33 Burst results for "Adderall"

"adderall" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

KROQ 106.7FM

02:19 min | 2 months ago

"adderall" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

"Your Adderall. It's time for a striker inclines. A d D news look around of Johnny Object. They've been trying to get them for years. And finally, after many, many court appearances and appeals, details on Trump's taxes have been revealed. Questionable is a word used to describe this show and Trump's taxes. He paid a total of $750 in federal taxes the year after he was a less elected and he paid no taxes. In 11 of the 18 years that they looked into. He has AH Britain off a total of 72 million that Lise is written enough. So he's Ah campaign taxes because I'm writing this stuff off also hasn't he lost millions and millions and millions of dollars, which is the reason he doesn't pay the federal taxes? Well, he reports all of these business losses on a bunch of things. I mean the history of his business event business ventures. In general, he's lost more money than he's made. On DH. That's part of why he doesn't owe money is because he keeps reporting these losses. But they think that one of the reasons why he ran for president in the first place was because he wanted to save his business. I have to get a better account because I tried to write off like little things I'm like, Hey, You know, I use a certain room in my house, Tio edit audio for the radio. Show up. No flag. Red flag. Come back on the road on what? But that's like a legitimate thing, isn't it? No, I'm sorry. Can't can't write that off. Meanwhile, enough 72 million. They're like gas. Forget it. All right. Succulents have been sucking up the dollars of millennials for the past few years, and now they have officially infiltrated Christmas succulent Christmas trees are here to empty our dreams and our wallets. First off. They're not the size of regular Christmas trees because if they were that would cost like $10,000 for one tree. There are 13 inches tall. They're made of 25 different succulents, and you can keep them after Christmas 13 inches tall. Yeah, That's nothing. I know. Because succulents are ridiculously spoke to stick to the normal tree, stick to the normal tree and toss him out to the side of the curb. Thie American way. O'Malley That's your TV news. Striker and climb back in two minutes. Thanks to the two minute.

Lise Trump Adderall Johnny Object O'Malley president
A Look At The Soon To Be Launched Statamic 3.0

Full Stack Radio

04:46 min | 3 months ago

A Look At The Soon To Be Launched Statamic 3.0

"We are working on static three We announced it I think I was six. I was I just learned to ride a two wheel like and I said. Virgin threes, coming. In fast forward. Thirty one years here. I am It's how it feels as I mean at the at the one inch yard line. That's not doesn't make sense at the one yard line fourth and inches ready to I don't even watch a Lotta sports why using sports as a metaphor we're almost done and every every Monday. It's like, all right. We're GonNa Watch on Wednesday and then on Wednesday that close throat like probably, Monday? Yeah we're that close like we are so close that maybe Maybe, before this episode is live were launched. Nice. So you don't know what is the current status like the today is Monday three, ten pm eastern time yes. Is this a we're launching on Wednesday moment right now? No, no, no, no, no, no, no no. So on Friday I thought it was this next coming Wednesday, and then at four thirty, I found a section of the site that had been completely missed by my redesign and. Now. It's not just like it's not a lipstick page. It's like it's like a whole you X. thing. So I, have to spend a couple of days to work through that and when it affects the ability to buy something. Yeah. So it's bringing me next week pregnant next week early next week that seems like a good time to launch something. Yeah. Early next week sounds good I mean unless unless I like fall into a bucket adderall or something I think the only just GonNa take some more time. Yeah. Well. That's cool I. Hope you get it out then because that'll make for for some interesting podcast fodder for sure. So I guess like, got us this page that you discovered on Friday what else is kind of in the In the Tornado of launch. Launch Madness. So I mean there's there's a lot going into the relaunch. So it's Not just version bumper you click upgrade you know. We're changing the business model a little bit. The pricing structure is different. We're going like full open source. We have a free version that you can use for whatever okay you want what's the pricing difference? I'm always always loved to talk about pricing. So let's talk about it because it's it's too late to do anything about it. We already announced it. So here it is. What is it now like? Yeah. So right. Now as of August tenth at three twelve pm, it is a one, hundred, ninety, nine bucks one time for the life of the line. To like however long US v two. That's what it costs We have a free trial. You can use it like in Dev or for staging sites, but to launch site on ninety nine, that's it There's no other that's it So with V three, we are kind of going both directions. So we are pushing the price up to two fifty nine and we're adding an annual renewal that gives you support and updates. So that's fifty nine bucks a year. Per site, but we also have the free open source version for like Solo like hobby projects, personal site. So like a lot of people that are like Oh God I don't WanNa spend another fifty nine even more while probably don't have to pay anything for that site and it's gone really The sites that are higher of importance or have clients have teams working on them like what's the difference between one ninety, nine to fifty, nine, Yup. That makes sense to me. So. What's the difference in the Free Model? So currently, it's like free in development, right? So like running on local host, your building the site, you don't need a license to do that. But what is like the heuristic now for like you have to pay the two fifty nine People can use it for like what does it mean to use it? For quote unquote small sites or whatever. Yes. So we have like in the code, we lock out some features. So you get one super user account. You can't have multiple users. So you don't have permissions you don't have user groups you don't have all that stuff You don't have some of the more workflow team based features like revisions like you have different versions of content. So you can like you know schedule and publish you know like yet. So this version it's you've just had selective about trying to differentiate between like. kind of simple and sophisticated customers sort of choose. Things. Sophisticated people with budgets need that other people don't need. Those real time collaboration not that useful when you only have one user count, right? Yeah I would just. Turn that off also the get integration in the control panel so the assumption would be. that if you're a solo person, you're probably the developer right? Because if you only have one person on project, you should be able to code. and. So you don't need to control panel get stuff. So that will also be a pro pro feature.

United States Adderall Developer
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 3 months ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. The new Vif Sea salt and pepper bars have three grams total carbs why it's in their nature after all, they're made with one hundred percent grass fed beef, and nature's Metro's three grams, total carbs, eleven, grams of protein find them in the bar borrow or at epic Bar Dot Com. Thanks also to stand for Small and American Express. If you're a small business owner head to stand for small dot com slash partner for resources, offers and tools from a growing group of companies that want to help your business get back to business visit stand for small dot com slash partner to get started. Thanks also to Microsoft, the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat, meet, call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Here, at life, we know that getting your financial house in order can feel painful. Now, there's this whole corona virus pandemic. The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
Topiramate and Adderall Reduce Cocaine Use

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

02:02 min | 3 months ago

Topiramate and Adderall Reduce Cocaine Use

"We often say that single positive studies need replication and here comes one in two thousand, twelve randomized trial found that the combination of toe. Pyramid and adderall ex SAR worked better than placebo at helping people with frequent cocaine. You stay sober. This new study sought to replicate that although it was by the same research group is the original one Columbia's New York state psychiatric. Institute. The. New Edition is a larger study that looked at one hundred and twenty seven patients over three months. It was a double blind randomized placebo controlled trial that tested the combination of adderall Exeter with. Toe Pyramid, likely earlier study the treatment worked on primary measure. How many patients stayed sober for at least three weeks none achieved that on the placebo but fourteen percent did on the treatment. They were careful and conservative cardiovascular measures, and actually one in five patients had to stop the treatment due to elevated blood pressure pulse during the study. Otherwise, the treatment was well tolerated, which begs the question why not just use toe, pyramid on its own Toe Pyramid does have promising pilot studies on its own for cocaine use as does adderall on its own though that particular adderall study was in people with Adhd who used cocaine but clinically. Less risky of the to pyramid before considering the combination and it would be nice to see a study with three arms that could test out whether Toe pyramid alone is just as effective as the combination in this study. Toe. Pyramid was tight traded over six weeks to a maximum of one hundred milligrams twice a day an adderall ex SAR was titrate over two weeks to a Max of sixty milligrams per day. The authors suggested that the cardiovascular risks might have been lessened if adderall was tight traded more slowly.

