35 Burst results for "Addison"

"addison" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

02:02 min | Last week

"addison" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"Get to remove that from your personal property tax but you also get to remove that from your tax base as well profile. Use that as as one of their strategies is like. If you if you're going to get rid of equipment get rid of it and you can fully depreciate anything that has any depreciation laughed or you know. There's there's some tax advantage to getting rid of heavy equipment that you don't have. You can talk to your cpa about at the wrong person to talk to you but Yeah there should be a pretty good ramp up of the asset purchase agreement so Yeah that's the short one. Hopefully it goes through a lot of things but Folks have questions can reach out to us on facebook or dsl and can help you through it. Yeah just one one quick. Shout out wanna you know. I just want to remind everybody that we're doing to start up thirty course at dental startup. Thirty dot com. If you guys are interested were addison. And i are going to be talking about this sort of thing ad. Nauseam for thirty days in our in our startup and acquisitions crash course. So because they're interested. I think there's still a few spots. You're trying to keep it under forty and we're like it. I think we're at like thirty five right now. So there's five spots left if anybody's interested if you don't have this type of information and you're thinking about acquiring practice or or starting a practice in the next couple of years or you're going through it right now is a great time to hop on you know or we can talk through this stuff together. Cool well we'll talk soon. Thanks mark all right. Thanks touchy soon budget up. So it's being brought to you by homeys over at magento. This is one of my favorite new companies that i recently rolled out in all of my dental practices. They have a really cool feature called voicemail drops. That's an ingenious and fully automated way to stay connected with your patients to welcome new patients to the practice. Reach out about unscheduled treatment reactivate hygiene patients. Were send out and of day post up calls. I use this on a daily basis. And it's been.

addison facebook
"addison" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

05:36 min | Last week

"addison" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"We'll get you forty five days to the most collaborative positive and educational network in all dentistry. Additionally we have an incredible continuing education library and one of the largest buying groups in the entire professions. Come on over. We'd love to see you inside the network. It is where. I do. Most of my communications where i spend most of my time. So if you guys are trying to get access to me for any reason That would be a great way to do it. Dental success network dot com forward slash. Free forty five okay. Guys enjoy the episode about asset purchase agreements. We'll talk to you soon. Welcome to another episode of the dental podcast. Or you're watching this inside. Espn welcome to our dsm. Members of we had a really great question that was posted in the startup. acquisitions room inside diaz n It's a it's a topic that comes up frequently. And that is you know how to handle the asset purchase when you are either acquiring a practice or Selling a practice. Actually 'cause there's two different strategies From those two different perspectives. If you're the seller you want a certain percentage to be hired if you're the buyer you want a certain percentage to be higher for the sake of taxes and and that is often an area where the two cpa's are a broker and a cpa or an attorney and a cpa often. Come at odds. And that's that's a big negotiating point so Addison and i just wanted to kind of cover this in a really short concise slash podcast. And i'll let you hit. Show your screen. They're addison if you like them totally so Basically we question like hey. We have an asset purchase agreement or practice purchase agreement. And so. yeah we do. We have a couple different types. I just posted one a short asset purchase agreement and by short thirty pages so better than the sixty five page one which. I'm still going through to clean up because if you work with a national brokerage firm. They're going to throw the sixty five age. You whereas if you cut out all the b s you know you can get down to a pretty good one in thirty pages. I really quick. Addison not to not to interrupt but i will say if you have your attorney review and make sure you're protected. Short is always better because the longer the document the longer it's going to take to go through negotiating process because the other attorney is always going to take that extra thirty pages and red line the hell out of it and if it's not absolutely important to be in the asset purchase remained you just to eliminate it so as long as you're protected all the main points are on their. You wanna keep that as purchase agreement as short as possible to to make sure that the the process of the closing process is as smooth efficient as possible oil from a you know litigation standpoint if it ever comes after the fact in. You're trying to fight over. I thought you sold me. this right. thought this was included The more complicated. The asset purchase agreement is. You can have different portions. That actually are contradiction of each other. Then your lawyer is gonna say this there going to say that so Yeah so the short one that we have is basically goes through you know. What are you buying. You're buying the equipment fixtures you're buying goodwill the inventory and supplies and then you know you're also sometimes buying accounts receivable And so basically you know you're gonna have all these Portions like this where Either the buyer does not by country seasonable or they do now. I think you and i both done it. Different ways and You know sometimes the advantages of buying the accounts receivable or that you have an instant cash stream so in one of our our friends who just bought a practice he did by accounts receivable and so that means which super nice he doesn't have to go to the bank for line of credit because you let's say this fifty or one hundred thousand dollars is going to trickle in the next few weeks from work that the previous dentists did in. It's gonna help support pay his payroll pay. His new supplies yada yada. So that's kind the nice thing about buying accounts receivable. Now i will say addison one thing to look at unite. Both have been stunned by. This is make sure that you look at their historical billing practices in their historical I guess batting average on how much they are getting compared to how much of their adjusted production. They are producing. So for instance. If they're you know if if they are a ninety two percent for adjusted production to collections billing department. You may want to stay away from that stuff. Because a lot of it's going to be ninety plus in accounts receivable which probably isn't going to be gettable and the newer stuff may not have been sent out correctly or there may be a number of different issues with the way the billing department is handled collections in the past so just do a quick audit on how effective the billing department has been in the past. And if it's been you know sloppy and eighty five to ninety percent Adjusted production collection ratio. Maybe you don't want to touch that and just start fresh. But in most cases you're ninety five percent or greater with the the the adjusted production to collections ratio. We say go ahead and buy if there's not excessive ninety plus a day accounts receivable and ninety plus.

Addison addison diaz Espn cpa
Over 13K Los Angeles area Edison customers without power Christmas Eve amid red flag conditions

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:55 sec | Last month

Over 13K Los Angeles area Edison customers without power Christmas Eve amid red flag conditions

"Southern California Edison says It'll quickly try to restore power as soon as the winds calm down the customers who had their electricity shut off, and we're working to inspected many circuits as possible and restore service to to as as as many many many costs costs costs customers. customers. customers. If If If you you you can can can buy buy buy this this this evening, evening, evening, always always always been been been keeping keeping keeping in in in mind mind mind safety safety safety during during during restoration restoration restoration and and and ensuring ensuring ensuring any any any issues issues issues out out out of of of line line line can can can be be be fixed fixed fixed effectively effectively effectively and and and quickly. quickly. The bank well with Addison tells Can EXP hours usually restored within 24 hours after the winds blow through, she says. It's not clear if the winds damaged any equipment. This time. One Canyon country resident says she understands the idea behind the cuts but is confused about how some decisions are made. I understand that you know, there might be a fire. I get that. What? I don't get Edison. Is how do you turn off one side of the street and you leave the other side of the street on it doesn't make any sense. Almost 14,000 customers are without electricity right now because of the public safety power shut

