33 Burst results for "Adamson"

"adamson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:54 min | 2 months ago

"adamson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"All right, so we should mention a couple of films that you might want to see. You go to Salem now dot com whose children are they. That's must seeing wait till you see it. There is a film that I'm in called 2000 mules, it is going to change history. It's one of these things that it's going to change history. People are going to be forced to deal with the fact that something happened in America that's never happened before. This is criminal activity on a level that should make us weep for our country, dinesh d'souza has made a film about it. Obviously, I mentioned I'm in the film, but I don't have much to do in the film except comment along with my radio host colleagues, Sebastien gorka, and Dennis prager and Charlie Kirk and others about what took place and the evidence. The evidence is just, it's incontrovertible. So people are going to have some problems. You can stay tuned. People can have some problems, but you want to see the film. Alvin, what else we forgetting? Oh, I do. It's today's Thursday, yeah. So we've got a lot. I'm traveling a lot. Tonight with that. Yeah, I'm speaking in Plymouth, Minnesota tonight. Then I go to San Jose, California, calvary church. A lot of stuff coming up, go to my website, Eric metaxas dot com. You can check it out. Don't forget nutrimetics. This month only for we got three days left. It's 30% off if you use the code Eric new traumatic, don't forget Mike lindell. Mike, don't forget my dot com, use the code Eric. And we're out..

dinesh d Sebastien gorka Charlie Kirk Salem souza Dennis prager America Alvin Eric metaxas calvary church Plymouth San Jose Minnesota California Mike lindell Eric Mike
"adamson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:11 min | 2 months ago

"adamson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"There that they will really enjoy. At Talbot group dot com. Waiting for someone to tell you everything sit around and wonder what tomorrow would bring. Hey there folks, Alban, do you want to wish somebody happy birthday? Yeah, my friend Jack in Pittsburgh, I just want to say happy birthday Jack. I hope you get another like 60 more. Thank you. Well, I want to say, I don't want to forget to mention this again in case people are just tuning in. I am over the moon. I use that term advisedly. I'm over the moon about the fact that on May 31st, in about a month, we're doing a Socrates in the city event in New York City folks. If you can get to New York City, this is the event. It is going to be with Apollo 16 astronaut Charlie duke. He's a man of Christian faith. He's the tenth man to walk on the moon, you'll have a chance to meet him to get a picture with him. I just can't tell you, we found out yesterday that he and his wife, Dorothy, they're celebrating their 59th wedding anniversary that weekend and they wanted to come to New York City or not that weekend that week. So this is a Tuesday night. We don't have the registration page up yet. It is going to sell out. I'm just warning you because a lot of people want to meet a man who walked on the moon. And I'm one of those people. So I am just telling you right now it's going to be up at Socrates in the city dot com. Maybe today, maybe tomorrow, but when it gets up, you get your if you get your tickets, I think, within a week, you get like an early bird price, which is significant. And then it goes up to the normal price. But I'm going to tell you, I just can't get over the fact that we have this opportunity. This is like a dream of a lifetime for me to get to meet this man to have a conversation with him at a stock season city event. We haven't done Socrates in the city in over two years since COVID. I think Peter Thiel was the last one we did. And then the lunacy happened. So we want to mention Socrates in the city dot com. If you go to my website Eric metaxas dot com and if you sign up for the newsletter, you'll get all this information. But I'm warning you, it's going to sell out. This is truly an opportunity of a lifetime folks to make this man. It's 50th anniversary. Of his walking surface of the moon. I'm hoping he brings his suit and he lets you climb into it. That would be so hard. He'll bring a couple of moon rocks and old pass them out to the kids. So we want to say that Sox and he said, I'm telling you, change your plans if you've got other plans. This is, you want to come to New York for this. This is so exciting. May 31st Tuesday night, Charlie duke general Charlie duke. He is going to be my guest. And I just can't get over it. It's amazing. It's going to be the union league club. Anyway,.

Talbot group Charlie duke New York City Jack Alban Pittsburgh Socrates Dorothy Eric metaxas Peter Thiel Sox New York union league club
"adamson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

07:29 min | 2 months ago

"adamson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Cried to the 7 million hey folks. If you know my Friends, Pete and Seth Talbot, you know what I'm up against. Bottom line is, when we started out this relationship, I just didn't like them that much. But why are we here? Why did we agree to you? Because you've grown on me. Somehow, the more we talk about it. Like if you really do know what you're talking about, and I'll be the first to admit it. I see that. Actually, all of your ideas make sense, but the last one, what did you want to talk about today? Because this one actually kind of kind of got me the title, the title. Well, basically how great ideas can sometimes be terrible businesses. I think most people listening to this program, like everybody has had great ideas that they think, I know, I know I have, they say, that would be a great idea for a business. You're saying, ah, maybe not. Yeah, I think when you look at what goes into making a good business, it starts with it has to be a great idea. But the truth is, is that we've had more failure than success by far. And that I think probably about 7, 8 years ago, I realized that one of the secrets that I would say leads to success eventual success is repetition testing of ideas that don't necessarily bet the farm. So non fatal testing. And it's a repetition. It's a numbers game. To me, if you've got good strategy and you learn with your mistakes and you have enough time to experiment in its repetition and repetition repetition, you can find some just good ideas and turn them into great businesses. But usually it's a lot of great ideas. I've had some ideas where I'm like, this is it. This is it. And it just goes absolutely nowhere. And a lot of business owners structured the business and structured their business plan and wager it all. It is like putting it all on black and hitting the roulette wheel. And what we became really passionate about in our businesses internally was starting to figure out, okay, you've got an idea. And I remember having this conversation in a conference room a couple of years ago. Where an idea was proposed. And it was a pretty good idea, but it had some negative baggage with it. I would call collateral damage potential with it. So it had some real good upside and some downside. And so what most entrepreneurs or small business owners don't know how to do is to distill an idea down and deconstruct it to figure out how to test that good idea. While mitigating and lowering the downside. But again, these were things that I started learning. And again, we've talked about this last week about how one of the major drivers for me was I don't want people to go through what I went through. And once I started realizing it was a volume game of testing ideas I realized, okay, well, how do we test without risking everything? This is so classic talbott and true confessions. I'm sort of the throw it all on black or throw it all on red. It would be very telling me that you have a gambling problem. Well, this is a dog. Metaphorically. That's for another show. Okay. That's for another show. Quite literally. But my point is, my natural state, as a risk taker and as an entrepreneur, was if I had a good idea, I would, if I had a hundred grand, I'd throw a hundred grand at it. Or sometimes a lot more. I'm actually writing a book. I've just started a book called how to fail successfully. See, now what my son has done, we've been working together now for about 18 years. Too long. Wow. And what's happened is we have failed. We have failed. Yeah. Like in the last 18 years, even with our most successful companies, which we've recently sold, but we feel more than me. We failed a hundred times. But thanks to him, we weren't putting a million bucks out of whack. Sometimes take $5000. Test this. The test this word. Yes, this phrase. This is big for you guys as I'm picking it up over the weeks. The testing, like limited test. Test the just repeat just to just repeat. Yeah, I would say you want the boldness to go heavy, but it needs to be strategic. Yes. And I think the trick is, ideally, you find a partner really where you don't have the timidity and the hesitation and indecisiveness. I'm super decisive, but I moved away from being knee jerk reactive to things. Right. A while ago, because I found that a lot of times I didn't have enough information to my knee jerk turned into an embarrassment thing later. But I also found that, okay, let's be strategic, but that big. We actually were talking about some of the bigger bets that we've been making over last years over dinner. And so you want to find that right dynamic where when you find something, go hard on it. But do it strategically, and most people that lean towards bedding hard don't do it strategically. Because they're not wired in a way to deconstruct it to figure out how do we go precise. So where our combination really played well, is that when I have an idea and I've kind of researched it, I don't have a timid business partner that's like, oh, well, oh, what do we do about this? He's ready to roll. And then he's amazing at the creative and the execution of this idea so that we can go and attack it. But most business owners don't really know that. So they're wired in a way where you've got people that are super cautious. And so then they don't know how Tibet and pursue something and to take the appropriate amount of risk. And one thing you learned in marketing is if you don't put enough dollars into a specific marketing attempt and hold it there, you don't actually get a valid test. So the people that are really, really timid that are wired in a way of test test test test test. We'll put their toe out, they don't get results, and then they pull it back. Or you get this super knee jerk is going to bet it all on black and hit the spin. And they're going to ride that ship all the way down to the bottom of the ocean regardless of the results. Right. So it's a matter of finding the right combination. What we love to do is to work with business owners or leaders, CEOs. To walk through that process, we talked about it before the first step to solving a problem is defining the problem. We're very forgive me for saying this so boldly. We are very good at that. We are very good at the science. It has to be the first step and we love walking through this process with business owners. We just love it. It's what we live for. You have, you have a track record. I mean, it's why we're talking about this. That you have been tremendously successful. And it wasn't luck. You've been very self critical, and I also know. And I want to say this for my audience. I know that you care about this. This is not about, hey, we've got a business. You actually care about helping people do good things better. So anyway, I should direct people to the website. Talbot group dot com to have a group dot com and you can call them at 8 6 6 Talbot. Thank you. We'd love to talk with them. We've got a two minute video on.

