17 Burst results for "Adams Zimmerman"

"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:38 min | 2 years ago

"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KCRW

"Six fifty one. Good morning. This is the California report. I'm penny. Nelson. Governor Gavin Newsom has weighed in on the mass shooting in New Zealand tweeting that no one should have to fear going to their place of worship. He went on to say that California stands with New Zealand and Muslims everywhere. Meanwhile, a new lawsuit filed in San Francisco federal court alleges that Stanford and other elite universities are negligent in their admissions processes. It comes days after the FBI charged more than fifty people with bribing officials to get their kids into the schools Lehohla law school, professor Adams Zimmerman says the lawsuit does not have legs what the courts are going to have to sit through our who's really eligible to bring a civil claim like this. And I'm skeptical that these planets will meet that test. In a statement Stanford said the lawsuit was without merit. So in this new year, there's been an uptick in the cases of measles in a dozen states, including California and one of the fastest ways to spread measles. Travel. Health officials in L A county warned the public earlier this week that they may have come into contact with the measles if they traveled through LAX in late February KPCC's elicit Jong Perry has more Elliott. County officials warned unmarked seventh that someone on a flight in route from China to Texas via LAX was infected with measles. A highly contagious virus spread by coughing and sneezing the traveler went to the international terminal and the connected to a domestic flight measles is so contagious. That health experts say one person can infect ninety percent of people nearby. If they haven't been vaccinated the virus is hard to track when the infected person is crossing state lines. So multiple health departments get involved to notify one another doctor Frank prize with LA county's department of public health this chain of information relayed along in this particular circumstance, we heard about it from the CDC LAX quarantine office and airline step in as well. They work at the CDC to alert all passengers on the same flight with an infected person signs of measles can appear ten to twenty one days after exposure. So as of yesterday, if travelers who went through LAX and leap February haven't developed any symptoms, then according to health officials, they should be in the clear for the California report. I'm Melissa Joan Perry in Los Angeles moving on. There are hundreds of lawsuits against Monsanto currently before a judge Vince Chabot area at the northern district court in San Francisco. One of the cases is in the hands of a jury right now and they're on day. Three of deliberations verdict is expected today or Monday joining me for an update is Dorothy Adkins reporter for law three sixty a Legal News wire. So Dorothy, can you give us the nuts? And bolts of this particular case, this trial is involving plaintiff Edward hardman who lives in Santa Rosa, and he plans his decades of use of a month. Punches weed killer roundup has caused his not hundred gins lymphoma. And what's he basing that on? He's basing that on his attorneys cited multiple studies that for portable. Show links between high exposure to this week, tiller and cancer. So why is this case garnering so much attention? There's cases earning so much attention because it's a first he's alleging these kinds of claims to go to federal court on there has been another trial over similar allegations. But that was in state court. So this is the first time a federal judge is going to roll. Well, federal jury is going to law on whether the weed killer can cause cancer, and that is precedent setting. Wow. So if it's a federal ruling, what would the implications be for America's larger agribusiness? It would mean that basically any anyone can depending on which side the jury comes down on and how the appeals courts besides it. It could mean that other plane is across the country could have viable cases in potentially win millions of dollars. Why were the other cases that have come forward, not viable? It's not that they have they're not viable. They haven't been litigated yet. They're all relatively new. This is just the first wave of cases, it all goes back to two thousand fifteen when the World Health Organization issued a report that said, the weedkillers active ingredient could cause cancer, and that's sparked almost thousands of cases at this point. And they just haven't gone to trial yet. So what does the ruling against Monsanto mean for California's large agricultural sector, depending on how the jury decides this could basically opened the door for a lot of farmers and just common household users of the week killer to potentially sue this company for causing their cancers. All right. Well, Dorothy Adkins is a reporter for the online news where law three sixty thanks so much for taking the time with us today. No problem and finally today people have been flocking to see super blooms blossoming up and down the state and finding fields with as many butterflies as there are flowers. K Q E, Mary Franklin Harbin brings us more to the wild. Flower hotline, widespread areas of flowers are blooming now and likely for the next few weeks, that's the wealth lower hotline Borrego springs chamber of commerce Unterberg state park near San Diego is one of the super blue meccas. In our state for Wildflower chasers. With the wildflowers have come millions of painted lady. Butterflies says art Shapiro a professor at UC Davis. He's been tracking butterflies in California for almost fifty years and says last year painted lady and monarch butterfly populations were down the monarchs by almost ninety percent. Shapiro has gotten calls from excited. People who have seen the painted, ladies and mistaken them for monarchs. It's easy to see why the butterflies get confused for one another. They both have similar orange black coloring where they can tell you is that I'm already getting messages from people who are seeing who painted ladies down the south land and saying this is wonderful. The monarch has been saved. And we do it or do they save themselves. And they're not my heart your painted lady's officials at onto go said the super bloom is a consequence of well-timed El Nino rains in the desert for the California report. I'm Mary Franklin Hart..