Toe Pyramid Adderall Cocaine Elevated Blood Pressure New York Columbia Adhd
Lack of Care for Privacy and Security With Overbit CEO Chieh LIU

The Bitcoin Podcast

03:38 min | 4 months ago

Lack of Care for Privacy and Security With Overbit CEO Chieh LIU

"See this a lot now. I don't know how it's coming up in such A. Everyday vernacular, but the cash coin shortage in everybody's scared that America's GonNa go to a cashless society. bitcoins Guy Unique. Part to deal with that just because. Now all the sudden. You really do have a need for some. Cash currency system that's outside of. A, pure. Government issued digital currency, but the the governor's like convincing the government to go with that. Happen, it's not. So now you're left with that scenario. That seems ever so more likely. There's going to be people that use big win. And outside of government issued currency, and then there's going to be governor issue Kersey. It's like one's always going to be sullied in out. Compartmentalized as the other people's currency and then there's government issued currency like. If especially, if we go to a cashless society, that's just going to be the way that it is I. Bet you point of sale systems one even like. charge a fee or something that will happen with someone tries to pay with Bitcoin or it'll just be the under the table kind of thing like you've. equivalency of being gadget will be bang. Gleaming Let's. How much are we going to assume that? Governments are going to pay attention to this stuff if they are only just coming to the realization like. Black people matter. You know that's a good question gory. It seems is based on like Previous episodes talked about black stuff like. Nation states will use will use things like bitcoin specifically bitcoin apparently because fuck privacy To? Fund things that they're not supposed to fund or like. Move money that they don't want kind of the. Treasury to keep track of that seems to be the case. and. That's such large volumes where it makes a significance in the use cases of bitcoin whereas like buying coffee. Doesn't really matter. And outside of that like. They probably don't care. Maybe, they'll use it to find I know that they use it to. They watch it to track illicit finance, so they can have more information about terrorist cells funding each other to do things that they would not like them to do across the board. All countries are doing that. And coined join. Puts up somewhat of a barrier to entry air, but I guarantee you a terror cells bitcoin. So they're basically just broadcasting their financial information. And that is something that governments are interested. Outside of that! You. Using Bitcoin to buy. adderall from India no-one Shit about. Outside of that like now, innovation happening I would say is not happening on Bitcoin.

A. Everyday Vernacular Kersey America Treasury Adderall India
"adderall" Discussed on Q95

Q95

01:44 min | 4 months ago

"adderall" Discussed on Q95

"Does it taste like a mud slide with a little bit of coffee? What's the What's the ABC What You'll call it content Can I'm going to guess just off the top of my head 4.5% just like a cold brew then, except it's from a company that is known for their bruise of five year, 5% of a hole in this It tastes like coffee. Wait a minute. It's really good. It's like taste like ice coffee with cream. I can't believe I'm saying this. It's amazing eyes. Quite a turnaround. It tastes like a chocolate milkshake with liquor. Exactly. I I also brought in Hey, Ah, Cold brew. Oh, Summit's coffee. That's brood cold and you're supposed to drink it cold, right? I want to. I want to get up to go restaurant thing of the day and I was so sleep yesterday. The guy do you have any coffee here and goes? All I have is this cold brew? Is that all? I guess I'll try it and I'll tell you what it was like a like a jolt of Adderall had two sips. And I was ready to go during this onto this where you were, where you always fiddling with things. You know how you react when you fiddle with things, you know, you get lost. You get this comm populated. So did you buy a six pack of this or just one? I don't know. I say I'm just gave me the one so hand way. Hang on a second. I'm asking that we have the other five. I could get the other five there only a mile from here. Oil. Was that really good? Really. It's really good. You should try it well, and I also I'll bring in the cold brew coffee next break. It's It's amazing liquor in it. No. Well, you know that I don't think there's any need. I think I have a bus. Nice. I had no idea. It had my turkey. That's good..

Adderall
Here's What Happens When You Treat ADHD in the Elderly

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

01:53 min | 4 months ago

Here's What Happens When You Treat ADHD in the Elderly

"In two thousand four, the FDA approved the first stimulant for adult adhd adderall. Ex are now. It's nearly twenty years later, and some of those patients are elderly yet. They're only a few studies of stimulants and people over age fifty. Yes, that's the medical definition of elderly these days and they are limited to case reports and patient surveys, so today's study add significantly tore knowledge, even though it's methodology. Ah Retrospective Chart Review of one hundred thirteen patients with adhd age fifty five to seventy nine isn't level one evidence. Here's what they found. One the doses were low, most took noth- affinity mean dose of thirty milligrams a day and ten percent. Ron dextra amphetamine with a mean of ten milligrams a day. To the responses were good. Sixty five percent had better concentration mood, stability, sleep and energy, and only five percent quit the medicine because it wasn't working. Three the side effects were fairly high. One in three quit the stimulant because of problems with anxiety, depression, sleep, or other side effects including cardiovascular. For, although seven percent of the patients had cardiovascular symptoms that caused them to stop the stimulant on average, the stimulant did not raise blood pressure even in the thirty percent with pre. Cardiac risk factors. The bottom line stimulants can work older adults, but they may have more side effects and these patients may need lower doses. Although where we assured about the cardiovascular risks in these patients, we need to see a lot more than one hundred thirteen patience to better understand that.

Stimulant Adhd Ron Dextra Adderall FDA Amphetamine
A Second Chance at Life: Getting Sober at Age 24

