26 Burst results for "Addie"

How Health Coach Massy Arias Found Her Real Strength

Latina to Latina

01:51 min | 6 months ago

How Health Coach Massy Arias Found Her Real Strength

"Have been on a mission to get mossy addie personal trainer health coach instrument fina on on latino latina since we launched we have hit a few bumps in the road is actually the third time with connected. Once musi got pulled away to be a mom another time she was at a photo shoot the acoustics in work and through it all. I learned that mosse is exactly who she says. She is. disciplined driven committed relentlessly an enthusiastic. She's also really savvy about her business building and for the first time mossy opens up about her divorce ignoring naysayers and building the life. She's dreamed up most of the time. When i hear your story it starts with you coming to the states from the dr. you're thirteen. I want to know what your life was like before that when you lived in the dominican republic well. My life was pretty simple. I come from very humble backgrounds very humble beginnings and i lived with my mom and my stepdad. My parents were divorced but it was pretty simple. I had awesome childhood than my family decided. We needed a better life. Was that transition to the states. Smooth what he remember about it no. The transition was in smooth at all. When my parents made the decision of bringing to the states. I was a sophomore in high school so as a teenager. Obviously i don't want to leave my friends. My family my culture. I had to pretty much transition into an environment into a new culture and even though i was excited to come to the states it was very rough.

Mossy Addie Mosse Musi Dominican Republic
A Conversation About Section 230 and the Future of the Internet

The Vergecast

06:52 min | 7 months ago

A Conversation About Section 230 and the Future of the Internet

"Week. Senior reporter addie robertson. Who have heard on the broadcast many times before held an event about section two thirty. That's the law that says platforms aren't liable for their users publish. It is a critical lot. The internet also just turned twenty five years old last month. So addy held an event with a keynote by senator. Amy klobuchar democrat from minnesota is one of the sponsors of the tech act. That's an act that would reform section to thirty as well as a panel featuring michael chia. Who's the general counsel video sedan. Harry is a researcher writer. And a strategist human attack and amana keeping general counsel at wicca media which runs wikipedia. Talking about where section two thirty is where might go in the future. So we're going to run some highlights of that event for today addie and russell are gonna join talk about how it went and what they heard what they thought and as it happens here right now. Russell has done good. Love it addie. Congratulations on your event. It was a good one. Hey thank you so. Tell me how you think. The event went. And then i'm going to hand over the episode to you and we can listen to some highlights and talk it through. But how do you think of went. I thought it went well. One of the things i like about. Section two thirty is that. It's just a really weird conversation that people kept asking okay. What sides her can there are like fifty different sides and we had a really pretty interesting spread of perspectives and senator klobuchar speech was really good scene. Setter and i'm overall pretty happy. Yeah you know. What i thought was really interesting. Just as i watched the whole event senator klobuchar has some very strong perspectives. About what can be done in those perspectives. We're definitely not shared by the entire panel. In fact the safe tech act is it's it's always interesting to me to hear. Senators talked about their own legislation. 'cause they always make it seem so common sense but it's actually quite controversial. Some of the changes that she was proposing. Oh yeah absolutely well and also like you know. She addition to talk to thirty. She takes a pretty hard line on antitrust. I was actually surprised by how sort of enthusiastic she was about it. And i sort of imagine. The video guy is sitting there easter like. She's talking about breaking up google. He's like yeah. Okay a lot of the sort of civil society tech people which this is part of what we wanted to introduce the conversation like. They don't have a problem with antitrust. They are mostly hoping that section two thirty doesn't get changed in a way that makes it impossible to have wikipedia exist and then bringing up things like misinformation also just throws its own kind wrench into things because that's actually not largely problem that addressed with section two thirty and so you end up slipping weird stuff like first amendment reforming there. Yeah this was. I think is the panel went on the combination of we think facebook too big but if we changed to thirty to punish facebook we might end up punishing ourselves and then senator klobuchar talking about an inch. Just dead ahead. And even to some extent bringing up the idea of breakup as a potential remedy. All of that is a swirl and we've been talking on swirl for for some time and it was just really interesting to hear the spread of perspectives during this event. So at russell. I'm excited for this. Why don't you start and take us through this event and what we heard. Yeah absolutely. I think the one thing i want to start with this sort of like the chronological beginning. But like you know. I always like it when these things make a little news. And i think i was very interested to hear santa club. Stars line on antitrust. She sort of coming to the fore of like the democrats antitrust policy. She wrote a book called antitrust and is the chairman of the subcommittee on competition policy antitrust and consumer rights which is basically the senate home for antitrust policy so she's really sort of at the forefront of it and i thought it was interesting she a lot of time she gets gloucestershire's like this moderate voice but she was pretty harsh on facebook. Here we have. We have this clip at the root of this problem lies the ability of a few companies to act as gatekeepers and as we see when they dominate markets exclude rivals buy out their competitors. We've got a problem. In the emailed words of mark zuckerberg. These businesses are nascent but the networks established. The brands already meaningful. And if big go to a large scale could be very disruptive to us they could be very disruptive to us. I always about the tech industry was about disruption it's about disrupting the status quo and bringing in new good ideas that basically blow up the marketplace in a positive way we can't have monopoly stopping disruption so in a way the work i am doing is simply a reply to that email so the interesting thing so this was this was something that we had on the site like dual casey and nikolai byline. When the antitrust hearing happened he's talking about instagram and path so instagram they bought path proved not to be disruptive to facebook. I think it's fair to say but this is not a public statement. He meant to make. And i do think i don't know i mean do do we do. We hear this. And think like amy kluber. Shar is on team break-up facebook it feels like it will qualify that by saying at the very least it's team don't let facebook acquire anybody else. Yeah but team break-up facebook. I don't know it definitely seems like it's on the table ray. Which is very interesting so there have been on the left. A lot of really aggressive sort of pushes for stronger antitrust like we need some new like we need to empower the justice department. We need some new legislation that will enable us to kind of go after these businesses more heavily. And it's fairly recent that closure is trying to to kind of lead that i mean she just. She's only now coming to the to the lead on this committee. And i think because she ran in the democratic primary sort of as a moderate voice. She's been glossed as like. Well she's not in the end gonna like usher in this new era of trust busting but then elsewhere in the keynote. She's talking about well. You know it worked pretty well when we did this against. At and i mean. I don't know. I'm still kind of undecided. It's always hard to know how committed people are going. It's going to be a really politically difficult road to walk. If they move on. you know.

Senator Klobuchar Addie Robertson Addie Michael Chia Wicca Media Facebook Amy Klobuchar Russell Addy Santa Club Subcommittee On Competition Po Wikipedia Minnesota Harry Nikolai Byline Amy Kluber Google Mark Zuckerberg Senate
"addie" Discussed on Not Another Horror Podcast

Not Another Horror Podcast

05:21 min | 8 months ago

"addie" Discussed on Not Another Horror Podcast

"Like a meat locker. It was no smell of rotting flesh in the bathroom was clean of any lingering blood on the walls of his silver for colored spray painted words of i love her total failure and finally look in the of with an arrow pointing to the stove door..

"addie" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

thebuzzr pod

03:39 min | 8 months ago

"addie" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

"Collaborate with anybody while the los angeles sweet album is still technically postponed. However i'm not sure if they're going to be moving forward with non last. I heard that it's just postponed until cove it chemically sow in. I don't have any shows yet. however i'm sure that will also take place. I have definitely been writing Writing a lot myself and not as many co-writes A few here in there with close friends but I was also able to co write via zoom. So that's new fun And is in teaching myself pro tools. So i'm i'm excited to give my listeners. Some body of worth. That's more a one hundred percent my writing on it because in the past a lot of it was so rights which i love as well but i think you know an isolation your guest found to do everything yourself so i'm trying to learn a little bit how to aware that production hat. Not that i necessarily think that my producing will be on the final record but it needs to get to a point where i pin at least garner some day download. So that's what i've been focusing on. Yeah sounds exciting. I really appreciate the time that is spent with us before we go added. Can you tell us where to find your music. Yes so you can go to. My website is w. w. w. dot addie hamilton music dot com. You can also follow me on instagram. My social media is hamilton addie And you find me on all the music platforms as well. So i love to talk to people. I'll be doing a fun project soon. Involving some Handwritten letters in postcards for some releases which is so fun for me. And i hope that i can connect to people more personally through doing that. Which have done before. And i truly enjoy doing that. So i keep in touch with me on social media and there may be a po box coming out. Well that's awesome. Thank you for joining our pod. Today it was a wonderful chat listeners. Tune it out. A hamilton risk is great and Also follower on social media. She'd mention yeah. Thank you so much thank you. You were awesome. Well thank y'all joining in on our episode talking with adam hamilton. next episode. We have robber. Happy walters from minnesota We're gonna listen to his break out. Track paid vacations and that will happen on january twenty six so see the pawn next time shares..

adam hamilton Today minnesota hamilton january twenty six instagram one hundred percent hamilton music dot com los angeles addie w. w. w. dot
"addie" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

thebuzzr pod

03:46 min | 8 months ago

"addie" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

"Up ballard tied enjoy Tongue tie shell struck by. He'll do i turn sixty by his tie. Those could kill his is shown kind. Oh him auch caused by us. Nine goals by school long.

"addie" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

thebuzzr pod

02:14 min | 8 months ago

"addie" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

"Completely new experience. I hadn't Quite like before was the Los angeles we album just having something that was that grandeur in that many people involved yet literally being so Spontaneous in collaborative that the songs we were recording not even just playing but recording had not been fully written in two minutes before that was exhilarating and You really felt like you contribute in in something i've been able to play with you know larger groups before in. Sometimes you're reading somebody else's music or you kind of need to be patient and Respect others in no one to speak or no when your line is but this Last project was just so because you really felt like you had an input in were heard probably haven't to the success of the. Yeah i hope so. I i i think so. It's it's a great album to listen to. Each song is different from the other because they really Chose the unique artists from every genre. Tim closed the next time. We're gonna listen to your track Release in february ballantyne timely. Release for that special day is already of you wanna tell listeners about that Not necessarily. I'm so excited about it. I just got a new mix From ethan this week in he really took it to a whole tara different field. So it's a treat to listen to. And i hope they enjoy it. So next.