Seth Talbot Pete talbott Tibet CEOs Talbot group Talbot
"adamson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

05:13 min | 2 months ago

"adamson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Me. Again, one of the reasons I'm excited to come to erskine college that you all have stayed on mission for coming up on two centuries. And part of that is a function of a connection with the denomination that is stayed true to the inner sea of scripture. Also with our board of trustees, the structure we have in our bylaws and the strategic plan that we have in place that such guardrails to make sure that we stay focused on the mission of serving God serving the kingdom to train up people either to be serving some leaders in church or as also to be servants and leaders within the broader community to help influence society. Well, I guess one question I want to ask you, and I don't know what you want to say about this, but what's a little depressing is to see other colleges that are today ostensibly Christian committed to biblical principles that have begun to go off the rails or to struggle with that. Why do you think erskine has been successful in this? Because this is, this is not a small thing. This is the battle of our day. You know, there are certain aspects of being very focused on your mission. There's also aspects of maintaining a certain size where you can fully. Students and you can have your faculty who are all of the same background, the same perspective. You have to be very intentional about it. Sure, there are going to be pressures from the outside to accommodate and sometimes those pressures. Clothed in the idea of, well, if you accommodate in this way, that might help enrollment or that might help in your donation dollars. But the reality is, is the end if you're true and faithful to God in a servant of God, he will bless you if he's thinking true to the course. Right, but you have to actually trust in the lord. That's the problem. There are a lot of people that they talk about that. But when it comes to this sort of thing that you're describing, they have a kind of corporate mentality and they do not, I mean, it's amazing to me what you just said because it kind of makes you think, do I really believe this or don't I believe this? And a lot of colleges, as I said, ostensibly evangelical Christian colleges have really straight. And I think it's a leadership issue. So I guess I want to thank you for forgetting this for understanding what's at stake. Now I know I'm speaking at the commencement and at the golden garnet form, is that right? Correct. Can anyone come to the gold and garnet forum on that evening? Yes, anyone can come. They can go to the college's website, burst in dot EDU. And there'll be a link there on the main page. And it's open for people to come. And do our South Carolina, do me a favor and explain to me where roughly are you? What big cities are you close to? So we can orient you. Yeah, if you were to roughly look at a directional somewhat southwest of Greenville, Spartanburg area, about an hour, and so it's within reach. And there are some other larger cities around us, but Greenville Spartan battery is the main area. Now, is this something you do every year at commencement? Yeah, this is actually the first time that we're doing this in the past it's been just the commencement in the morning. And then the students go off and do their celebrations, but it's such a unique opportunity to be able to have you available and with your books you've written and the stance that you have on Christianity and interaction and how Christianity deals with the secular culture around us and higher education. Doctor Adamson, thank you and I look forward to being with you in due west in a few weeks. Thank you, Eric. Appreciate it. You know, enjoy seeing you and here as well. Crazy day's and reckless night hey folks, if you listen to this program, of course, you've heard me talk at infinitum about my pillow and my friend Mike lindell. Well, Mike is just announced that you will receive one of his books in the book is next level insane. It is called what are the odds from crack addict to CEO. It's his story. You will receive it absolutely free with any purchase using the promo code Eric. Did you hear that? It would be a great time, by the way, to buy his warm and wonderful my slippers for limited time. He's offering.

erskine college erskine Greenville Spartanburg Doctor Adamson South Carolina Mike lindell Eric Mike
"adamson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:37 min | 2 months ago

"adamson" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"My pleasure. Thank you. It's a very nice when you have someone to hold your hand. You know where I stand you know I'll always be a fan in case you haven't been paying attention. The Biden administration has caused a financial crisis and they have no clue how to fix it. Oil prices have skyrocketed and when oil prices go up, the cost of transportation and shipping spikes leading the prices of goods to rise. And when we're already seeing record inflation, that's the last thing we need. Our economy is in trouble and you need to take steps to protect yourself. If all your money is tied up in stocks, bonds and traditional markets, you are vulnerable. Gold is one of the best ways to protect your retirement. No matter what happens, you own your gold. It is real. It is physical. It's always been valuable since the dawn of time. Legacy precious metals is the company I trust for investing in gold. They can help you roll your retirement account into a gold backed IRA where you still own the physical gold. They can also ship gold and precious metals safely and securely to your house called legacy at 8 6 6 5 two 8 1903 or visit them online at legacy p.m. investments dot com. We can never know hey there folks as promised. I have a special guest for this segment. Some of you know if you follow my schedule, I'm going to be going to do west. I mean, I got to read this due west South Carolina to erskine college, I am somebody who's just getting familiar with this in college. And I said, why don't we have the guy who heads it up, doctor Steve Adamson on the program so that we can all get to know him. So doctor Adamson, welcome. Thank you. And I'm glad to be here. How long, I mean, we should probably tell people, I'm gonna be speaking there. I don't know that I have the date in front of me. It will be on May 14th. It's the gold and garnet forum. Is that what you call it? That is correct. And I know my subject is Christian thinking in a secular society. So I've got some work to do. To think about what I want to share with you all. But tell, just for my audience, familiarize them a little bit with erskine college because I get when I learn about something like this, I kind of get excited about it and I want to tell other people. So do me just give us an overview of the college and how long you've been there. First in college actually began in 1839. So we are closely approaching 200 years of existence. It was started by people in the associate reform Presbyterian Church with two goals and two focus one is to train a people to be servants of the lord in the church. And then others to provide a liberal arts education for people in this general area and that was an important way back in the beginning, South Carolina in the 1830s. Yeah, it's kind of important now, but most colleges that started with these ideas, I think if my Alma mater Yale, they started with the same idea in about 1701. And they got off the rails pretty quick, so it's kind of impressive to.

Biden administration west South Carolina erskine college Steve Adamson Adamson associate reform Presbyterian South Carolina
Dr. Steve Adamson Tells Us About Erskine College

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:25 min | 2 months ago

Dr. Steve Adamson Tells Us About Erskine College

"Doctor Adamson, welcome. Thank you. And I'm glad to be here. How long, I mean, we should probably tell people, I'm gonna be speaking there. I don't know that I have the date in front of me. It will be on May 14th. It's the gold and garnet forum. Is that what you call it? That is correct. And I know my subject is Christian thinking in a secular society. So I've got some work to do. To think about what I want to share with you all. But tell, just for my audience, familiarize them a little bit with erskine college because I get when I learn about something like this, I kind of get excited about it and I want to tell other people. So do me just give us an overview of the college and how long you've been there. First in college actually began in 1839. So we are closely approaching 200 years of existence. It was started by people in the associate reform Presbyterian Church with two goals and two focus one is to train a people to be servants of the lord in the church. And then others to provide a liberal arts education for people in this general area and that was an important way back in the beginning, South Carolina in the 1830s.

Doctor Adamson Erskine College Associate Reform Presbyterian South Carolina
Eric Chats to Charles Thorngren, CEO of Legacy Precious Metals

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:55 min | 2 months ago

Eric Chats to Charles Thorngren, CEO of Legacy Precious Metals

"He's the CEO of legacy precious metals. And here he is, Charles Thornton, welcome to the program. Thanks, Eric. Thanks for having me. Well, I know the basics, but I thought there was an article recently that I read where treasury secretary Janet Yellen was just talking about the economic chaos that lies ahead. I mean, I think most people know the economy is to use the technical term L stinko. And so, you know, your financial expert, how did we get to this place? And what can people do about it? Because people are asking me, and I don't have the answer. What should I invest in? It's a big question, but I think if we look and we really are honest about how we got here. It's several administrations worth of bad money management. We have run a deficit in this nation that's unsustainable for quite some time. And we've seen that become even hyper exaggerated with this new administration. With $9 trillion in debt, you put yourself in a situation where your dollar doesn't have the equity that it's supposed to. And ultimately, when we talk about our economy, we want to talk about the lives that we're living, how it affects us. The quality of our life. And that's what we lose by having a weakened dollar. We parlay that into our retirement accounts. And where we keep our money usually in the equities markets. The market is so over exaggerated in its value right now. From years and years of quantitative easing and free money and easy money that that has to come into play and be

Charles Thornton Janet Yellen Treasury Eric
What Eric Is Most Looking Forward to in the Next Few Months

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:23 min | 2 months ago

What Eric Is Most Looking Forward to in the Next Few Months

"What are you most looking forward to in the next few months? Wow, that's a great question. Actually, there's so many things that are ahead. I honestly, I think going to a beach someplace would be a nice thing. But that's not till the summer. We love the summer. And we love to get to beaches when we can. So there are so many things I could say to that. But I'll say this actually. Because the Twitter thing is an example of it. I believe that a God has is answering the prayers of the saints, that people have been praying across this country. They have seen how horrible things have gotten. And many people don't want to know, but I'm telling you, many of us know, we've seen what happened. We never dreamt America could go down this path that you could have an election stolen through vast criminal conspiracy. And then everybody says, oh, it's the safest election possible. Get the vaccine. All of this madness. I think that God has heard our prayers and that we're going to see amazing things in the months ahead. And I want to say to everyone, pray for this country every day, ask God to have mercy on this country because we're the last best hope of earth according to Abraham Lincoln. There's no America waiting in the wings when we go down.

Saints Twitter America Abraham Lincoln
Would Eric Consider Writing a Book About Responsible Environmentalism?

The Eric Metaxas Show

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

Would Eric Consider Writing a Book About Responsible Environmentalism?

"Will you consider writing a book about responsible environmentalism? I feel so many people definitely myself are searching for a reliable truthful and balanced understanding of how we might best be responsible stewards of this amazing planet. While not getting caught up in political fanaticism of global warming. So the question is, will you consider writing a book about responsible environmentalism? And I'll have to say, not in your life. How's that for an answer? No, I mean, I think it's not a subject that particularly fascinates me. And it has become so politicized. I can't even I can't even talk about it. It's preposterous. Everybody knows. Everybody knows that you want to be responsible and do things right and but it has, of course, become so politicized that I wouldn't even dream of writing a book about it. But thanks for the question. And my twin brother writes about that all the time for different publications. Yes, he does.