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

09:02 min | 8 months ago

A Second Chance at Life: Getting Sober at Age 24

"Hello and welcome to. Let's talk a series of podcast produced by the Hazel and Betty Ford Foundation on the issues. That matter to us the issues that we no matter to you to substance use prevention research treatment of Addiction Recovery Management Advocacy and education. I'm your host oil moyers and today we have a story of hope brought to us by Holly S. Welcome Holly Thank you. Thanks for being here again. I'm so struck by the fact that as a young person in recovery. You've been so willing to stand up and speak out. You were on the stage at Hazelton BETTY FORD IN CENTER CITY MINNESOTA. When we had the drugs are there yet. You shared your story that they had that feel free to be up on that stage really awesome. I spent fifty six days. He's old and as a patient three times a day. I was sitting. And you know in the seats looking up the stage and so to be on the other side of that And even having the confidence to speak in front of a group of people as astounding. My my teachers would be proud. Come a long way so you tell us just a little bit about your your addiction journey. The first time you used you remember. Yeah I do I was fourteen. Bonfire my brother was four years or is four years older than me And so he had friends in his grade that were siblings of kids in my grade and so We went to von fire a night and drink and it tasted horrible. But it made me feel calm. Addy is and I was like okay. I hear often that this this is what I needed. That's it was. I kept drinking more looking for what you found it right. Exactly and and I never wanted to find that thought. I would have a problem with alcohol because my dad was suffered from substance use disorder. So that wasn't in my plan. So you knew a little bit of history you drank. It felt good even though it tasted lousy and alcohol was the drug that you continue to use correct. Yeah it was Up until I was twenty four years old in college I did use adderall and violence is prescribed that and and abused that after you know few months of having it And then it just any any mind altering substance it was you know zero to one hundred all the time. I didn't have turned off button. And then the day came when new. You couldn't do this anymore. Tell us about that day. Yeah so I actually when I was probably twenty one I knew I mean I had always had a bad gut feeling like my drinking is not normal. It's not that I would drink every single day but it was every single time. Major anchor would block out When someone told me they didn't lack cal. I was genuinely surprised like well it. That's not what you do and you drink And that was scary. Own and the waking up and not remembering But when I started drinking every day and when I started drinking by myself and when I started using it as a coping mechanism fats and I was like okay. This isn't right And that was around. Twenty twenty one to twenty four years old Brit just progressively about so much worse towards totally isolating and just drinking by myself in my room and Stang fire and just before you had your bottom. You had a family tragedy. Yeah so My Dad died from the disease of alcoholism and fat was a long time coming. I mean I grew up watching him drink as a you know as a young kid and and I didn't know what that silver and way read can was but I knew that the more that piled up next to his recliner the more he wasn't going to be my dad. You know he damore beer. He drank or whatever So that was a scary thing as a kid for my brother and I And then after my parents got a divorce when I was in fifth grade just progressively got worse and then it's really hard to ought somebody's slowly and then quickly wither away And a degree the loss of my dad twice The first time when alcoholism totally consumed him where the disease totally consumed to him and then once again when he was actually gone And I honestly think the first time was worse Because the staff that I loved so much wasn't the same and so for me when he passed away. I I was even deeper and might action right like you think that'd be a wake up call And it was to some extent but I did. I had no idea how to cope with and what to do and so I just kept drinking four more months for former months. Yeah said enough. Yeah and then I. I'm GonNa die can get help. And I started really experiencing the physical withdrawals you know not being able to go. X. Amount of hours without the shaking sweating meant I just. I watched my dad for so many years and to be experiencing that myself I was like I don't want to live that way. And My dad dying gave me a second chance at life because that brought me to his old buddy Ford and and that helped me get through sober living and IOP And counseling financially at. That's what money did for me and what that was Was that that you found recovery November for twenty seventeen. So here we come up on. It'll be soon two years in fall. Two Thousand Nineteen Been What's been the toughest part of your last two year journey and recovery? You know. I think it's really figuring out myself and figuring out my feelings and boundaries to to actually sit with discomfort isn't easy you know it takes a while to get to get used to and I would feel a little bit out of control of you know I'm like how am I supposed to handle this and And by just sitting with it I've and reaching out to peers and the sober community and I found that okay this shall pass and I can. I can do it Shortly you will be graduating from college yet. Your degree is in community health education. Where does that come from? What do you want to do with that Yeah so I. At first I wanted to do nursing. I wanted to go on for nursing and actually working IGNATIEVA I. I loved my nurse so much and I was. I WANNA be her but I am really looking forward to exploring the advocacy piece And that's a lot of what community? Health Education is health promotion intervention disease prevention in the arena of addiction. Yeah absolutely yeah So I'm I'm really excited about it. And your internship has been working in a sober for an organization that promotes sober living. Saint Paul's living and it's it's more of a structured sober living. But it's yeah but it's all about finding life in recovery life beyond treatment and and finding meaningful relationships and sober friends. Because that's that's hard. I I believe for me. Had I gone home to South Dakota? It would have been hard because in Saint Paul the twin cities. There's five hundred six hundred meetings a week. I mean recovery. People there are so many young Pe- ray. Yeah and it's I feel normal.

Betty Ford Betty Ford Foundation Moyers Twenty Twenty Holly S. Hazel Hazelton South Dakota Adderall Addy Center City Minnesota Saint Paul Ford
"adderall" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"adderall" Discussed on 600 WREC

"That's sweet I got one one that's two things around one do you do we have any of these did you know we can sample and we can use stand and I think there were I could I don't I was actually thinking about they say you know if you do that well one of the things that they're trying to test now is if you have those focus but do you really need to take like Adderall are Ritalin or something like that right keep out okay no problem is a guy like me a young guy like me I put those things in right yeah and I walk into I don't know a restaurant and a bar whatever and the nice waitress will see those things in my ear and say would you like to order something to drink you could say I'm not sure I'm focusing on the phone Hey can I tell you an insider secret all right okay so when we were talking before the show and I and they were saying like you know which one's going to be the real one I said you know it's gonna be number two so when you came out and said it was number two I move number two to number one did you yeah yes just so there's some there's some really nasty stuff going I I hate to lose behind the scenes I hate to lose I'm so compact so now you're coming back from a big win I am is are you gonna come back next week I am hello you know locus on it it depends on what the focus groups in the ratings maybe he needs a brain drain may put a cap on it come on well you know what you did you know what let me give kudos you got like two in a.

Adderall
"adderall" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"adderall" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Yes that's that's three I got one one that you're on the air that's two things around one do you do we have any of these did you know we can sample and we can use stand and I think that were I could I know when I was actually thinking about they say you know if you do that well one of the things that they're trying to test now is if you have those focus but do you really need to take like Adderall are Ritalin or something like that right keep out okay no problem is a guy like me a young guy like me I put those things in right yeah and I walk into I don't know a restaurant and a bar whatever and the nice waitress will see those things in my ear and say would you like to order something to drank you could say I'm not sure I'm focusing on the phone Hey can I take an insider's secret all right okay so when we were talking before the show and I and they were saying like you know which one's going to be the real one I said you know it's gonna be number two so when you came out and said it was number two I move number two to number one did you say yes just so there's some there's some really nasty stuff going I I hate to lose behind the scenes I hate to lose I'm so combat so now you're coming back from a big win I am is are you gonna come back next week I am I don't know you know locus on it it depends on what the focus groups in the ratings maybe he need the brain drain may put a cap on it come on well you know what you did you know what let me give kudos you got like two in a row that was.

Adderall
ADHD treatment device approved by FDA

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

03:20 min | 1 year ago

ADHD treatment device approved by FDA

"For the first time the FDA approves device to treat ADHD kids. Get low level electric pulses while they sleep and the results are similar to the effect of non stimulant drug treatment. Dr Tara knew Rula talked about it on CBS this morning. The device is basically a new treatment that's non drug related, which is great for a lot of parents who don't want to put their kids on medication. And so it's the size of a cell phone. And basically it has a wire that attached to a patch that's placed on the child's forehead. They wear it at night while they're sleeping for about eight hours. It's meant for kids who are over the age of seven not on medication. And essentially the way that it works is it emits a low level electrical pulse that essentially stimulates cranial nerve called trae jemele nerve, and the ideas that that nerve then sends signals into the brain particularly to the area. That are important for attention for functioning behavior in the ideas that can help symptoms, and they did see in this small study about sixty kids over four weeks. It did reduce symptoms. It seems to be on par with the effects seen with non stimulant medications. So this is area of the brain. That's still developing. Right. This is the executive functions. Right. Doesn't get fully cooked until age twenty five. What's the downside of it? Feels like you're tinkering with a part of the brain. That's developing. Well, this is clearly the first of its kind, and I think probably we have a long way to go in terms of the research. But as far as this study, they did not see any serious adverse events, they did see side effects drowziness increased appetite some fatigue headache teeth clenching. But as I said, it was a small study, and it was over a short period of time. And we don't know what it would be like if kids were on medication when they use know the difference between a child that's a little rambunctious a little distracted a little, hyper and somebody that has ADHD a lot of the symptoms like daydreaming fidgeting really talking a lot could be misconstrued. But really this is a chronic disorder. Text about ten percent of children, and it's characterized by three things hyperactivity impulsivity and inattention. And the important thing is that it's pervasive. So you see it at school and at home it persists for longer than six months. Make an control ended affects function. That's really if they're function is limited ACA, Democles, socially. Emotionally. That's when you might want your child to be seen in evaluate. And they may in fact have this. We know that a third of these kids have other disorders like anxiety disorders mood disorders, a third will go on to carry the symptoms into adulthood, and the issue is that it really can be associated with things like increased risk of substance abuse, injuries, either accidental or intentional poor self esteem. Poor academic performance so important to identify it really truly identified and get kids treated for it. When you have a deal always have it. Some people may outgrow it in some people's. I said it can persist into adulthood brochure and there are treatments for kids under six the recommendation is behavioral therapy. And this is really where we teach parents how to reinforce positive behaviors. And eliminate those ones that are negative and also then medication in combination. With behavioral therapy for kids over six the class of drugs. We typically use are stimulants like Ritalin or Adderall mom. But as but important for this discussion, a lot of parents don't want to put their kids on these drugs 'cause they. Have side effects to things like at a rec CEO or poor growth or even cardiovascular side

