OCULUS which is owned by facebook and valve. Which made half life. Alex and they all have headsets at sort of varying price points. Then there's these standalone oculus quest which was very popular relatively speaking in two thousand nineteen and seemed like a had a pretty good chance of breaking through even without everyone playing Alex on it. You can sort of connect to a PC. But it's really just meant to be a generalist headset And then you have playstation VR which consistently seems to sell pretty well and to how pretty good games that people like despite not being as Buzzy as it was at the beginning now we seem to be at a moment when you know for example a lot of people would love to be using this for home schooling if this shutdown last a long time or there are rolling shutdowns or there is a reluctance for people to go back to work in school long term. Do you think that this is something? That companies could capitalize on whether software companies or headset makers. I think there's definitely a space to expand a lot of the places where. Vr was already being used in the workplace like. It's already a very useful tool for running simulations and for doing certain kinds of research and visualization. I think there's a chance that that could expand I'm still fairly ambivalent about its use as either say a replacement for something like zoom or as even a virtual teaching tool. It's still pretty hard to get these headsets. It's still they're still pretty expensive. Were now figuring out that there are a bunch of kids who don't even have access to good Internet and can't find a decent laptop and so. I think that we should be really careful about promoting the idea of the our headsets which are even more inaccessible difficulty us as a solution for homeschooling Addy Robertson covers virtual reality for the verge and now for some related links in case you're wondering most VR. Headsets are still sold out as an example of how fast things are going gamespot. Put up a story in the morning on Tuesday saying the OCULUS quest was back in stock by afternoon. An update on the page that it was already sold out again. And there's a link on our website to a piece about the renewed promise and potential VR in the workplace from just last week. That was the question we were asking about a month ago. Seems THAT CONVERSATION IS COMING. Back around. And speaking of facebook owned oculus. The company just announced Thursday. That it's moving. It's virtual reality. Conference called oculus connect to an all virtual format. The event didn't have a specific date set but last year it was held in late September. I would imagine that. Facebook will be hard at work on something that actually announced at that event last year facebook horizon a social network in VR. That according to early testers is like the most sanitized most Nintendo looking rudimentary version of the metaverse from ready player. One but honestly I bet my kid. We'll be hanging out there if it were available. Now here comes the revolution I

Alex Facebook VR Buzzy Addy Robertson Biard Ohio Nintendo The Times Reporter HTC
A Second Chance at Life: Getting Sober at Age 24

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

09:02 min | 1 year ago

A Second Chance at Life: Getting Sober at Age 24

"Hello and welcome to. Let's talk a series of podcast produced by the Hazel and Betty Ford Foundation on the issues. That matter to us the issues that we no matter to you to substance use prevention research treatment of Addiction Recovery Management Advocacy and education. I'm your host oil moyers and today we have a story of hope brought to us by Holly S. Welcome Holly Thank you. Thanks for being here again. I'm so struck by the fact that as a young person in recovery. You've been so willing to stand up and speak out. You were on the stage at Hazelton BETTY FORD IN CENTER CITY MINNESOTA. When we had the drugs are there yet. You shared your story that they had that feel free to be up on that stage really awesome. I spent fifty six days. He's old and as a patient three times a day. I was sitting. And you know in the seats looking up the stage and so to be on the other side of that And even having the confidence to speak in front of a group of people as astounding. My my teachers would be proud. Come a long way so you tell us just a little bit about your your addiction journey. The first time you used you remember. Yeah I do I was fourteen. Bonfire my brother was four years or is four years older than me And so he had friends in his grade that were siblings of kids in my grade and so We went to von fire a night and drink and it tasted horrible. But it made me feel calm. Addy is and I was like okay. I hear often that this this is what I needed. That's it was. I kept drinking more looking for what you found it right. Exactly and and I never wanted to find that thought. I would have a problem with alcohol because my dad was suffered from substance use disorder. So that wasn't in my plan. So you knew a little bit of history you drank. It felt good even though it tasted lousy and alcohol was the drug that you continue to use correct. Yeah it was Up until I was twenty four years old in college I did use adderall and violence is prescribed that and and abused that after you know few months of having it And then it just any any mind altering substance it was you know zero to one hundred all the time. I didn't have turned off button. And then the day came when new. You couldn't do this anymore. Tell us about that day. Yeah so I actually when I was probably twenty one I knew I mean I had always had a bad gut feeling like my drinking is not normal. It's not that I would drink every single day but it was every single time. Major anchor would block out When someone told me they didn't lack cal. I was genuinely surprised like well it. That's not what you do and you drink And that was scary. Own and the waking up and not remembering But when I started drinking every day and when I started drinking by myself and when I started using it as a coping mechanism fats and I was like okay. This isn't right And that was around. Twenty twenty one to twenty four years old Brit just progressively about so much worse towards totally isolating and just drinking by myself in my room and Stang fire and just before you had your bottom. You had a family tragedy. Yeah so My Dad died from the disease of alcoholism and fat was a long time coming. I mean I grew up watching him drink as a you know as a young kid and and I didn't know what that silver and way read can was but I knew that the more that piled up next to his recliner the more he wasn't going to be my dad. You know he damore beer. He drank or whatever So that was a scary thing as a kid for my brother and I And then after my parents got a divorce when I was in fifth grade just progressively got worse and then it's really hard to ought somebody's slowly and then quickly wither away And a degree the loss of my dad twice The first time when alcoholism totally consumed him where the disease totally consumed to him and then once again when he was actually gone And I honestly think the first time was worse Because the staff that I loved so much wasn't the same and so for me when he passed away. I I was even deeper and might action right like you think that'd be a wake up call And it was to some extent but I did. I had no idea how to cope with and what to do and so I just kept drinking four more months for former months. Yeah said enough. Yeah and then I. I'm GonNa die can get help. And I started really experiencing the physical withdrawals you know not being able to go. X. Amount of hours without the shaking sweating meant I just. I watched my dad for so many years and to be experiencing that myself I was like I don't want to live that way. And My dad dying gave me a second chance at life because that brought me to his old buddy Ford and and that helped me get through sober living and IOP And counseling financially at. That's what money did for me and what that was Was that that you found recovery November for twenty seventeen. So here we come up on. It'll be soon two years in fall. Two Thousand Nineteen Been What's been the toughest part of your last two year journey and recovery? You know. I think it's really figuring out myself and figuring out my feelings and boundaries to to actually sit with discomfort isn't easy you know it takes a while to get to get used to and I would feel a little bit out of control of you know I'm like how am I supposed to handle this and And by just sitting with it I've and reaching out to peers and the sober community and I found that okay this shall pass and I can. I can do it Shortly you will be graduating from college yet. Your degree is in community health education. Where does that come from? What do you want to do with that Yeah so I. At first I wanted to do nursing. I wanted to go on for nursing and actually working IGNATIEVA I. I loved my nurse so much and I was. I WANNA be her but I am really looking forward to exploring the advocacy piece And that's a lot of what community? Health Education is health promotion intervention disease prevention in the arena of addiction. Yeah absolutely yeah So I'm I'm really excited about it. And your internship has been working in a sober for an organization that promotes sober living. Saint Paul's living and it's it's more of a structured sober living. But it's yeah but it's all about finding life in recovery life beyond treatment and and finding meaningful relationships and sober friends. Because that's that's hard. I I believe for me. Had I gone home to South Dakota? It would have been hard because in Saint Paul the twin cities. There's five hundred six hundred meetings a week. I mean recovery. People there are so many young Pe- ray. Yeah and it's I feel normal.