Tim this week Each song february ethan two minutes Los angeles
"addie" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

thebuzzr pod

08:13 min | 8 months ago

"addie" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

"A quote the patrick. Your manager says as tangerine is a reminder to focus on the beauty in life and to believe that miracles can happen. What do you feel about that. yes yeah Kind of picture. That are in painting was being a world. That's all black and white in. You're the only one who can see the other colors he conceived in red can see the and agency. The tangerine but nobody else sees them. And i really try and convey that yearning for understanding in the lyrics. Where says you know that. nobody When you listen to courts it says that nobody knows they asked me what i say. Cantering they asked me what i mean. So it's really about keeping faith. Because i do believe miracles can happen. I'm always trying to see positively. And sometimes i'm the black sheep in that So yeah let's believing leaving miracles keeping safe when the world around me says otherwise timely. Very time i'm not you know. In tangerine has been the a song. Called centuries been Released by several artists one notably led seth love released a song and herb alpert. Great her i hate. There is a lot of her bowel for make. Great grandmother selection in my grand father loved him on to any. I mean i. I don't care how many times it's played. I love it so your visual aspect. Vitual arts aspect that goes into being an artist. How important is that to you as an artist. And what do we see in your work of the passion that you have for the visual arts side of your musical side. Well it's definitely important to me. I think because. I can so clearly see how i would like others to Be able to enjoy my news occasionally when it comes to music videos and album artwork that i definitely always have ideas in the line to put things together as far as my artwork goes and i have great friends my friends avian feo on film for the tangerine cover Daniela luna he does great set design on. They both helped me out a lot and we kind of take turns helping each other on different shoots so maybe when week faith in and i are going to be doing a set design with daniel on netflix photo. Shoot or something like that. So i Have kind of garnered. I'm not gonna say huge scale but definitely a big interest in set design and theatrics if you look at a lot of Those early shows in vaudeville. I look at that and they're still a presence of that. I think in entertainment in la. But it's something that is so fun. Indefinitely needs to be shared more. Said you know our current world. So you'll see a lot of that especially in my live shows. They'll be they'll be korea. There will be set design. The van will be dressed. It's going to be very much inexperience. Big show yeah maybe or maybe you know maybe one song it could be the exact opposite in various stripped down but haunting at the same time you know it doesn't always have to be super glittery It could be very real to but no matter what i think it needs to take you in some sort of world in in the visual. Hasta match the audio. So june joy performing live. yes. I love it. I haven't in a while. I've been mostly writing for tv and film and then this past april. I was hoping to record a jazz album. Which is been postponed. And i was set to tour with the orchestra in europe this past summer so Twenty twenty and twenty. Twenty one for me was supposed to be a lot of shows for both my personal project as well as los angeles sweet projects so Am hoping that can still happen in twenty twenty one and i'm definitely not short on ideas so we will see how how this next year plays out. A lot of people are waiting for that as well. But you're keeping busy and you're putting out music which are positive things You talked about your collaborations with your friends. Which has added to the presentation of your art and music and covered latte The other collaboration you've done are quite substantial. One being rune westberg and another. Does he valentine. Angie also worked on a coal right with hit on. Hypnotize g spice. What was your favorite collaboration. I'm why i love them all like i told you earlier. Sometimes i'll go into a writing session and maybe it's for another artist project there may be. It's even like a jingle you now. But i just genuinely love people i love characters. Even if it's somebody who you might think vary you know quote unquote normal. I just find people fascinating. I think that's part of growing in a big family. I just everyone in my family is so different. And i love to see how they react differently to things both big and small. So it's just so fun to be in a creative environment. And i really enjoy my work. I really enjoy Being physically present in a room in creating something with somebody else i. I'm trying to teach myself to be better with your admin staff and doing things on my computer this year but for me. It's if i have something scheduled in the books. And i have even if i could have like two rights day. I love coming home after that creative exhaustion feeling like i was really able to contribute so i can't really say that i have a favorite. I mean some sessions go into it could be very prominent songwriter. But i could be having an off day or they could be having an off day in a song. Just isn't so good or maybe it could be. The exact opposite. Could be somebody that i'd never met before in. Its you know they could be relatively new. Or i'm very new at it in in bennett something. That's this great so they always changes. That's great there's always new music to be made so the every collaborations different than yet. I mean one thing that was one one thing that was a.

europe Angie daniel patrick rune westberg korea netflix one thing both one song this year next year Daniela luna this past summer tangerine seth love past april two rights los angeles twenty twenty one
"addie" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

thebuzzr pod

02:55 min | 8 months ago

"addie" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

"Y ou phone. Not just draw from montana a the sky. Okay how in your mind. Ono's sincere Polls show complain because a scott. A and.

"addie" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

thebuzzr pod

06:31 min | 8 months ago

"addie" Discussed on thebuzzr pod

"Influence the Peggy lee betty gunman an earthquake hit. I can definitely see that in listening to your music Is there any other. Influences joins talk about Peggy liter goodman and how they influenced too. Yeah definitely while they were. I would say they were like my first. Inspirations because they were all a part of that collective that my great grandmother had in her record player. I love earth. Kit is a performer. So that opened up a lot of ideas Regarding dance for me and then when it comes to inspirations even the performance world i love bob fosse and i'd love to incorporate some of his Corio or something inspired by him into a stage routine in performance. I love chet baker's delivery. I just love how smooth. He is as a vocalist and as a trumpet player Chad baker things definitely one of my favorite albums both of them and when it comes to sonics and arranging i love daddy elf men. I love tom way I've been listening to a lot of dorothy. Ashby not sure if you're familiar with her. She's in old harp player. No i'm not. She's she's a great a lot of a lot of people don't know about her but she kind of debts into that what's the word like a lot of lionel. Hampton would be in the same world's like they it's almost exotic If you ever listen to any early exotica. It kind of reminds me of that. So she someone. I've discovered i think within the past two years in somebody else who's really inspiring to me not necessarily music but visually which is definitely intertwined Is biography berkeley. I love his visuals in would definitely have always loved in in even tried to do something like that for videos. And would you say that most your music is inspired by the nineteen thirties to sixties era of jazz swing and rb. Yes now. I mean a lot of things end up sounding that way. I think my vocal does a lot of it. Because i've i've listened to so many jazz singers. I think that when i was developing a singer earlier just grew into a jazz voice And i love brass people. When i hear a jazz vocal in our here brass or maybe than a really lash like string arrangement they automatically put it to an era. But i don't necessarily sometimes. But i don't necessarily try in said in a studio and be like this needs to be from nineteen forty two glenn miller i love glenn miller. I love my favorites. Yeah he's great. He's great to dance Used to do a lot of solo charleston. Lindsay swing in an. I love to dance to him. I love already shot. Two are similar with artie. Shaw his name nightmares. Always been a great one. It's so like erie. The next guy coming up. We're going to be listening to your truck. Tangerine that was released early january. And could you tell us a bit about what went into the making of that. Yes so I worked with these amazing guys on the east coast. Todd way ethan. Mentzer and i believe the first time we wrote. It was when i was in virginia visiting them both in todd studio and The word actually came i to be honest. I wish i could tell you that. I had like some deep reason to choose that word but it was actually a flavor of chapstick. I had in my pocket was at it in now. I've i actually think it's funny enough goodman may have written. It was benny goodman or one of those thirties. Composers may intangible. He's a song called. Tendering which i didn't know then now i i do anyway so i think when we wrote it was a little over a year ago and i remember we were on a walk taking a break from writing another song and i just love how it slipped off the tongue in so i said why. Don't you write something about tangerine and then from there really came the lyric in It it's very abstract. I'm not sure if you've padden opportunity to listen to it yet. But i can. I can talk more after we do. Yeah i have a great great tune the lyrics very abstract Adam shows the the listener can connect d'oro meaning to the like. It's very open to interpretation by those who would you great. Yes i mean. I have my own thoughts about what the lyrics mean to me. Of course the. I don't know. I'm almost apprehensive to share them. Because i think it's so important for everybody to draw their own conclusion. Okay well we're going to listen to the track and will continue shouting with addie after we listened to january.

virginia Lindsay early january Chad baker nineteen thirties Shaw bob fosse Mentzer Adam both charleston first erie berkeley one glenn miller artie Ashby Two addie
"addie" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