Stimulant Adhd FDA CBS Impulsivity Dr Tara Adderall Democles CEO Executive Rula Eight Hours Ten Percent Four Weeks Six Months
ADHD treatment device approved by FDA

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

03:22 min | 1 year ago

ADHD treatment device approved by FDA

"For the first time. The FDA has okayed a device to treat ADHD in some kids. They would get low level electric pulses while they sleep results are similar to the effect of non stimulant drug treatment. Dr Tarun Rula talked about it on CBS this morning. The device is basically a new treatment. That's non. Drug related, which is great for a lot of parents don't wanna put their kids on medication. And so it's the size of a cell phone. And basically it has a wire that attached to a patch that's placed on the child's forehead. They wear it at night while they're sleeping for about eight hours. It's meant for kids who are over the age of seven not on medication. And essentially the way that it works is it emits a low level electrical pulse that essentially stimulates cranial nerve called the TriGem nerve. And the ideas that that nerve then sends signals into the brain particularly to the areas that are important for attention for functioning and behaviour in the ideas that it can help symptoms, and they did see in this small study about sixty kids over four weeks. It did reduce symptoms. It seems to be on par with the effects seen with non stimulant medications. So this is area of the brain. That's still developing. Right. This is the executive function executive, right? Doesn't get fully cooked until age twenty five. So what's what's the downside of it? Feels like you're tinkering with a part for. Of the brain. That's developing. Well, this is clearly the first of its kind. I think probably we have a long way to go in terms of the research. But as far as this study, they did not see any serious adverse events, they did see side effects like drowsiness increased appetite some fatigue headache teeth clenching. But as I said, it was a small study, and it was over a short period of time. And we don't know what it would be like if kids were on medication when they use them. How do you know the difference between a child that's a little rambunctious a little distracted a little, hyper and somebody that has ADHD a lot of the symptoms like daydreaming or fidgeting or really talking a lot could be misconstrued. But really this is a chronic disorder affects about ten percent of children, and it's characterized by three things hyperactivity impulsivity and inattention. And the important thing is that it's pervasive. So you see it at school and at home it persists for longer than six months and make an control ended affects function. That's really their function is limited academically socially, emotionally. That's when you might want your child to be seen in evaluate. And they may in fact have this. We know that a third of these kids have other disorders, like anxiety disorders or mood disorders, a third. We'll go on to carry the symptoms into adulthood, and the issue is that it really can be associated with things like increased risk of substance abuse, injuries either accidentally or intentional poor self esteem. Poor academic performance so important to identify it really truly identified and get kids treated for it. When you have a deal always have it. Some people may outgrow it in some people as I said, it can persist into adulthood for sure. And there are treatments we know for kids under six the recommendation is behavioral therapy. And this is really where we teach parents how to reinforce positive behaviors. And eliminate those ones that are negative and also then medication in combination. With behavioral therapy for kids over six the class of drugs. We typically use are stimulants like Ritalin or Adderall mom. But as but important for this discussion, a lot of parents don't want to put their kids on these drugs because they have side effects to things like at a rec CO or poor growth or even cardiovasc-. Side effects

Stimulant Adhd Dr Tarun Rula Executive FDA CBS Impulsivity Adderall Eight Hours Ten Percent Four Weeks Six Months
Adderall, ADHD And Harvard discussed on Paul and Jordana

Paul and Jordana

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Adderall, ADHD And Harvard discussed on Paul and Jordana

"Are concerns over Adderall in Ritalin a Harvard study on the effects of medication prescribed to those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder ADHD suggests that teens and young people could face an increased risk of psychosis with certain drugs. So now the study showed that while the chance of developing psychosis. Which is that's a condition that affects the mind and causes a person to lose contact with reality. Now, it's low, but there is an increased risk of developing the disorder in patients

Adderall Adhd Harvard
With ADHD, amphetamine has double the psychosis risk of methylphenidate

KNX Programming

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

With ADHD, amphetamine has double the psychosis risk of methylphenidate

"A new study could change the way patients shoes to manage their children with ADHD researchers at McLean hospital and Harvard Medical School say they evaluated the two most common ADHD treatment compared a new users of amphetamine. Jeans, which are drugs like Adderall and Vance to new users of methylphenidate, which are drugs like Ritalin or conserva. What we found was people who were started on Adderall type drugs had an increased risk of developing a psychotic episode researcher. Dr Laura Moran says while the overall risk of developing psychosis is low the number of those using an abusing such drugs are skyrocketing. And that's cause for

Adderall Adhd Dr Laura Moran Harvard Medical School Mclean Hospital Methylphenidate Psychosis Amphetamine Vance Researcher
ADHD patients on amphetamines like Adderall might be at greater risk of psychosis, research finds

The Breakfast Club

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

ADHD patients on amphetamines like Adderall might be at greater risk of psychosis, research finds

"Let's about ADHD, right? If you give your kids some type of medication for ADHD, which is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. You know that when they say kids are too, hyper hyperactive, they say that could actually lead to other risks that you have the twice the risk of having psychosis. So they actually tested when people take stimulants like amphetamines like Adderall, you have a higher risk of developing. Psychosis says it's be careful whenever you give medication. And they said that happens just even a month after you start taking

Psychosis Adhd Adderall
This may be why you jerk violently when falling asleep

Curiosity Daily

01:28 min | 1 year ago

This may be why you jerk violently when falling asleep

"Sometimes right after I fallen asleep. You know, the window when you're not quite asleep. You're not quite awake either. I'll have a muscle spasm somewhere on my body. It's random the will make me jerk semi violently which wakes me up. I'm wondering what causes those spasms? And why are they always worse when you're overtired? Great question. Angela. It turns out that this is such a common phenomenon that it has an official name the hip, Nick jerk. According to the national sleep foundation as many as seventy percent of people have experienced this at some point. Unfortunately, we don't actually know exactly what causes a hip knee jerk. It's possible that as your muscles, relaxing, your brain nods off and loses track of its surroundings, the occasional nerve misfires resulting in a twitch. Another theory goes the evolutionary route. Maybe when our ancestors lived in trees drifting off to sleep signaled, the imminent danger of falling to the ground. And so that violent jerk help keep them safe. A third theory says it's a conflict between the part of your brain that's falling asleep and the part of your brain. That's still awake. You don't fall asleep all at once and sometimes wakefulness can put up a fight by overreacting and giving your muscles. A sudden jerk whatever the cause there are ways to keep hip Nick jerks at bay if they're causing you trouble stimulants like caffeine, alcohol and Adderall have been linked to a higher frequency of hip, Nick, jerks and stressing anxiety don't help either. So really the best way to fight them is also the best way to get better sleep work to reduce your stress cut down on stimulants. And maybe keep your phone out of your bedroom for good measure,