"adamson" Discussed on The Addicted Mind Podcast

The Addicted Mind Podcast

05:48 min | 6 months ago

"adamson" Discussed on The Addicted Mind Podcast

"Name is Austrian and I'm your host and we are on to another episode. So today my guest is windy Adamson and she is the author of two books, mother lode and incorrigible. And on today's show, she's going to talk about her own recovery trauma, but specifically talking about intergenerational trauma, how her own mother's mental illness impacted her and how her addiction and mental illness impacted her own children and how she was able to get recovery and help everyone in her family heal. It's a wonderful story of hope and possibility. So I really hope you all enjoy it and get a lot out of it. And if you are enjoying the addictive mind, podcasts, please share it with a friend or write a review. That really does help get the podcast. A lot of exposure and I really appreciate it. Let's go ahead and start this episode. All right everybody, welcome to the addicted mind podcast. My guest today is Wendy Adamson. And she is author of two books. Mother lode and her new.

Adamson Wendy Adamson lode
Julie Grant and Sam Blackman on Cancer Drugs for Kids

The Long Run

02:18 min | 11 months ago

Julie Grant and Sam Blackman on Cancer Drugs for Kids

"Julie grant and sam blackman. Welcome to the long run. Thanks luke thankfully To be talking to you again. It's been a long time. Yeah so Day one biopharmaceuticals. You are trying to chart a new course here in pediatric cancer drug development. Can you start off by telling me like where this came from. What's the origin story of day. One julia you wanna start cher. I i think the origin story of day. One is a lot of serendipity a lot of fortune and i think also A lot of really good people who wanted to make a difference in a group of patients who have been rather overlooked by our industry historically which has children with cancer. And luke. I think back to to some of our conversations not thinking back to two thousand eighteen in before we ran into each other at the biden. Cancer initiatives Conference together. And the way that this really was raised on on my radar was through a a physician. Who at the time was the chair of the children's oncology group Gentleman named peter adamson who at the time was Chop so at a u. penn's pediatric oncology center. And he at these meetings that we were having to try and think about national level. Change for oncology in the united states. He really raised my attention that he he thought that there were medicines that could potentially work for children that were not moving forward because of lack of support from the pharmaceutical industry and that really caught my attention and we had a series of meetings where he educated me along with a woman named susan. Winer who lost. Her child took to cancer in his been a lifelong advocate in in the field and talking to congress about legislation and through that process. I became much more aware of of this. This unmet need in pediatric oncology. And it hit me that it also could create a real opportunity for company. Originally i was thinking it would be a nonprofit that i would be part of but then over time it it really converted into a concept which we can get into as a for profit

Julie Grant Sam Blackman Pediatric Cancer Luke Peter Adamson Penn's Pediatric Oncology Cent Cher Julia Biden Cancer Winer United States Susan Congress
"adamson" Discussed on Life Is Now Podcast

Life Is Now Podcast

12:46 min | 11 months ago

"adamson" Discussed on Life Is Now Podcast

"And then i spent some time journaling and writing out. I am statements so positive affirmations about the woman that i am and the woman that i wanna be. I go for a run with my dog. And i come back and have what. I call superwoman.

"adamson" Discussed on Life Is Now Podcast

Life Is Now Podcast

03:15 min | 11 months ago

"adamson" Discussed on Life Is Now Podcast

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"adamson" Discussed on Life Is Now Podcast

Life Is Now Podcast

03:58 min | 11 months ago

"adamson" Discussed on Life Is Now Podcast

"Let them know how they can contact you for sure So i'm very active on social media. I would love to connect with you and you can find me on facebook and instagram under the lifestyle millionaire and my website is www dot the lifestyle millionaire dot com and on you can definitely Access a free copy of my e book the six steps for turning your passion into profit. And i definitely wanted to mention to you guys. I am over the moon right now. Because i've been counting down to the launch of my brand new program the ultimate success blueprint program and basically. It's a six month group. Coaching program for anyone. Who's ready to start their business and really turn their passion into profit or for anyone who already started their business but is ready to take their life and business to a whole new level in so if that sounds like something that you're ready to do. I definitely want to connect with you. Because on august twelfth it is a very special day because it is my thirtieth birthday and decided for myself. Thirtieth birthday's there was nothing i wanted to do. More than to give the world of present and so. I'm launching my branding program on that exact day on august twelfth and so i'm low invited because we're going to be opening the gates to ten new participants for the initial launch and it's going to be the most amazing tribe of just the most incredible people i've ever met because they're already come into me. I manifesting it. They've already they've already beyond in on the phone and i've been meeting the most incredible people because of this creation and so i'm just very excited about it. It's awesome and for people that if you haven't gone to her facebook page. I just recommend day number. Sixteen that for mason. Lightman that motivation. Like if you missed one through fifteen sixteen will inspires or go to facebook page because the countdown is on. Yeah what he's referring to as we've been doing thirty days. Facebook live challenged the countdown the launch. The new program today is day number seventeen. I believe just. That is very very excited. We'll think we just want to thank you again and let you know that we'll very honored. We're very grateful for taking the time out out of your busy schedule. this podcast and we're super super super excited and very blessed to have non you guys so much been so incredible connecting with you and i'm so excited that i have you guys in my life because i'm all about meeting like minded people who are on a similar path and company grateful to have been connected with you. Thank you if you to contact us caller. If you need to be cheered on one morning you can counterpoint hours a day because this is not a only about business and about podcasts. This is about being real and connecting with people and sometimes we do getting our funk and sometimes The least person we expected really rises up is the person that's wanted and needed to. We just want to extend that out to you. Law lanes element. You guys just heard a talk of on of the line coach. Lindsey adamson on Life is now podcast and she does rock this frigging interview. I just have to say that all right. You have a good day in blessed night. Okay linzie.

facebook instagram Lightman mason Lindsey adamson linzie
"adamson" Discussed on Life Is Now Podcast

Life Is Now Podcast

07:21 min | 11 months ago

"adamson" Discussed on Life Is Now Podcast

"We're about to find out. And i can tell you what you you're gonna love what you're going to hear. I want you guys to know she is based out of canada is powerful. She's an amazing speaker christina. You really ready to just jump in and see what she is all about just because she's canadian. Yes i am. I love canada. You love canada while i love the energy that she brings bring stupor hockey. Cue have you on our podcast. I invaded here are so excited to be here with you guys and i've already got a huge smile on my face over doing something all we're doing something right. Now that i know that you are smiling is going to go with what i wanna know. Like lindsey for those who don't know you're amazing inspiring story who is lindsay adamson well. I'm a born and raised canadian girl. And i have the privilege of Operating an amazing business that allows me to travel all over the world speaking and coaching the most incredible people i've ever met and helping them to really live by their passion as they start their road into entrepreneurship and so i have developed a lifestyle millionaire inc. just under a year ago. It's a speaking in coaching business. And i help people to transition into entrepreneurship in a way that they get to really live their lifestyles the way that they wanted while they develop these businesses to fit that lifestyle. That they've envisioned for themselv-. I'm all about living. I while you create your wealth while you create your version of and i've been so privileged to be able to create lifelike that for myself and i'm honored to be able to help others to do the same. How is all i have to say. I'm super excited reading about you.

canada lindsay adamson christina hockey lindsey
"adamson" Discussed on ScreamQueenz: Where Horror Gets GAY!

ScreamQueenz: Where Horror Gets GAY!

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"adamson" Discussed on ScreamQueenz: Where Horror Gets GAY!

"Know whether the screen real advocates really fucked up. And you'd like flaps some like valley dog great. you'll have to forgive the sloppy craftsmanship. My favorite example. This is the creepy for me. Was the corpse puppetry. Yeah there's like. Tina has fantastic deaths. Same she makes out with tony. Roberts for five seconds. Not knowing is not tony roberts but the mask smells big. Glue thing happens budnitz you by the way. So do i near lip. It's peeling curves. Had a quickie right here. Which is that little screen between us and public exposure. Everybody always wonders how. I get those straight as i keep telling them. I do lots of extra credit assignments. God he's still breathing. Jeff done on the line.

How to be Two Ways strong: Dreamtime science and finding yourself

Science Friction

05:11 min | 1 year ago

How to be Two Ways strong: Dreamtime science and finding yourself

"I'm am bob. I'm from kabul queensland coming away from queensland knowing anyone down he coming down here obama self. I was a little bit like nervous anxious about what was going to happen. I can elect make friends. 'cause i'm a little bit shy but eventually i mean caitlyn now i'm caitlyn. I'm from leading new south. Wales was really awkward at first meeting. New people are being part of a big crowd is really scary. Say i'm tony adamson. I'm a student at the university of adelaide studying a bachelor of science in wildlife conservation. Biology to yanni attained his cantonese ago as a year. Ten student herself in it triggered this enormous event in her life. Afterwards which you'll hear about next week but as a mentor he. She's living with this bunch of smart fifteen year olds who all applaud from right across australia to be here. Artem land to adelaide kabul cha to coffs harbour and for some of them. This is going to be the first time they surrounded by this many other indigenous people there i night. Some don't have much knowledge about their indigenous heritage. In fact how would you describe what feeling students have when they first arrive at this camp. Yeah definitely Nervous unsure of what to expect a lot of them are feeling a little bit vulnerable especially vulnerable in their cultural identity. I love it. I love my culture. Much like those a lot that i need to learn. I'm katie nugent. Catherine megyn i'm from queensland and just the feeling like when i'm on land when i'm with people who have a close connection to the land i just feel something as it's pride is like a really warm like feeling like i belong kind of thing and i want that connection. I don't know scott the feeling like it's only my stomach. It's a good feeling. I have a certain but it makes me eager to learn about my own culture and like we from two. When i can imagine that many of the students that you're working with don't necessarily feel a strong connection to culture yet. That's a really powerful emotion. Orange provocative question. A lot of us do know that we've lost our metro part of our culture. Ghana elda rosemary. Wang inane is here to support the students through the next nine days in her role as a cultural later on born. Fifty five psalm. Sixty three. And i can't speak language. I was born into policies that was about assimilating and being raised on missions and reserves way you contained and controlled to be manipulated soccer logically to deny your aboriginality and your cultural beliefs concert understandings and practices today. Rosemary runs heroin company which she calls the australian institute for loss and grief developing a model for healing based on her own experiences of being dislocated from her culture or congo. We missed business. I can't do ceremonies. can't practice sorry business in a traditional way so it goes back to. What do we mean as average people. What do we mean by culture. Because pre seventeen ninety eight the traditional culture very powerful structured wise of of living and being for thousands of years post civil tonight in saw it was part of that so so what. I didn't learn why can't teach my children what children can teach my grandchildren. It this program here with these kids there. My grandkids generation. That no even this than me. Yeah we've got a responsibility to these young was. Do i think talk about. What do we mean by culture because we're living in a very very continue sitting now and that's what makes aboriginal summer school for excellence in technology and science run by the sea siro unique this intimate blending of culture with science indigenous science to two way learning aboriginal people in australia have been practicing science and scientific method for sixty thousand and eighty thousand one hundred thousand. Since the first son came we have been practicing the scientific methods through medicine through nutrition through architecture through agriculture through physics through astrophysics and it really is quite accurate when people describe acids the first scientist said what we were doing now it may not have been the language of western science that we're so used to hearing about now but it's undeniable that it was science and practicing the scientific method