Betty Ford Betty Ford Foundation Moyers Twenty Twenty Holly S. Hazel Hazelton South Dakota Adderall Addy Center City Minnesota Saint Paul Ford
The Skeptics Guide

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

09:11 min | 1 year ago

The Skeptics Guide

"Today is Wednesday March Eleventh Twenty Twenty and this is your host Steven Novella joining me this week or Bob Novella. Everybody Cara Santa Maria. Addy Jane Avella. Hey guys and Evan Bernstein. Good evening folks. So it's official the World Health Organization who has declared a worldwide pandemic. Welcome APPS. Well yeah we were. Just I mean we were at this point. We were there just still. It's a milestone only. It is at some point like it's like a certificate you would put on your kids wall. I survived the pandemic t shirt when he wanted story. It's only the third time right. You got the Spanish flu in the late. Nineteen we have the wealth twenty eleven and this burglar twenty eleven. No it was a big enough current pandemics HIV AIDS in Corona virus recent pandemics include nineteen eighteen influenza and the two thousand nine flu pandemic. You're right Steve H. One and one bird flu right or is that swine flu swine flu swine flu and then HIV AIDS. Though it is a global pandemic. It's been categorized. Okay all right we're will make sense. It makes sense so thousand case three thousand cases in the US. Italy is you know they're in the middle. I think of their epidemic China's on the other side of their heirs right. We're just gearing up so now we're in. The phase of social distancing is kind of the word of the day for the US so you know events are being canceled left and right no non essential travel. People are starting to talk about taking their kids out of schools now ours our high school. They're basically gearing up there sending emails out saying that you may have to shut down. We haven't decided yet. But this is what we're GonNa do if we do. And there's sort of laying out the plan threes and it seems inevitable. A lot of colleges are saying we're doing all online classes for the rest of the semester. I'm lucky that I go to school. That's mostly online anyway so I feel like my professors are really prepared. They know what to do. They've been really up to date with everything getting the emails out about plans for in person meetings but I feel bad for a lot of the professors who have never taught online before because it's a totally different skill set and you have to know what to do. Yeah and they're just going to be thrown into it and also the students who have never done online classes like it requires a different amount of self efficacy. I don't know what are we gonNA have older professors taking pieces of chalk and trying to write on so it looks like as of today today the eleventh. Yes yeah one hundred. Eighteen thousand three hundred twenty six confirmed cases globally and four thousand two hundred ninety two deaths. That's that's alive sewer. We'll be talking about a couple of corona virus related news items a bit later in the show. But yeah this is. You know we've been talking about it. You know obviously for months giving the updates and now we were just hitting. I think we could see the peak coming now. You know in. Us As least and a Lotta experts are saying now. Basically everyone's GonNa get exposed. You know it's really just a matter of. How quickly is it going to happen? The key is we want to slow it down as much as possible so it doesn't overwhelm our resources so it's not that we're GONNA keep it. We're not going to keep it from spreading. We're just going to slow the spread because that's a huge difference there were some jackass on. Tv saying just to expose everybody now with opposite. WanNa do we because then the mortality spikes when you run out of things like then a laters beds. It's not going to be literally everybody. It's going to spread through the population. But that doesn't mean everybody's going to be exposed right. I think that everyone is not going to necessarily contract it. The infectivity is not one hundred percent now. But unless you're like seriously isolated you're probably going to get exposed there whole countries where there's only like three cases. Yeah it'll get there eventually. That's the point that's what they're saying it's GONNA it's the human population has no immunity right. So it's a naive population. And it's going to make the rounds. It's going to eventually. Just make the rounds all over the world and then it'll slow down mainly because people will have either most people have already been infected. They won't be enough new. You know naive hosts to keep it going and do we know that you can't be reinfected. Well you'll have. Some level of immunity may not necessarily be one hundred percent of your no longer naive host. You have an immune system that seen seen this virus before the other thing is we want to slow it down and maybe an Iraq seen in twelve to eighteen months we have a vaccine and maybe we further slow it down and also. Maybe it'll be a seasonal situation and it actually will naturally slow down over the summer and give people some relief up until the new season starts if it operates seasonally. Yeah so any of the other thing that everyone is saying which is correct is don't panic but use your commonsense. You know just to avoid unnecessary contact with lots of evil face mask in the. Yeah yeah at least. Some Clark's wipes for the rest of us. Please honks toilet paper yeah please? The Toilet Paper Discusses Shelves Empty. And also don't be getting into fistfights over toilet paper at Costco. It's embarrassing yeah. We don't need a Thanksgiving Black Friday incident. Oh they're all over the world embarrassing. Okay Kerry you're going to give us a what's the word? Yes Oh. This word was sentenced by Linda from Petaluma California. She said I teach chemistry in high school and this term came up recently. So I figured I'd share with you and the whole crew. It's one I've always loved for the simple fact that I find it fun to say out loud. Always a good one to bring up in casual conversation and the word that she recommended is. Moity and Moya and many many of you have asked that we spell the words each week and this is an especially. I think. Necessary one dispel M. E. T. Y. Yeah it's a good one right and so I'm going to start a little bit with the etymology. Because then I think it makes more sense. When you look at all the different usages. Because it's true I had only ever heard of this word in a chemistry context but it apparently also has a sociology context as starting Brooklyn. No it's okay kind of were all French and it also has a property definition so the etymology of the word. Yeah it's from the Latin originally but the first time that has started to look like is old French around the fifteenth century in that usage it meant an equal half a half part or a share which is basically still its definition is just become a little bit more specific over time so if you look in like a dictionary definition you're gonNa find that it means let's see Miriam Webster. Which is kind of the American standard will say one of two equal parts. A half or one or two approximately equal parts or one of the portions into which something is divided or one of two basic complimentary tribal subdivisions and if you look at Cambridge Cambridge Dictionary. You'll see something similar. Apar- share something especially when it's divided into two parts but there they've added the chemistry definition but they just wrote a part of a molecule which is honestly not very specific. So if you really start to dig deep into the term you'll see that again. There are basically three main utilizations. There's the chemistry. Utilization Utilization Kinship and then a Moi early title which is a legal term that describes a portion of title ownership. So if it's like a divided tidal which is kind of interesting make sense in kinship. You'll see it. Referring oftentimes to tribal groups usually native American or specifically Iroquois or Australian aboriginal kinship groups. And also. I think there's a native Hawaiian kinship group and with that respect. Moi Eighty is like when there's a group that descends from a larger group and only hangs out with one other group