Nick Jerk Angela Official Adderall Caffeine Seventy Percent
Opioids killing more children and teens

The Pension Group: Your Money Matters

04:11 min | 2 years ago

Opioids killing more children and teens

"To use substances in order to feel good to party to to get high. But more and more we're finding that kids are using prescription drugs specifically to manage their lives, and though we find that there. They'll take a ADHD medication to to study for a test. They'll take an opiate to escape. There's really a lot of life management going on. And and that's that's really scary. And for kids it can get out of control very quickly. And also, the the the Polly drug abuse, they use of of number these substances at the same time or in combination with alcohol can can very quickly be deadly. Now, it's affecting all socioeconomic backgrounds in different communities. Correct. It is this really like all addiction issues. It's a disease that does not discriminate. But we're really seeing that this is something coast to coast. No community seems to be immune from this issue and the devastating consequences that come with that Marcia wire teens abusing medicine. So oftentimes, they are using it to cope, I think that there's sort of this halo of FDA approval that teens think that because something's medicine it's safe because it was prescribed by a doctor that it's not going to be harmful to them. But we we see the statistics in terms of the overdoses. We know that that's not in fact, the case, and there's widespread availability availability. Always drives use when it comes to illicit drugs. And it's it's no different with prescription medications. Could you explain to the listeners what medicine abuses dangerous? So there's there's a wide number of reasons why these substances can be dangerous mean first of all we're talking about a number of different types of drugs. Some are opiates which are painkillers they're pharmacologically related to heroin. So it's really no different than than taking heroin when someone abuses one of these products. It's a synthetic version and for people who need them people in pain their lifesavers but for teens who are not used to taking opiates, and who may be also combining these products with other drugs or alcohol, they can really be deadly. It's very easy to overdose on some of these products, and with the benzodiazepines drugs that are in the same classes valium. Combining knows it alcohol also incredibly dangerous. And teens. Oftentimes, don't realize what what they're what they're doing on the ADHD medication front. These are stimulants it's sort of like a a super dose of caffeine and those are dangerous too. Because when we find out that we find that when teens are abusing those in regular basis. There sleep cycle is thrown off. They no longer can can sleep at night, and they wind up having to take other drugs to be able to get them to relax and wind down at the end of the day. And then they sort of go in this roller coaster cycle of meeting and upper during the day in a in a Downer at night, which is incredibly dangerous and can spiral out of control very easily. If you're just now tuning in, this is iheart radio program on youth and drugs what you need to know about medicine abuse. Joining us now is Dr Meredith Grossman clinical psychologist, welcome. How are you today? I'm doing well. How are you? I'm doing good. Thanks for joining us. Glad to be here when it comes to medicine abuse. What issues are you seeing in your practice? It's interesting because what I see it presentation. And then what comes out later tends to be very different. There tends to be a big divide so eighteen in younger, basically in highschool younger. They're not fessing up a lot initially. Whereas the college students are much more apt to tell me things, however across the board would everybody reports is Adderall and even the teenagers. Have no problem telling me west they I walk in. No problem whatsoever. I've been told it's the quote unquote, new designer drug. I think it's because it's so accessible, and you can't you know, OD on it in the same way that you hear about you know, benzodiazepine or opioid so like with eggs or Oxycontin or anything like that. So it is perceived as safe. So that's for sure the number one thing, I see. And then interestingly as I get to know people better, especially the high school students, then they started disclose more. And then I hear probably second-lowest

Adhd Heroin FDA Dr Meredith Grossman Marcia Benzodiazepine Painkillers Caffeine Adderall
"adderall" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"adderall" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Alphabetize energy bars. I fixing elliptical cycle. I lost five pounds. And I work at curves. Now. You know, it's. It's interesting this whole Adderall. Craze. I hear that people buy Adderall our people get a prescription of Atarot, and then they sell them. That's like the rage for for young people. I guess they get more than they need or whatever. It's interesting because Adderall is bay. I mean who would have thought that people would be so eager to try. It's not really like a recreational drug in my opinion. I mean, maybe I maybe I've got it wrong. But I'm less hard on somebody that is illegally using Adderall. Then I am somebody. Using heroin Bursa laterals not nearly as dangerous. I don't even know if it's dangerous at all. But the benefits of extra focus. Heightened awareness. I'm gonna guess you're going into the category of cocaine. I never did an never tried. I never really tried any of those drugs. But in marijuana does nothing for me. So that's out to. But I never tried cocaine because friends of mine who did said don't try it because you will love it has everything that you love about live. It makes it heightens. You'll be able to focus longer you build. I mean, I gotta tell you. I I don't know if it's a personality type or what I'm sure some of you are this way. I love it when I'm rested. And I'm reading a good book, I'm rested. And I'm listening to good podcasts. I love to sit down and go through my inbox. And make sure that every person who has written to me I've read every one of those are forwarded things that need replies. I love to draft a memo to staff of the redneck country club our to our radio show. Hey, can you do this? And can you do this can you? I love to get organized. I love I love the feeling a sense of that. I love office supplies. I love my desk, and my my computer and all those things in my understanding is all just sort of heightens all of that. It's just an interesting change. That's the drug of choice. I think some of for some people the whole drug thing is partly about doing that which you're not supposed to do. Right. You're not supposed to have this and your you do it. So that's that's you. You're not doing it. Legally you being a bad boy. And I think there's probably some of that. But the other one is there is a joy to being able to focus. So I can understand where where that thing would have picked up where people would start doing that. But my understanding now from what I've heard. Is the new drug, and this is forty year old white suburban women is Vance. You heard about this from? Vance is Adderall with the additional benefit that it's a appetite suppressant. So these women have increased focus, but no appetite. So they're not hungry. You take appetite suppressant? And how do you not eat? I don't understand how you went from just eating all the time to now not eating at all very weird. That helps I can't mention that on air though. Why? Your wife. Wife will hear it. Okay. All right..

Adderall cocaine Vance Atarot Bursa heroin marijuana five pounds forty year
"adderall" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"adderall" Discussed on KTRH