06:58 min | 1 year ago

"addie" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

"Captive. You're like I'm only here for an hour and a half you're giving me alternative endings like this is fantastic. It's like you know how I felt like watching the hangover for the first time where I was like this is the most exciting thing I've ever seen in my life. No idea what's going to happen and I love that feeling in a theater and so I think in some way I'm trying to figure out how to do that and it never really happens. You're like, what is GonNa Happen Yes. So that's why theater frustrates me subtypes especially the work I saw in college like like they told me was great acting because it was like. I'm so much more entertained by watching Kiefer Sutherland as Jack Bauer on twenty four than I am at this beautifully acted check off he's like a killed me sometimes. But then I had good teachers that like would work on scenes and they do a little like like sometimes the scene work became more interesting than like an entire show those. I agree with that I. think that's incredibly valid that sometimes just a ten minute scene can be the most interesting thing you and you don't need anything more. You're like, oh? That was like an psych. It feels like it holds as much information as an encyclopedia in minute checkoff scene. That's John Wall in class. Yes yes. Do. You think you're still I mean this this interview that voyage La did with you you talk about stuff that I just had an heard. You say before about sort of how your production company North Node specializes in stories stole from Feminine Perspective, and the exploration of self-centeredness and selfishness. This really intrigued me because you told me once you're like ragged I don't think la is as superficial as people say it is but and then I have other people that are like, oh my gosh is the most superficial thing ever tell me this what is your relationship the Super Fishy fishy -ality in Los Angeles, and then I want to delve into how your work explores more of self centeredness. Yeah. So. I think I got really lucky when I came out here because I I had my nyu friends who were very down to Earth if not just a little like I think the worst thing that nyu kids is that they're like a little snobby about their tastes. And you know what I mean like everybody's dislike. It could have been done a little bit more like this like. That Laura I literally, just embodied somebody that I actually know. Totally. delayed. So that's probably the worst thing about nyu kids but other than that, and then I then I joined lesly Kahn where I met this huge group of people who you can't go through lexicon unless you're a really hard worker as you would just leave immediately kind of would we you out because it's like you do this intensive and it's literally the most intense two weeks. So I just met a group of really hardworking people who were also very business oriented, but also, very talented. and. I just feel like I got very lucky in terms of I don't have any superficial friends and I don't re anytime I smell or feel that like there is nothing that turns me off more than people trying to compete with me or trying to one up me like I will be so out of there. So fast jet sometimes that happens at parties or with people that I don't really know but I just know like I'm I'm so not interested in I mean maybe. Some people like pursue those kinds of people and maybe I would be further I don I don't believe. So what you mean is that when you say that like it's not that much. The culture is in or there isn't like a huge piece of it. That is it's that you were able to find a community of people out warrant and if you want to escape it like keep looking because they are actually out there. Yeah and I think that in any place you're gonNA, find a I. Mean I believe in you know it's Yennin Yang. So you're going to have a lot of people that are great and a lot of people who really aren't great and that's just the way that it is and so just try to find more of the great people that you get along with and and it's okay to have a tight circle. I just think in terms of an a lot of it's an especially now in more of this like I'm reaching out to people and trying to collaborate with. Just extending my network of filmmakers of sound and lighting, and you know directors of photography. So in that sense, it's being mindful in those first couple conversations with them but I just I, I don't even run into it there. It's just about binding people that you feel like WanNa make art like Sim have similar ambitions and you like their work and I think just focusing on the work I think it's really easy to find people who aren't doing any work. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, and that gets to you know what you were saying earlier now I'm sure we went off tangent from that about like the work like. Being busy people. That's the thing I think in L. A. It's really easy get distracted because there's the beach and there's hiking and it's pretty. Right. But it's just if you just attach yourself at the hip to people who are busy and you'll stay in a good doing creative things that inspire you I mean or like invested in those kind of eggs. Yeah and I think you know in terms of that like selfishness that you were. You were talking about you know when I was quoted in that article. I think what I. I think this past a year has made me think about selfishness and terms of like activism. And I think that that was more. I think there is that undertone as well. I mean I'm talking about multiple themes now in all of my phone's just sounds ridiculous but. But, like there is a conversation there spat especially in the ceremony but about narcissism that I'm very interested in in terms of like what narcissism as and how it affects the world. As well, and sure that's La too. But I don't know I'm interested in like talking about it more. Yeah. Yeah. self-centeredness and selfishness. Yeah I think it's well I mean I think the biggest thing that has come out of this pandemic is kind of like the big question of like. Well, if we can't go out and we can't do all these like high end exclusive like fire festival level things that with our lives like the, what are we doing all the work for? And just because like like like a lot of people's lifestyles shut down and they were faced with themselves, talking to this a lot with other people.

La nyu Kiefer Sutherland Jack Bauer North Node Feminine Perspective John Wall Yennin Yang Laura lesly Kahn Los Angeles
"addie" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

08:49 min | 1 year ago

"addie" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

"Ladies and gentlemen we have actress filmmaker gold digger. You're going to get into what that means. addy doyle is on the open loops podcast. Abby. Thank you for coming on today. Thank you so much for having me Greg. This is amazing. Yes. You know. So so that give some context to everybody addy and I met each other at the Commonwealth Shakespeare. We were the first class to be in the Commonwealth Shakespeare Apprentice Program. What was it? Like? Two? Thousand Nine, I think I think it was two, thousand, nine, summer two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten to two thousand, ten. Wow I hated high school two, thousand, nine. I was going to my sophomore. I just finished my freshman year at nyu. This was the summer program that I applied to between freshman. Sophomore Year yes and you know what? I don't know if you experience this but I definitely felt that I mean in general I think we both just like connected as people but it was also like I was this New York person going to this program and everybody was like an Emerson or they were in the BBC programme there's a girl in tops theater program like it was a very new england-based brandeis students very, New England, based group of kids and I. Was Like Oh God like this nyu person like trying to get into the Boston theater scene a little bit here, and then you were like I I met you and you're like, Hey, I'm at Nyu I went to Strasbourg and I was like, Oh wow. Wow I feel like that was a key moment for us. We really connected. We did we fought a little bit about Strasbourg versus Adler because. Your. Sorted into houses like Harry Potter and at hogwarts and we were in sort of opposing school the I mean that's complete bullshit because it's actually the same thing that. Foschi but we interesting debates which I loved yes I you were one of those kids that like love talking about acting theory as my learning it so much I'm such like a Yeah I love acting theory Yes ole March and I could just talk about it all the time I think it's really it's really fun. It's just that it's not like I don't know if it now applies to my current life, but it's fun to talk about and like debate about but I think that's super. That's just because you're in school and I think that now that I'm you know I'm ten years older. And you know I've had professional experience. Now you know it doesn't matter. Everything is really valuable and important and I think back then I was like I'm on the right side and yes yes. Well, actually you know what? Here's what I'm curious about and we're GonNa talk about the main reason I definitely had you on today because you were like rag were about this admit this film that you were in to some fist festivals and I definitely want to talk you about that. But you know it just like let's talk about your acting lifers second you've been in Los Angeles. I mean, how many years now I've lived here for six years six years so you've been out and you've done I mean you've been on you've been on. Regular national television like like shows on. ABC. You've done web series. You've been short films, feature films when you're on the set, how often does a teacher's voice? From Strasbourg, enter your head how technical does it get to that level of technique from school all that's a great question. I think the big thing that repeats in my head if I'm if I'm having a moment of insecurity like I'm not really sure if I'm doing the right thing or are making the right choice or I'm understanding the writer on properly I. Think that it really just comes down to I had a teacher named Robert Ellerman, who still there and still teaching he was also like a disciple of Bobby Lewis who. Group, theater? Yes. Yes. So he's like a direct descendant of of not not biologically but. He worked with him very intensely and he just said all this. It's the only question you ask yourself is can I believe this? Can I believe? Can I believe this and I think it's just getting to that point where you just are. So you you have this map of what you're doing. But then at the same time you have to like, let go within that map that the mapping out is so that you're honoring the writers. Direct Vision, producers vision and also like the audience. And then just kind of marrying that with also like living in the moment and having those like deep moments of connection which don't happen all the time on stage or on film. But when they do all this is why I do this like you're so energized and you're like I see that person like I, see them. And that's the big bats. The that's were was one of the biggest takeaways for me was like, can I believe this yeah? Yeah? Sometimes, in my head, that's very cool I. Also, just really think is interesting is. You Know I. Read an interview with you where you were talking about. Wanting to triple threat growing. Up. The idea of being like an actor, her dancer you know. There was one time that I was in like a bookstore in I think it was in Cape Cod and these old guys were like like the these old men were in the movie Sachin rousing the movie section and these old life in Roy talking and they looked at may engagement a conversation they were you know Juno Judy Garland, used to perform in film a Dan not she would go out to these concert halls and still perform for a crowd even when she wasn't doing films, she would still do it. She had these young actors today they don't do any of that stuff. I find it. So interesting that like I think you still need to do theater at like you. You can't just do film like you always find a way to do theatre somehow like do you feel like that's just Like a theater nerd and lover like is not just an essential part of everything you do like how does it factor in win La is so film and TV based Yeah and I've done some theater here and I've produced a little bit of theater out here as well. Yeah I mean I think it is. You know and I've debated about debates. So I've debated about this to their to very they are different and similar at the same time because if you really can be do a full show from start to finish and do the rehearsal process and live in that space and really like a go back going back to that like believe for two and a half hours. You know it makes transitioning to film a lot easier. However, there's a lot on film. You cannot get away with that can get away with in theater, and I think that that's something not some people like fight about like one say like Oh films so easy and I and I don't agree with that like there's so a film auditions to me like there is you just cannot get away with certain stuff like they just see right through. I, mean like with the camera disclosed like you can't lie no lies no room for lies. It's tougher that way because you have to be. So in the zone because in theater what's Nice about it is that there's distance no one can touch you like a soon as it's like you know curtain up and the music starts playing your musical or whatever play like nobody's going to interrupt your process they can't maybe somebody. But like really you can hide or whatever your on the film set. You don't have that luxury as an actor usually there's so much going on around you and there's I mean there's sometimes two hundred people doing very important things around you moving incredibly expensive and heavy objects. So you have to like really concentrate it's just a different level of endurance. It's a longer day. Film actor it can be two hours it can be sixteen to eighteen. So that's the level of endurance at different and then with traditional theatre, it's eight shows a weeks and that's a very different level of endurance because you know you're just you're in this this rhythm..