United States Twenty Twenty Cara Santa Maria Steven Novella World Health Organization Jane Avella Evan Bernstein Bob Novella Aids Official Cambridge Cambridge Dictionary Italy China Moi Eighty HIV Costco Miriam Webster
In a world of remote work, virtual reality is still pretty much MIA

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:58 min | 1 year ago

In a world of remote work, virtual reality is still pretty much MIA

"As more people are working from home to help. Contain the spread of the new corona virus. We're starting to face the limits of remote work technology on the one hand we've got zoom and Microsoft teams and Google hangouts but some workers need more than conference calls or even shared documents to get work done a few years ago. The idea of virtual reality for the office was all the rage and today. We're wondering what was the promise. Vr for work. And why so far? Has It utterly failed to materialize addy? Robertson is a senior reporter with the verge who follows virtual reality. I asked her why. Vr for the office hasn't taken off the hardware still has high enough costs a lot of different ways. That it's not really worth the tradeoffs from the things that we already have You get this sense of spatial presence with other workers and if you have hand controls you can interact with people in ways that feel more natural. The problem is that VR headsets. Still just have a lot of downsides for one thing you have to get one for every worker. The headsets are pretty heavy. You don't usually want to wear them for more than maybe an hour and if you're trying to do work on them also like what. Do you do. Do you type on your keyboard that you can't see. Do think that all of that promise back then you know that it would just be the future of collaboration and it made so much sense in. You'd have avatars and the sense of presence would mean. You really didn't even need to go to a meeting. Do think that some of it was just over hyped or did the technology not progress and get cheap fast enough kind of both that. The technology didn't get I think lighter and cheaper as fast as people expected and also the are turned out to be good for some very specialized things that often. It was already being used for. Like if you want to do really serious design work and you want to pull a bunch of people in to look at a car model or something then actually the are makes a lot of sense there but just as a general purpose office thing. Y- think there were a lot of people who are always skeptical for very good reasons. Where at this moment now where? We're kind of talking about the tech tools that people might need to us from to work from home and that's sort of what prompted this conversation that there was this idea that virtual reality could give us better virtual office spaces. Do you think that was just a bad idea or that? It might ever happen. I don't think it's a bad idea. And augmented reality makes more sense and a lot of ways if you imagine the kind of idealized version of smart glasses where you can see something projected on a table and you can have a colleague. Sit in a chair across from you. But they're actually somewhere else and being projected that gets around a lot of the problems you're still in your normal environment but you can also get the collaborative aspect of being able to say gather around a whiteboard on sense of physicality that you don't get if you're just seeing somebody video feed right well in that you said is still in development. Like how close are we to that? Do you think to something that actually is the thing. People want to just wear around the office. I think's still several years away. Their systems like Microsoft. Holo Lens that again are very good for simulation and training but they're still pretty inconvenient to just wear around the office and you wouldn't WanNa just hang out with them on. I think we're also I'm I'm we're kind of talking around the goofiness factor of how silly a lot of people feel wearing these like I don't because I cover VR. And I've done a lot of this but I am fully aware that a lot of people think this just looks completely ridiculous and they would feel so silly wearing it addie. Robertson is a senior reporter with the verge who covers virtual reality most big the are makers. Htc facebook owned oculus Microsoft. Google have all announced to be our or a our headsets for the enterprise. Hdc's enterprise will be available later this year and now for some related links. I also wrote about this topic for wired that column published today because in some ways the failure of VR Ar to materialize. It's kind of a metaphor for all the ways in which we are not ready to transition our workplaces or our lives to telecommuting even self isolation which is kind of weird because these technologies have long promised to decentralize us to increase our ability to take our jobs anywhere maybe reduced the burden on a few expensive coastal cities and even fundamentally changed the way we think about how and where we work. Inertia is a powerful thing and we haven't had to make fifteen to so far but that's not to say we won't. You can find a link to that column or the whole thing at marketplace Tech Dot Org and the Los Angeles Times and I were on a wavelength. That paper also has a piece about the many ways we are not ready for mass telecommuting and notes that the closest we've come in recent history was second life and here's what else we're watching in tech. The trading apple robinhood went down again Monday in the midst of yet. Another huge sell off. I feel like it's gotta be hard to blame a huge amount of usage for this crash though because who in their right mind is still using Robin Hood. Pouch The Wall Street Journal reports that some of the big GIG worker companies lift Uber Post meets door dash and others are teaming up on talks to figure out how to pay their workers if they're quarantined or affected by corona virus. Thousands of people do work for these companies but are technically employees now. The companies are discussing creating shared fund to pay people for sick time or missed work. Sort of like they might get if they were employees. Misinformation AND SKETCHY SNAKE. Oil promises continue to spread all over facebook twitter and Google related to corona virus. We'll have a story tomorrow on how platforms like Amazon and Ebay are trying to fight fake an overpriced goods but in other tales of misinformation twitter and facebook have responded to a doctor video that the White House shared that was edited to make it look like former vice president Joe Biden accidentally endorsed President trump twitter labeled it quote manipulated content a label that users should see when they see the tweet. It's actually the first time. Twitter has applied that label and then on Monday. Facebook tagged at the same video as quote partly false speaking of twitter. Ceo Jack Dorsey may have avoided the boot. The company on Monday reached a deal with two investment firms including one. That was trying to oust him. There will be some changes and a big stock buyback. Otherwise apparently no changes at the top. Welcome back Jack. I'm Ali would and that's marketplace tech.