"Bars. Fixing elliptical cycle. I lost five pounds. And I work at curves. Now. You know, it's. It's interesting. This whole Adderall craze. I hear that people by Admiral are people get a prescription of Adderall, and then they sell them. That's like the rage for for young people. I guess they get more than they need or whatever. It's interesting because Adderall is bay. I mean who would have thought that people would be so eager to try. It's not really like a recreational drug in my opinion. I mean, maybe I maybe I've got it wrong. But in my I'm less hard on somebody that is illegally using Adderall than I am somebody that's using heroin will Atarot nearly as dangerous. I don't even know if it's dangerous at all. But. The benefits of extra focus heightened awareness. I'm gonna guess you're going into the category of cocaine. I never did an never tried. I never really tried any of those drugs. But and marijuana does nothing for me. So that's out too. But I never tried cocaine because friends of mine who did said don't try it because you will love it has everything that you love about live. It makes it heightens. You'll be able to focus longer you build. I mean, I gotta tell you. I don't know if it's a personality type or what I'm sure some of you are this way. I love it when I'm rested. And I'm reading a good book, I'm rested. And I'm listening to good podcasts. I love to sit down and go through my inbox. And make sure that every person who has written to me. I've read every one of those are forwarded things that need replies. I love to draft a memo to the staff of the redneck country club our to our radio show. Hey, can you do this? And can you do this? I love to get organized. I love I love the feeling the sense of that. I love office supplies. I love my desk, and my my computer and all those things in my understanding is Adderall just sort of heightens all of that. It's just an interesting change when that's the drug of choice. I think some of for some people the whole drug thing is partly about doing that which you're not supposed to do. Right. You're not supposed to have this. And you're you're doing so, that's that's you. You're not doing it legally you being a bad boy. And I think there's probably some of that. But the other one is there is a joy to being able to focus. So I can understand where we're that thing would have picked up where p. Will start doing that? But my understanding now from what I've heard is the new drug, and this is forty year old white suburban women is violence. You heard about this from oh, Vance is Adderall with the additional benefit that it's a. Appetite suppressant? So these women have increased focus. But no appetite. So they're not hungry. You take appetite suppressant? How do you not eat? I don't understand how you went from just eating all the time to now not eating at all. So very weird. That helps I can't mention that on air though. Why? Your wife. Wife here. Okay. All.

Adderall cocaine marijuana heroin Vance five pounds forty year
"adderall" Discussed on Your Own Magic

Your Own Magic

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"adderall" Discussed on Your Own Magic

"And I would drink until I got sick, and then. I was so so drunk that I could finally eat food without feeling guilty for it. Like, man, it was just a rack and I used I also and I don't talk about this part often, which I think is actually pretty important talk about, but I also used. ADD medication like Adderall. Yeah, Adderall in order to suppress my hunger and also work out more like I run seven miles and be like, oh, I am God. I am amazing like and have so much self righteousness and pride around not eating and running nine miles a day. Like taking this medication. That's not for me like just treating my body so terribly. And people were saying, you'll look, great girl like, okay, theaters, you know, it was just ought so damaging in so disordered. So I support by the way when it comes to Adderall, everyone you have your lowest load the next day. So it's not worth. It's not worth that extreme high the first day because a lot of people might hear that. It'd be like, Ooh, I wanna try this. You know, I think that's one of the reasons why don't mention it. Often got a little bit worried that sometimes when I share my story, it gives people ideas like right, but it's so worth sharing. Just also really a sewer staring at some people might either be abusing Adderall or be tempted to and it's worth to know that. Yeah, you might experience that high. That's something you can do without Adderall completely. But also that next day you are on your low low and sometimes that trickles onto weeks months and it's not worth feeling depressed to runs day. Yeah, it's speed. It's like when you take it, you are on a high, you are high. You are like you feel invincible. And there's an entire documentary on this. I forget the name, but it's on net flicks. So if anyone just Google's like Adderall speed, Netflix documentary, it's on there in I was captivated because I have that experience of totally abusing drugs and and you're right, like you have this really low dip and you start to feel like I'm not smart. If I'm not on this, I gotta find totally sparring. You're so you have to go through that period of letting go of it and and I did, and I realized, oh, I can take tests without it. Oh, my body's actually really hired. I should rest today instead of cats. It's crazy this. This is a topic that I do think should be discussed more because it is so accessible to get these drugs when you don't have a prescription and you don't need them. Yes, exactly. I'm so happy that you actually brought this up because I know that it can be so tempting ended. So easy. Access even in high school because I abused it in high school if a high schooler can get to it, who knows who can imagine, there are a lot of high schoolers that listen to the. So I'm happy.

Adderall Google Netflix
On first day of school, Oklahoma girl, 14, stabbed by fellow student

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

On first day of school, Oklahoma girl, 14, stabbed by fellow student

"KNX a. Fourteen year old boy in Oklahoma is in police custody after stabbing. A fellow classmate at a high school it was the students, first day back from summer break authorities say. The boys stood up and repeatedly stabbed the teenage girl during an. Assembly a teacher reportedly, jumped in to stop the attack the girl was airlifted to a. Local hospital with multiple stab wounds conditions. At this point is not

Afghanistan Adderall Randy Arroyo Seco Six Arroyo Seco Memorial Cami Mccormick Africa Kabul Afghan Government CBS United States Pentagon Adhd Frank Motech Manchester Oklahoma Pasadena Larry Miller President Trump California
Were 'Biggest Loser' contestants given drugs to lose weight? NBC launches an investigation

KRLD Programming

01:54 min | 2 years ago

Were 'Biggest Loser' contestants given drugs to lose weight? NBC launches an investigation

"Just watched was fair competition right yes, absolutely be, a nice, thing, so what are they. Saying about the biggest loser from. Fox News NBC reportedly launched an internal investigation to see whether or not contestants on the networks canceled show the biggest loser were given drugs to help them lose weight, according to the Hollywood reporter the investigation was revealed. In privileged logs which were, submitted in connection to a defamation lawsuit involving. The show sports talk dirt onto Roberts Zinger network reportedly looked into whether or not contestants were given stimulants diet medications. Weight loss supplements or diabetics NBC decline Fox News is request for comment noting the network cannot. Comment on pending legal matters who, worked on the series for seventeen seasons is in court battling, the New York Post over a number of articles. Including one from may two thousand sixteen titled bigger Loser dragged us so we lose weight the Elliott, reports, and for the Hollywood reporter the post interviewed former contestants who claim they were given Adderall and pills containing FDA Banda federa- according to the Hollywood reporter, one contestant in the articles it was a new exactly what we were doing and never tried, to? Stop, it. And the notes in. The lawsuit the physician says the statements are false and ultimately caused him to lose business relationships the Hollywood reporter states the judge has yet to formally roll on dismissal dismissal motions as a result embassy universal received a subpoena to see what the network. Knows about drug use on the biggest loser as well as medical concerns compensation and the show's cancellation according to, the outlet on June, twenty-ninth NBC universal reportedly turnover along which according to the Hollywood reporter, had emails, containing information, providing, legal advice regarding investigation. Of allegations of the provisions and. Or use of drugs on the biggest loser and actions considered in response to such allegations now the Elliott reports from the emails go back to two thousand eight hundred, other notes related to the investigation were from to Thousand thirteen, according to the Hollywood reporter on Monday one of, the New York Post attorney Steve Mentz sent a letter to the New York federal judge on.

Reporter Hollywood New York Post NBC Elliott Roberts Zinger Fox News New York FOX Steve Mentz Adderall Attorney
"adderall" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"adderall" Discussed on 790 KABC

"So he agreed to it was adderall and he had an adderall problem but he was working on stopping at blah blah blah blah so four weeks go by he says he's off adderall we found him all this natural stuff and everything's great until a week ago he starts acting strange behavior starts twenty four hour disappearing turned off his phone he was stressed out blah blah blah blah i've mentioned again i think it's something more than adderall she decided to go over to his house and find all his windows completely closed up at two in the afternoon not answering the phone i i'm on the phone with her and i'm said banging on the door until he answers and you're going to see him face to face well she saw surprise boy he found him face to face and he was as high as high could be and she doesn't really know what drug it is i don't know that it really matters what it is it does matter that there is a drug involved he said he did have a previous cocaine problem but he had red rashes all over his face had no signs of sniffling and she tends to think it's mess i don't know anything how to help her and what kind of direction to give her she has asked him to get help and he says he doesn't have a problem he periodically does this as a show so thing i don't believe that you can do a drug like this socially what kind of advice can i give her or help her i have two answers i would tell her to run him to call packs house that was a few a few are a woman or a man and you're going for somebody who is an active addiction chances are that you know somewhere and your family and your upbringing that you probably had i mean what does it howard stern's they must for saying when he meets a stripper he says oh hi what did.