Southern California Edison Addison
Building and Branding a Real Business

AdLeaks

06:43 min | Last month

Building and Branding a Real Business

"We talk so much about the technical right the the bids and the scaly strategies and the rules and and so much that so important right. I'm not taking anything from that. It's critical and i talk a lot about it. But i think what's becoming more and more apparent Hokey agrees this hundred percent rate. So it's more and more apparent is that especially with mood to. Cbo there is becoming a less and less importance on those skills and more and more important on the quality of the product the quality of the offer the barandy the voice. The creativity of the copy like those elements are becoming so much more important. What happens post purchase. The post purchase experience. The customer satisfaction. The up sells lifetime value increases. All that is so important so critical and so you'll see brands and companies. That aren't necessarily great media buying in terms of they don't understand the nuances and they don't tell. The auction works algorithm works. And all this stuff but they have really great videos in really good brand and fun and their ads and humor and they've personality and a great products and they're killing right and so what i want to show tonight me. A quick video is like how we've kind of doubled down on that. With with at least with our info product business my personal grant how. I've kind of really doubled down on brand pattern eruption having fun like here's a i love what i do right i. I absolutely love. I've done a lot of things in my life that i haven't loved that i've done because it's been a way to make money but what i do every day. I absolutely love like i get to tell stories. Relevant essentially i mean that's that's what marketers do we tell stories right. I get to teach people get bring like my lessons to thousands tens of thousands of people on a regular basis And help those individuals achieve their dreams right. Like i'm living the dream. And i realized for a while like the way was marketing didn't reflect. Who was the person. And i wasn't. I wasn't fun with it when i first started doing my courses. You know two years ago. Like i look back at that ad copy and yeah i had some funds snark with it can start up drugs but a lot of it was very good cutter right. I was doing whatever else is doing. Because that's what i'm doing. And i think a lot of us fall into that trap especially when you're in various facebook groups and stuff like we're all looking to find the next big thing we're all following different people and we're trying see like what the person above us doing right because there's all of us have somebody look up to. There's always somebody doing bigger better things smarter than right. That's reality and so. I think a lot of times we neglect our own creativity and our own personality and our own uniqueness because we want to do at that bigger figures doing right so this per person x this is how they're advertising their drop ship product person wide south advertising. Their course they're doing a cookie cutter. Add to a webinar pushing fake scarcity and then they sell in the webinar and they have a retarding sequence where they push the cart clothes and all the copies very you know. Hey you have one day left by my course before the car close. Make sure you get it. Now here's what joe said like it's all so formulaic and listen. I'm not saying that you should never follow the crowd because a lot of times. There's a reason why everyone's doing something one way. Because it works right that being said i think there's varying degrees of that so i think what works for tyler. Open grand cartoon doesn't work for everybody right tyler has greg. Ode have a specific demographic ties demographic might not be the same demographic as years right so you following the same formula of showing off your rented lamborghini and your ended house and money and and things on that might not resonate at all with your target customer or by bringing the wrong customer right and so i think the gist of as i'm sure if you examples ads right now is that like writing ad. Copy should come natural right. I think the reason why people feel like they can't read copy in there. I'm not good writing copy. I'm not good writer and stuff is. I don't necessarily believe that. I think everybody can write ad copy. I think the challenge is when you start writing ad copy for somebody else. Essentially you're writing ad copy for who you think you should be instead of writing ad copy who you are and i think that's what leads a lot of challenges. It's very hard to write from somebody else's perspective right. That's why there's professional groceries out there. The chargers money. 'cause they're really good at that but most of us we can only think talk act like like we've done entire life who we are So if you're marketing your business if you're marketing your course your webinar. You should be authentic to who you are. Don't pretend to be somebody or not because it's very very hard to be successful that way it eventually things fall apart. It's very hard to keep that up at scale and with mass volume. It is very difficult unless you who you are. Changes to match who you are on camera. I've seen that happen but for me like i've realizes okay everybody is is on the guru train and it seems like every consumer personal industry like calls out gurus in has a negative connotation gurus so why as many sunk info products but i want to associate myself with same practices that most people consumers and industry don't like the makes no sense right. What does make sense. Is associating myself with that group in our mutual dislike for another group right. There's few things that bond people tighter than mutual dislike right. So you can bond over things you love and you can bind over things you hate and so by coming out against that lifestyle and that marketing message and the fake scale. All the bull-crap that that those people do people that hate that as well resonate with my message because that's what they think right so this guy thinks the same way that i'm thinking and if he's thinking the same way i'm thinking any addison for products there's no way he's also the bs like those people right so achieved so much by me doing that. It's also pattern erupt like interrupts patterns. And that's the other thing right if you're doing what everyone else is doing. If you're writing copy the same way into the same structure to same formulas the same creative the same video formats all the same stuff. The same cold traffic to webinar cart like it becomes routine becomes like people come blind to it because they see all day long. It's all they say right. So if you mix it up if you start saying the exact opposite surfing polarizing sure you're gonna ruffling feathers ensure you're gonna have people don't like it but that doesn't matter. I don't care if half the half the world hate me. I don't care i find with eighty percent world hating me because i usually means at eight in the world. Hates you twenty. Percent loves right. It's you're polarizing enough to be hated. You're also polarized enough to be loved.

CBO Tyler Facebook Greg JOE Chargers Addison
"addison" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

05:52 min | Last month

"addison" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Of mirza. By joseph. Addison when i was at grand cairo. I picked up several oriental manuscripts. Which i have still by me among others. I met with one entitled the visions of mirza which i have read over with great pleasure. I intend to give it to the public. When i have no other entertainment for them. And she'll begin with the first vision. Which i translated word for word as follows on the fifth day of the moon which according to the custom of my forefathers i always keep holy after having washed myself and offered up my morning devotions. I ascended the high heels. A bag debt in order to pass the rest of the day meditation in prayer as i was hearing myself on the tops of the mountains i fell into a profound contemplation on the vanity of human life and passing from one thought to another surely said i man is but a shadow and life a dream whilst i was thus musing i cast my eyes towards the summit of a rock that was not far from me where i discovered one in the habit of a shepherd with a little musical instrument in his hand as i looked upon him he applied it to his lips and began to play upon it. The sound of it was succeeding sweet and wrought into variety of tunes that were inexpressible melodious and altogether different from anything i had ever heard. They put me in mind. Those heavenly airs that are played to the departed souls of good men upon their first arrival in paradise to wear out the impressions of their last agonies and qualify them for the pleasures of that. Happy place my heart melted away in secret raptures. I had been often told that the rock before me was the haunt of genius and that several had been entertained with music who had passed by it but never heard that the musician had before made himself visible when he had raised my thoughts by those transporting airs which he played to taste the pleasures of his conversation as i looked upon him like one astonish he beckoned to me and by the waving of his hand directed me to approach the place where he sat. I drew near with that reverence. Which is due to a superior nature and as my heart was entirely subdued by the captivating strains i had heard i fell down at his feet and wept. The genius smiled upon me with a look of compassion and affability that familiarized him to my imagination and it wants dispelled all the fears and apprehensions. With which i approached him. He lifted me from the ground and taking me by the hand mercer. He said i have heard the soliloquies..

mirza grand cairo Addison joseph
Juan Benet, Founder & CEO of Protocol Labs Discusses Filecoin and the Vision for a Decentralized Web

Epicenter

05:40 min | Last month

Juan Benet, Founder & CEO of Protocol Labs Discusses Filecoin and the Vision for a Decentralized Web

"Now. Let's talk about five point. Five point is the incentive layer that kind of brings it all together. What happens another would say. I am someone who wants to retrieve some content that i know is somewhere out there so basically what would happen. Whom would i pay. Who's incentivized by. What's what are the economics going on. Here yeah so basically you're saying hey like let's walk through kind of the the life cycle of data and kind of like follow it and so on Yeah so maybe. That's our with a three. So i that think about adding capacity to the network than adding storage. So you know a client hiring hiring a minor to its data and then the third is a another client retreating. Something that exists there so the first case A minor that has sort of provide. And i walked up to the network and up pledges. Certain amount of sectors and a pledge is a commitment to the network that you're going to store a certain amount of addison capacity and you're going to produce some proofs for that capacity and you also have to of because this is a relief to consumers. You have to have something at stake here. You have to discern conditions in which the might eat. Certain kinds of you could play That includes kind of eighty positive. A falcon A minor add smart of the networks some actual capacity than gets a random seed from the network to start Some data and kind of to produce a kind seal. What is right now. An empty sectors know capacity. And this is a kind of a sector today thirty two gigabytes and then there'll be kinda size actress in the feature on in what they might or might walk in with satire by or something like that you're by terabyte into you know thirty two gigabytes segments Any now Seal all of these segments in the ceiling processing in a reputation that you actually have that capacity to provide the network and the minor you have now signed up with an hour to for the this capacity in addition to monica sets a an asking price which is how much they're still is going to go for when clients are going to hire less storage What go right now. The sort of a global ask bryce on minor mostly use cases. Miners have one price in that set. In the future winters debate we want to have a flexible and fluid ask model where minus can have many different prices for different tiers Looking to stuff But for now sort of a very simple one price for all the storage so that point kind of the minor has committed to to of this and now other parties can can view it so now along comes a user client and says okay great like i want to store this data. And so the data they can just added with. There's different kinds of tools. So that can i get a hash or they can add with a five win with the latest client which is kind of look at the one of the main pump implementation's or a bunch of other tools. That that speak these protocols like exile arrogate or slate which is consumer lincoln application. There's a bunch of different kinds of things and that was the You can now hire. You can kind of create a deal to hire minor to back this backpack this data and that deal is of a relationship between a client and it client in a single minor and a single piece of data just kind of like the unit of of agreement as a. You probably want to do this with multiple minors because he want to replicate your data with multiple different parties and and so you now sound good data over to find these miners in the network by you. This number of ways you can either a numerate them from the blockchain you can find them in a buck explorer this much tools that can show you what miners what prices they have and so you select which minor you want and you could be maybe presented but you might also take into account other important details about the minor so for example they're kind of reliability. There's a different kind of schedules features about the minor that tracked by the blockchain and can score ran others. There's no emerging score the everybody's using yet but you could put these kind of like rating style numbers from the kind of like a very simple way of selecting minors klein right now. Uses a minor and sensor data over to the source provider one source brighter receives that they the deal is completed and the minor. Alicia the deal into the network. There's a bunch of operations that happened underneath a hood in order to like actually making that make that work this in preparation of the data that has to happen in order to make it easier to prove on and so on and definitely a different sizes of the data really matter writes a few set sending a little. Bit of the nsa. A few megabytes few kilobytes megabytes. That's going to be the kind of distribution very different than if you're sending gigabytes or terabytes and so for example in the smaller scales that just a very simple protocol where right away i can just over and make the deal and whatnot user Completely hidden from you. You know the client and the mine are doing this. This software is doing this under hud users themselves. Don't have to be exposed to all of this going on but it's kind of like a like a bitcoin. Transaction in theorem transaction. There's a lot going on happening under the hood where transaction to move to a certain place get validated execute on. Not but all of this kind of hidden from from the actual users

Addison Bryce Blockchain Monica Klein Alicia NSA HUD
"addison" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

01:59 min | 2 months ago

"addison" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"Something in each of your four futures and there's a blank page a directly next to it so literally writing down like strike prices for stocks that. I'm waiting to to drop during this during the you know the the election period here and my workout goes in there like my gratitude. Journaling goes in there and all of my my my short-term and long-term goals which rewrite every single day go in that piece of paper to so very very valuable i think You know. I've never had a journal that that that was that all encompassing i usually carry around like four composition books which can get clunky and i've just eliminated all those and i write everything in my journal now so i know where i find everything works. Yeah it's that's that's why i like it so much to it's it's It's very useful in having the empty page next week. So then i just start writing. I meetings or other stuff right. I'll bet on the empty page so for sure. Yes so while there. It is guys. Yeah for sure. Donald success network dot com forward slash ops dental success network dot com slash. Ops you get the ops manual futures journal addison's book my book. Hopefully you guys find value from it all right. I know you have patients to see this fine day. And i wanted to make sure that you got out of there with plenty of time to transition over to that but i really appreciate your time today. My friend yeah. You're welcome have won all right. Ladies and gentlemen. Addison killeen and that wraps it up for another episode of the dental poor. Podcast look forward to reconnecting on the next episode. Thank you so much for joining us today on the dental preneurs. Podcast checkout true. Dental success dot com for full of every show a schedule of our live events free video tutorials and a whole host of practice building resources..