Twitter Facebook Microsoft Google Robertson Reporter Ceo Jack Dorsey Vr Ar Robin Hood Los Angeles Times Apple HTC ALI Joe Biden Amazon Vice President White House
"addy" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"addy" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Here in Florida this is at a Canada US invention we're going to create some Fauria addy and does indeed on to use a little gift so what would be that without the song to end up with the music and send it back to you with my music what we get that out after sure last March but right now we left our listeners hanging they got a sick plant is covered in bugs it's will think that look good and they just treat the plants but you're telling them no what do they do do they test their soda what I'm telling them is that is that first of all you know their long term and short term solution sold something you've been doing you know if you go you got this plan being attacked you can pretty much do a long term solution because the plan will die by that so I'm trying to teach people look you know so this is a result of what you've been doing for a long time usually I find ninety five percent of the time people roll over water I tell people you know the Michaels and not very good swimmers and this when this and this chemicals in the salt in the water to flow that the chlorine bromide whatever this is in there you know fluoride what is added it to the I know that all kinds of stuff I have no idea what they put in the water but I know that could was something in the water to kill the bacteria and guess what the solos mail back terrorists will be putting that you know for the soul is closely be attacked for one thing or another so that ninety five percent of the problem is that because usually what happens wall over warding distrust kills a slow back to an assault means is not there but the back to Minnesota to the whole job that they have been see we have evolved from them we were you know we if you look at this tree of life where we come from be it all goes back to the slow microbial life into because millions of years one day we say Hey you know I'm going to separate myself from the soil I'm going to put all the my boat crew microbes in my stomach so my stomach gonna have a moving soil will be a moving so I'm gonna get up and move right right trees so do the most things are still you know hooked into the saw but we and other animals all the creatures decide we're going to go the separate but we still have the same functions we have our stomach our skin is basically a bag you know it you know and started to call a dagger that you meant beings called bags of water because were made mostly of water yes I'm yeah I know yeah I got the water right exactly but that's basically we've all we decided to become a bag of water and move around but we brought it back to you with this which evolved in Michael's we have our own Michael's in our stomach which is is is the car if this is just too should people be filtering water that they water a sick plant with he has some what about people like me on a well there's no fluoride in that right so read too well water could be interesting a lot of ways because I lived on the place well water I tested was like heavy so they basically had a lot of minerals as well that's cool heavy with iron and all kinds of metals you can smell it you can smell it and that's actually good for the soil because that's the types of minerals that the plants would use and stuff like that may not be got to filter just for your use and stuff like that because you know what but it turns a warning your plants the stuff they would love that any day of the week as opposed to getting sterilized water with nothing in it right okay okay so that's one thing you can do if your plan to six start filtering the water you give that particular plant give it some to manage right if you plan is sick yeah this is okay first of all I have to stop doing what's causing the herd the plan to get sick so what am I doing this because in the plan to get sick so if it's in the ground to contain a different conditions so is that something is in the ground that usually means a lot to different things that's why people want instant results but do you have to understand what they're doing like cooking you know this is it yeah he they would know what you're doing are you gonna be burning everything up all the time so it nor to figure it you know you have to say okay well usually what happens in my experience has been that if your chemically if you're conscious goes that chemical way are my go to store and buy this chemical fertilizers and it'll put chemical fertilizer you know if you think you know that causes uses I wanna go to store by some something go from my garden summer get this fertilizer and we get that pesticide fungicide and looted a week you never the word chemical or bad or anything doesn't show up in your classes this is what you've been taught to do so that's your problem right there in terms of you have to tell me what that are you are you can you can grow your plants personally yeah and I did all kinds of crazy things like my banana peels in my coffee grounds and I'm busy in there there's no garbage around here I got two kids I'm on a farm so pleasure talking about okay yourselves everything gets everything it really is a targeted attack once in awhile like it's spider mites will invade my tomatoes or a cucumber beetle will attack Mike you coming and usually I do a lot with water usually okay so I don't know yes to this okay so on your farm what are you doing for minerals well probably not in my you have five seconds due to to to to nothing nothing except I guess over the compost and the the newer I guess I give everything the newer and compost so I don't know if you have they have some minerals see red altogether I I had to speak and so of them in your address for a year and then you have all the other animals yeah coats and what else yes dogs and cats and actually we have to go to another break but when we come back from the break I wanted to ask you about that cat litter problem because some people want to compost it and I wanted to know I don't compost mine I wanted to know if there is a way okay so well you're going to get a.