Strasbourg nyu writer addy doyle Commonwealth Shakespeare Appre Abby Greg Los Angeles Cape Cod Harry Potter brandeis BBC Boston ABC Judy Garland New England New York Emerson Robert Ellerman
Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

The Vergecast

31:46 min | 1 year ago

Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

"Hey everybody seemingly from the verge cast really special interview episode this week yesterday the verge published feature package where calling capturing the police which was a months-long effort for almost everybody at the site to really interrogate the role of technology in the movement against police violence. The heart of the package is a feature where we talk to. People who had filmed the somewhat viral videos of police violence asking him why they did it. What happened next how they felt in the moment whether they would do it again, really contextualising these that we've seen over and over and over again we estimate videos. One is about a specific incidents with a specific set of men in Baytown Texas who filmed police violence and what happened next another one from the science team is about body cameras and police body cameras, and how they affect your perception. What's going on in some academic research that's come out about that. So I asked verge reporter, Steven and verge video producer, my calf, the two leaders of the site wide project To come on, say talk to me about the project what they learned in. Really I, keep thinking about this, the role that our phones are playing in changing our relationship to the and the government. I don't think any product manager or designer at a smartphone company ever thought that their products will be used in this way or create this moment. This is the direct intersection of technology and culture, which is something the virtuous. Investigate. So this is a really great conversation with John and Maria and a really big project. We're very proud of it that'd be read. Watch it here are John and Maria. Maria Abdul. John Steven Welcome to the virtuous easy doing well I. I'm doing great another beautiful day in. Quarantine Mario. How are you? I'm good. I'm very relieved that this really big thing that we have produced is out there. So now I get to. Take back and reflect de. So Youtube or the editorial leaders have big projects that four I would say two months we just called the police project I. Hope Everybody can see it on site. We're very proud of it in scope it looks at how people have been using technology to record the police record police behavior protests use technology and the tools to organizers protests to organize. The movement around police brutality, and then a lot of how those cameras in particular affect our relationship with the police. So it was a huge project and it looks like one big feature, a bunch of. Additional reports around that feature in two videos that my help produce. Let's start with where it came from. How did this project begin in? How did it take the shape that it ended up being on the site? That is very, very good question because. It was sort of such a big undertaking. We it started in a very different direction than it ended as I think a lot of large projects generally tend to. So it started with an idea, a sort of idea in the staff, one of our executive editor was like we should do something to capture the moment then it sort of fell on me to shape that idea. Which is, which is interesting sort of problem because I was very interested in. Working with the initial iteration of the of the project, but getting a chance to shape it meant that I had to think critically about sort of what what would fit the moment and what would capture the moment. Well, I would say so that's how we came came up with the idea of focusing on the people filming videos of police brutality because it felt like there was a section missing to the narrative that was Benjamin. Circulating around social media, which is to say, we don't really hear from those people like we hear a lot from from victims we hear from police officers, but we don't really hear from people who like the everyday people who are sort of in the line of fire and decide to make the very brave decision to pick up their phones and record and sh like shine light like shed light. On on this type of violence that really sort of goes undocumented because one of the things we police finances, it never really shows up police reports. Yeah. One thing that caught me is I say this a lot but this is a new way of using phones that fundamentally what's happening with with all of these if you look at our feature, we started at very intentionally with Rodney King. George holiday that the person who shot the Rodney King beating in the nineties using gigantic Sony eight millimeter cassette handicap which basically no one had those like some families WanNa had those. But the the that camera was present at that moment in time at one am on that corner to witness that thing was astoundingly improbable and as we've come to now, the presence of cameras is actually more likely than not in just the way people live their lives and so the decision to record seems at once. Easy simple. Everyone has a camera. It seems likely that everything will be recorded, but it also turns out to have dramatic consequences. Yeah. Yeah. I think one of the main threads which will I'm sure get into later is a lot of these people felt afraid of retaliation from the police because they posted on social media they sort of were indentifying themselves as targets, Samara and you pretty. Videos here how how did you pick the two together the verge video team did want in the verge science team did one how do we land in those two? So. At the first video and Ben Evita's. I initially saw the video on this very large like database of other videos, police brutality that had been collected, and that was being shared on twitter that we were using that we were looking through for this project, and when I first saw the video I serve noted it as something worthy. But because it had, it didn't happen at a protest. It wasn't the the video that I thought I was going to focus on but after just Justin Callum did the interview with Isaiah for the peace reporters feature in. Told me after he published the video, there had been an increased police surveillance in his life and that he was feeling a lot of anxiety and a Lotta paranoia since he published video. It just really struck me that he still even with all of the sphere and all this anxiety and what was happening he still wanted to talk to us because he had told Justin that he was interested in being part of the video project and so as soon as she told me that I spoke to him and as we sort of spoke, it was just. So clear that he understood the magnitude of recording and he understood the consequences that comes with it and yet still wanted to bring awareness to not only this moment but also what happens when you record the police? So that's how we landed on that video. So our second video on the role of body cams and capturing police brutality fell imperative that we would cover. It in that way given that it's not only bystander footage that is coming out of these recent protests. It's also a lot of body CAM footage in. So we thought it was important and imperative, and that verge science team thought it was imperative to also cover the role of camps and capturing police brutality, but also how they might actually influence how we perceive police. Violence. So it just added a different layer and a different impact to this larger piece. One thing that caught me about that and Addie has report that just is really stuck with me as we went through the project about how all these videos of protests and police violence are becoming a genre film, and as I read that and I watched the body cam video. It just occurred to me that we actually have to use of the formal language of film to describe what's happening here that the body cam is telling the story because it's one kind of camera it shows you one kind of it has a gaze and all these other cameras have another kind of perspective in it. I. Don't think we ever think about that as these videos is having maybe like that formal connection between what the cameras are doing and what you is the viewer perceived and that to me has been a very powerful through line of this whole project. Actually cameras are active participants in these stories and they shape the narrative. The same way that we we know this in every other situation where there's cameras camera shape the narrative, and they leave things out in a enhance other things and that to me I think there's going to be a big long cultural reckoning over the role of cameras in these moments because we don't really understand how that affects our blazing to the culture to the police to the state, and it's changing because the. Cameras Right now I mean it is ironic a little bit that this genre films started in Los Angeles. Well, that's the most cameras right and it's I mean like you know if you think about it that way it's like it makes sense that like Rodney, King beating was filmed by a person in Los Angeles and maybe not elsewhere but also I, think I think it's interesting that you bring up peace because i. I do think filmmakers understand this. And it is also I mean to to get not conspiratorial but to go a little bit off the rails which I still think it's in line but. The US government spends a not insignificant amount of money advising film makers were making films about the police and the military, and they do get some of these editorial. Editorial. Control some of the stuff. and. I think that perspective does shape the way that we see some of these institutions. Which is why I think it's very powerful that. People on the ground filming and they're making their own narratives about these institutions in real time. So let's start there. That's the that's the big feature. That's the piece reporters. It's eleven interviews with people who film police violence. I want to just immediately atop credit or creative director William troll and the engineer from the box media team Adler who built this thing it is beautiful is quite an experience to go through it. But the stories are actually of course, the most powerful thing. John, tell me about one thing you said to me at the very beginning of this project was this is the same story over and over again? Yes. And there's something about the volume of it that I think really brings it home feature came together and tell me hey, came to that realization and tell us what that story actually is. Yeah. So we interviewed a lot of people that was that was the hard part. One of the hardest parts of the projects was finding people who actually wanted to talk to us but I think we were using Greg sets list on twitter to find some of these people Shasta Greg I did actually interview him for. The you know that's a separate thing but yeah, I think I mean I. Think it's very it's interesting right because through these videos like they all have the same, the same beginning middle and end and. It's once you've see enough of them. It's very it's becomes predictable where the rising action in the falling action isn't purely film criticism terms I. Think the reason that we decided to go this route was because it adds context experience police violence like it's one of the things that like it really gives depth to what's going on and it's stuff that you don't normally see and the idea was to bring that sort of reality. Home to people reading, which is why the reason it's the same story every time and the reason that it's sort of like it was distracting actually at the beginning because I was like, okay, this is a different place. This is a different time. These are different people, but like chronicling the experience effective people in the same way, and that's why it was the same story every time because it's not every day that you see. Somebody who is like an officer? Who's who has sworn an oath to protect the public, just beating the shit out of. A peaceful protester and I think it's one of those things it sort of jars you out of complacency and I think for a lot of the people that we spoke to the interviews it seemed like these people were very sort of Shell. Shocked. They sort of knew the extent of the problem but a lot of them were just normal people who happen to be a protest and happened to be filming when stuff went down and so it was very strange reading these these. Reports from the ground like these eleven fourteen over and over again because. One of the reasons I think that it's important that we have the dateline like when it happened where it happened and like you know how many shares or whatever it, the the videos got was because it, it gave back some necessary context because again, if you're if you're reading this stuff in a vacuum if you're just reading reports. From. People who filmed the stuff it really does get eerily similar in for whatever it's worth videos are almost all at night. If they're usually chaotic and they all feel like are happening same place. Yeah. It's really strange and maybe they are I mean at least psychically speaking right like it's it is the same sort of mental place I think yeah and that was one of the notes as we were putting the thing together that we got from our editors was this we have to return some sense of place to it. So we we added that back in as you were kind of editing each of these individual vignettes. was there a theme that that really came out from each of the people? Was it? What what strikes me as as I watch all these videos there's just everyone has a phone out. Right like all the time it just seems like this instinct to have your phone out that to me is new. That's yeah. That's not how people thought ten years ago or twenty years ago I really do think that's in large part because of the power of social media because again, like the thing about social media, people dismiss it out of hand as like a bad and toxic place which a lot of the time it is like don't get me wrong. However, it is one of the only avenues for social change for people who are marginalized like it's a place where you can go to be heard. By by the institutions who would normally just have the power to ignore you and I think like police violence is one of those things where it is like it is sort of an abuse of power, right? It's one of these. It's like something that it won't show up on an incident report somebody like a cop like using their baton on a protester but if somebody films that and films like the circumstances where it where it happened how it happened like you you you you get a sense of whether or not this was justified and I think. A lot of the Times it's not and a lot of the Times that goes on reported and I think. People have seen that you can actually like get some measure of justice from these otherwise unaccountable institutions by sharing the stuff on social media because public pressure is still a thing and it's interesting that to go back to Isaiah Ben Evita's. He has video that officer fired like his him posting the video actually made a change at the very local level. In his town and I think I think that's a really important thing and I, that's that's sort of what's driving this stuff because again, institutions like the police were previously entirely unaccountable to the public. Mario I mean you, you are yourself filmmaker you talked to Isaiah how do you? How do you take that? That everyone is just instinctively pulling out their phone because they think it will lead to some some change down the road. I think what's interesting about Isiah specifically is that this video doesn't take place at a protest it. He was filming outside of a convenience store they were coming from a barbecue. They hadn't gone to protests recently, they were the at that moment they weren't planning necessarily planning on going to protest later that week however. In as the video begins, you hear him say I've got to get out and record this. You also hear his friends in the car say we've got a record this and yet when we interviewed them, it was the first time any of them had ever recorded police had ever been with other people who recording the police and I think that is largely part to seeing these videos. On twitter and on facebook of police violence being captured by by citizens being captured by civilians, and so they wanted to hold this police officer accountable and they also started recording him preemptively. They didn't start recording him the moment he started you know approaching them they started recording the minute they were pulling over in. So I think that really signifies to