Addison killeen Donald
"addison" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

02:03 min | 2 months ago

"addison" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"I'm an idiot. Just pretend that. I have absolutely no experience. So if i if you guys all got sick with gerona by tomorrow you need to be able to teach me in one. You know one or two pages. How do i put in a check. Do i take payment headway sunday. An insurance claim like. Teach me the idiot how to do this. So if if you can teach somebody that has absolutely no software experience like big red highlight. Where do i press each button. And so Yeah and so. That's basically the level of detail that is in the book of If somebody you know of like you call it the alien abduction manual debt. Is you literally abducted by aliens. How do we do your job and yeah. So that's what's what's cool. I do have to remind the staff a lot like a remember. You understand more than you think you do. So make sure you bring this level down to the most granular detailed level. And that's that's kind of here. Yeah i mean it's it's a good gap filler. If you're an advanced level practice already and you've already taken the time to to start the process. It's a great gap filler. I mean there's lots of things that you don't it doesn't need to be proprietary information to your organization right. I mean there is a similar flow of patients through your office. It's a good starting point right. Here's here's mark and addison's you know lifetime patient experience. Here's here's what it looks like. Here's what they're scripting sounds like. Of course yours is going to be slightly different. And you can you can customize it to your own personal personality. But it's a good gap filler. Here here it is for now and we're going to just slowly work on each of these scripts but is done right. Here's exactly how you do these These procedures at the front desk. Here's what the trae setups look like. And if you don't if you're trae setups don't even resemble ours. You can see what we've done and and improve ours. I mean that's the whole idea right. That's i think the idea about business books in general. The idea.

addison
"addison" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

03:20 min | 2 months ago

"addison" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"Addison killing. How you doing. Addison you say miracle practice owner. I don't know what miracle i'm talking about. I haven't walked on water or done anything like that recently. you get one point something million dollar practice for a startup and i call you miracle worker. 'cause i've done many a startup that hung out in the six figures long before we we bumped over the seven figures and some startups that. I'm still waiting to bump over the seven figure mark in a much longer timeframe than you've been able to do it and so that's why i call you a miracle worker. Appreciate the kind words but yeah you know. That's why i have a receding hairline and you know we're more gray close just so that my hair doesn't look So aged come on now. You look like you're twenty so the reason that we wanted to get on a call today or on this zoom today was because addison's been busy as usual executing and putting some really cool stuff together for our mastermind members and for espn. We wanted to just talk about it to the general public and see if anybody was interested. We have a great thing that you've been able to put together addison. You took a lot of virtual operations manuals. Now i will say that Operations manual creation as kind of One of the. I would say it's the backbone to systems ation because you have to have somewhere to put everything you have to use utilize it for the on boarding process you have to have You have to have a place where everybody can refer to to know exactly how it is that we do things here in this particular practice. So we've always taught from the very beginning that operations manuals one of the most important things that you have to get in place. and Many people most people i would venture to say Through my experience working with over thousand dentists. Don't have this and and want to so tell us about your history with operations manual creation and what it is. You've you've been able to put together in a physical sense here. Yeah so i mean you know kind of like what you teach and and we help out clients with is basically just making making sure that they're not the funnel like the constriction point of their business of answering questions. Have what do i do here. What do i do their or am i setting this room upright or You know yeah like ray now. Obviously the dental industry has virtually no unemployment because so many people left the market. You know you have two hands and can speak english or even not like you and so As we onboard all these employees. We just need to make sure that they're trained up in our systems. And so what we've done you know using your documents As well as my documents and just conglomerate them altogether is Just making sure that you have an operating system to run your practice. I mean we have our our phones. Computers like you need an operating system to make sure that things run correctly and so That's what we we put together in this book And so for those you watch it on zoom.

Addison espn ray
"addison" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

01:44 min | 2 months ago

"addison" Discussed on The Dentalpreneur Podcast with Dr. Mark Costes

"Had no real plan to aratu kate and a slow down the explosive growth of this virus in it was looking like if we're going to take you know an example from europe that things might lead to another aggressive locked down here in the states. Hopefully you know. We have dodged that bullet hole we will be on our way to some positive liberty and some business as usual cheese. I'm just hoping so much. Life has changed for so many of us in so many different ways to twenty s. Been a very challenging year for a lot of us. I love to watch and see how many people in our profession have pivoted and ended up doing just fine Done what was necessary to keep their businesses not only afloat but Were able to thrive during this very difficult period of time. But i just my heart goes out to everybody. That's been effective affected negatively during the past few months. I hope that your business is still intact and that your family is safe. But i'm just i'm optimistic. I'm very very optimistic. And it was. It was fun to wake up to that news this morning. All right this episode is myself dr. Addison killeen on a dsm webinar just last week. When we're talking about our brand new book our brand new Operations manual in print where we took some of our black belt operations manuals including myself and addison and a few other really high.

dr. Addison killeen kate europe
Chicago's Outbound Kennedy Expressway Shut Down Due to Accident at Addison

WBBM Morning News

00:32 sec | 4 months ago

Chicago's Outbound Kennedy Expressway Shut Down Due to Accident at Addison

"Has been a mess for hours now due to a very serious accident. Let's get the latest now from the traffic center in IBM's Bo Duran. I had the first reports of this crash came in before six o'clock this morning, and when I Dot crews arrived on the scene, they found a grisly scene. The crash involved a motorcycle in a semi and the driver of the bike was transported to a hospital with life threatening injuries. For now, all lanes of the outbound Kennedy remained blocked and Addison while Illinois State police troopers investigate no estimate of when the lanes will reopen. We'll have more on the traffic impact.

Bo Duran Addison IBM Kennedy Illinois
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 5 months ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. The new Vif Sea salt and pepper bars have three grams total carbs why it's in their nature after all, they're made with one hundred percent grass fed beef, and nature's Metro's three grams, total carbs, eleven, grams of protein find them in the bar borrow or at epic Bar Dot Com. Thanks also to stand for Small and American Express. If you're a small business owner head to stand for small dot com slash partner for resources, offers and tools from a growing group of companies that want to help your business get back to business visit stand for small dot com slash partner to get started. Thanks also to Microsoft, the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat, meet, call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Here, at life, we know that getting your financial house in order can feel painful. Now, there's this whole corona virus pandemic. The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
How the TikTok Ban Would Affect the Influencer Economy