adderall cocaine howard stern twenty four hour four weeks
"adderall" Discussed on Make Speidi Famous Again

Make Speidi Famous Again

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"adderall" Discussed on Make Speidi Famous Again

"Use me as a guinea pig i don't care just yeah you're the paragraph below the commercials warning you could have an inside well annabelle says she didn't have diarrhea so it's all good yeah i'm as long as it's my favorite price which is free give it to me are you on dating apps have been asking listening no i am not on dating app so like that you've asked catherine dennis ben affleck is really on because he's not on he's not dating that saturday night live producer anymore he's is but he's also on a dating of x lou wow wow didn't you do this all ready the nanny and like the strippers when you jlo's when do so she's like i do it i think he's so hot my buddy who who went and had dinner with him or whatever drinks literally was i i understand why he's a frigging super size he's the most charming intelligent like damn homie are you dating him like his pitch was so solid from boston i love guys like an actual athletes so much more based off as some of the i know saying he's dang superstar as when my friend was telling him about like what's going on like subtly funny was i say oh at that time i just wanted to oskar whatever it's like shading my homies i i loved it well where can they find your podcasts they can find it on itunes at adderall and compliments and they can find me on instagram at annabel desisto and your facebook group is adderall and complements kittens and guys she is beautiful you're missing a catch here any really great single men and should be a great ball or non mom way depending on how much money you make she was atm.

annabelle diarrhea producer adderall annabel desisto catherine dennis ben affleck jlo boston oskar facebook
Starbucks stores to close Tuesday for anti-bias training

Brian Copeland

02:17 min | 2 years ago

Starbucks stores to close Tuesday for anti-bias training

"Your usual caffeine routine could be interrupted no more than eight thousand starbucks cafes nationwide will be conducting antibias training tomorrow it's for good reason the coffee chain's leaders reached out to biased training experts after the arrest of two african american men out of philadelphia starbucks late last month i'm kevin mcallister back to the best of chip franklin on o eight ten so we're we're talking about heroin the city and some of the problems with trying to deal with all these needles and i took some photographs i'm going to put them on facebook i found like thirty six needles in a block right nearby where we work here and i know and we're not anywhere near the tenderloin i can only imagine what some of those streets are like over there and what that means to a city we have a problem and here's the problem like the mark farrell who the mayor current mayor suggests that we go out and service them and bring the drugs to them and not heroin but a drug that would make them feel high but not on heroin i i don't know man i just you know i know it's hard i know you're an addict there's a genetic part of this you know darin cabin okay is with us here one eight hundred no cuffs darren you've been of course you deal with a different drug most of the time which is alcohol which is the biggest killer by the way kills more people in the united states each year than heroin cocaine and meth combined although when you start getting into this opioid crisis you start to see some numbers that eclipse that eclipse those but yes i i do deal a lot with alcohol related cases and clearly that's that's caused some issues my home in san diego was i was about six blocks from high school and the and the homes around the high score getting broken into by teenagers looking for oxy and then you know smash ups norton adderall and all this stuff and you know i even though adderall is not in the same ballpark it's not addictive but nonetheless it seems like we don't really have a plan here and by the way when you're talking about people breaking into houses to try and get painkillers i see quite a bit of this where a you're someone get started on an opioid for either legitimate medical reasons or for illegitimate reasons.

Starbucks Kevin Mcallister Heroin Mark Farrell United States Cocaine San Diego OXY Adderall Painkillers Caffeine Philadelphia Darin Darren
"adderall" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"adderall" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Is that an addiction the adderall i you know i would simply become an addiction i have i know other controls that have said that do it too but what's sad is you have parents that are paying for adderall their kids they're adhd and then these kids go to school and they sell it to their fun so the kids that need to be taking it on taking it because they're selling it to their friends that want to touch your bud man there's so many potential problems when you have kids it's just a nightmare oh it's horrible the drugs situation right now is unbelievable and i was very upset with the school for her high school pinkerton at the time when we i started finding all these little empty capital well over my house and i'm like what are these things and i went to cvs and i asked them and they told me what it was and so of course i confronted my daughter and said you know what's going on oh i just take those to stay focused i take those two what to stay focused oh yeah you taking them so you know it just started as an i mean we had interventions would her back then what do you need to be that focused well that was right that what do you is so focused about i mean just knew better than everybody else 'cause she was sent to me all i have it on the control don't worry i'm not i don't use it all the time gene years old team oh man i mean quit high school or a year i got so involved in the drugs that fool no longer manage to her it was just weird but she got high from and yeah i mean you know it's it's been a nightmare i need to finish up with you we're not quite done can you wait through the weather all right tammy in new hampshire this is a nightmare for a parent it's one thing what you do to yourself manure that is what you do to other people like parody a kid man that is just not cool stubborn ub's e yes news update north korea is steaming over some recent comments by vice president mike pence in an interview with fox news.

adderall adhd tammy new hampshire korea vice president mike pence fox
"adderall" Discussed on Mentally Ch(ill)

Mentally Ch(ill)

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"adderall" Discussed on Mentally Ch(ill)

"Hey you guys welcome to another episode of mentally chill you guys are so lucky that i'm doing an episode this week i'm telling you you guys should be on your knees thanking me i really have not been feeling good for well over week now and i was like just don't do an episode the speak don't do it don't do it and i must have a much better work ethic than i really give myself credit for because i was like no i can't not do it there are people depending on me and when i say people depending on me i am very grateful that i don't mean children or actual people depending on me but you guys are actual people you're just depending on me and much more casual way and that i can handle so today's episode is all about stimulants psychostimulants they do really help kick start your brain i met someone recently at a party named lyric she's super cool and i heard her say the word violence and i know violence is a adderall like drug but i have never ever talked to anyone about it and immediately was like okay menu we need to chit chat so she's on the show to talk about her experience with five and i will talk about minus while i've taken it a little bit here and there so stay tuned for that and i am really grateful for you guys i always forget to say this please remember to rate and comment on the show only if you like the show it helps the show rise up in the ranks for i tunes and so the show becomes more visible and i can get more listeners and therefore ruled the world so please please please if you enjoy the show do a quick rate and comment and that would be amazing i apologize for any sort of dog sounds in the background he's been a very patient boy as i've been sitting here editing the show and now of course i go to record he just cannot sit still so i need to get him some.

adderall
"adderall" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"adderall" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Alarm kids are running out any start blown away and nobody has a weapon to put him down to put him down and that poor coach he runs toward the shooter to protect those three girls and he's massacred and he slaughtered now that's the bottom line put yourself in this position in the school as a teacher as a coach or whatever and you got a mass shooter you got a guy in there and you know what you're thinking dammit i need a gun to put this guy down but you know lot have a gun why while the union says this and the the scoreboard success and this one says that and that's where we are all right thank you for your call scott corpus christi texas how are you listening to us on were k y s i'm sorry kyiashko go ahead yeah i want to fear opinion on this there's the current theme or at least a common element between a lot of recent school shootings in that's trouble kids that are in our psychiatric care that are under some type of drug and if you look at what he was under he was under psychiatric care but he hadn't been seeing a doctor for a year and it's almost like we put these kids on drugs without really understand and longterm effect and then the league gets pulled off and they act in a manner that's violent no one's looking at the history or the health of our children is that remember my daughter when she was going to a public school they were pushing heard of beyond adderall or griddle end because she had add and we are hammering our kids we don't know what the longterm effect is and no one is talking about that issue what created this guy people people are talking about it and.