us at least to me that. Even. If you've never participated in a protest or never participated in filming the police, you now know that's an option for you. That's an option for you and that's an option for your community. It is I do think the third part that is going on said here. Is that like it is a protective thing too. You have evidence that maybe you weren't doing anything wrong even like, okay like you get pulled over by the cops and they sight probable cause like you're sitting there peacefully. You get to tell your story, view the camera to I think. These videos, I. Am sure are showing up in courts of law across the country. One thing that's really interesting about this. Again, I come back to that the piece from addy come back to the the body cam video from the science team. I was filming someone else he was at a remove right? It was his friend who is in in the encounter at the police. Most of the powerful videos we see the lead to change our are removed. They're not from the participants. How do you? How do you think that plays out in this larger? There's a lot of change in this country. Now, there's a lot of conflict actually WANNA talk we we published the piece yesterday there's been some criticism I wanNA talk about that. But right now we're we're seeing one sort of very clear perspective from a remove. How do you think that's that's playing I. think a big part of when you hear Isaiah speak about filming he talks about the fact that he constantly to remind himself to take a step back because he knew the moment that he engaged directly with these officer, the officer could come out for could come for him. You know he had he very much understood the power dynamics at play. Even, as him as the filmer, so he kept as the officer kept getting closer he kept moving back and he would ask you can hear in the learned the full twelve minute video this incident you continuously hear him ask the other officer in the video hayes it. Okay. If I'm standing here, is it okay if I'm standing here, he's very conscientious of his body and his proximity to the violence to the violence has been that's being enacted against his friends and when we interviewed him the reason that he did take a step back was because he knew that if they took him if he got arrested along with his friends that that video. Might, not like not not got published right? Like he might not get his phone back. These things might happen and he knew the power of that video and the power of what he was holding his hands and he wanted to share it with the world so that meant taking a step back so he do that and it doesn't mean that it didn't traumatize him every time he sees the video he gets. Traumatized by seeing his friends violated in this way however, he understood that the consequences would not have been possible. Had he not taken a step back and capture according? I also think. Just. Generally speaking like we tend to trust videos that come from outside sources or people who are around but not exactly involved. It adds another like an extra veneer of credibility. I think which is. Another reason that like some of the biggest videos that we see are not like it's not the body cam it's not the person on the ground being choked to death. At, somebody else. Who has has has had the same realization as as but. I think you know just subjectively with trust trust those perspectives more because they feel more objective. CVT camera just happened to capture the incident on on film. I would say with this specific incident like the group that was arrested. In Zambia. The was interested but his friends, Skyler Gilmore Phillips were they were all taking part in questioning this officer across the parking lot. So I don't think they were necessarily objective I. Don't I. Don't think they were I think they saw there being pulled over, they recognize the police officer there friend had just been with them at this barbecue and I think the fact that he was able to get the video out there in the fact that you can see the whole incident play out right? Like in our video we don't show the whole twelve minute video, but it's like five minutes. Of Not, much going on until the officer sort of approaches them. So I think the added quote unquote like credibility is that you see the beginning middle and end of that incident Isaiah did not stop recording until the police left Isaiah began filming before the police had even had even gotten out of their cars. So I think with this specific video, it's less about the eject objectively and more about the fact that he was able to capture all. How do you think that ties into one thing that we write about a lot surveillance where all being surveilled all the time you mentioned TV cameras. A on a different day in a different moment. The way our talks about like extremely prevalent C. T. V. Cameras is crap ring put a camera everywhere. Now we're being surveilled in the cops have access to this footage, right? At the same time what we've been talking about a lot is the presence of this camera at a remove actually serves a purpose is Asia. Taking that video from that remove sort of purpose. How should we think about this balance because I I personally right? Like you catch me in a different minute. I'm over here. I'm over there. Actually surveillance is good. No, I think the difference is it really depends on like the the institution that has the footage and what they want to do it. Right like the cops when they get ring footage and what I mean like it's not it's like the cops are using footage to incriminate and I think generally this is very generally speaking in very, very general terms like it's evidence, right? And you know when it's coming from people on the ground protests were filming. It's documentation it's like the same footage, but it can be used in very different ways depending on who's doing the asking. For, the footage like and where it's going I think I think that context is actually super important right? Because like in England, for example, there are cameras everywhere. There's just like municipal cameras run by the fucking. Like in London, for example, there's there's cameras run by the Metropolitan Police Department, and that's just that's just a fact of life. And I think it's interesting because like they I think they have like controls on how you can use that stuff whereas with ring networks here it's like sort of ad hoc private companies turning it over to the police whenever they feel like it. I don't know I guess I'm going on a little tangent here. I really do think that like it depends on who's asking for the footage and what they intend to do with it. I think you know people taking footage is as it's intended to sort of exonerate his friends and that they weren't doing anything wrong and this sort of an unjustified thing. And I think the intent really matters. So I think that it's not just about the presence of cameras and footage, but it's also about who has those cameras and this of act of pulling out your phone to question authority to question police officers is actually referred to as surveillance by scholars. It is the opposite of surveillance. Right surveillance is often reserved for those in power. It doesn't necessarily mean it's always the state surveilled someone but the moment that you begin to surveilled them, you were taking a bit away a bit of their agency away from them. You're taking a bit of their privacy away from them but soon, valence is this idea of challenging. Authority by trying to sort of disrupt this power dynamic by filming your oppressor by filming specifically in marginalized communities, the police, and so with surveillance, it is the idea of this is what we're talking about right like it's not mentioned one time in the videos nor is it mentioned in any of these pieces but all of this is what scholars refer to sue balance, which was coined by Steve Man, and it's all about looking from below. So you're not looking from below you're not the person who is above and the position of power. You are the person who's often surveilled right like with Isaiah and friends like they were they knew this officer they. They had never recorded this officer, but they not only knew of him. They had previously had seen incidences of him, and so I think by pulling out their phone, what they're doing is trying to challenge this authority figure to them that had represented sort of. Head oppressed in had sort of harassed or had allegedly harassed and targeted African Americans in their community. So they see this officer, they see their black friend being pulled over they understand this officer had allegedly been targeting and harassing African Americans they pull out their phone to begin to try to create a counter narrative, and before any of these things I think Bijon spoke about this earlier like when you start recording early on, you can sort of see the maybe there wasn't any probable cause and what you hear them saying the first few minutes of the video is, what's the probable cause? What's probable cause like why did you over in the officer officers aren't engaging right? and. So I think the role of that video in that moment is about who has it right? Like you can hear them. Surveillance video from above that's muted that can be distorted. It's about the person who got out of the car who started filming. Once they start one saw him started getting attacked the person who filmed at the very beginning and surveillance often doesn't involve you filming. Once you see the police officers sort of attacking someone but you film when you see a police officer because you want to challenge there are over you. Yeah. The when I say we're GONNA face a long period of cultural reckoning over this I don't think that we the surveillance scholarship is that it's very early stages right and it's not builds out. It's not complete. We're learning how it works and that to me is one of. You know when when the smartphone cameras invented I don't think people thought the people who invented the ship in the back of every smartphone thought we're going to have to have a conversation about surveillance when this is all said and done and that to me is. Right and that I think about that, all of the time like there are engineers and product managers and designers who make these products. and. Sometimes they have a guest of how they'll be used but this to me is one of the most surprising revolutionary uses of the technology right just fundamentally and I think this conversation about what does it mean for everyone to record the state? What does it mean for the state? Maybe record your back with a body camera or something else it's going to change the nature of our relationship with the people in power. It is interesting like one of the things that fascinates me about taking video protest specifically is like I think, a lot of police officers on the ground seat is violence when somebody holds a camera to them because it like it does challenger Authority, but it also like like it is a a thing creating a record in real time that they cannot control in a situation and I think it's just very strange because. Yeah I mean, the perspective really matters who's who's taking the video really really really matters. Let's talk about that for a minute in this conversation. In the feature, we have very intentionally chosen to highlight one perspective people filming the videos. We have almost no perspective from the police in return know perspective from the state in return as we are making this project I, you know the editor in chief ultimately I'm for everything I knew we were making that decision I felt comfortable with it. We do hear a lot from the police, but that notion that the camera is impeding the the police officers job that the police are themselves scared of violence they need to be protected that there are people with guns in the street Often fear for their lives how do you think that I mean the piece is almost yesterday right for many people liked it. Some people were critical of it. We appreciate the criticism and makes us better. But how do you how were you prepared for that criticism that there was no perspective from the police as after pieces published how did he react and where are you at now? That's a really I mean that's a really really good question I haven't seen much of that criticism. Charts to my filters I. Guess My. But it's I mean I think the larger question of like what police think is really interesting to me new I. Don't know if you know there's been a few years ago. I actually spent a year in Ohio reporting a story on cops there and like. Like this, this very, it was Liverpool East Liverpool Ohio, which is a very small town between it's like West Virginia Pennsylvania and Ohio. It's right on the border of those places and it was the site at one point of the like it had the worst heroin. Like heroin outbreak people were dying of overdoses every single day like the average was like one a day and the police department was like it largely fell on them to take care of the people and it was really interesting because I what I did was like I just spent like my time going on right alongside like. Suit up get my notebook get in the car and we drive around like I would smoke black and milds with this cop, and we would like He. He would pick people up and so I went to the county jail and like I saw the mechanisms of the state like from the passenger seat, which was very interesting because like the more time you spend with police officers, the more you understand that like. Seeing people seeing people's worst every day does something very bad to your brain. It puts you on extremely high alert. And it makes ordinary situation seem incredibly terrifying and I think. One of the things that goes unexplored is the trauma police officers sort of feel, and they just don't talk about it like all of these. There were seven people department all of them were very, very, very clearly traumatized. In a way that was not obvious to them, but very obvious to me is like an outside observer. And it was interesting because like the other thing that they did most of the time, it was just like social work they were just they knew all the people that were talking to they were involved in the community. Everybody knew them like I remember. The COP I was with like picked up this woman because she like had drugs on her. And he was like, why? Why? Like what happened like we talked about this I let you go last time because like you said, you were working on your raptor what happened to that and it was like one of these things where I was like Oh this guy actually really doesn't understand like where these people are coming from we ended up having to take her to the county. Jail because she didn't have money for bail is like one hundred bucks and he was like on the on the hour long ride back. He was fuming that she would have to spend this long in jail just because she didn't have hundred dollars and so it's one of these things I think like you know there are good cops. The police is fundamentally like disordered. I will say it's like. And I think both of those things are in conversation with each other because like again, there are days that are incredibly bad like this cop was telling me like the worst day of his life I ask offhandedly by the way never ask cop with the worst day of their life is. He Was Not prepared for the answer which was like he was like Oh. Yes. So I had to respond to a call this. This guy had kids who you know his his kids were friends with he locked them in the House and burn the house down because his wife was cheating on him and so this cop had to respond to the call and then go tell kids afterward what happened and it was I was just like that is just like outside. So outside of the scope of a normal person's life. That it's like did it requires examination right and I think that's the kind of trauma that these people are like seeing like one of those one of those events can scarred for life I don't necessarily think being police officer is as dangerous to save a firefighter like statistically speaking. But again, like these horrific incidents of violence really do change your perspective and I think a lot of this kind of trauma is invisible and goes unexamined and it's difficult because a protests which is a very ordinary event. There is A. There is some potential for stuff to go wrong and I think if you're on the lookout for that, like it makes it skews your perspective and you can't see what is happening objectively, which is I think why it's very important that people also film the police at these events because there is another record that is being created in real time.