Florida Canada US Fauria ninety five percent five seconds one day
"addy" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"addy" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Addy I agree how you doing listen every week to me that there were gonna do a little William Shatner here we go number one he wrote a series of science fiction novels called space quest that were adapted for television real are ridiculous it's a real all right I'll agree sorry not I would say no but I met he sounded like he knew what he was based quest came out of now you sound like you have one thing rain all right in AD two thousand eighteen Shatner released why not me his first country music album real are ridiculous I think that Israel yet Israel it's yeah number three he appeared in third rock from the sun as the aliens that goes I had managed to say real yeah it's real nope it's not really was somebody else he was big giant had yeah he was always he adds you know that's my goal is to put my groups to work in here and yet you know what I have us William Shatner one four you're ready and the you'll know the answer when I tell you are you familiar with my Twilight Zone radio dramas that I that I have you ever heard any of them I heard a call all yeah well do you know that I reached out to William Shatner and he turned me down get out yeah it is I had all these amazing actors in this I'm like you know we'd love to have you you can do one that you did originally or will you can star and a friend he's like now well the answer is I don't want to do that read on for an autograph yeah he's he's kind of a little bit of a crumb legend well you know what yeah at least he answered there's a lot of people that don't reply yeah this is true no it was on the phone I'd call that he's I called as managers manager will like here's this phone number give me a call oh wow do you still have that number now all right of it playing the game with yet he had he you are the winner you want a desktop in our weather station is brought to you by American whether makers heating and cooling the sixty minute man visit American whether makers dot com you're going to love it I love my weather maker I hope you do too Boston Blackie Avery it's it will will do that for ya buddy take care bye bye thank you all right well we were successful taking an axe ray of Lisa's brain I have it I'm gonna posted a similar to and that was the cool what you'll you'll take a look at it I got a book page and see what you think yeah all right but right now it's time for part three of Donovan's brain on such Spence.

Addy William Shatner Israel Blackie Avery Lisa Donovan Spence Boston sixty minute
"addy" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"addy" Discussed on KTRH

"What matters RJ on the black line. Go ahead, sir. Argenta jackets, resilience to be resilient. How when I got knocked down not. But when I got knocked out just back off Addy, also told me when his little nuggets was never say, the F word, and it was fair. It's a life NAS fair, that you're gonna have to work for everything that you want to go. Sometimes even though you work for it. It's not gonna come your way. Just be glad. It's what you have gone for it came moving back. RJ detected a little Donham clerk in for you RJ, but we. But we couldn't stay. Good call. RJ. Ray. Louisiana europe. Yeah. My dad is an amazing man. Eight told me. So much in live as. God family and country and third-generation navy now. My grandfather was in the navy during World War, Two my dad was in the navy during Vietnam and. I did ten years navy and moss on wants to be a navy in. I just tried it still on my daddy, you know what? That's how you know, you were raised right? If you wanna pass those same things down, Ben.

RJ navy Argenta Addy Louisiana Ray Vietnam ten years
"addy" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"addy" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Result of that it's just. Seem to work. Investigators say it's too early to say 'cause but believe that speed played a factor in the crash, a meeting at the White House between President Trump and House Democrats ended with the president angrily leaving to deliver remarks to reporters ABC's Karen Travers at the White House. President Trump seemed to close the door on working with Democrats on infrastructure and maybe any policy issues so long as they continue with their investigations. I told. Senator Schumer speaker Pelosi, I wanna do infrastructure. I want to do it more than you want to do it. I'd be really good at that. That's what I do. But you know what? You can't do it under these circumstances. The president and congressional leaders were set to meet to talk about the way forward on a two trillion dollar infrastructure plan. But a policy discussion never took place. The president ended the meeting after about five minutes. He didn't even sit down at the table. Karen Travers, ABC news, the White House. And this is how the house speaker described the aborted meeting. It was very very, very strange. During a forum in DC Nancy Pelosi suggested that she's not surprised by anything that Trump does Pelosi double down. And also said Trump has been obstructing Justice in plain view. Prosecutors in Manhattan are filing new charges against attorney, Michael Addy a high profile lawyer is accused of stealing money tied to a book advance from his former client and adult film, star stormy Daniels Addy was separately, indicted today on extortion charges for his alleged attempt to extract more than twenty million dollars from Nike an abortion law boycott has begun from Hollywood. The first TV and movie of pulled out of Georgia following the state's new abortion laws, the movies, the Christian wig comedy. Barbara Starr, go to this dumb mar in which she stars in co wrote the series is an Amazon show called the power producer read Miranda rights on Instagram that it felt wrong to take money in the form of tax credit from state taking the stance on abortion, Atlanta's a major location for filming these days and many other stars in productions of threatened to boycott over the heartbeat Bill, which essentially bans abortion, after six. Weeks. Jason Nathanson, ABC news. Your next news update is at four. I'm Suzanne Duval, NewsRadio eight forty WHAT. Yes, kentucky. Breaking news, weather, and traffic station..

President Trump president White House Nancy Pelosi Karen Travers ABC Senator Schumer Daniels Addy Suzanne Duval Barbara Starr Michael Addy Jason Nathanson Nike kentucky extortion Amazon Instagram
"addy" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"addy" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"What were your thoughts about Addy a second room to my how opposed to buying a new house? Okay. I have a newborn and to us two storey house and going up there at night just is not really working. So my thoughts to add a second down there. But my husband just wants to buy new how okay, what is your home worth? Right now to forty to fifty okay? And what are the homes on your street and within the surrounding two or three streets? So for what is the range? That's about the range to twenty two sixty to twenty two sixty years priced at two fifty. Okay. So you're near the top and the room would call show much to add. I'm calculating five to ten thousand dollars. Any on the size? That'll probably add a closet. Well, I found someone that willing to do it for now. No. Ten room the only even cover the materials. Are you talking? Is there an existing garage you're gonna finish out or an existing porch or something if you have to build a roof structure in a whole extension to the house? It's going to be more like twenty five thousand dollars. Okay. So I don't know. I don't think you've got accurate numbers. You need to look into this. I mean is there is there a garage or wanting to finish out or some kind of thing that has roof structure over it. My husband's not really interested into making the garage into a room. I'll be open to it. That's not what I'm asking. I'm saying the five thousand dollar bid is ludicrous. Like completely off the charge. Not right. If you're talking about extending an actual structure to a house in North America. Yeah. Those are ready door. It was just kind of add a room. Yeah. Your husband owns the argument, you need to move because it's going to cost so much to do this to add a room that you're not going to get the value out because you'd have to get twenty thousand dollars more than anything else in the neighborhood sold for in order to break, even after all this crap just to get a room. Just so you don't have to go up stairs. So now, I would just move on with your husband. I think you're better off from real estate perspective to move. And and I don't think you're dealing with real numbers here yet anyway. So thanks for the call Frankie's with us in San Francisco. Hi, frankie. How are you? How you doing a big fan? Thank you. We're gonna help. So I just got out of nursing school. I I set my Roth IRA I've been contributing to it. But I wanted to start saving for a house. I want I want to keep contributing in my Roth good in my in my in my traditional, but I also wanna save up. And I don't feel like there's gotta be a better way than just building it like stack minute checking account. There's some kind of like, Nope. Is there any way to gain interest while I try and save for that? Or they're plan that you know, interest is not going to cause you to have money for a down payment you putting money in..