adderall
"adderall" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"adderall" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Alarm kids are running out any start blown away and nobody has a weapon to put him down to put him down and that poor coach he runs toward the shooter to protect those three girls and he's massacred any he slaughtered now that's the bottom line put yourself in this position in this school as a teacher as a coach or whatever and you've got a mass shooter you got a guy in there and you know what you're thinking dammit i need a gun to put this guy down but you're not allowed have a gun why while the union says this and the the school board success and this one says that and that's where we are all right thank you for your call scott corpus christi texas how are you listening to us almost haywire some sorry kyiashko head ahead yeah i wanted to hear opinion on this there's the current theme or at least a common element between a lot of recent school shootings in that's trouble kids that are in our psychiatric care that are under some type of drug and if you look at what he was under he was under psychiatric care but he hadn't been seeing a doctor for a year and it's almost like we put these kids on drugs without really understanding longterm effect and then the lake gets pulled off and they act in a manner that's violent no one's looking at the history or the health of our children is that remember my daughter when she was going to a public school they were pushing her to be on beyond adderall or riddle end because she had add and we are hammering our kids we don't know what the longterm effect is and no one is talking about that issue what created this guy people people are talking about it and.

adderall
"adderall" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"adderall" Discussed on WTMA

"Alarm kids are running out any start blown away and nobody has a weapon to put him down to put him down and that poor coach he runs toward the shooter to protect those three girls and he's massacred any he slaughtered now that's the bottom line put yourself in this position in this school as a teacher as a coach or whatever and you got a mass shooter you got a guy in there and you know what you're thinking dammit i need a gun to put this guy down but you know lava have a gun why while the union says this and the the scoreboard success and this one says that and that's where we are all right thank you for your call scott corpus christi texas how are you listening to us are more k y s i'm sorry ky us go ahead yeah i wanted to fear opinion on this there's the current theme or at least a common element between a lot of recent school shootings in that troubled kids that are under psychiatric care that are under some type of drug and if you look at what he was under he was under psychiatric care but he hadn't been seen the doctor for a year and it's almost like we put these kids on drugs without really understanding a longterm effect and then the league gets pulled off and they act in a manner that's violent no one's looking at the history or the health of our children is that remember my daughter when she was going to a public school they were pushing her to be beyond adderall or griddle end because she had add and we are hammering our kids we don't know what the longterm effect is and no one is talking about that issue what created this guy hopeless people are talking about it and i think it's important point i but here's here's what i'm saying the uscca they wanted to tell me what you think the can there's a lot of issues out there videos people talk about movies tv shows drugs had kids are on that one guy down the hall less you know we're not going to solve all that we're not going to solve it we're not going to resolve all that stuff why and and by the.

adderall
"adderall" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"adderall" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Richard hara what do you make of that i'm in riddling adderall vioence cash it is improved for more than a decade yeah drug who'd been around for a long time they are widely used both in high school friend in collagen that doesn't mean they they they work and if they don't work it probably is on on a work nece or the ability to pay attention that is not the same thing is intelligence so when i say there is no evidence that they work i mean there's no evidence that they increase in taligent no evidence at all really let's get into colon here on this point from boston nicole welcome to the program taking thanks for having me so that exact point i took adderall on and off for about fifteen years uh thinking that i had adhd actually heading diety um so it finally being treated correctly and my experience was very odd i was told that i'd be able to focus more but what actually happened is um my creativity was completely stunted so um i was normally off of outer all like a very right brain thinker and then on out of all i was very hyper focused on less brain leaning sings uh and my right brain essentially means appeared when you meet at odds on the weekends because i i'd be off of atarot and then i couldn't find things that i put away on outer all it was uh it was always a battle and um my mom describing his robotic on on adderall i couldn't think at a higher level um on out of office adderall i was a much higher level seen kerr talker so it it was a weird experience for me i didn't find that it may be more intelligent at all i just found that it switched my intelligence in a way um from one side to the other and uh i guess my question is is adderall considered in intelligence enhancing drug because in my experience.

Richard hara adderall atarot boston kerr fifteen years
"adderall" Discussed on The Skinny Confidential Him And Her Podcast

The Skinny Confidential Him And Her Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"adderall" Discussed on The Skinny Confidential Him And Her Podcast

"Tell your 85 hope ruled rules this is the blog post it wanted you are you going to be on outer all tell your 85 like think about it though i mean i get it i i was the same as you i tried adderall when i was in college for my finals at sc and i was a crackhead and i will tell you that yet might have increased blood flow to my friends loves i might have like killed it on a test but i cannot tell you what that tests was about you want longterm memory you don't want short term memories eishin you know you want to you won't absorbed things and take them into your life also you you we don't know when we really don't know the side effects of these drugs yet revision bring lauren of period of term tomorrow but what my question is is people that are using outer all to lose weight what happens when they lose the weight and they decide to get off because don't you feel like leeches gain it back he will if not more you will because a large grocers yeah well it's um you know it's interesting because people even just like with marijuana people are like it makes me so chill no it makes you anxious you just you know like it actually increases anxiety when you get off of it and the same goes for adderall it increases the anxiety of w and decreases your conference confidence in your ability to get stuff done on a regular basis without the substance and that's a problem you know i i think if someone is diagnosed an has had brain scans and shows lack of blood to frontal lobes there are neuro so that people can get you note start taking things called the aim and clinics all over california they do brainscans they work with nfl athletes they look at blood flow in the brain they give you specific and neuro tropics are like nutroceuticals that like vitamins minerals specifically for the brain so um you know i know they're one that someone could swing clinton owner really comes down to the and this has been lurch obure or re talkin rule of law we we used to soak discipline in helping you know not looking for quickfix solutions members who were order you want to mix permanent changes in your body composition or rear way to your door.

adderall california marijuana nfl clinton
"adderall" Discussed on Happier in Hollywood

Happier in Hollywood

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"adderall" Discussed on Happier in Hollywood

"You know so and then a neurologist told you looking at your scam that this was a reaction to adderall yeah he said this is the atr all pattern and it is a rare but not uncommon reaction to the drug um and i didn't have high blood pressure but i did have high cholesterol so they thought that may be or just something genetically in my body was reacting to it that way because i wasn't even taking that much they right you know what was prescribed and i what i was taking and they're like you know this is not even that much adderall really it's a some people cannot handle it have a negative reaction um so you stop taking it immediately oh yeah and i know you told me you're like okay that's it out our eyes i told everybody thought they did it and so everyone in all of your friends who were taking it to to be reductive did stop yes and so now everyone's just sort of managing now we're just coping without our wonderdrug yes a lot of meditation apps and then you know and a lot of balance and i think part of the stress came from just feeling that stress you know if you do feel a little bit more balanced and careful in life like i get my work done now without it so it's kinda fascinating to me and do you still feel that pressure or you're just accepting that you can just do less but have more stability you know i think i just kind of except the fresher but i don't respond to it anymore uh i'm kinda leg oh well you know um i'm going to get it done and hopefully do it'll be as good as it was but i allows the pressure came from my own wanting to please people you know yeah so it's really does my outlook on my work that has changed because we can write so fast you know but we just put it off now i just tried to create an environment where i can do that writing whose i can write three thousand words and into.

blood pressure adderall