Officer Isaiah Ben Evita Twitter John Steven Rodney King Texas Metropolitan Police Department Youtube Product Manager Maria Abdul Reporter United States Los Angeles Engineer Heroin Isiah Justin Callum Producer
NASA to launch mission to Mars

Morning Edition

03:17 min | 1 year ago

NASA to launch mission to Mars

"NASA spacecraft bound for Mars launches from Florida Today. It's one of three missions taking off this summer. While Mars and the Earth are in a favorable orbit. The new U. S mission is carrying something unusual for a spacecraft a microphone. From member station W O M F E Brendan Byrne tells you about it from Hiss. When the perseverance Rover lands on Mars in February, it will unpack a suite of scientific experiments to help uncover ancient signs of life on the red Planet. High tech cameras, spectrometers sensors, and this is the voice of Roger. Weeks speaking to you through the bars microphone on super Camp. Roger Weans is the principal investigator of the rover super Camp, a slew of instruments, including a camera, laser and spectrometer that will examine the rocks and soil of Mars for organic compounds, a hint that there might be further evidence of past life. Tucked away inside the super cam is the Mars microphone. And so what is there to listen to anything interesting? First of all on Mars, and so we should hear wind sounds. We should hear sounds of the rover. We might hear things that we never expected to hear. And so that's going to be interesting to find out. The Mike will also listen as perseverance is on board laser blasts nearby rocks, you might think we're going to hear like you. But you probably won't University of Central Florida Planetary scientists Addie Dove says the sounds of Martian rock blast will help scientists determined if they might contain organic material evidence of life on Mars. But it will actually sound more like this. Microphones on spacecraft are quite rare, really, because there's not much to here in space for sound waves to travel. You need an atmosphere sort of like a slinky, right compressed the sound waves in between the source and your ear drums. And then they make your ear drums reverberate. That's how we hear sound. Still, spacecraft microphones have been used before. NASA's insight. Mars Lander caught a snippet of sound capturing wind vibrations from two of its sensors, not exactly microphones. The observation was a surprise to mission managers. Engineers converted the vibrations into sound, speeding it up and shifting the frequency up by 100 times for our ears to hearing planetary society, says hearing things from another world would help build public support for space missions. For decades, The organization has lobbied for microphones on spacecraft, but those efforts have fallen short for technical reasons or lack of funding. So what will Mars actually sound like? That's still a mystery. The atmosphere of Mars is far less dense than Earth's and made up of mostly carbon dioxide. That's going to change the way sound works on Mars, says Weans. You could not hear somebody scream from a block away on Mars. On DSO. That's just that's life on Mars. But what we what we will be able to hear is our things that are close up, and it's going to still give us just a whole new world of information from this new sense that we will have on Mars. The Mike can also listen for mechanical issues as the rover moves across its landing site, Jezreel Crater. It's like when you're driving your car, and here a strange rattling sound. You know, it's time to take it to a mechanic. For NPR

Rover Super Camp Roger Weans Nasa Earth Mike Florida Today Super Camp Brendan Byrne University Of Central Florida Principal Investigator Jezreel Crater Addie Dove NPR W O M F E
"addie" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"addie" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"It includes your fight go credit score and checking your score card won't hurt your credit learn more at discover dot com slash credit scorecard limitations apply you know what's so ironic I am actually talking about fuller law right now I just got an email from his paralegal over it fuller law and guess what John fuller's paralegal said Hey we finally got Addie Addie is my daughter we finally got it done we needed to sign some documents in the check is going to be on its way you realize they got I don't even want to talk about split it is amazing how much fuller log out is for that accident someone rear ended her the vehicle was totaled China acted like basically the coach of a football team telling us what to do not to contact the other insurance company he was perfect and guess what it's not the first time we use fuller law we got T. boned Suzanne and I one time about two years ago once again the car was totaled Suzanne's nose was broken you know what he got a sad time ready every single penny that insurance company had to pay out for that person that hit us we got the maximum the maximum policy limits and that one John fuller will fight for you if you were in a car wreck and it was due to somebody not paying attention it was due to somebody besides yourself just call John fuller I'm telling you call John fuller I've used them twice I'll use them again three oh three five nine seven forty five hundred three oh three five nine seven forty five hundred.

Addie Addie China Suzanne John fuller football
In a world of remote work, virtual reality is still pretty much MIA

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:58 min | 1 year ago

In a world of remote work, virtual reality is still pretty much MIA

"As more people are working from home to help. Contain the spread of the new corona virus. We're starting to face the limits of remote work technology on the one hand we've got zoom and Microsoft teams and Google hangouts but some workers need more than conference calls or even shared documents to get work done a few years ago. The idea of virtual reality for the office was all the rage and today. We're wondering what was the promise. Vr for work. And why so far? Has It utterly failed to materialize addy? Robertson is a senior reporter with the verge who follows virtual reality. I asked her why. Vr for the office hasn't taken off the hardware still has high enough costs a lot of different ways. That it's not really worth the tradeoffs from the things that we already have You get this sense of spatial presence with other workers and if you have hand controls you can interact with people in ways that feel more natural. The problem is that VR headsets. Still just have a lot of downsides for one thing you have to get one for every worker. The headsets are pretty heavy. You don't usually want to wear them for more than maybe an hour and if you're trying to do work on them also like what. Do you do. Do you type on your keyboard that you can't see. Do think that all of that promise back then you know that it would just be the future of collaboration and it made so much sense in. You'd have avatars and the sense of presence would mean. You really didn't even need to go to a meeting. Do think that some of it was just over hyped or did the technology not progress and get cheap fast enough kind of both that. The technology didn't get I think lighter and cheaper as fast as people expected and also the are turned out to be good for some very specialized things that often. It was already being used for. Like if you want to do really serious design work and you want to pull a bunch of people in to look at a car model or something then actually the are makes a lot of sense there but just as a general purpose office thing. Y- think there were a lot of people who are always skeptical for very good reasons. Where at this moment now where? We're kind of talking about the tech tools that people might need to us from to work from home and that's sort of what prompted this conversation that there was this idea that virtual reality could give us better virtual office spaces. Do you think that was just a bad idea or that? It might ever happen. I don't think it's a bad idea. And augmented reality makes more sense and a lot of ways if you imagine the kind of idealized version of smart glasses where you can see something projected on a table and you can have a colleague. Sit in a chair across from you. But they're actually somewhere else and being projected that gets around a lot of the problems you're still in your normal environment but you can also get the collaborative aspect of being able to say gather around a whiteboard on sense of physicality that you don't get if you're just seeing somebody video feed right well in that you said is still in development. Like how close are we to that? Do you think to something that actually is the thing. People want to just wear around the office. I think's still several years away. Their systems like Microsoft. Holo Lens that again are very good for simulation and training but they're still pretty inconvenient to just wear around the office and you wouldn't WanNa just hang out with them on. I think we're also I'm I'm we're kind of talking around the goofiness factor of how silly a lot of people feel wearing these like I don't because I cover VR. And I've done a lot of this but I am fully aware that a lot of people think this just looks completely ridiculous and they would feel so silly wearing it addie. Robertson is a senior reporter with the verge who covers virtual reality most big the are makers. Htc facebook owned oculus Microsoft. Google have all announced to be our or a our headsets for the enterprise. Hdc's enterprise will be available later this year and now for some related links. I also wrote about this topic for wired that column published today because in some ways the failure of VR Ar to materialize. It's kind of a metaphor for all the ways in which we are not ready to transition our workplaces or our lives to telecommuting even self isolation which is kind of weird because these technologies have long promised to decentralize us to increase our ability to take our jobs anywhere maybe reduced the burden on a few expensive coastal cities and even fundamentally changed the way we think about how and where we work. Inertia is a powerful thing and we haven't had to make fifteen to so far but that's not to say we won't. You can find a link to that column or the whole thing at marketplace Tech Dot Org and the Los Angeles Times and I were on a wavelength. That paper also has a piece about the many ways we are not ready for mass telecommuting and notes that the closest we've come in recent history was second life and here's what else we're watching in tech. The trading apple robinhood went down again Monday in the midst of yet. Another huge sell off. I feel like it's gotta be hard to blame a huge amount of usage for this crash though because who in their right mind is still using Robin Hood. Pouch The Wall Street Journal reports that some of the big GIG worker companies lift Uber Post meets door dash and others are teaming up on talks to figure out how to pay their workers if they're quarantined or affected by corona virus. Thousands of people do work for these companies but are technically employees now. The companies are discussing creating shared fund to pay people for sick time or missed work. Sort of like they might get if they were employees. Misinformation AND SKETCHY SNAKE. Oil promises continue to spread all over facebook twitter and Google related to corona virus. We'll have a story tomorrow on how platforms like Amazon and Ebay are trying to fight fake an overpriced goods but in other tales of misinformation twitter and facebook have responded to a doctor video that the White House shared that was edited to make it look like former vice president Joe Biden accidentally endorsed President trump twitter labeled it quote manipulated content a label that users should see when they see the tweet. It's actually the first time. Twitter has applied that label and then on Monday. Facebook tagged at the same video as quote partly false speaking of twitter. Ceo Jack Dorsey may have avoided the boot. The company on Monday reached a deal with two investment firms including one. That was trying to oust him. There will be some changes and a big stock buyback. Otherwise apparently no changes at the top. Welcome back Jack. I'm Ali would and that's marketplace tech.