The Vergecast

03:54 min | 5 months ago

How the TikTok Ban Would Affect the Influencer Economy

"Terror Lawrence walking adverse cast. Thanks for having me you are reports near time see cover influencers the influence our economy, which is what I won't talk to you about but I asked you on the show to talk about Tiktok a while ago like several days ago and I said we should do this as late as possible before we publish because something else will happen with Tiktok and Lo and behold last night according to some Friday last night Thursday night very late the trump administration issued two executive orders one banning all transactions with Tiktok in forty five days, which is September twentieth in the other we chat. Benny. All transactions we chat and we chats parent company ten, cent which owns. Stakes everything from spotify they own all of League of legends they on forty percent of fortnight on religion epic games I want to talk to you about Tiktok. But that all happened what has been the response from sort of the influence or community to that I feel like I should just ask you from the job. Yeah. Well, it's been a roller coaster for them. Maybe to a bunch of people last night because you know earlier this week, it seemed like it was going to be fine like a lot of them were told at trump said even last week that the ban could come as soon as last Saturday and when when that didn't happen. The kind of thought they were all good again, and now they're scrambling it's literally thrown huge swath of the entertainment industry into arrears I mean we saw Forbes released their list of top earning talkers, yesterday, and including people like Charlie, Milio, Addison, Ray, all of these kind of young Internet stars and they're making millions and so you know. All of that money that they're making his in jeopardy all of these big brand campaigns that American Eagle. Other brands are doing in jeopardy The music industry is obviously scrambling. So it's it's a mess. Yeah. I. Want to come back to that thing in the moment but I wanted to the reason I wanted to have you on is I think the influence, our economy, those millions of dollars that you just talked about this kind of not well understood. And you do a great job of covering it. I think I've told you like your coverage has definitely been an influence on our coverage. I think of our creators is a secret business section on the verge like that's bundle mentally what it is it's our. It's our teenage millionaire section like it's a business desk, not really like a memes desk but just to give even that even some context, your personal reporting history has twists and turns the kind of led you here. Can you give people just a sense? Of that because you started as like like a strategist, a digital strategist and you've ended up covering platforms and the money gets made on them, I see a pretty clear through line there. Yeah, I. Mean I've always been really obsessed with these platforms I, mean I graduated over a decade ago now into the recession and got on Tumbler and which I very quickly built some popular blogs on Tumbler, and that was my entry into social media world and yeah, I worked as a as strategist basically helping social media. Brands like household names like Bud light kind of navigate the social media world. This was before branch twitter was even a thing facebook just rolled out brand pages in like two thousand nine. So I was sort of helping brands build audiences online and I got really fascinated by how these deals were being done on the Internet how people were leveraging audience for themselves and yeah sort of did that and then ended. Up doing the same thing for media companies as a social media director for a while, and then I was always sort of writing on the side and then finally about almost three years ago I switched over and started reading about at fulltime. I think also the equator economy I don't think it was truly a beat until that time the way that it is now I think the real money started pouring in. Maybe Post Twenty sixteen.

Tiktok Lawrence RAY Benny Donald Trump Spotify League Of Legends Executive Twitter LO Facebook Forbes American Eagle Director Charlie Milio
Jennifer Aniston teases 'more fun' Friends special after delay

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | 5 months ago

Jennifer Aniston teases 'more fun' Friends special after delay

"Jennifer Aniston is saying, Hey, the show will go on. He's reassuring their fans that after it was announced yesterday that the long anticipated friends reunion specials being postponed again, while HBO Max is not giving a definite date went, production will resume. Addison says she's not worried. Just she's looking at the delay is a good thing, saying it will give them more time to make the show even more exciting and fun.

Jennifer Aniston HBO Addison
Prosecutors Drop Murder Charge Against North Miami Man, Citing ‘Stand Your Ground'

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:28 sec | 5 months ago

Prosecutors Drop Murder Charge Against North Miami Man, Citing ‘Stand Your Ground'

"Criminal charges are to be filed against a North Miami man accused of shooting and killing a former lover, according to the Miami Herald. Bernard ST Pierre won't be charged in last month's shooting that killed George Addison ST Pierre told investigators he was standing his ground because Addison, who went by the name Cleo was attacking him with brass knuckles that contain a powerful stun gun. There's surveillance video that supported ST Pierre's claim, so prosecutors won't charge him with manslaughter.

St Pierre Bernard St Pierre Miami Herald Addison Cleo
Washington, DC - Montgomery County police officers credited with saving stabbing victim's life

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 6 months ago

Washington, DC - Montgomery County police officers credited with saving stabbing victim's life

"To Montgomery County police officers are being praised for saving the life of a stabbing victim knew Bodycam footage shows officers Justin Lee and Addison White, applying a tourniquet and sealing the chest wound of the victim. Back in June, Lee found a 28 year old man with multiple stab wounds around 4 30 in the morning on June 28th in Silver Spring. He was shocked by how much blood the victim had lost. The natural reaction and what they're teaching Academy is like when you have that thought. That means that it's probably an arterial bleed, and so they in the academy they teach us. The steps for how to deal with someone who's injured like that. The first thing that stop always is Arterial bleed, because that's going to kill a person back. The man has since been released from the hospital, 30 40 year old Marvel Austin of Washington, D. C. Has been charged in the stabbing.

Justin Lee Montgomery County Addison White Silver Spring Austin Bodycam Washington
New UK research shows lack of diverse voices

podnews

03:15 min | 6 months ago

New UK research shows lack of diverse voices

"Diverse is UK podcasting fewer than five percent of the top one hundred podcast in the UK hosted by women or non, binary, people who are black Asian or minority ethnic. That's according to research from spotify gave announced. UK An Irish applications are now open for their annual sound up podcast accelerator program it's aimed at black. Asian and minority ethnic women non binary people in the UK an island until the fourth of August to enter for access to a full week virtual training course with equipment. Paul being the second largest professional podcast host is now. Certified Company achieved certification last week and it means that bean is using a standard measurement for podcast downloads. We linked to a full list of podcast hosts, including those that are. Certified in our show notes a newsletter today on July the third we reported that Karston Comic Relief, fundraising the prize, being to join your favorite podcast and record an episode with them. We hear that so far. That's raised over fifteen thousand pounds that steady twenty thousand US dollars for charity. There's still time you've got until August the second to enter. McClellan A I has published a look at US podcast, advertising, movers and shakers in June the most increased advertising brand. What's the new Samsung Galaxy Five G., the data's clearly-impressed Westwood One. They've announced they subscribes to McClellan air is competitive advertising, intelligence, service and McClellan a are sponsoring our newsletter version of pod news this month and today's new exclusive show for spotify is from Addison Ray a Tiktok instagram star. She has announced that she's to produce a new show with her. Mum Sherry Nicole. If you're unfamiliar with Tiktok Link to Sherry and Addison dancing in our show notes newsletter. Sherry only has eight point one million followers on Tiktok astern. Her daughter has over fifty million. Get with the program. MOM Like Dur-. After News reported a bug. NPR has fixed NPR one android podcast APPs user agent. Fix rose out later this week and it'll benefit podcasters everywhere. Thank you, NPR. Paul News in the John Bartolome show an underwater celebrity fashion photographer. It's thing Kiara Selah bony from one ocean talks, deep sea, diving, photography, and swimming with sharks, BMW has sponsored Napoli's science fiction scripted dramas had in two, thousand, eight, hundred, sixty three in its first week. The podcast hit number one in eleven. Countries says a release. If you're a fan of the Beatles, you might like your own Personal Beatles. Beatles it's got some very clever artwork, and it explores our own personal relationship with the greatest band of all time, and in wide world of Doug's Comedians Doug. Benson and Doug Mela meet new dogs in an effort to find the best and most exciting. Doug's in the world this week's episode. We're show. They can't beat Doug e Doug

Doug E Doug UK Mcclellan Sherry Nicole NPR Spotify Beatles Addison Ray Doug Mela Paul News Mcclellan Air United States Samsung Kiara Selah Like Dur Benson BMW Paul
Kim Kardashian West sells stake in beauty brand for $200M

Comments By Celebs

00:45 sec | 7 months ago

Kim Kardashian West sells stake in beauty brand for $200M

"According to Monday report by the Financial Times Kim Kardashian. West just snagged a big deal for her beauty brand earlier this month, Global Beatty Company cody disclosed it was in talks with Kim over potential collaboration for the beatty line is now being reported that cody has agreed to actually buy a twenty percent stake in the reality. TV Stars Makeup Brand Katie W. for two hundred million dollars. The deal now values West Cosmetic, company at one billion. And basically cody said Monday that expects the acquisition to be completed third quarter, and that all the products will be sold through luxury beauty retailers as well as online. The partnership comes just a few months after cody locked in a six hundred million dollar deal with Kim Kardashian, little sister Kylie Jenner also with TMZ Kim said quote. This relationship Allama, focus on the creative elements that I'm so passionate about or benefiting from the incredible resources of cody and launching my products around the world.

Cody Kim Kardashian Global Beatty Company Kylie Jenner West Cosmetic Katie W.
Chicago to Reopen Indoor Restaurants Friday

Roe Conn

00:37 sec | 7 months ago

Chicago to Reopen Indoor Restaurants Friday

"Illinois restaurants are set to reopen for indoor dining as soon as Friday Chicago Tribune restaurant critic Phil the telltale WGN's John Williams when he gets back to reviewing establishments will have to take into account changes they've had to make these are not the restaurants they were in most cases they're doing they've simplified the menu a little bit for efficiency sake and for the fact that the they can't always get their hands on the ingredients sort of a greenish they took for granted a year ago the city today announcing extended outdoor dining and several Chicago neighborhoods including Chinatown Andersonville Little Italy and Addison

Phil John Williams Addison Illinois Chicago Tribune Chicago Andersonville
Man Charged With Throwing Brick Through Chicago Police Station Window

Steve Cochran

00:19 sec | 7 months ago

Man Charged With Throwing Brick Through Chicago Police Station Window

"On the jury manage accused of throwing a brick through a window of a Chicago police station over the weekend Benjamin lot has been charged with two felony counts of criminal damage to government property thirty say he was arrested after he was seen throwing a brick through the window of the town hall district station near Addison in Fremont no injuries were reported

Addison Fremont Chicago Benjamin
"addison" Discussed on VIEWS with David Dobrik and Jason Nash

VIEWS with David Dobrik and Jason Nash

01:38 min | 7 months ago

"addison" Discussed on VIEWS with David Dobrik and Jason Nash

"Assume! The worst, my my mom's a little more aware and careful about what you post because she realizes that a lot of people see it, but like my dad like it's such. I can't even speak about Al I. Tell Him to delete it. Oh. Yeah Yeah, because they're like really embarrassing and I'm like Oh my gosh. Pictures today of her. Does that is so bizarre and then she goes. Addison commented on it. Just leave it. My. My daughter is obsessed with that as an talk about to talk feeling insecure. Okay so. Charlie called me like Wednesday. She was like. Hanging out with David. David. David Fuck call me. So I mean like you know. Everyone feels that way and then Jason commented Wail on my. Addison made it, so you can't comment the word whale on her Tiktok, and then I went in to see and you can. So for those amount. has well from Jason that. We all need a break now and then, but why not keep your brain active? All you relax, that's why I love the fun. Puzzle game best fiends. It's an oasis of fun. You can take everywhere. I really I genuinely do love. But just funny that they put it. It's an oasis of fun into the script for they are absolutely never but best great guys Natalie Lou. Plays all the time on her own, which is great because I don't have to communicate with her a lot, but it's also kind of Shitty because she doesn't get any work done, but it's a unique and exciting puzzle. That's really you don't have to tell me under the bus. That's now..