Addy Frankie North America San Francisco twenty five thousand dollars twenty thousand dollars twenty two sixty years five thousand dollar ten thousand dollars
"addy" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

11:53 min | 3 years ago

"addy" Discussed on WGN Radio

"I don't even spell that. But. I mean, the other one is because the president sent out a caps tweet this weekend as he often does. But this one was finishing the wall. Addy's felt like he was yelling at me. And I don't like to be yelled at. So I've just like you send me a caps. Text about anything. You're doing this morning. Driving to work, right? Knowles joins me now from CNN. Good morning. Ron how are you? I just want to understand that. So you don't like to be you want all your listeners to yell at UB attacks celebration of the fact that I don't want people yell at me. I also, right. All right. Ryan, we all took the forty push up challenge in the video is up wgnradiOcom, and it's linked on I'll social so the idea the idea is you have to do forty push ups or you should do forty push ups. Man can do forty push ups have lower risk of heart disease. That's the deal. That's really, okay. You'll be impressed. It are you telling me that I need to do that and respond to that. Is that is that the now you're too young to be middle age, but everybody should be able to do forty. And frankly, I kicked tail on everybody on the show. Wow guy. I know we're all suppressed. You'll be surprised and you see the video. All right. So let's jump in here. What would you say? The number one story of today is. Well, it's gonna be the response to the president's decision to declare an emergency to deal with the border crisis. And you know, he did it on a Friday afternoon. So a lot of people I don't think understand the full breadth of it. It was a a long weekend for a lot of people. But I think what we're going to see day. In fact, I'm headed into Washington here in the next twenty minutes or so to cover protest right out in front of the White House and protests like this scheduled all across the country where you know, these are organized groups that oppose the president on a number of friends, but they're gonna make their voices. No that they are unhappy with this. And you know, we expect kind of the basic fallout from the president's opponents. But I think what is going to be really interesting to see play out your over the next week or so, and especially after congress comes back from their weeklong break is how Republicans respond to this. You know, there've been some level of opposition to this idea that you can just kinda arbitrarily use the declaration of an emergency to get. Funding for some pet project. Did what could that mean if a democratic administration took over? One of the things is these buckets of money that he's pulling from one of the buckets is to. A money that's spent to stop drugs coming into the country by the want you to think about that. I second he has taken money. If he gets the ability to do this finalized away from the DA to fight drugs coming into the country. So he can pretend to build the wall. It's it's just it's beyond insane in Mitch McConnell rolled over so fast. It was embarrassing. He was I don't think we should do this fully behind the president the congress. This is completely given away. It's separate but equal powers if they allow this to go forward, and I and I think you raise a point there too. Because, you know, initially when he says, you know, declaring an emergency or we're gonna find this money to build the wall people are like well that sounds good. But then you start to physically actually draw that money from different parts in those pots all have interest groups that are connected to them that you know, there's a chance it could come from military housing. Or does it come from disaster relief pools of money that exists for people that are recovering from hurricanes? So I think you're going to see that become the next stays of this conversation is is the money actually coming from. And then of course, there's going to be a Winky court battle to try and figure out whether or not this is actually constitutionally legal, which the president is going to have to deal with. And it all comes back to this idea that, you know, nobody really knows what Donald Trump wants here. He keeps shifting his interpretation and his definition of exactly what he's looking for. You know, it's hard to give guy. What he wants? If you're not even a hundred percent sure what that want is. Ryan, I think what's happening to the sort of education of the American people when it comes to the national emergency since nineteen seventy six every president has declared one whether it goes from fighting drugs has mentioned, obviously cleanup in different places. But there have been issues that have have a national emergencies been tied to so for one obviously, there's political steak, and obviously diverting or going around Congress's appropriation. But it, but it does there does seem to be when it comes to a legal challenge. A precedent set that national emergencies aren't necessarily for quote, unquote, the national emergency. Yeah. No. I I think you're right about that. Just and I I do think there's been a lot of hand wringing about the definition of what an exactly an emergency is. And I do think that the constitution gives the president the United States pretty flawed power to eat the person at interprets what in emergency, as you know, that's part of what? You'd addict it when they elected Donald Trump. They gave him that authority. And I think tracks back really Steve's initial point about the role of congress in all of this the way the system was set up was not for the president just arbitrary do whatever he wants, but congress will roll over and then for state attorneys general to sue the president in federal court with the goal of trying to stop something from from happening. They're supposed to be a legitimate checks and balances between the executive and legislative branch that says, hey, you know, the constitution explicitly lays out that we are the appropriators. We are the ones that decide how the money gets spent. And then you just spend it in this is an area where the pledging definitely flown in the face of that he's using this kind of narrow definition of an emergency to try and launch off of that. And there's a very good chance. He wins this court case, or at least wins it in in a way that he can claim victory. Ultimately, it's the responsibility of congress to challenge the president on this in prevent something. Like this from happening in there. Just doesn't appear to