Twitter Facebook Microsoft Google Robertson Reporter Ceo Jack Dorsey Vr Ar Robin Hood Los Angeles Times Apple HTC ALI Joe Biden Amazon Vice President White House
The Rediscovery Of The Colorado Orange Apple

Environment: NPR

03:19 min | 1 year ago

The Rediscovery Of The Colorado Orange Apple

"As the decade comes to a close we can now report that in fact you can mix apples and oranges well kind of in the western. United States Apple. Well an thr- apologists are excited about the rediscovery of an apple variety that was believed to be extinct. It's called the Colorado Orange Apple Jud Shannon Meyer of the Montezuma Orchard Restoration Project in South Western Colorado. Helped track down the Orange Apple. We asked him what makes it so special so the Colorado oranges a mix of sweet and tart being a winter apple. The flavor opens up over time so winner apples like the Colorado orange. You wouldn't even think of starting to eat until Christmas. You'd go through all your summer apples all your fall apples. You'd have these in the root cellar. And then starting Christmas. You'd start to pull these out and month by month. The flavor would open up a little bit of the suite would go a little bit of the. Tang might but they were still going to be very flavorful. They have some of the most complex flavors of any apples. You'll ever have. They said culinary have some of the most complex flavors you'll ever have anything. The Colorado Orange was popular in the late eighteen hundreds but around the nineteen forties. It started to disappear the biggest thing it had going against. It was a yellowish wish. Orangish glow apple at a time when America was going into monoculture where shiny red apples were considered the only apples worth buying. It wasn't because it was bad quality or didn't grow. Well it lost out like so many of the thousands and thousands of apple varieties that have gone extinct. It lost out because it wasn't the Shiny Red Apple Shanta Shanta Myer says locals around Canyon City Colorado cherished the Orange Apple. They knew it was a really high quality apple winner Apple. Good Keeping Apple in in Canyon. City of the memory of it was kept alive for a long time in the old timers. Like Oh yeah. I used to have a tree at died but we kept thinking there was still going to be one around we. We felt like we could still find one and so he and his wife. ADDIE started combing the state two years ago. We were in Canyon City in this orchard in December. And this person Mr Diana said. Hey I've got a tree also and he took us to a tree my wife. Addie and I looked at it and Lo and behold on the ground underneath the tree and the duff there were. These orange blushed apples apples and then on the tree. There were some of the apple still hanging and it had that really good sub acid flavorful. Taste that you'd expect from a winner apple so yeah it was a it was a a big moment for us. But the Shannon Myers have been careful and taking their time. They did cutting edge. DNA testing and compared their find to some archival wax apple full replicas at Colorado State University. They wanted to make sure they'd found the actual orange apple of memory because it's considered extinct. There's probably never in absolute but we've got his close to an absolute as we can between this newest new DNA technology the historical purvey of the orchard itself in and the waxed apple to compare it to. That's an extraordinary amount of information that most people would never be able to have to compare anything and so in a couple of years once the a young trees get going. Keep Your Eyes Open in the produce section for something new and please restrain yourself from asking. Ju- Shanta Meyer about mixing apples apples and oranges. Yeah people when they hear of the Colorado Orange. They definitely wonder what we're talking about. That's for

Apple Colorado Orange Jud Shannon Meyer Colorado Colorado State University Montezuma Orchard Restoration Canyon City Colorado Addie United States Shanta Myer Canyon City Shannon Myers Tang Mr Diana LO America
"addie" Discussed on Just a Tip with Megan Batoon

Just a Tip with Megan Batoon

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"addie" Discussed on Just a Tip with Megan Batoon

"Yeah but you should. Why are you spending all that time like China data and I don't even know if you make that much for that to be worth it. I don't know I just know that like it is like for for example so one of my goals for the year. and I like a fitness track so that I really thought about it. I was like I just want fitness and like it's working out just to be a more normal part of my lifestyle well. I don't like going to the gym to ever feel like Oh my God. I have to go work out because I hate my body because I I don't want to. I just wanted to be like Oh the same way that I brush my teeth Ethan. I eat lunch and I like check instagram. I also work out like that's just what is so by the end of the year. I will have completed two hundred twelve workouts. The end of this year like my year goal is you're doing squad. Were just constantly. Oh Yeah I am in a pool of sweat like a swimming pool diving and and water is salty and if I do that that averages out to three to five workouts a week and I'm saying a workout is anything thing where I am like sweating in my heart rate is up so that could be even if it's like a ten minute Ryan or something phone call or a phone call. I'm like a hike or like hike with friends or like doing something with other people giving that as a gift to myself and that is a measurable goal so it's not like. I just wanted to be more of a lifestyle. That's my goal is just to be healthier right right and so how can I measure that. That's been my goal for so long and it doesn't ever work yeah that's yeah. I like that a lot. I'm a pick a number that will be really good. Good Yeah and it's nice to us. It's nice to have to have goals with people and to be like you know and to do things with with friends I mean I I adjoined cross fit gym and it has been really fun to go not because I like love Crossville. I think is a fun workout. I'm not like I'm not really addicted to any kind of like working out thing. I think I just generally like doing karate. My body is kind of like. It's fit to kind of any sport fine like it's not like I'm a May uh-huh amazing at one thing. I'd like swimmer's body. It's like I don't have a swimmer's body but I could swim out so it's like. I'm not like built built for cross fit but like I can. I can do it so it's less about like. I love this specific sport but more about other people here. I want to go because I wanNA see Katie and Cole. I WANNA see like I wanna I wanna go to my boxing class or even teach boxing now and it's really fun to see the same faces who come and take the class and then even that feels like not as much of a job. It feels like to see Chris. How're you doing Katie. Chris and Coal Katie could people. I'm Bob single ripple. I'd the Steph has been taking my Tuesday Thursday. She loves it. She's got a dog named Susan Okay. Susan and I and I am closer with her because she's been taking the class hasn't she's happy about it. She now loves boxing and it's like it is fun. I I liked and a sounds like wow this is I have I'm talking some. We're talking about goals and I spent so much. It's time talking about how much I like working out with people and it's a community and it's like. Oh if I liked that so much I should make that a goal for that to be a consistent part of my life totally because it does make me happy and it's the part outside of career. Yeah I can have my own goals with yeah and my goal isn't a weight number. I think that gets tricky for me because I like eating disorder stuff for. I've had it and so like saying or I still have. It never really goes away fun but like but for me. It's like oh I don't. I Never WanNa be like I have to wait this amount of weight 'cause for me. That doesn't work yeah a lot of ways. I usually never get anywhere close and I ended up just like hating myself which is the opposite head of what the goal is. That's the other thing. I want to take a break but right when we come back. I Really WanNa talk about like what happens. If we don't hit a goal because that is detrimental ideas okay we'll take a quick break gives us an extra piece of advice. You could find at just podcast on instagram and we'll be right back. I realized that the older I get the more I want to learn more about everything this year alone. I've learned how to cook a poached egg how to use more powerful than I even knew.

Susan Okay boxing Steph Katie instagram China Chris Ryan Crossville Ethan Bob Cole ten minute
"addie" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"addie" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"All of the experimental classical composition that was being done in the thirties and forties. Into the main stream with you know, sergeant peppers and and revolution number nine. And all the experimental music. They did. So they I I have to say that all of the Beatles experiments were were influential, and inspirational and and at this point in my life. Hopefully, I'm including all of the different all the different influences. I've been fortunate to have been influenced by, but none none stronger than the Beatles for for certain. Okay. So I'll listen the new album is invisible light the Kuske space. And so I'm listening to Saturday. I'm by myself. I took time just to shutdown just zone out. Listen to this. And I found myself at some point during the album almost hypnotize at high alert is some points e even a little bit scared. Then I research our research and the the album. About the idea of society being electrically programmed to lose our ability to differentiate between fact and fiction, and that's that's not too far off is it. No, well that that is what's happening to us. Now, there's an extraordinary book I want to recommend to you into all your listeners called the road done freedom by Timothy tonight or and he does a really beautiful job of breaking down. What's going on in the world? And we have to be knowledgeable about it. We have to we have to share this knowledge with each other or rebuttal become controlled by these machines. And I it's I don't feel like it's too late or too early to raise this alarm. And that's that's what this this music. Is we call it Addie hypnotic music, although we I do feel it. It is hypnotic part of part of what we're doing is creating a transfer Buzek in that we're giving people the. The opportunity to just relax appear sound and this one of the remarks people make similar to the one you said that you became hypnotize in a way, it's people find this music, although to derby, they find it relaxing. And and that's really are what we wanna do. We want to expand attention spans because we're all extent. Attention.