Caitlyn Queensland Tony Adamson Adelaide Kabul Katie Nugent Catherine Megyn University Of Adelaide Yanni Elda Rosemary Artem Kabul Coffs Harbour Australian Institute For Loss Wales BOB Barack Obama Australia Ghana Wang Scott
"adamson" Discussed on Escaping The Real Estate Investing Newbie Zone - Make Money In Real Estate Wholesaling Properties For Quick Cash

Escaping The Real Estate Investing Newbie Zone - Make Money In Real Estate Wholesaling Properties For Quick Cash

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"adamson" Discussed on Escaping The Real Estate Investing Newbie Zone - Make Money In Real Estate Wholesaling Properties For Quick Cash

"The newbies dot com on this episode. We will make sure that we include those leaks initial knows rico. So bryant One last question won't that How can anyone What name is charlotte. Social media one more time so what people can connect which you and your social media my. Id is brian b. r. a. n. underscore adamson d. a. m. s. o. n. In the number one perfect perfect okay and last question acts you act any by everybody that comes on his gas. Excuse me If you were starting brand new and do you know what you know now right and you start a brain new. What advice would you give your old self to get your first deal. Close it escape that newbies own.

brian b rico bryant adamson charlotte
Creating Antimatter: Matter's "Evil Twin"

Short Wave

10:06 min | 1 year ago

Creating Antimatter: Matter's "Evil Twin"

"Jeff. i have a lot of questions about antimatter. But can you just start with regular mater. What is that. Yeah so a refresher for who don't remember regular matters abroad category for everything. So you're matter i'm matter. The studios matter the microphones. Yeah i get it matter and we matter. It's a nice thought. Yeah and as matter were all made of atoms. So you're bunch of adamson the shape of an emily corn. And i'm tabatha the shape of a jeff brumfield now for antimatter. I'm actually going to let another jeffrey. Who knows a lot more. Physics denied to answer this one. His name is jeffrey hengst. And he's a researcher at our house university in denmark. And to i. I think of it as kind of an evil twin of the stuff that makes up our everyday world intriguing. Go on it is it is. It's just this kind of opposite matter. It's like this muir to everything that's around us so antimatter. It's here right now yet. I mean it's a little more complicated than that but anti matters real stuff and it exists in our universe and actually before anyone ever even detected it. They predicted it because math. The equations of physics demanded in fact it was discovered that way by coming up with an equation that predicted his existence. Nobody was really looking for it. And i am not going to attempt to describe the fundamental equations of physics on this podcast. Because i don't really understand them But hank says the closest analogy. He's got for us mortals to think about. Is this math problem. What's the square root of four two very but there's a second solution negative to allocate right because negative negative to is four so the way you just went straight to two. That's exactly kind of what happened in physics like there were these equations and there was a positive set of solutions for particles and negative said and everyone was like the negative set. What does that even mean. That's nonsense but it turned out there. Worthies negative particles. They did exist in. They're called antimatter. Oh okay so there's this theoretical idea of antimatter kicking around for awhile. Which kind of explains what it is. But what is it exactly. Here's the thing it really is like opposite matter. Protons remember protons. Yeah their positively charged subatomic particles. They are anti. Protons are negatively charged electrons their negatively charged and their anti particles are positively charged. This is kind of amazing. It is kind of amazing. And here's the best part. It actually lives up to the sci-fi analogy so just go with your sifi brain and i get it emily. You're more of like colin firth. Pride and prejudice bbc. You know no shame in it. There isn't there isn't i've seen it probably more times than you have in my life. But what do you think happens when matter and antimatter Get together when they actually meet okay. If anti matters the evil twin the fight they do will. They do like in a jane austen novel. They do. Well you're not too far off. I'm going to let the actual experts explain it to you. And i have a tendency to cancel each other out a minute. Where's this under. Certain conditions when to identify articles of matter. Antimatter meet these. Are your experts. Jeff captain kirk and is that leonard nimoy as relationship. Yes total complete absolute annihilation. Spock it is. That's right and you're right. That's star trek season. One episode twenty-seven original track the best track. But here's the thing eveline. It's actually a hundred percent accurate or pretty close so the universe won't end if antimatter and matter meat. But the two particles do disappear in a flash of light. The anti-matter can't exist in the presence of matter. The science fiction stuff comes in these things really do annihilate each other if you get together okay. So i've covered a lot of physics over the years and this is pretty much the only case where the sci-fi and the reality match although i will say annihilation is actually a lot less sexy in real life it's really Just annoying to have to deal with something that you have to make that the universe is trying to destroy and every every every turning point be an antimatter physicist it it is. I mean he's literally been doing this since the ninety s and like he does get a little frustrated. All right you said earlier that antimatter. It's here in this universe but this universe is full of matter and i don't see any antimatter lurking around. So where is it if it's existing theory but it's hard to find in reality. I don't get this you know who else doesn't get it. Every physicist on earth this is one of the fundamental questions the equation say there should be as much antimatter matter but in practice. Antimatter is actually super hard. To find and hank says nobody knows why there aren't any good ideas about this. I mean physicists. Do see little bits of antimatter here. and there. In fact anti electrons for i discovered in cosmic rays coming from deep space way back in the nineteen thirties. And actually i've got another natural source of antimatter right here in the studio emily in this room. Yes ready yes this banana. What are you talking about this real episode. This is an episode about nothing and tomfoolery. Hold the banana to make sure it's real. I'll explain yes okay so obviously. The banana is not anti matter. But here's the thing about bananas. Bananas are full of potassium. Which is really good for you. But there's also a radioactive isotope potassium into banana called potassium forty. This is a naturally occurring. isotope So some porsche. The potassium in the banana is potassium. Forty now here's the thing. Potassium forty when it decays releases an electron but very very very very rarely it releases an anti electron. So if we just hold this banana and wait for for. How long are we waiting. Okay we'd have to seventy five minutes. We're at ten minute podcast. Geoff just sit here for seventy five minute. What i'm hearing is seven part series on antimatter. Emily kwan and a meditation silence. That's right no so. On average this entire banana will spit out. One anti-electron every seventy five minutes. I think this really makes the point. Well right like antimatter exists. It's not some parallel universe but one tiny anti trump for trillions of banana adams is like even. That's a pretty rare thing to have. Happened and jeffrey wants a lot more than that. That's why he's at this giant particle accelerator cernan switzerland. Okay so tell me what. He's up to their well. Hanks wants lots of anti electrons. And in this is key anti protons. Hey so it turns out the anti electrons are kind of easy. You can find other radioactive sources Besides bananas that can make a lot more of them and then the elevator makes anti protons. And here's the thing so you have to very carefully hang us to bring the anti protons in the anti electrons together we call it s- merge it's a smooz merge merge but even after that merge they still end up with a lot of antimatter just disappearing. Thirty million anti protons. That's converted two hundred thousand or so trapped. Anti protons of those will get twenty or thirty that actually make anti hyphen that we can use well. Willow anti-hydrogen is that what i just heard. Jeff what is that. Anti-hydrogen is just one anti electron orbiting one anti protons and it's the antimatter. Equivalent of the lightest element on earth. So that's regular hydrogen willing to go to all this trouble just to get a few atoms of anti-hydrogen but why go through all the trouble you know of making andy hydrogen okay. So here's the thing. He's hoping to get some clues from anti-hydrogen about matter antimatter and the thinking goes like this. Hydrogen is the lightest element in the universe and hydrogen is probably the thing we know best. We've been studying it forever. We really understand it. So by looking very very carefully at anti-hydrogen. He's hoping that they can learn more about what's going on with antimatter. And that's basically what he's doing he's using lasers all kinds of stuff to probe this anti-hydrogen to see how it behaves. Well has shed any light on where the rest of the antimatter is. Not yet not yet. And so far. Anti-hydrogen is behaving exactly as predicted by all those fundamental physics equations. And so far with the places that we've looked and to the precision with which we've looked they're the same and that's kind of a problem because they also say there should be much matters antimatter unless they can find some sort of deviation it may not be possible to figure out you know where the antimatter went. So we don't have any clues but that's okay because he's just

Jeff Brumfield Jeffrey Hengst House University Jeff Captain Kirk Tabatha Hank Adamson Jeffrey Colin Firth Denmark Eveline Leonard Nimoy Jeff Jane Austen Emily Kwan Spock Emily Banana Adams BBC
"adamson" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

The Steve Warne Project - Sports

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"adamson" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