be the will at least one Republicans and even to a certain extent Democrats pushed hard enough. I think if they legitimately think this is a problem. I think it's an issue that neither side wants to deal with anymore. They know he's not going to give up on this. They prefer to just like let him take this and move on. So that they can deal with the other issues of the day every every day these outrageous come up, and they're all as we push forward. And wait for the Muller report. And see what happens. I said at the time. I stand by it Obama overreached. When he did the executive orders, especially related to ObamaCare, you have to work through congress. Even a bunch of dunderheads believe is a word. I'm president stay that was last used by. William Henry Harrison. But the fact of the matter is congress is supposed to be that checks and balances for the executive branch. And I don't care who's in the White House. You can't allow a president to run amuck like this one. Is you have to be able to stop it? And there's no guts in the Senate, particularly Republicans. How you do it because you know, Ryan, here's the truth. If Obama was wrong, then Trump is wrong. You can't have it both way. No. That's a hundred percent, right. And I do think that there's definitely been a shift in the way that we govern in that. You know, even go back to the Reagan years, you know, the the the folks in congress had kind of a love for that institution. And even if there were Republicans democratic banding together to kind of defend Congress's an institution. And now more see elected leaders pledging fealty to their political parties than they are these institutions that they've been elected you. And so, you know, Mitch McConnell who claims to have this love for the Senate as an institution seems to be more concerned about the Republican party. And because Donald Trump happens to be a Republican. He's you know, in many ways just allowed him to run roughshod over the institution that he claims to love so much. So, you know, back in the days where, you know, tip O'Neill and some other congressional leaders we're not afraid to challenge President Reagan. He would find Republican counterparts do that because that was the divorce congress. The Congress's responsibility. And you and you talk about Democrats kind of you know, what we need on this as well. You know, this goes back to Harry Reid and the way that they attempted to push the judges, you know, using the nuclear option. So, you know, this is not it's not as if Republicans in this current incarnation are solely to blame for this. This is a kind of a shift in the way, we have governed this country. That's happened over a series of decades in this. Alternate has become what we're left with here in your you just continue to provide the president of the United States, the executive, and I don't care who it is Donald Trump Barack Obama whoever comes after him an inordinate amount of power that I don't think the framers had in mind when they initially planned one things came up this weekend. We'll let you go on. This was the Scully Scott. What sort of McEvoy where you end a deal scuttling scuttling Scotland. Many old school presidential words as possible. The Amazon deal and Amazon made a deal. They should have stuck to their deal should have dealt with the politics and all that. But they didn't they pulled it. The thing that seems to have misunderstood here in Cortes. And all of the folks who shot this down guilty of this the three billion dollars in tax breaks that were going to be given Amazon that's not real money. That's money that doesn't exist. So to save money that can now be used on other things is just factually wrong. Yeah. And you know, I think the I can't believe it's the Washington Post had an interesting aditorial about the way that this Amazon deal went down and comparing the difference between what happened in Virginia persons. What happened in New York? And I've lived in both states was grew up in upstate New York. I live in Virginia. Now, covered the Virginia capital for ten years and Virginia's incentive package and what they offered. Amazon was so much different than what New York offered it was much more about Amazon delivering on certain things. And once they delivered those incentives would kick in New York offer much broader package of up front incentives, which in Jerry, it'd be Alexandro Cortes is of the world and people like that. And so you you're also comparing apples and oranges is here because the business climate and Virginia's much different than it is in New York City to begin with but offered them a different way to provide packages. And so, you know, I I think there was a funny joke on Saturday Night Live this weekend. When they said, this is twenty three thousand jobs in other words, more. Jobs than there are in the entire country of Greece. The idea that you can just had a snicker engineer at the idea that this massive company was going to bring all the jobs, and that wasn't going to have a positive economic impact. I think it it doesn't seem all that smart. But I do think it is. Yeah. I do think it is a lesson for politicians moving stored in this. You know, I've covered. Many of these announcement of all these jobs coming to certain towns, particularly some of the more economically depressed. The cities that I've lived in. They don't often come to fruition. I think the politicians that much smarter about how the incentivize these companies in each more on the back end than the sun and get them in the door. But then make them deliver before they can take advantage of those incentives. And I think that's what you saw New York different than Virginia were Virginia's already pastor incentive package. That's going to happen. That's going to be about ten miles from where I live right now. So we're excited about our home values. So. Point because think about the people that live near where Amazon was supposed to go in New York. Their home values are double oh. Those are gone now. Right. Home values right down on those jobs are gone as well. And everybody's like mad at Jeff Bezos. And Jeff Bezos has more money than he'll ever be able to spend your relevant Germaine. About the small business owner that it planned to build a mom and pop deli right around the corner from where this was going to be or the people that leveraged, you know, all this this.

president congress Donald Trump Amazon executive Virginia Barack Obama President Reagan Ryan Mitch McConnell New York City United States Jeff Bezos CNN New York Addy Ron Knowles
"addy" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:47 min | 3 years ago