David Fuck Addison Natalie Lou Jason Charlie
Make the vision a reality.

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

06:56 min | 8 months ago

Make the vision a reality.

"Welcome back Brown Girls Ashanti here. The founder of the broncos Guy to politics, the Stop Shop podcast for women of color who want to hear and talk about the world of politics. As we continue with our collaboration with she, the people we're highlighting women from their twenty color to watch twenty twenty less. These are all barrier-breaking women Kerr changing the political landscape this year and beyond. ME, insight thought and Jennifer APPs Addison Jennifer at Edison is the president and CO executive, director of the Center for Popular Democracy, which works with affiliates partner organizations across the country to build a more inclusive equitable society and political institutions that worked for everyone. Jen. How are you doing today, i. Doing as well as anybody can be expected I'm surrounded by family I have been able to be in close contact with you know parents in loved ones, and of course I know protected with the benefits of a good union workplace so I, you know all things considered I. I'm feeling very blessed. We love to hear that in before we start the interview we were chatting in. We're talking about being on the road so much doing this work. What inspired you to get involved in community? Organizing I? Mean I think my mother was just born this way you know I grew up a black woman in the state and city that has been named the worst place in America to be Black Milwaukee, Wisconsin and I know most people don't think of black folks when they think of Wisconsin, they think of like beer cheese in the packers, but you know there have been generations of deeply entrenched. Racial segregation in in problems that have. Led to this dichotomy of Wisconsin, being one of the best places in America if you are a white child in the worst, if you are black and so I think I recognized that from an early age felt really passionate about it in a high school student I became really politicized around the around school funding around the idea that you know. Schools in the suburbs were getting twice as much per pupil. Than you know the school that I was going to in the city of Milwaukee. You know the reality is. Is that every single thing that we hold to be sort of like a part of the American dream was. Fought for and won by people organizing their communities in taking collective action in so You know I feel very blessed to be able to spend my life. Really working with folks to help as many people as possible in this country, find their voice empower. That is that is very powerful. What you just said. and. You mentioned being from Milwaukee. Were in the middle of the virus, and we're seeing it as a city where the majority of the black population there is infected with the virus in that has also just spur conversations to about how so many people still had to go to work, and how are essential workers a lot of them? Grocery workers aren't getting a fair wage in Eve. Let so many different campaigns including fight for fifteen. So how are you connecting at the moment all the work that you've been doing with fight for fifteen for people to have a fifteen dollar an hour wage in what you're seeing with essential workers who are putting their. In their lives on the line right now to make sure that we are able to get the benefits that we need and say stay in our homes. I mean first of all. What we saw just as pass Tuesday in Wisconsin was a travesty, a failure of democracy There's no way around it. You have a city. The largest city in the state. Multiple, times, the population of any other city. That is used to having over one hundred fifty polling places that on Tuesday, in the midst of a crisis in which we are not supposed to gather in large crowds, crowds over ten had five polling locations open for a critical election had A. Tens of thousands of people who had requested absentee ballots who had not received them as of Election Day, and the you know the impact on on my community on my people is is not an accident, right? It is the product a decade's worth of policy passed by elected officials who are incredibly hostile towards the city of Milwaukee on the city's behalf towards sort of neo liberal You know business oriented. Democrats who have allowed the city's most vulnerable populations to suffer in struggle and become the scapegoats of the, and so you know I'm really grateful for groups like black leader, organizing communities in the Laki and leaders igniting transformation who are organizing You know black folks. Brown folks in in the city to really demand the future they deserve in at the end of the day. All of these campaigns, the fight for fifteen, the fight for paid sick days. Many people don't know that. In Milwaukee we passed a referendum with more than two thirds of the voter support to require any business in the city of Milwaukee to provide paid sick leave earned sick leave to their workers, and that a law that was passed by voters was overturned by preemption at the state level. At the at the request of the crack mayor when we talk about the now eighty seven percent of the people who have died of Covid nineteen in Wisconsin are black. We have to understand that this is a consequence of lack of. Political Power and UVA intentional suppression of in particular Black Communities in the state of Wisconsin, and so it's important that we're having this conversation in the context of she, the people of you know a movement of a women of color who are demanding more than just to see at the table, but who are demanding real power. That, we can use to transform the lives of our people. That's what women of Color braying and I. Think you know it's if we look at what's happening in Wisconsin through the Lens of women of Color, we begin to understand the multiple layers enrich raises on in sexism and capitalism are creating. This you know are exploding the impact of this crisis in places like Milwaukee, Detroit and New York. City another's

Milwaukee Wisconsin Broncos Kerr Stop Shop Jennifer Founder Center For Popular Democracy America JEN Partner Packers President Trump Director Covid Executive
Dallas - Historic warplanes fly over North Texas in salute to frontline workers

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:42 sec | 8 months ago

Dallas - Historic warplanes fly over North Texas in salute to frontline workers

"D. and honored to frontline workers about the skies North Texas today city of Addison in the cabin off flight museum join together for the Addison salute to heroes flyover they brought in historic war planes designed to say thank you to the front line workers in hospitals across the area they've been working hard that's worker at the Carrollton regional Medical Center says it's been a challenge has been difficult it's something that we haven't seen before in trying to deal with the new disease process is scary because which is never seen it before so it's difficult but we're learning more every day planes flew over seven hospitals in the area of Dallas Plano Carrollton in Addison and even flew over the F. W. national cemetery for the Memorial Day

North Texas Addison Carrollton Regional Medical Ce Dallas Plano Carrollton F. W. National Cemetery
Nation’s 1st Saliva Testing Site Opens in New Jersey

WBZ Afternoon News

00:39 sec | 10 months ago

Nation’s 1st Saliva Testing Site Opens in New Jersey

"The country's first coronavirus saliva testing site is up and running in New Jersey correspondent James flipping tells us about it rector's university partnered with biotech firms to establish the system in which patients can self administer the test by spitting into a tube set up at the DMV in Addison for Middlesex County residents by appointment only county freeholder Ronald Rios bank to the workers in attendance your little early saving people's lives and I get choked up sometimes first hand thank you the hope is the self administered tests can help rapidly expand the amount of people that could be screened while also protecting health care workers who would otherwise have to swap the

DMV Addison New Jersey James Flipping Middlesex County Ronald Rios
New Jersey convention centers to be converted into field hospitals amid coronavirus pandemic

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:56 sec | 10 months ago

New Jersey convention centers to be converted into field hospitals amid coronavirus pandemic

"New Jersey now has more than forty four hundred coronavirus cases the number of deaths has climbed to sixty two governor Murphy says the state is working to increase hospital capacity are stating correct me if I'm wrong currently is eighteen thousand four hundred and thirty three acute care beds including two thousand beds for those requiring critical care again that's eighteen thousand four hundred and thirty three acute care beds including two thousand beds for those requiring critical care over the next several weeks our goal is to increase our capacity by two thousand three hundred and sixty Murphy says three field hospitals will be set up at the Meadowlands convention center in Secaucus New Jersey convention center in Addison and the Atlantic city convention center he hopes they will be needed Murphy says daycare centers have until Friday to certify they serve children of essential workers or I'll have to shut

New Jersey Murphy Secaucus New Jersey Convention Addison
15 children killed in Haiti orphanage fire

BBC World Service

01:32 min | 1 year ago

15 children killed in Haiti orphanage fire

"An urgent investigation is underway in Haiti to determine the cause of the fire that killed fifteen children in the orphanage fire officials are looking into reports that it may have been started by a burning candle used for light during a blackout the orphanage run by US based Christian group it's just one of hundreds operating in Haiti without official authorized ation are America's Addison Illinois to Russia told me mall the fire happened on Thursday night in the most of the victims were taken to hospital where they died of smoke inhalation it's been tragic in many say it was an accident waiting to happen because there are about thirty thousand children in more than three hundred and sixty orphanages in Haiti in only about thirty of them rates that are licensed to to work this one belongs to American Christian organization based in the US and we don't know yet what happened but there is speculation local reports that that you might have been caused by a candle because the generator that the building wasn't working and children have been using candles Haiti has is the poorest country in the western hemisphere and the situation deteriorated dramatically after the the terrible earthquake of two thousand and ten many of the children who are in the orphanages I'm not really old friends simply the parents are just to pool to look after them and they take him to those