"You know you you can't you can't do anything right now about it other than what's required to social distance and and stay away you know. I don't agree with what that guy's doing you know i. I don't agree with it at all even beyond that more stupidest people not wearing masks. You know yeah hardly anybody at that hold protests today Had mask gone and and that's what it was kind of about. It was providing a forum for people who are anti lock down. And i mean i. I don't agree with what they're doing. But i understand where the emotion sparks from. Because this these these measures have been in place since march. And i think that there's a real attitude that's growing and growing that these measures aren't working. We're destroying businesses and families financially for measures. That aren't working because it's just as bad as it was on day one. So that the the flaw in that argument though jimmy. Is if you decide to not do these measures. Watch how bad this thing can truly get. Yeah right right if you don't you gotta stay inside man. You gotta stay inside still you know. It's just pure frustration for people. And and i understand that i understand living that i am living that when i go to leave my house to go to god. I don't do that right now. You know the they don't have a handle on this thing yet and not wearing the mask thing is just. It's like there's there's so much upside okay to you're wearing a mask okay. There you know but if you don't there's a ton of downside man and wearing a mask you know it's not it's not an it's not like lucky you gotta give away cashier steve or anything. Just where frequent masks in the meantime. Anyway that's how i feel about it. You know. I think. I think you're you know where people say you're you're infringing on my rights. I still go to that example of its you may. You may wanna do that. Not wear a mask and be steadfast here in your your rights and freedoms but you could. You could give it to your kids. And i think just for full perspective on this particular story about adamson barbecue They weren't ignoring anything like they were very diligently demanding. People wear masks right. There were diligently taking names and numbers. They were diligently making people social distance but where they drew. The line was a full and complete lockdown that they didn't agree with so it wasn't like they weren't buying in at all like saying this is all a bunch of malarkey blah blah. They were doing everything they were asked to do. They stopped short though of being told the close right. Yeah i have you know. Plus it's going be you know. Look look what it's doing right. It sounds to me like this things. Bubbling right is that that's that someone's gonna snap you know.

jimmy adamson steve
"adamson" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"adamson" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"It's much <Speech_Male> it's and <Speech_Male> some of the themes that we've talked <Speech_Male> about right? I think <Speech_Male> it's great. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> encourage our <Speech_Male> listeners to <Speech_Male> buy <Speech_Male> a copies early and <Speech_Male> often. I guess I'll <Speech_Male> leave you with this one last <Speech_Male> question, <Speech_Male> you know, <Speech_Male> I as see on your website, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> there's some great <Speech_Male> nasl <Speech_Male> soccer stuff <Speech_Male> there on your walls <Speech_Male> and I got <Speech_Male> to think there's some other <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> perhaps books <Speech_Male> or projects <Speech_Male> beyond your <Speech_Male> blog writing <Speech_Male> that maybe <Speech_Male> you have <Speech_Male> sort of in your <Speech_Male> internal shoot <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> for future <Speech_Male> endeavors. <Speech_Male> Where am I? Am <Speech_Male> I projecting <Silence> <SpeakerChange> No, <Speech_Male> no, you're not. You're <Speech_Telephony_Male> you're absolutely right. I'm <Speech_Telephony_Male> actually <Speech_Telephony_Male> working with a soccer <Speech_Telephony_Male> coach right now. <Speech_Telephony_Male> I'm helping write <Speech_Telephony_Male> his autobiography. <Speech_Telephony_Male> It's Preston Goldfarb <Speech_Telephony_Male> who <Speech_Telephony_Male> he started the <Speech_Telephony_Male> soccer program <Speech_Telephony_Male> at Birmingham-Southern <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> College and he's kind <Speech_Telephony_Male> of a <Speech_Telephony_Male> a legend in the Southeast <Speech_Telephony_Male> as far as <Speech_Telephony_Male> being a real <Speech_Telephony_Male> soccer Patron. <Speech_Telephony_Male> So I'm <Speech_Telephony_Male> I'm working <Speech_Telephony_Male> with him right now. <Speech_Telephony_Male> It's basically <Speech_Telephony_Male> his book. <Speech_Telephony_Male> I'm just helping him with it, <Speech_Telephony_Male> but it's <Speech_Telephony_Male> being a big soccer <Speech_Telephony_Male> nerd like I am <Speech_Telephony_Male> it's just thrilling to <Speech_Telephony_Male> hear all these Insider <Speech_Telephony_Male> stories, you <Speech_Telephony_Male> know dating back from <Speech_Telephony_Male> his <Speech_Telephony_Male> college days <Speech_Telephony_Male> as a kid and he also <Speech_Telephony_Male> coached and the <Silence> usisl <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> the Birmingham Grasshoppers <Speech_Telephony_Male> and that was one <Speech_Telephony_Male> of the first <Speech_Telephony_Male> quote unquote local soccer <Speech_Telephony_Male> teams that I followed. <Speech_Telephony_Male> So <Speech_Telephony_Male> that's kind of a <Speech_Telephony_Male> labor of love for me <Speech_Telephony_Male> to just walk in with that. <Speech_Telephony_Male> It's just a good <Speech_Telephony_Male> chance for me to get a lot <Silence> of <Speech_Telephony_Male> inside info <Speech_Telephony_Male> and soccer which I'm <Speech_Telephony_Male> as much as <Speech_Telephony_Male> I love Birmingham pro <Speech_Telephony_Male> football. <Speech_Male> I really <Speech_Male> really love soccer. <Speech_Telephony_Male> So any chance <Speech_Male> I am Right about <Speech_Telephony_Male> it. I've jumped <Speech_Telephony_Male> on that opportunity. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> All right, our thanks to <Speech_Male> Scott. Let's <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> see <Speech_Music_Male> now <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Scott's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> multiple blogs <Speech_Male> can be found <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on Adamson media <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> media Adamson <Speech_Male> me off. Com <Speech_Music_Male> great <Speech_Music_Male> stuff follow you. Can <Speech_Male> you send your <Speech_Male> email in there and get <Speech_Male> all this latest <Speech_Male> postings and stuff <Speech_Male> and it's not just football <Speech_Male> but soccer <Speech_Male> other <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> sports generally <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> other <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> rack using <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> it's a hoot <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> great stuff and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> some great imagery <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> from <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> his his <Speech_Music_Male> his lair <Speech_Male> his Sports <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> man cave, <Speech_Male> I guess so with a great <Speech_Music_Male> stuff <Speech_Music_Male> page you'll see on <Speech_Music_Male> his walls. I'm jealous about <Speech_Male> some of those <Speech_Music_Male> some of those <Speech_Music_Male> hangings that he's <Speech_Male> got there <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the name of <Speech_Male>

soccer Birmingham Adamson media Preston Goldfarb Adamson Scott football
"adamson" Discussed on Taking Her Lead

Taking Her Lead

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"adamson" Discussed on Taking Her Lead

"Because trace allows me to think because I'm a slow thinker. That's why also thinking and trumpetings neighboring. Anything I wanted. And you know there is one more thing I do. You know people that I have never met I'm reading the. Book Right now it is called rejected princesses. And it was written by Jason Aura Neo R. E. T. H. and usher how we pronounces his last name. But these are all miss stoorikhel stories A. Man Throughout the world and throughout time frankly kicked ass broke the mold. I mean these are stories of just women not living the life that you would have assumed a woman in another country or woman just years and years ago was leading. I think it's really powerful when we see those examples especially in other locations than in other times of the world of women just flat out mazing and strong and powerful. And knowing that. No were all capable of doing us Sometimes I do think we get really structured in our thinking of a woman's role or how a woman should behave, and it's nice to see that it is not a newer modern saying she'd be leading or to be stepping outside of you know the standard norm or the mold and the women have always been doing this I just found the book. Online. There's actually there's another one about mothers I can't think of the name of mother I haven't, but I've learned it to a friend. Mother now they're both really, really excellent. And they look over to. Children's story, but he does start getting know this is not a pure children to read. Though. they're great for. Really I get example of. Just seen some different role models. We don't always see in our day to day lives. What were some challenging situations that? Maybe you haven't had any which, hey, yeah you but in case you have. Challenges Things that you've gone through that. You've experienced that you made it through and you learn some things about yourself. You know and I I kind of touched on some of this just. Coming up in never really quite. Fit. Exactly the mold of way was supposed to be em's of you know something that I I am GonNa share and it wasn't super wanted to share this or not. But I think it's very important message for anyone to hear not only women. But especially for women's you here is growing up as a child I had obsessive compulsive disorder and I had a as an adult which I didn't actually even know you know is completely controlling my life. I thought that obsessive compulsive disorder or OCD as you hear people say is what we really cleaning really organized which I am not I strive to be and I'm fairly organized but I love to play in the dirt. Yeah and We have such a habit of having such a stigma against what we will mental help not. You know we don't really. Have the education around it that we should. and. So you know kind of innings. Disorder but on steroids and I just really thought all growing up there was really just can actually kind of broken with me. I thought that my brain just really didn't work or the I was just really broken. I had known anybody with OCD. which is just really introduces intrusive of thoughts I agreed example they remember when women sharing a story of a frigid shut her cat on the fridge. Alerts us what if what am I dish on my cottonmouth within should get it out. So she was checking for two hours even after she saw her cat walk by her foot she still couldn't saw checking the F., which is really comment if you've experienced OCD and it was. A very powerful being in my life you experience that. To have this whole story built up in my head that he lived my life of how. Broken brain probably was they didn't understand. This is just a little catching the rain. You can go get treatment for it. There's things that you can do. It's just that computer in your head having a little bit of a glitch and I, share not because. Aching all of society has this idea that there's something wrong talking about mental health where You know mental health is like physical her open. It's like physical fitness where we should all be working towards. Mental Health and mental fitness not just the accents of you know an illness that really mean mentally strong and having that be a great theme that we're that we're working on but it's very stigmatized and I know that a lot of people that very personally if they do experience depression or anxiety or they polar disorder or anything like that. Know for me it was something that I used as a reason to hold myself out. They think that they shouldn't leave. They shouldn't these opportunities because I was Rogan are there was something wrong with me when we all have a brain like every single one of his men and women in fact, would you have a brain therefore? We all experience. Hines when our mind is not well, just like our body is not wow and it's shameful in it's not anything that we need to hide and I would just love to see a day when we talk about mental fitness to the same degree that we talk about. Physical fitness and you know at the positive conversation and it's something that we work towards and it's not just know the absence of an illness. So I do Shanna and that's something that I try to talk about his for me. It was something that I internalize launch shame around now even experience depression and anxiety that went around it, and he don't think that I'm the only one that has had that challenge of feeling ashamed of odd or of other things in our life and let me not be the thing that ultimate back in our worst or if thinking that, we don't deserve the opportunity to step forward or chew be an example to other people. Thank you for being willing to share that. That's trace not say this 'cause. This often but well, my background is in working with people with special needs and. Severe Medical. Disorders and the such, but also I have really intersected with people. In that population who have different Atypical neurological conditions, and I, like to call them differences anything else as opposed to issues are conditions because they're I'm looking for right now on my shelf I can't find it that there's a company a couple books out right now that. Really focus on the powers and skills and approaches that are valuable that come along when you have things like that wearing wearing like that. So all of doesn't send them to you but all that sage's thank you very much. We want to share that because I think that's profound. A profound learning and mature that you gained because. So many people struggle with those kinds of conditions in those differences and they're such a huge stigma around that. It just you know it does stop people from learning the skills to little more for life with just you know tuna. So heartbreaking I honestly didn't understand it until I was well into my thirties. And I just think of all of the Haim that. Could have not elsewhere and you know I did I honestly learned about it because another woman shared her experience with it. And I was able to recognize that with myself. So I do think that there's a lot of power in destroying our story even apart that maybe we think people don't want to hear because those are usually the parts that people need the low. Yeah, and I agree with you this the thought of like if you broke your arm, people would say, oh no, that's broken. How can I help you and I don't know why it is when it's someone's brain that we say will that's weakness instead of how can I help you and I think the more we get to a point where someone can say these are the things that I'm. Living with right now and and and have that.