"addy" Discussed on KGO 810

"On Twitter, some of your tweets Addy, 'then behrman PG file bankruptcy chapter eleven that is a debt reorganization is not a liquidation. It does not mean there's a break-up of the company. The judge will make sure that gas and electricity are delivered to people's homes. Just I've got to lay that outright upfront. It. It's not a liquidation is chapter eleven which is debt reorganization too much debt is what the claim would be. And when they filed the listed assets of seventy one point thirty nine billion dollars liabilities of fifty one point sixty nine billion dollars when they file in the bankruptcy court for the northern district of California, bankruptcy. Keep in mind is a specialized federal court. It's not a state issue. It's a federal question as set forth in our constitution and our special courts just for bankruptcy with special judges. Who understand the process? It's a it's a really unique thing. Bankruptcy is. But they filed chapter eleven to what what should happen with PG any that is the question. Four one five eight hundred eighty eight ten Dan in sonoma's, Dan, Iran, Keijo, eight ten with Ethan Bearman the morning, I've been following the story for a long time because it affected me personally here. There's a lot of bad actors in the situation and a tremendous amount of misreporting. In fact, PG was blamed the very morning of the fire by channel two and other news outlets without a shred of proof before Email is is that brought an army of lawyers here to Santa Rosa. They're all their efforts at PG knee, and you and I and everyone in your audience will be paying to the nose in the end when the salt done. But the problem I have is this it was proved that the tubs fire, which is the point of origin here in cinema, or in Santa Rosa, rather, the origin of that fire. It was true that he didn't do anything wrong. It's also a fact that the PG power lines. Equipment was shot up at the source of the paradise fire. So PG and is not responsible for any of these fires. But that didn't stop these ambulance chasing lawyers from becoming across the country trying to pilfer as much money as possible. I've got a number of issues there. So you just brought up the many things first off the tubs fire. You're right. That was a private electrical source was what was just determined the other day to be the start the cause of the tubs fire that will relieve PG any of a fair amount of liability that doesn't mean they still won't be sued. There's difference between being sued and successfully sued does are different things, however paradise. They haven't been cleared in paradise. I'm not sure what you're talking. There's been no official report that says that they're clear in the start of the paradise fire. And there were a numerous other fires where they are. Specifically, the source the under California law, a utility whose equipment, even if properly maintained starts a fire, then they're liable for the fires the equipment causes that is our law and even more so under common law. Dating back ancient English times for us. That's called negligence. You have a duty your breached your duty you caused the fire and there's damage from the fire and all that back in here. Yeah. You're you're talking. You're talking about inverse condemnation what you're talking about. That's a California law that says that our utility an even if it does everything it's supposed to do can still be held accountable. That's an outrageous law. I mean, let's say you're on the radio, you're doing everything you're supposed to do. And someone sues you, for whatever reason. And you have no way, no recourse. This is what teaching this is. This is what's so Cal Edison basis? This is a much bigger story than what the media's projecting. Yeah. Okay. So I've already explained Dan on the air that there are technological solutions to this actually had a listener point me die Tripoli's back from October twenty eighteen San Diego gas and electric already implementing these solution for this. And he hasn't even announced that they're even looking at it yet there are structural problems in the organization regarding safety and starting fires and the upper management seems to be very content taking. Large paychecks at the cost of the ratepayers. And that is what people look at. Hey, you caused the fire, and I understand inverse condemnation is you consider to be problematic guess who doesn't the state and in. That's what matters in this case that is state law because we the people of the state of California determined that is what we believe in. And we support that if we didn't guess what we could start an initiative to defeat it or we would elect legislators to defeat it. We haven't therefore the people believe that that is the right approach. Now, your right? We pay too much electricity as a result of some of these policies. However, I mean, this is really there are three thousand fires that the three main utilities have acknowledged. They started in the last three and a half years. There's a problem there, and we need to deal with that. And just pretending like why why why never will solve the problem? I appreciate the call. Oh, Dan, four one five eight hundred eighty eight ten Carl in San Jose, Carl you're on Keijo ten with Ethan Bearman. Yeah. Good morning. I'll tell you. What's outrageous? What's outrageous? Is that no one's being held criminally responsible for the deaths of these people, and the fact that he genie. I mean, I'd be willing almost except the bankruptcy. If there were some criminal actions handed out, and and somebody's prosecutors did something about some of these people that falsified safety inspections. My god. I don't care. What this last gentleman said what about that? Yeah. I mean, I'm with you. If you falsify I actually Carl it's so funny that we keep agreeing on things. I completely agree with you. If you're gonna falsify a safety record, you should be in jail. I mean, I it's just that simple. You're going to falsify. It means you had you had the knowledge you took action knowing that you were doing something that was wrong. It's called men's Raya in criminal law. You had the mindset the mental capacity you made it you made a conscious effort to do something. You knew was wrong. You ought to be jail for that. You're endangering the lives of all these people, and we we have laws against that. And and I agree with you Karl there there needs to be people that go to jail for these things lie Enron in that case and thanks for the call get to talk to you day. Four one five eight hundred eighty eight ten Robert in Oakland. Robert, you're on KOA ten with Ethan Bearman. Thank you. Good morning. I'm glad you mentioned Enron. I'm just a ratepayer not a PG needs employees. But if we break this thing up, and we start to manage it. But some quasi public entity. Is it going to cost the ratepayer more? The last time we went through something like this back during the Gray Davis administration. I didn't know either not synonymous terms or situations. I just remember getting a Bill during the summer months, and I don't have AC in my house in the Bill is like two thousand dollars. Okay. I'm with you. I'm already following. Yeah. It's here's what we face in this State, Robert look other, and I feel your pain because I'll never forget when I moved by the beach and I had no air conditioning. And my electric Bill was still over two hundred bucks. That's impossible. I don't even have air conditioning. How could I possibly pay that much for? I I lived in Texas and that AC running twenty four seven for six straight months and didn't pay that much for electricity that that's our problem right now is we do we have these gigantic bureaucracies in the forms of these quasi public utilities with a state mandated monopoly in PGE. So Cal Edison, San Diego, gas and electric. They have no incentive. Literally, none. I've worked inside of these utility not these ones specifically been another one another part of the country. That's absolutely the equivalent of PG any there is and I'm not exaggerating Robert. Zero incentive for there to be any operational efficiency. Because the way they look at it is well, if we need more money, we go back to the we ask for way more than we want. They make us come down. So they can look good to the public, and we still raise the rates and we cover our costs, and we still give everybody their pay increase. And then we could have a bloated administrative bureaucracy. And we wanna have way too many people on the payroll, so we have more people out in the public who support us, I'm not exaggerating. That's how it works. And so why breaking up, and you get smaller companies that be I I've heard from people who belong to the Marin co op Ed and the Silicon Valley one and others that they're way more responsive. I've also belongs to an electric co-op in the past way, more responsive to the customer.

California Ethan Bearman Dan Robert Carl Cal Edison San Diego Keijo Santa Rosa Enron Twitter Addy official Silicon Valley Gray Davis administration Iran San Jose Oakland