Haiti United States America Addison Illinois Russia Smoke Inhalation American Christian Organizatio Official
"addison" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

Relevant Podcast

13:25 min | 1 year ago

"addison" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

"A hole in his okay and comically what they look at you. Chandler like lifted up his hockey mask and looked at his glove and it was a hockey puck sized hole. That was it is our after we talked extensively about that. We did talk about how refreshing it is to have a book that really does challenge an idea about something like I said. That's it. That's very tough to do is to take a termer idea that people have familiarity rarity with and really challenge. What they think about it in this book does a fantastic job and legitimately will challenge you in in your faith and spiritual growth so anyway here is? I'm excited for people as part of my conversation with Addison but here the idea for the book is so cool like I love kind of unpacking hacking a term that a lot of people are familiar with but aren't really familiar with like we especially insertive like non like in Protestant circles. It's like evangelical circles. I guess I kinda like Catholic upbringings people have an idea of like saints but for evangelical like it's just assist term that we know because you know it's it's using the gospels. We don't really have a context for it to me a little bit. About how the idea and the concept the book came about so I was actually reading a book that was published I think is in the early. Nineteen hundreds and the book wasn't about Saints But the author author he he made a brief reference to saints and it was a single line and what he wrote he's had he referred to them as people who practice participate in the mystery of the final day. I was like what what practice participated the mystery of the final day and I had this certain idea of what a Saint I was at that time. I know I really want to dive into this. I want to figure out what this means. 'cause they're really intrigued me. And so that was honestly that was a catalyst for the deep dive into what ah so we when you started this deep dive you know what. What did you find out about the idea the same kind of surprise you? Well well I think there I mean there's quite a few ideas that that surprised me. The first one is is that the identifier saying it doesn't just belong to dead people we have. Yes I did a thing. We think of someone who lived a good life. It's a post mortem distinction. It's like Oh that person accomplished X Y and Z. There were canonized by the Institutional Church coach. But if you look at the New Testament and the way that the word is used actually use in a way that energizes the president and merges the worlds of what is and what will be and so it's actually an identifier that gives meaning to the here and now for the purpose of vision for the purpose of hope for the purpose of faith and moving the world into everything thing that God has spoken over it. That's that's such a powerful idea. And I guess like kind of the logical follow-up is like you know for a Christian in that wants to be considered someone who's like a saint in God's eyes and participate in this kind of eternal purpose. How do they get from point? Eighty two point the how do how do they go from considering themselves. Just like a follower of Christ someone who has the eternal divine purpose. Yeah well I think one of the things. We have to due to deconstruct the idea that the the identifier of saying that only belongs to this exclusive group of people. If you look at the the New Testament the the writers of the New Testament they used the word Christian only three times twice in acts wants him I peter that's Cristianos and the Greek only three times but awards saint is used over sixty times tagyos degree and it was the identify of the Early Church when Paul would rise to the believers and ethicists I would say to this saints and ethicists the saints and wrong. It wasn't like to the select few who are saints. He would refer to all of them as saints and Again Jin it was a it was a present distinction and the whole idea. Here was saying that this this identifier actually possesses everything that we crave human beings. Missing belonging meaning uniqueness all of these things these ideas that we look for in our existence all found within in this sort of thing and so what he's doing when he addresses them as saints. He's speaking to who they are today and this right now and he's also with that single award. He's also connecting them with the purpose the inherent purpose that's tied with what it means to be. The people of God he that that kind of leads to ooh interesting but I feel like a controversial question For some people who are listening but do you feel like it is time or it should be consider that we might not abandon the term Christian but to you know maybe not use it as the primary identifier of ourselves especially as it pertains to our faith. Yeah I mean. Here's the thing I've heard more people refer to our world as the post Christian world When I think give the term Christian I think of a cultural identifier? Recently I was on a I was on a plane and there's quite a bit. I'm very introverted. But when I'm on planes like I talk to people and I have to interact with people so these I agree. Yeah right I mean once we get going it's amazing anywhere else. One of those conversations close proximity to people you know two inches from a complete stranger. Yeah and it's rude if you don't at least acknowledge their existence at some point during the fight as hard as I try to not as hard as I try to just be like okay. I'm here by myself mound on bubble. It just doesn't work. But I was having this conversation with this lady and she and she let me in like for whatever reason like her walls down and she went deep deep very fast and she just started asking my vice in my opinions on different things and then toward the end of our conversation. She looked at me and she's like what what. What religious practice do you follow? That was in that moment. Honestly just like squirmed in my. I do not want to tell her. I'm a Christian and honestly honestly like most of my adult life. I've struggled with this idea of identifying as Christian like listen. I have no problem identifying as a follower of Jesus he is the only human when you got this whole humanity thing right like I love following in his footsteps wrestling with attention and figuring out what it means to be a follower of Christ in today's world but when we think of Christian there's so many stereotypes stigmas that are wrapped around that label. So the identify of Chris isn't inherently are necessarily a bad identifier. But but I do think because it's become a cultural identifier it's lost its meaning and it's it's become something that's confusing for a lot of people. So what would you suggest yes as like kind of not to go too far down the rabbit trail but like as an alternative especially in the context of Saint because a lot of people. There probably aren't allowed to be more likely to hear people say well I'm no saint you know like qualify. It like that but if if you want someone to kind of capture are you know the identity of ramifications of that term but without sort of self aggrandizing what what would you suggest to someone. One way to identify themselves Without the kind of the baggage of Christian yeah. I mean it's challenging. I mean what I would do before I I stumbled upon the immensity of the term term. Saint what I would do is either done is a follower of Christ and the reason with this with this book. The subtitle is becoming more than Christians and in the word Christians Christians in quotations If we're first thing on I'm a saint like be that does have a certain connotation and it will get a certain vibe to the people like oh I'm such an amazing perp person and we do use the term flip and like. Oh she's such a thing but the reality is if we look at our history and and if we look at the that that is tied to what it means to be a follower of Christ there really is no better word than saying and I think we need a revolution of identity eighty and one of the definitions of the word revolution has to go back to the beginning when we go back to the beginning of this idea. Following Christ we find this word Sane and and and so for me. I love the word Sane because it requires us to break down the barriers that we conveniently construct between the secular the sacred. And that's and that's one of the big ideas of the same as like saints refused to allow those bears to exist. They refuse to call anything off limits and really ever since the enlightenment we as the people of God we we said like. Hey we'll take we'll take our church services we'll take our Bible studies. We'll take our prayer groups and then the secular space can have industry can have the arts science economics all of that. We're going to call that secular and we've created this is to -ality we've created this dichotomy between Between what it means to be a follower of Christ and what it means to live our normal everyday lives and saints by deconstructing that barrier they actually find meaning in the mundane. And that's what so many people are looking for like they're looking for meaning in their everyday everyday lives and saints are people who dignify our everyday lives because they have a vision for what will be what should be. What could be that energizes this this moment this relationship this opportunity this workplace? Whatever it is we find ourselves on that was Addison Veer Nextstep your feedback? Volpe does as they need a maybe they I. I don't really mind you're listening to lazy. Lazy is a judge. wjr who sentences you to judy more creative and arguably more redemptive bath of sending you to a church camp. Ah Okay so last week we asked you lots of movie news. Lots of Christian movie news in this pod. Today I say the ditch. I warned you at the outset you. I should've seen this coming last week. We asked you to pitch and cast a movie based on stars. He didn't disappoint here. Are Some of our favorite responses. Yeah and we should say this is in reference to Kevin Matt. Well there's a lot of caesium movies. There's new Jeremy Camp by OPEC and Kevin Max ask people on twitter. Ju- you pitch them casting a DC talk movie so we wanted to hear some some people's ideas and you honestly a lot of these would be really I'm not I am. I'm of the minor have always been of the mind that there's a good movie in like the and like doing it Christian music biopic if it was told if all the real stuff got in there if if there was like a great behind the scenes look at what really goes on on the confident that'll ever happen but that's in my mind that's our pitch and all of these. Yeah okay so I wanna read this first first one and the I don't even know any pass this first one. There's a ton of feed with this one. I think we need to but I can't get my mind has been waiting for this moment. The whole pot okay. Okay Bryan George Sweetie this Seth Rogan Tom Holland for trade. Keith and Steve Green during the rise of Christian radio which by the away lingerie casting great story great true-life CCN figure see complete suite. Two different looks to different voices one battle royal to you determine who gets a seat next to Sandy Patty at the Double Award Sandy. Patty obviously another very important figure at the rise of Christian radio she was kind of the Darlene. Arlene the biggest one of the biggest stars. Okay so I followed that tweet. I'm like listen to a great pitch. I love the cast. I love the idea of leading to the double was Sandy Andy. Now that's a great story so I look at that tweet and and I ended when I when I was a grabbing I clicked on it and to copy and paste and drop it in the rundowns we can read it and I noticed that it had a reply. Okay someone replied to that tweet. The person or it's not even a person the account that the twitter account replied to that tweet. It is the Indiana Pizza Club which is exactly what it sound. It is a club in Indiana. There's a website and all they do talk there. Evidently people who live in Indiana but all they do is talk about pizza. It's Pete's it is entirely the account in the website and the club is entirely dedicated to pizza in Indiana. Okay so that's which is weird but fine by the pizza if they had Xenia Pizza Club you better believe I wish every club up there and also great band name. Jailer if you saw that there's a ban Indiana Pizza Club. Would you not give them absolutely absolutely great band name but anyway it's this isn't ban. This is actual Pizza Club in Indiana. And here's what they replied and and this is the entirety of the reply and Mrs So freaking baffling to me this and this. This is provided tweet Sandy. Patty destroyed the economy in Anderson. Indiana.