Disorders OCD depression Jason Aura Neo R. E. T. H. Haim Rogan Shanna Hines OCD.
"adamson" Discussed on Taking Her Lead

Taking Her Lead

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"adamson" Discussed on Taking Her Lead

"Had in me to do..

BAME Mental Health

Mentally Yours

05:11 min | 2 years ago

BAME Mental Health

"Every black person I know at the moment is finding themselves. From willingly, but gaining followers gaining a lot of them. Sometimes unwanted sometimes wanted messages, and that the Adamson talking about. You know lots of people self self flagellating about book. Can they do about racism of Our ship question 's coming through saying pre spring overwhelming and I don't think I know anyone who hasn't hot the influx. Of people not quite a unauthorised shore of how to talk to us. How can people. Look after their own mental health. The moment especially Falcon ethnic minority people I think it is quite tiring. particularly when you'll someone. Who Does this work year round? Someone who feels this pressure in this sadness year round to only be August just because. Another person like because one death has hit the news in a way that that makes people upset. You know like lots of us are aware of many more, happening or aware of this constant proximity of black people to death. and. In a wall, this is all the more jarring untiring because. In are being out on such an international scale. It can sometimes be a bit fling to me where I'm of like Oh why now lack. Of now you're interested, but will you be interested next month? Will you be in so that's what makes it quite difficult to deal with. Especially because. Well. Sometimes it's. Sometimes it's you've actual real friends checking on the which is nine. But a lot of the time it's people who posing acquaintances best who seem to be going through a list of every lesson. They know and going. Hey, you a K and. And you know responding to that in a way that isn't. I kind of take it on this policy right now. Where like? I? If I don't respond. Kindly, respond at all. and. Some people. I don't know a lot of the time. There's a lot of just trying to get. So towing the doing the right thing as opposed to an actual desire. To help whatever, but then again that might be very. Cinco may perhaps lots of people are feeling uncomfortable, being confronted with this Oh thing for the first time. And don't know what to do, other than to talk to the nearest black person to them, which would have to urge anyone listening? Please not to do. I can tell you the like. There was a long period of time in fact. I didn't want to talk to any white people about this at all like I took pretty much like almost two weeks very rarely looking at social media ignoring my phone almost completely. And United Responses to e mails became longer with stocks because it can be very exhausting, so. Comforting the person who's come to you to try comfort you. They don't really have anything to offer me in terms of comfort. Of course they couldn't. For. Something to offer them. The Old I'm fine and. You know you're doing the right thing and it can be very tiring. On the other hand I might sound like. Something that is actually really great in this time. You see so many different fundraisers for projects that have been going on for a really long time and because of this. Because of the current. Attention on black activists and black work and things and. Public works that makes black life, more tolerable and enjoyable. Lots of people are donating campaigns that they wouldn't have so. A perfect example is own project project Myopia, which is a project that's been going about three years now that. Is working with different universities to decolonize the curriculum? But. This, so we all we do! We have funding currently. That's going to you know. A few grand left off funding, and that is going to run out, and then we'll have to look for another funding body, because the funding for this project is conditional on me still having PhD. Funding I'm coming to the end of the end of the Sunday's coming right. And we shouted across a Michelle Pay Powell and got more donations in this week Louis ever have. Like this moment where people are going. I feel really impotent. Maybe I can do something to contribute to efforts. The already exist,

Adamson Michelle Pay Powell Cinco Louis
Mental Health In Police Custody

Mentally Yours

06:48 min | 2 years ago

Mental Health In Police Custody

"Hi, everyone, and welcome to Mentally Yours Metro cody KS mental health podcast I'm that and today. I'm going to be chatting Tamasha rake. She's the sister of shorn rake a black wishes, musician who lived with schizophrenia and died in police custody in two, thousand and eight. We're going to be talking. About how her brother died, and also about the death of George Floyd in America. Every black person I know at the moment is finding themselves. Often willingly, but gaining followers gaining. A lot of them. Sometimes unwanted sometimes wanted messages and the Adamson. Talking about A. Lots of people so. Self flagellating about what can they do about racism of a ship questions coming through same pre spree overwhelming and I don't think I know anyone who hasn't hot influx. Of people not quite on shore of how to talk to us. How can people surfing the cost of their own mental health? The moment, especially backend ethnic minority people I think it is quite tiring. particularly when you'll someone who does this work year round and someone who feels this pressure in this sadness year round to only be August just because. Another person because one death has hit the news in a way. That makes people upset in like. Lots of us are aware of many more happening are aware of this constant proximity of black people to death and. You, know wash. This is all the more jarring tiring because it's being played out on such an international scale. It can sometimes be a bit baffling to me where I'm like Oh why now like. Now you're interested, but will you be interested next month? Will you be so? That's what makes it quite difficult to deal with? Especially because. Well. Sometimes it's. Sometimes it's your actual real friends. Checking on which is nice. But a lot of the time it's people who pausing acquaintances best who seem to just be going through a list of every lesson. They know going. Hey, you a K and and you know responding to that in a way that is. So I kind of taken on this policy right now, where like? I. If I don't respond, kindly responded at all. and Some people. I. Don't know a lot of the time. There's a lot of just trying to get. So points doing the right thing as opposed to an actual desire. To whatever, but then again that might be very cynical is made. Perhaps lots of people are feeling uncomfortable. Being confronted with this. Oh thing for the first time. And don't know what to do, other than to talk to the nearest black person to them, which would have to urge anyone listening? Please not to do. Is I can tell you the like. There was a long period of time Fox. Where I didn't want to talk to any white people about this at all like I took pretty much like almost two weeks very rarely looking at social media, ignoring my phone almost completely. And you know responses to emails became longer new the stocks because it can be very exhausting, so. Comforting the person who's come to you to trying comfy? They don't really have anything to offer me in terms of comfort. They couldn't. I have something to offer them. The. Old I'm fine and. You know you're doing the right thing. It can be very tiring. But then on the other hand might sound like. Something! That is actually really great in this time. You see so many different fundraisers for projects. They have been going on for a really long time and because of this. The current. Attention on black activists, and that work and things and. Public works that makes black life more tolerable and enjoyable. Lots of people are donating campaigns that they wouldn't have so. A perfect example is mine project project Myopia which is a project that's been going for three years now that. is working with different universities to decolonize the curriculum. But. This, so we are we do. We have funding currently. That's going to you know. A few grand left off funding, and that is going to run out, and then we'll have to look for another funding because the funding for this project is conditional on me. Still having PhD funding I'm coming to the end of the end of the funding's coming right. and. We shed across a Michelle. Pay Powell and more donations in this week than we ever have. Like this moment where people are going okay I feel really impotent. Maybe I can do something to contribute to efforts that already exist, which is really useful, because people are out there doing the work like so many friends who run you know different projects like looking for you know trying to improve. Access to theater for. People of Color on access to you know like so fringe of color run by my friend, Jeff's broth and Things like. Tiny compasses black Christmas. Things have been able to Gaza donations. In Pau because of the current attention. And you kind of in this weird position as a black activist where you have to. Solve Square your discomfort with. Because I, wouldn't really you cool it profiting 'cause? We don't profiting off this time it's. Taking in funding to continue the work that we're doing to support, black paper. It feels unseemly in some ways, but at the same time why attention attention spans fickle, so you kind of have to take advantage of that current moment where people do feel. Badly in. To help

George Floyd Adamson America Gaza Michelle FOX Powell Jeff
Katie Adamson on how the YMCA is like an Iceburg