Beatles Addie Timothy
Daddy Warbucks is Dead

Generation Bold

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Daddy Warbucks is Dead

"A popular English actor who was also a producer and director of film television and theatre has passed away with a look back on his life. Here's USA's Chris Barnes. He was a three time Golden Globe winner, the British actor appear. As daddy. Warbucks in the one thousand nine hundred eighty two version of Addie I love money out of power out of capitalism. I do not now never loved children, but Albert Finney had dozens of roles also as Ebeneezer Scrooge. And he appeared an errand Brockovich has died at eighty two is family says he succumbed to a brief illness

Chris Barnes Ebeneezer Scrooge Albert Finney Brockovich Producer USA Director
"addie" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"addie" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Going to get you upgraded. Yeah. And and here's one of my favorite stories today. This comes out of Alabama. Apparently a rural truck a rural truck on a rural highway. Yeah, overturned it was hauling boxes of chicken tenders, and it overturned on highway thirty five Cherokee county and the Cherokee county sheriff has the issue warning to threaten the locals with charges to keep them from taking an eating chicken strips fell off a truck. What are you gonna do with them? Well, I. They were worried that they will be charges if they take a steal of Addie tham. They're creating a traffic hazard by stopping on the highway to pick up the chicken, Ted. This is bigger than went. Remember that the Brinks truck that they left the door open the money that was New Jersey. What the final towel on that? In New Jersey, people go crazy for money now. Bama for. Whatever floats your boat. All right time for the secret sound, what is this folks. Stephen once you are first up. What do you think it is Steve a jackhammer like a jackhammer? Sorry, steve. How about Mark in Newport.

Cherokee county New Jersey Addie tham Steve Bama Ted Alabama Stephen Newport Mark
Are people sleeping on the Oklahoma City Thunder

First Take

02:35 min | 3 years ago

Are people sleeping on the Oklahoma City Thunder

"I want to get to another team in the west. That's been a surprise. Obviously we're talking about the nuggets. But how about the thunder Paul George had twenty five fourth quarter points and Russell Westbrook past Jason Kidd on the all time list for most triple doubles has the thunder win again. Okay. See has jumped all the way to second in the west guys. Let's not forget Russell, Westbrook's real real good. Stephen it. Are you buying thunder as real contenders combine them by them? I think Russell Russell Westbrook is a superstar in this league. Yes. And he is the he's the most ruthless competitor. There is in the word. Everybody that's not wearing the same uniform for those forty eight Paul George is something special and the watch him continue to Bob considering the injuries that he incurred. I give him a lot of credit where credit is due right now. He's averaging about twenty four point three games. Stephen Adams is obviously good. And then you look at some of the young talent grant and entrusted to pick up a forgot land. Big Tom pickup. I like what I'm seeing from them. I still don't have them go into the conference finals. Obviously, even though if the players would to begin today, it will be the Lakers vs Golden State in the first round. And then the legs will home, I'm thinking, nobody. But the Golden State out west would beat the Lakers in the postseason. But I will tell you go Oklahoma City is a force to be reckoned with because without having to deal with the whole mellow issue. And it's just about the big two in Stephen Adams in young talent that game Schroeder coming off the bench. I got to admit I'm very impressed with what I'm seeing from the Oklahoma City thunder right now, I. Cannot take my eyes off of them. I don't say it don't say they'll say, I'm kind of hoping the rockets don't get good this year. It's look so bad for Carmelo right now. Like, you take them off the team look at how much better they get. And I understand they're deeper and there are certain differences in the team. Now, then forget about Carmelo several years ago. But but but not take this team versus the team that failed against Golden State in game seven at oracle several years ago. Yes. There are some differences that make a difference. But we all know the NBA at the highest level is about your very best players guys. They pose zero threat to the warriors because they couldn't get past the warriors before the warriors had K de Paul Georgia's excellent is he is is not K D. And now Katy is on the warriors. So since their two best players used to be K, D And Westbrook. And now, it's K D And Paul George and now the team that they couldn't get past as Addie, Katie. There's no way for them to beat the warriors. There are threat to anyone

Russell Russell Westbrook Paul George Stephen Adams Lakers Oklahoma City Thunder Carmelo BOB Nuggets Paul Georgia Jason Kidd Tom Pickup NBA Katy Schroeder Addie Katie
"addie" Discussed on Rants and Randomness with Luvvie Ajayi

Rants and Randomness with Luvvie Ajayi

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"addie" Discussed on Rants and Randomness with Luvvie Ajayi

"Be last night i'm going to bed and i'm like abbie levies gonna ask me what i do for self care so can you tell me turned off the tv and she's like okay let's think about it okay other answer off the cuff lovey you know like i haven't even considered this so well what ellie brought to me was one that i'm buying the most downdraft person that you know so i has about probably five or six people that i love very much that i let super super super close to me and then i love the rest of humanity like i love humanity that actual human beings are really hard for me so big ask down as my great loves always there abby my kids and and then also i think from sobriety i learned that big thinking doesn't work for me so in other words like asking myself how do i have a good life never work but asking myself how do i have a good day work because you know that any dillard like how we spend our days is how we spend our lives so one thing that i talked about last night that i do is that a long time ago i figured out okay they're only about five things that are stupor important to me so that would be my kids and addie and my work my output my creative output and then my input so like what i'm learning and my body like keeping physical things strong and rest respite super important to me so all i do is i figure out what i value and then i divide my day up into those things the and it becomes very simple and like what i learned is that if i'm leaving one out i feel cranky and upset and and it's always that like a such a little empty.

ellie abbie addie
"addie" Discussed on H3 Podcast

H3 Podcast

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"addie" Discussed on H3 Podcast

"Trolling i don't know proof well no offer any proof but this is kind of what you were hoping for yeah okay let me ask this would you know his username if he said it do you know them on all the moderators username i don't think okay i mean well if you try you're still listening moderator i i saw your email email again with some proof and let's just be wonderful birthday gift i'll be great all right where were we the story of deed on so we've got drake in black face to explain explain the significance how he's a black man so what so i mean what's going on here yeah i think there's maybe more nuance to it but it's very kind of people having very visceral reaction obviously it's face it really there yeah was he said that it's from a photo should was about yeah that right like personally can't see any of the reason why drake a person who staff blah with don black face other than as some you know stay yeah i agree yeah and he i have his explanation let's let's blast through this so he releases the story of addie john he attacks drake's father his mother drake's best friend for having the disease m s stuff that's not really something the chris you ns having son of a gun yeah the way he says that you have lines yeah his producers name is forty and he's like he's hunched over like he's eighty tick tick that man is six six sick and then he kind of says he's he's dying right so predators brutal yeah.

addie john drake
"addie" Discussed on H3 Podcast

H3 Podcast

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"addie" Discussed on H3 Podcast

"Days to prepare his which is actually impressive yeah drake doesn't really get credit for doing it in twenty four hours he's he probably was still around like four or five days four five i think it was about the same okay so he drives this song the story of addie don this now we're now we're fully up to date yeah and this is a picture that he dug up of drake when he was younger in black in black and their significance to the clothing as well yeah he's wearing kind of this yeah it's it's it's from a clothing brand that supposed to be kind of like an artistic depiction but just blake blatantly scene like this it does look very fencing let me say this before we get deep into the story of dido with things really heat up let's throw it to a quick commercial break and we'll be right back stay tuned y'all you know the stories about buddha are told wrong the truth is he was in lightened once used a quick electric toothbrush and only until then that's right this isn't to the pressure of the buddha was reincarnated with any took up to heaven it's not great let me tell you i'm obsessed with oral hygiene and i hate shopping for to throw this to firm is too soft it's all wrong you can electric toothbrush is good at cost two hundred dollars and it's got a huge battery pack that fits in your garage you have to charge in your garage not this this is a quick electric toothbrush it's incredible in you push the button if ivories brush brush brush it goes for how long two minutes two minutes after one minute it pulsating remind you hey idiot brush the bottom that part needs to be cleaned too so you get a perfect clean brush just like your doctor doctor recommends or your mother there's a little voice in saudi arabia your mom and your dentist it says hey.

addie don drake saudi arabia blake two minutes two hundred dollars twenty four hours one minute five days
Nashville, Sugarland and Dan discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

The Bobby Bones Show

01:25 min | 3 years ago

Nashville, Sugarland and Dan discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

"Latest from nashville and hollywood amy's thirty seconds skinny taylor swift made a surprise appearance at nashville's bluebird cafe on saturday night still stories informed songs even drink little fireball whiskey it's all going to be part of a documentary that they're doing and honor of the clubs thirty fifth anniversary sugarland finally revealed the release date of their first new album in seven years it's going to be called beggar and it's coming out june i'm amy better second skinny jannine shade tell us about dan's awkward proposal to his wife addie we're out of the beach okay the ring in the sand it was nearly dark times you drop during in san accidentally accidentally it wasn't like i you know i wrote like big letters in the sand and she walked out of the it wasn't anything like that wasn't wasn't romantic buried in the sand with just my hands to tease the bobby bones show have you had your morning cup of coffee well then you gotta grab some west rock coffee there maze of land is a best seller it's great hotter iced and it means good morning and rwanda where the company i started we keep it around the studio at all times so grab some for yourself it's your local kroger on amazon or west drop coffee dot com hello beautiful i'm amy eric founder.

Nashville Sugarland DAN Addie Rwanda Amazon Founder Thirty Seconds Thirty Fifth Seven Years
"addie" Discussed on Watch What Crappens

Watch What Crappens

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"addie" Discussed on Watch What Crappens

"She goes endured game mute husband him she's like which fits better honey and they're both hideous they're both like like old lady clam costumes are both terrible and she's hike will make scolding me work is scully doesn't need to be style as well on the sta with onestar and that's me he's just an average link at him lakes he's strong enough to keep molly chained together did you get that is that a go is that a go entities said ago mara now let me introduce you to my trudell kids let's have some fun with him hey kids dating these days in my wrought havilland addie mae people tinder are thought that was something you did to gather together together via mullah burt the taxi to allow boat that's attended doling not agenda this lang wells' playing wella ismet would they reaching seek to give you one from you twenty now that's it i'll look kids kids lawyer mahran acting so we go back to the seoul bahrein bistro where the fashion show is happening and louise is there any guilder shows up because she louise hasn't viola gilda and some friends and louise arbour said she's like it's gonna be glitzy it's a ticketed affair why all my productions at the louise playhouse ever corsets another opening lime it's like it's ticketed affair and of course our i've got the top taibu got it poses that work for you moore's as like how many seasons of openings are you gonna shoot louise.

mara mullah burt seoul bahrein bistro louise louise playhouse scully molly havilland addie mae gilda louise arbour moore