Indiana Sandy Patty twitter Indiana Pizza Club Saint Addison Xenia Pizza Club Chandler hockey president Mrs So Sandy Institutional Church Jin Early Church Anderson Jeremy Camp Sandy Andy Addison Veer Chris
"addison" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

Relevant Podcast

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"addison" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

"Been here even weird okay. So jailer is now. Poppy and I started going through some of his recent posts and in his latest instagram story. Okay he I'm going to read through the caption to a couple images and tyler you let me know. If this doesn't sound like someone who slowly morphing into a serial killer Miller who like murders people by you know You know strangling them with a vine from some exotic plant okay or or it has or he creates man-eating size Venus fly trap that he sets to devour his like poison. Exactly Blake like eating Batman Alive. All right I'll show you straight so here he has. There's two different pictures of plants on his instagram. One and both of these captions should I should should note are in all caps which makes them even more unsettling one just says it's a small plant and it says baby's okay for many other us a tiny little plant that's growing in one of my plants. It's there were literally you don't need to all babies okay. It's a picture of plants in pots. Another one with with small plants in plots all caps once again because that everything is at all caps just these captions says it all shouting a true. Exactly it's very unsettling me.

Blake instagram Poppy Batman Miller
"addison" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

Relevant Podcast

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"addison" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

"Move bleak I have. I am an encyclopedic knowledge of these files. A similar plotline of one with Whoopi Goldberg Goldberg. where she wins a halftime content? Like so this one. I'm trying to remember the The name of the film. But here's the plot. Plot of the film is this. I remember I saw it in the theater where I was like twelve. Just because when you're twelve you just go see whatever movie theater and I and I if you listen to podcasts. You can know much of my childhood was spent spent in front of screens. I'm a huge advocate of screen. Time because I probably watch five hours of TV hits a day a child and went to the movies all the time but in this movie will be Goldberg She. She's at a New York Knicks Games and like the halftime contest. Is You know if you sink that the half court your shot you get to be an assistant coach for the second half of the game you know kind of a gimmicky thing. While she thinks the Josh she becomes the assistant coach and the coach gets ojected in the second half and guess who temporarily becomes a New New York Knicks head coach ends up leading up to the victory and she becomes from that halftime contest. The New New York Knicks all the plots were wildly. Implausible the most offensive and the one that is the most poorly from that era is one called Jonah man which is a sort sort of a modern take on the film tootsie but it's it's it has some very confusing gender politics because it's about an NBA player who uh-huh even saying even describing the plot as problematic it's about an NBA player..

Whoopi Goldberg Goldberg. New York Knicks New York NBA Josh
"addison" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

Relevant Podcast

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"addison" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

"Nashville Tennessee. Back there in Orlando Florida. Making sure that we stay off the rails that we never even get on that we never we start in finishing the same ditch in the same place even is our producer Chandler string slip and out there in Loveland Virginia doing his best to keep us on track eye on the prize is a man of truly superhuman focus and attention. -ality Dr Fred Jesse. Kerry hello mighty man of Valor. Indeed now tyler. We have a lot to get to. I'll let you intro the gas in a second. But I prepped. A lot of shows over the years. I mean literally hundreds of these of these podcast. You particularly these little outlines that we look at to kind of make sure it gives us a little some guideposts. Yeah exactly and walks to the show every show we go and we share the rundown that that You know you've you've done your fair share while you're a master. Does he just say this. This is going to be this is going to be one of the weirdest most fun shows every point. I'm working in this rundown weirder and they're so much to talk about today. And here's we've been on a streak lately where we've been having multiple by big name guests on the show like we've Cory Asbury Echo Smith Brian Stevens. We've had this run of these big guests and we've had a lot of like you know. I think the last three weeks we had over the last three episodes we had Carlos Whitaker Cory Asbury prop said that in honor show. We've had a lot of these guests. This is a spartan crew today but we have some weird things that I am very very very much looking forward to but like I said that is you know I know where the goalpost stands in getting weird on this podcast. Okay okay. Well we're we're we're kicking one from seventy five yards al today as the win win that one that one's sailed through barely sailed through but that was deep deep kick and that's what it is today but honestly it'd be easy because if if if we had somebody like say like say Cory Asbury like we love having people on to help associate. I think it's important that we do. Yeah I would say a moral compass maybe to abide by you know what I mean like we. We can't get to get to high into the stratosphere or we're going to lose them they're they don't Wanna fly. They don't WanNa soar those sites today. We don't have to do. We don't have to hold anybody hand and now we don't. We don't have to talk down. We don't have to like try to set the set the table for anybody. We're just going risk listeners. If that leaves behind were that's why we're warning you now. Yeah and and and and I woke to we have one real meat and potato segment agreement. That if you're listening to this and you're wanting some spiritual death I will say the guest is going to bring it but don't expect expect some shallow waters that wish. Wish him the very severe that you're just GONNA fall into knocked out but we have a great. Yes Italian on the show. We're excited. We are excited to welcome. Addison revere he's GonNa be talking to us about his new book. It's called saints becoming more than Christians and that's super cool and Addison revere a good guy comes from a really storied legacy. The book is terrific. The Conversation Jesse that you had was also really really strong right. Yeah I I mean I I you know. I highly recommend this book because I was selling Addison this after we wrapped our interview the other day which you'll hear later in the show You know it's not often that I feel like a book takes a term and idea that we all know and are familiar with in this case as the idea of saints the Word Saints and is able to not only describe the original intent of the word but also so show how US getting it wrong all these millennia later since that you know since that was recorded in scripture has kind of you've has a detrimental effect or can have a detrimental effect on our own spirituality in our own faith. It's fascinating book fascinating conversation. Definitely currently stick around. You're going to want to hear about Addison's book saints the other great thing about Addison And I didn't know this when we were and this is where this is where it begins. This is a restart this. We produce meat and potatoes. But we're starting off with jelly beans. Were just sweet sweet jelly beans. Because we're doing it. We're talking we show the three of us and we're going through the outline and Chandler. Goes you know Addison Veer. I grew up playing street hockey together. Yeah so I want to talk about this real quick Shammar Addison. I'm assuming is about your age. And because his parents parents who are very John v are very well known authors and your parents are publishers. They had a relationship. And I'm assuming that maybe maybe John and Lisa would drop off in your call the sack and you guys would office at one on street hockey. We're talking here a group of people so you know we're we're not like best buds. But he was in the group and I was in the group and I I was the goalie. I don't remember what what he played. But did you wear gear. Where did you wear goalie gear like? Okay how big of an influence. Because I played quite a bit of street hockey rounds could not formally. I'm talking rollerblades. And the coolest sack name. No and it was. Yeah and so. Was this a leaguers at this kind of situation. We're talking to pick up. We're talking to pick up street hockey. It wasn't it was the league but it was a rink. Yeah Rick Real Quick wins the last time you guys seen kids today played street hockey when I was a kid street. Hockey was everywhere. No the last I. I remember a kid. Do they know what street hockey. And that's a real shame together. You and Addison do street hockey spin on street.