HIT Like a Girl

06:51 min | 2 years ago

Katie Adamson on how the YMCA is like an Iceburg

"My Name Is Katie. Adamson and I am Vice President of Health Partnerships in policy at the YMCA The USA. I have been at the Y. For fifteen years that I've been in the space for thirty so old I am about prevention and at the Y. We're about community health and so a bit different from the conference. I think I'm a bit of an outlier in terms of that. But that's kind of exciting. So I started my career out working for elected officials and so the first one was Pat Schroeder from Colorado and she stealth helped start the congressional women's caucus and children's caucus and she was one of the first graduates of Harvard law school too. She was a super big innovator in women's rights and I also got to work for a member of parliament and Ireland row when I was yeah when I was there. He brought the whole government down for itchy rights again so it was kind of neat to see the parliament go down because he felt like everyone should get access to HIV care and treatment. Ap Don't mind my asking. When is this like right out of college? He was right out of college. Okay now. They're probably more progressive in the United States. Went back then. They weren't that guy that I worked for a very desmond. He introduced contraception into Ireland around the pope. While that kind of tells you he was a real meek guy I was lucky to work for him and then came back and went back to pat. Schroeder's Office. I had been an intern for her. And I said I still want to work on the hill. Can you help me find a job in so Bernie? Sanders had just been elected so when I worked for him. Nobody who was now. Everybody knows who he is. And Bernie's known a lot more. His super super liberal left issues but he was a huge and continues to be a huge advocate for prevention and that the system is skewed and needs to be right-sized towards bigger investment in prevention. So that really influenced me a lot and for him. I worked on those issues primarily and we introduced legislation to establish national cancer registry in this country so that we you know we have more baseball statistics about guys in the world series than we do about women who got breast cancer and so the idea was if you could really kind of capture when people were diagnosed how they were diagnosed that public health could intervene catch it earlier do better screening referral. Things like that so we were able to pass. That legislation helped him get reelected helped him work with Republicans which he had to do in order to get reelected so I was doing a lot of work at the time for him to increase funding for prevention and so the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. You know we're the only federal agency outside of Washington and we don't have anyone to help us. Educate the hill about what we do. Would you come work for us so took us about me about a year to get that job? But then I gotta go down to the Centers for Disease Control and help them come up and educate members of Congress about what the problems were and how big of an issue diabetes and cancer arthritis and all these issues were for the nation and how we needed to be doing more and building more programs in communities and that was an incredible experience for me. I came back and I work for some law firms as I was A nonprofit lobbyists basically so it was a law firm for profit. But I I worked for twenty nonprofits and I had to get all of them federal money. Wow so it's very hard. That's a huge responsibility was back in the earmark days and those are really good earmarks. I worked for Christopher and Dana. Reeve when they were alive. Superman and Dino's goal was that no one would ever have to make more than one phone call after a family member had become paralyzed because she was in a privileged position. She had all the access to anything. You could need in in terms of getting help for Chris. It took her like twenty six phone calls to get just a few things answered and so we built this entire center to help people living with paralysis. Get ACCESS TO CARE and information. Our Son had an issue so I've actually reached out to the Christopher Dana Reeve's foundation in having left the hospital after six months day with something that turned their lives upside down there just tremendous. Aren't they incredible? They really are and ours was not an interest spinal cord injury issue. It was non interested central nervous system but the people over there are just a pleasure to work with. I'm so glad to hear that because I was a long time ago so I'm so glad there's still doing three. Oh yes I was lucky enough to also work for Queen Noor of Jordan. Tell us more cues one of our clients and she and her husband when he was alive did so much to get rid of landmines in Jordan. And she helped takeover after. Diana died so she took over and ran the landmines survivor network and they'd won the Nobel Peace Prize with a group of others. Trying to get land mines out of the ground but they also started a landmine survivor. Peer Support Network around the world and so when they start this peer support network around the world. They helped landmines fibers. Get jobs and be able to survive as a lot of people few lose a lamb in another country. You're completely ostracized because you're not value to your family anymore. So long story short one of my clients was Ymca. When I was working at the law firm for just six months and I was about ready to get married and have a family and I needed to slow down because it was a really busy work so I came to the YMCA. And I've been there for fifteen years and so when I came to the YMCA. It was a really good time because the why was looking at trying to take the network of twenty seven hundred wise in the country and ten thousand communities we reach and drive the ship in the direction of prevention and control of chronic disease. And we've done this a few times in our history before during World War One and World War Two. We won the Nobel Peace Prize for our work during wartime a lot of people. Don't know that you know that. Yeah we were on the ground helping prisoners of war sadly were giving him some cigarettes and some donuts but back then we didn't have the science and that was part of what we did but we did a lot of social support the why was also on the Japanese internment camps providing health and well being in recreation so really got a lot of history in this country for things we've done and collectively tried to respond to community crisis a needs later when women were going back to work and we had latchkey kid problems. Why became one of the leading provider childcare? So the why was looking at it. It's makeup and saying we have challenge here. We are hello being organization we wake up everyday thing about spirit mind and body for all and we're losing the war here and if we're not part of the solution part of the problem so how do we get everybody moving in the same direction so that was kind of when I got to be hired and so it was Super Fun. Time to start helping our wise be connected to the innovators and so we worked with Folks like the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and we taught wise. How do plan do study? Act Really How to evaluate your work how to change the building so people felt welcome when they came in so they didn't see this gym equipment Or get a tour of the why they saw coffee and people sitting down and talking

Christopher Dana Reeve Centers For Disease Control An Pat Schroeder Ireland Parliament Bernie Vice President Of Health Partn Harvard Law School Colorado Adamson Breast Cancer United States Queen Noor Washington Intern Sanders Institute For Healthcare Impro
3 Types of Theology

5 Minutes in Church History

04:20 min | 2 years ago

3 Types of Theology

"In church. History there are basically only three types of theology. Well that's what Dr Scroll said. And he went on to identify these three types of theology ass Augustinian Azeem Palladian ISM and semi plagiarism. So what are we talking about here? Well to understand what is at stake here. In this statement of identifying these only types of theology we have to go back to the fore tends and the issue is of course. Agustin's teaching of Adam and Adam's sin in its connection to us and the challenge of that teaching by a monk named Pelagia sees from the British isles but he was rather peripatetic. He made his way to Rome. And then as the visigoths were making their way to Rome he went to Africa and then from everyone even to the Middle East. But we're in the four tens and the issue is that palladium denied the transmission of Adam's sin. He believed that Adam wasn't example for us. But that was the extent of the connection. So we are not born centers in fact we are born with the ability to sin and we were born with the ability to choose God and to assert our will to do good and to be good of course the GUSTON ATTACK. This and he spent much energy in the four. Twenties refuting Jesus and some of his key disciples in four thirty one at the Council of Ephesus Pelagia. Sin His teaching and some of those prominent disciples were condemned. But that is not at all the end of the matter. So what happened next? Well the issue was the degree to which Agustin's refutations of pelagia accepted in other words. Here comes in that third type between a Guston and play. Jesus we have the semi Palladian view and this would go not only through the five hundred but would go right on down even to the present day the allergy. Well when we're talking about the semi Palladian view the issue is what is the full effect of Adamson on humanity. Does Adam leave us sinful but yet the will is still free to choose in the will can. In fact choose it can choose to send or not to sin and it can choose God not God that in a nutshell is semi plagiarism. Now some folks will say well. That's semi Augustinian. Ism Right so the question of is the glass half wars the glass half empty or you might say have. I lost a sock or have I gained despair. But it's that halfway house of not accepting what PELAGIA was up to but not wanting to go fully with what Augusta was saying so. We are right back. Aren't we to the issue of original sin? Well look at this issue. This doctrine of original sin. It has two dimensions. I it has the fall. That is Adam's fall in the garden that historical event or Adam violated God's command plunged himself and all of his posterity into sin and so rigid sin teaches that all of the sons and all of the daughters of Adam and eve that has all of humanity are born with an innate moral corrupt sin nature. They don't become centers when they said they are sinners and because they are centers they in because we are centers. We send an Augusta further concluded that we are dead in thin and so God must work in us. I in order to save us from our sin but again that strikes. Some in many actually as problematic as denying moral accountability is denying responsibility. And so the introduce this idea that the will is free and we have more liberty and we can choose to send or not to send and that is ricocheted through the centuries of the church came up again and the reformation and in the post reformation era so there you have it. The three types of Theology Augustinian ISM salvation is a work of God alone. Plagiarism Salvation is all about human effort. It's the assertion of the human. Will we have the wherewithal to be good and to do good? It SMACK DAB. In the middle is that semi plagiarism. Salvation is cooperative. Work God in Maine working together. Well those are the three types of theology.

Adam Augustinian Azeem Palladian Is Pelagia Council Of Ephesus Pelagia Agustin Rome Palladian Guston Dr Scroll Middle East Augusta Maine Adamson Africa
Creating Antimatter: Matter's "Evil Twin"

Short Wave

07:44 min | 2 years ago

Creating Antimatter: Matter's "Evil Twin"

"Antimatter. I'm so excited to talk to you about antimatter and emily. I know exactly what you're thinking. Anti-matter pods are rigged to blow up the moment we star Trek Right. I mean antivirus. A huge part of Star Trek. All right I know. The Vulcan Salute. Live long and prosper. That's about the extent of my knowledge of Star Trek. But I get your point. Antimatter does kind of sound like science fiction. But it's Real. That's the cool thing. Yes antimatter particles. Are these strange mirror particles to the stuff we see all around us and scientists have made it using a giant particle accelerator in Europe. They're studying it because they hope it can answer some fundamental questions about the universe. Okay not entirely sure I get it but by the end of the episode I assume we all will so today on the show anti-battery what it is how it works and why one scientist has spent decades trying to trap it. Jeff. I have a lot of questions about antimatter. But can you just start with regular matter? What is that? Yeah so a Refresher Viseu. Don't remember regular matter. It's a broad category for everything. So you're madder I matter the studios matter the I I get it matter matter matter. It's a nice thought. Yeah and as matter. We're all made of atoms. So you're a bunch of Adamson the shape of an emily corn on the shape of a Jeff Brumfield now for antimatter. I'm actually going to let another Jeffrey. Who knows a lot more physics? Naidoo answer this one. His name is Jeffrey Angst. And he's a researcher at our House University in Denmark and to Madeira. I think it is kind of an evil twin of the stuff that makes up our everyday world intriguing. Go on it is it is. It's just this kind of opposite matter. It's like this mirror to everything that's around us so antimatter. It's here right now. Yeah I mean it's a little more complicated than that but anti matters real stuff and it exists in our universe and actually before anyone ever even detected it. They predicted it because math. The equations of physics demanded in fact was discovered that way. You know by coming up with a an equation that predicted existence. But nobody was really looking forward and I am not going to attempt to describe the fundamental equations physics on this podcast because I don't really understand them But Hank says the closest analogy. He's got for US mortals to think about. Is this math problem. What's the square root of four two very good? But there's a second solution negative to Aoki because negative negative to four so the way you just went straight to. That's exactly kind of what happened in physics like there were these equations and there was a positive set of solutions for particles and negative side and everyone was like the negative set. What does that even mean? That's nonsense but it turned out there. Were these negative particles. They did exist and they're called antimatter. Oh okay so there's this theoretical idea of antimatter kicking around for awhile. Which kind of explains what it is. But what is it exactly? Here's the thing. It really is opposite matters. So protons do you remember protons. Yeah their positively charged subatomic particles. They are anti. Protons are negatively charged electrons their charged and their anti particles are positively charged. Hey this is kind of amazing. It is kind of amazing. And here's the best part actually lives up to the SCIFI analogy. So just go with your vestigial Sifi brain and I get it emily. You're more of like Colin Firth. Pride and prejudice. Bbc D. You know no shame in it. There isn't there isn't I've seen it probably more times than you have in my life but what do you think happens when matter? Antimatter get when they actually meet okay. If antimatter is the evil twin they fight they dual. They do lake in Jane austen novel. They do well. You're not too far off. I'm going to let the actual experts explain it to you. My her Antimatter tendency to. Cancel each other out. Where's this under certain conditions when to identify articles of matter? Antimatter meet these experts. Jeff Captain Kirk and is that Leonard Nimoy as relationship. Yes total complete absolute annihilation as stock. It is that's right and you're right that Star Trek season one episode twenty seven original track the best track. But here's the thing heavily. It's actually a hundred percent accurate or close. The Universe won't end if antimatter and matter meat. But the two particles disappear in a flash of light. The anti-matter can't exist in the presence of matter. That's where the science fiction stuff comes in. These things really do annihilate each other if you get them together okay. So I've covered a lot of physics over the years and this is pretty much the only case where the sci-fi and the reality match although I will say annihilation is actually a lot less sexy in real life. It's really just annoying to have to deal with something that you have to make and that the universe is trying to destroy and every every every turning point that's hard to be an antimatter physicist I it is. I mean he's literally been doing this since the ninety s and like he does get a little frustrated. All right you said earlier that antimatter. It's here in this universe but this universe is full of matter. I don't see any antimatter lurking around. So where is it if it's exists in theory but it's hard to find in reality. I don't get this you know who else doesn't get it. Every physicist on earth like this is one of the fundamental questions the equation say there should be as much anti matters. There's matter but in practice. Antimatter is actually super hard to find and Hank says nobody knows why there aren't any good ideas about this. I mean physicist. Ducey little. Bits of antimatter here and there. In fact anti electrons I discovered in cosmic rays coming from deep space way back in the nineteen thirties. And actually I've got another natural source of antimatter. Right here in the studio emily in this room. Yes ready yes. Data this banana. What are you talking about? Is this a real episode? This is an episode. About nothing and Tomfoolery. Mom Can I hold the banana to make sure it's real Alex Lane? Yes okay so obviously. The banana is not anti. It's it's matter but here's the thing about bananas. Bananas are full of Potassium. Which is really good for you. But there's also a radioactive isotope of potassium into banana. Call Potassium forty. This is a naturally occurring isotope So some Porsche. The potassium in the banana is potassium. Forty now here's the thing. Potassium forty when it decays eight usually releases an electron but very very very very rarely it releases and anti-electron so if we just hold this banana

Physicist Hank Jeffrey Angst Europe Colin Firth Jeff Jane Austen Jeff Brumfield Naidoo Scientist Aoki Adamson Alex Lane Jeff Captain Kirk United States Porsche Madeira Researcher BBC
Allen Adamson, CEO And Ivers discussed on KQED Radio Show

KQED Radio Show

02:08 min | 3 years ago

Allen Adamson, CEO And Ivers discussed on KQED Radio Show

"Uber says it's teaming up with a company called cargo twenty shopping app for uber riders the idea is that why you're in car you'll be able to buy things like luggage or make up or what have you kinda like sky mall the for uber right drivers will get a cut so there is an incentive for them to sell to you but really this is an old marketing technique right selling stuff to a captive audience but our consumers really up for that experience marketplace Merrill segera reports on the strategy cargo has actually been around for a couple years it's so website you can use to buy stuff your uber driver has on hand she won't stand at the Yale school of management says that makes sense it solves an immediate need you know why you are writing what do you need you may need some water you may need some kind of small snack which you can get it right here now cargoes launching as a full fledged apps separate from over and it's going to start selling big ticket items little ship to your house Allen Adamson who teaches at NYU stern school of business says this is less likely to work because if people want to shop online mother in an over they can just go to another online retailer and he says this could backfire it's going to damage the usual brand if uber drivers are trying to sell you a kitchen sink because cargo is relying on writers as a captive audience stuck in the backseat and forced to listen to potential sales pitches from drivers who by the way get a twenty five percent cut of those sales the drivers certainly motivated is a is a get squeezed into a tighter and tighter margins in our they're desperate to make an extra dollar just crave the CEO of cargo says he doesn't expect the worst drivers to become pushy sales associates I don't worry about it because we don't charge Ivers detail one anyway but Adams in says there is a risk that reach Ehlers and marketers need to be aware of the cost they can't really is the disruption to the customer experience and the negativity it produces and customers when they feel captive these days if you're that customer maybe your next online purchase is noise canceling

Allen Adamson CEO Ivers Adams Ehlers Merrill Segera Yale School Of Management Nyu Stern School Of Business Twenty Five Percent
"adamson" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"adamson" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"So aggressively tried to destroy a city in my whole life. Zac, Adamson Colleen fanning president, Bob the rest, they hate you. They hate Indianapolis line up for them at forty monument circle. They would just like to come by. And slap you in the face the minute. Tony you're calling for more aggressive handling of the homeless on the streets. This is how they're going to do it that are going to. They're not they're not handling the homeless. They're handling the homed deride homes. Those are the ones that are handling your increase the times of parking meters, which is a tax then you reduce the speed limit in in the miles square and other surrounding areas, then you eliminate right turn on red. So we should be clear that all of this is social engineering to keep you from driving. And luckily, we've got a red line for you. This is a social engineering from beginning to end and Zach Adamson thinks that this is the way to run a city. Zach Adamson is going to destroy this city. He's going to ruin it because he has not put forth and neither has President Ali in his year. None of them have put forth anything that actually talks about growth. I said why do we have a red line when we need a performing arts center, something that would actually bring art back to the city and allow the city to have. More of an establishment. No one's using a red line. But people would use a performing arts center there answer meatless Monday. They don't. They don't care about the businesses of Indianapolis. They don't care about the people of Indianapolis. And unfortunately, the people of Indianapolis are staying totally quiet Wallace city with nothing but promise is getting punched directly.

Zach Adamson Indianapolis Adamson Colleen fanning right turn on red Wallace city Tony president Zac President Ali Bob
Lana Del Rey postpones Israel show until she can “perform in both Palestine and Israel”

WBZ Morning News

00:38 sec | 4 years ago

Lana Del Rey postpones Israel show until she can “perform in both Palestine and Israel”

"YouTube fans in Berlin, are being, offered rain shacks after the band called off last night's concert the reason singer Bono losses voice out of. The first couple of songs he was. Unable to continue despite taking a break for a drink the band posted. An, apology on its website in Israel Singer Lana del Rey won't. Be performing at, a music festival there this week she says she was pressured to cancel by Palestinian activists del, Rey was headlined. The inaugural meteor festival but in a, tweet last week she says she's now dealing. Delaying until a time when she can schedule visits for both is really and Palestinian fans it is

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Paul, Senator John McCain and Accountant discussed on Bill Handel

Bill Handel

00:18 sec | 4 years ago

Paul, Senator John McCain and Accountant discussed on Bill Handel

"Say I know status Steer my records find it and prove it for me and it costs six, hundred dollars yeah Has to pay for. That That's right I understand but, it's you you get to pay. For it they don't have a legal duty to pay for it unless

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Four hospitalized, police eye more arrests after Portland clashes

ABC Perspective

00:58 sec | 4 years ago

Four hospitalized, police eye more arrests after Portland clashes

"Dueling protests in downtown portland erupt in violence saturday portland police declared the event a riot after demonstrators were seen attacking each other and throwing objects the crowd got when the right wing patriot prayer group began marching down the street clashing with groups patriot prayer was granted a permit for the march but it was canceled wants things spiraled out of control police made several arrests during the riot and seized multiple weapons and two brothers sit in jail on suspicion of murder charges in lewis county detectives found a body buried on their family's property an autopsy saturday did reveal it's the body of sixteen year old ben eastman of rando who had been missing since sunday sixteen year old benito marquez and his twenty one year old brother jonathan adamson were arrested on suspicion of murder we have learned the team died from blunt force trauma to the head the sheriff's office hasn't said why believes the brothers are linked to the case komo news time is one thirty four means it's time to check aaa traffic every ten minutes on.

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