Addison Hockey hockey Cory Asbury Dr Fred Jesse Chandler Addison Veer Shammar Addison Orlando Florida Nashville Tennessee Kerry producer Loveland Virginia Wanna fly Rick Real US Carlos Whitaker John Brian Stevens
"addison" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"addison" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Addison McGill on cops behaving badly what you just heard is only a from a video shot outside shore ridge high school when an indie metro police officer had a student in the this is a call to the school because of a fight and run to find I. P. as police already had a student in custody officer Robert Wilson is shown in the video hitting the boy with a closed fist in the jaw putting him in a headlock and kneed him in the abdomen in September the family of the boy found a lawsuit John here reports on attorney Terrence Kennard's response he said pointer son a W. was attacked it short ridge high school by a group of children who had been bullying and harassing him for a week I PS officers responded during their response they detained Mr A. W. while other students continue to attack him he said pointer than trying to get our questions answered by administrators at the school and that didn't happen officer Lawson was charged with battery and striking the student without legitimate concern for self defense the prosecutor Terry curry on September sixteenth curry said Lawson light and police reports saying he hit the boy with an open palm strike fear in the seventeen year old was about to hit him and then another officer saw the boys we get lost in first our next story has not just a police officer in Anderson behaving badly but a police chief to Ashley father with a report from July police chief Tony waters is accused of confronting state troopers as they arrested his son last month prosecutor Rodney Cummings says state police told him waters came up to the troopers and put his finger in their faces during the arrest the chief's son in Anderson police officer is accused of attacking his girlfriend in October interest in mayor Thomas Broadrick junior decided to remove Tony waters from his position because of his interactions with I. S. P. after his son's arrest his last day was on October thirteenth waters wasn't the only chief in the hot seat in February Marvel police chief Matthew long had a warrant out for his arrest Kirk Darling explains soon afterwards Matthew long turned himself and charged with theft and official misconduct say Indiana state police long was accused of manipulating a payroll system in order to give himself more hours of sick leave long denied the claims but court documents show that in twenty sixteen and twenty seventeen long added a hundred and forty two hours to his sick bank meaning he received additional sick days and fifteen hundred and thirty dollars in pay finishing off the segment as an officer that goes by many names some may know him as hot Daddy nineteen eleven others as bush marker nineteen eleven but his real identity is Andrew back of for Wayne police officer that is accused of trying to have sex with underage girls back frequently sent photos of himself standing naked in front of a mirror and asking his victims if you could tie them up and show them while having sex he was also accused of being in a relationship with a sixteen year old from Wayne high school in April police found back thirty seven Snapchat accounts one being bushwhacker nineteen eleven where he made suggestive sexual offers and sage pornographic images of young girls his G. mail hi Daddy nineteen eleven had naked photos of himself and emails from Craigslist looking for sex in October he was extradited back to Allen county after being arrested by US marshals while being deployed with the military in California his first court appearance was October eighteenth backs bond was set for fifteen thousand which you paid and was released from jail on for the nineteen in nineteen only modest kill.

Addison McGill
"addison" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"addison" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Addison McGill on cops behaving badly in India what you just heard is only a from a video shot outside shore ridge high school when an indie metro police officer had a student in the this is a call to the school because of a fight and run to find I. P. as police already had a student in custody officer Robert Wilson is shown in the video hitting the boy with a closed fist in the jock putting him in a headlock and kneed him in the abdomen in September the family of the boy filed a lawsuit John here reports on attorney Terrence Kennard's response he said pointer son a W. was attacked it short ridge high school by a group of children who had been bullying and harassing him for a week I. P. S. officers responded during their response they detained Mr A. W. while other students continue to attack him he said pointer then tried to get our questions answered by administrators at the school and that didn't happen officer Lawson was charged with battery and striking the student without legitimate concern for self defense the prosecutor Terry curry on September sixteenth curry said Lawson light and police reports saying he hit the boy with an open palm strike fear in the seventeen year old was about to hit him and then another officer saw the boys we get lost in first our next story has not just a police officer in Anderson behaving badly but a police chief to Ashley father with a report from July police chief Tony waters is accused of confronting state troopers as they arrested his son last month prosecutor Rodney Cummings says state police told him waters came up to the troopers and put his finger in their faces during the arrest the chief's son in Anderson police officer is accused of attacking his girlfriend in October Andersen mayor Thomas Broadrick junior decided to remove Tony waters from his position because of his interactions with I. S. P. after his son's arrest his last day was on October thirteenth waters wasn't the only team in the hot seat in February Marvel police chief Matthew long had a warrant out for his arrest Kurt Darling explains soon afterwards Matthew long turned himself and charged with theft and official misconduct say Indiana state police long was accused of manipulating a payroll system in order to give himself more hours of sick leave long denied the claims but court documents show that in twenty sixteen and twenty seventeen long added a hundred and forty two hours to a sick bank meaning he received additional sick days and fifteen hundred and thirty dollars in pay finishing off the segment as an officer that goes by many names so I know him as hot Daddy nineteen eleven others as bush wiper nineteen eleven but his real identity is Andrew back of for Wayne police officer back is accused of trying to have sex with underage girls back frequently sent photos of himself standing naked in front of a mirror and asking his victims if you could tie them up and show them while having sex he was also accused of being in a relationship with a sixteen year old from Wayne high school in April police found backs thirty seven Snapchat accounts one being bushwhacker nineteen eleven where he made suggestive sexual offers and sage pornographic images of young girls his G. mail hi Daddy nineteen eleven had naked photos of himself and emails from Craigslist looking for sex in October he was extradited back to Allen county after being arrested by US marshals while being deployed with the military in California his first court appearance was October eighteenth backs bond was set for fifteen thousand which you paid and was released from jail for the nineteen ninety nine Madison kill.

Addison McGill
"addison" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"addison" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Eighteen Addison McGill on cops behaving badly what you just heard is only a from a video shot outside shore ridge high school when an indie metro police officer had a student in the this is a call to the school because of a fight and run to find I. P. as police already had a student in custody officer Robert Wilson is shown in the video hitting the boy with a closed fist in the jaw putting him in a headlock and kneed him in the abdomen in September the family of the boy filed a lawsuit John here reports on attorney Terrence Kennard's response he said pointer son a W. was attacked it short ridge high school by a group of children who had been bullying and harassing him for a week I PS officers responded during their response they detained Mr A. W. while other students continue to attack him he said pointer than trying to get our questions answered by administrators at the school and that didn't happen officer Lawson was charged with battery and striking the student without legitimate concern for self defense the prosecutor Terry curry on September sixteenth curry said Lawson light and police reports saying he hit the boy with an open palm strike fear in the seventeen year old was about to hit him and then another officer saw the voice we get lost in first our next story has not just a police officer in Anderson behaving badly but a police chief to Ashley father with a report from July police chief Tony waters is accused of confronting state troopers as they arrested his son last month prosecutor Rodney Cummings says state police told him waters came up to the troopers and put his finger in their faces during the arrest the chief's son in Anderson police officer is accused of attacking his girlfriend in October interest in mayor Thomas Broadrick junior decided to remove Tony waters from his position because of his interactions with I. S. P. after his son's arrest his last day was on October thirteenth waters wasn't the only team in the hot seat and February Marvel police chief Matthew long had a warrant out for his arrest Kurt Darling explains soon afterwards Matthew long turned himself and charged with theft and official misconduct say Indiana state police long was accused of manipulating a payroll system in order to give himself more hours of sick leave long denied the claims but court documents show that in twenty sixteen and twenty seventeen long added a hundred and forty two hours to his sick bank meaning he received additional sick days and fifteen hundred and thirty dollars and pay finishing off the segment as an officer that goes by many names some may know him as hot Daddy nineteen eleven others as bushwhacker nineteen eleven but his real identity is Andrew back of for Wayne police officer back is accused of trying to have sex with underage girls back frequently sent photos of himself standing naked in front of a mirror and asking his victims if you could tie them up and choked them while having sex he was also accused of being in a relationship with a sixteen year old from Wayne high school in April police found backs thirty seven Snapchat accounts one being bushwhacker nineteen eleven where he made suggestive sexual offers and sage pornographic images of young girls his G. mail hi Daddy nineteen eleven had naked photos of himself and emails from Craigslist looking for sex in October he was extradited back to Allen county after being arrested by US marshals while being deployed with the military in California his first court appearance was October eighteenth backs bond was set for fifteen thousand which you paid and was released from jail on for the nineteen ninety nine that is looking.

Addison McGill
"addison" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"addison" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Topic about Addison, Russell is his acceptance of his suspension, some sort of an admission of guilt at some level something he'd previously denied, I think any time you accept. A course of action. Where there is a direction given the idea that we look at is that. Addison is getting therapy Addison is growing and understanding the responsibilities of his team's league is city and that in the as you can see from the suspension that they're different levels. And there's different elements of conduct and the learning curve of this is good for everybody as good for the league is good for baseball. And in the end has been really really good for for Addison going forward. I think any time we try to improve people, and and have a system that does that and brings attention to things that in a society that make us better on and off the field. I think it's a very positive. I know it's secondary to what the topic. But you think the cubs are bringing him back and rehabilitating him. Well, I can go through the roster people any organization, and I have yet to find one that has a. Wanted to improve things in their life address issues and go forward, and I think that any organization as long as there is a very strong understanding and commitment to learning and growth that as long as you have that ideology of wanting to be the best person player employee. And community service, and you can be for your franchise as long as they know. That's the players attitude. I'm sure as in most cases in the past that teams are understand that they've got. An athlete that wants to address things you think he'll be speaking out at any point. Where he's at in his rehabilitation, I think that will come, you know, I think that you know, Addison is is in regimented schedule right now and and going through this. We certainly been in communication with the cubs and everybody understands what's going on Addison and how he is been very diligent where this program and his therapy going forward..

Addison cubs baseball Russell
"addison" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"addison" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"Legend the default a brand new now she hit the grocery shop group john god we don't pray just pray how's the ones in addison appease twenty avenue as one on we're talking money needed mcarthur ninety four nine music base station for music discovery one hit music dennis lloyd never mind soon owners maybe want to see.

dennis lloyd addison mcarthur