California Dorothy Adkins cancer LAX New Zealand San Francisco Melissa Joan Perry Governor Gavin Newsom reporter professor Mary Franklin Hart CDC Nelson Monsanto Stanford Edward hardman FBI Shapiro World Health Organization
"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"He's thirty three locations Manzini's can help find a mattress to fit your budget and xfinity xfinity's home security solution customers, get twenty four seven professional monitoring remote access to their system from anywhere on any device. Good morning. This is the California report. I'm penny. Nelson. Governor Gavin news has weighed in on the mass shooting in New Zealand tweeting that no one should have to fear going to their place of worship. He went on to say that California stands with New Zealand and Muslims everywhere. Meanwhile, a new lawsuit filed in San Francisco federal court alleges that Stanford and other elite universities are negligent in their admissions processes. It comes days after the FBI charged more than fifty people with bribing officials to get their kids into the schools Lehohla school. Professor Adams Zimmerman says the lawsuit does not have legs what the courts are going to have to sit through our who's really eligible to bring a civil claim like this. And I'm skeptical that these planets will meet that test. In a statement Stanford said the lawsuit was without merit. So in this new year, there's been an uptick in the cases of measles in dozen states, including California and one of the fastest ways to spread measles. Travel. Health officials in L A county warned the public earlier this week that they may have come into contact with the measles if they traveled through LAX in late February KPCC's elicit, John Perry has more LA. County officials warned on March seventh that someone on a flight in route from China to Texas via LAX was infected with measles. A highly contagious virus spread by coughing and sneezing the traveler went through the international terminal and the connected to a domestic flight measles is so contagious. That health experts say one sick person can infect ninety percent of people nearby. If they haven't been vaccinated the virus is hard to track when the infected person is crossing state lines. So multiple health departments get involved to notify one another doctor Frank prize with LA county's department of public health this chain of information relayed along in this particular circumstance, we heard about it from the CDC LAX quarantine office and airline step in as well. They work with the CDC to alert all passengers on the.

California LAX New Zealand Stanford CDC LA county Professor Adams Zimmerman Governor Gavin news Manzini FBI San Francisco Nelson schools Lehohla school John Perry Frank LA China Texas
"adams zimmerman" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"adams zimmerman" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

"This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast lawsuits connected to opioids have been really bad for drug makers and this year alone. There have been a lot of them. So many that one company Purdue pharma, the maker of Oxycontin says it might file for bankruptcy north country. Public radio's Brian man reports in a statement sent to NPR Purdue pharma spokesman Bob Josephson said the company has made no decisions, but is considering all its options, and that includes bankruptcy Richard house. This is a law professor at the university of Kentucky who follows opioid litigation closely. I guess they're serious if you declare bankruptcy. There's an automatic stay all the lawsuits that would be a serious blow to the more than fifteen hundred local and state governments suing big pharma. They argue companies like Purdue triggered the opioid epidemic. By aggressively marketing highly addictive painkillers, they want help paying for things like increased law enforcement and rehab programs Adams Zimmerman and opioid litigation expert at Loyola University says companies like Purdue facing a barrage of civil claims often use bankruptcy to limit their exposure, bankruptcy, starkly, drew nevi. One of the most powerful tools for the Bendon rum as best as companies the night nineties through today. PGA bankruptcy as a way who globally. Resolve large numbers of lawsuit. Purdue is a privately held company internal documents made public in recent months showed the Sackler family which owns a controlling interest pulled roughly four billion dollars out of the company while pushing opioid sales legal experts differ on whether those profits would be affected by produce. Bankruptcy Zimmerman thinks the Sackler private fortune could be vulnerable. The company that declared bankruptcy has the ability to go up there. The other party in order to clawback money that that wrongly taken away from a company that actually happened in in the main bankruptcy, though, that definitely could happen case. Like this to these opioid lawsuits target a wide range of companies, including Purdue, but also name brand companies like CVS, WalMart and Johnson and Johnson. If Purdue does seek bankruptcy protection, the whole, interlocking web of cases becomes much more complicated in trials could be delayed by months or years. Richard house nicotine university of Kentucky says government swing big pharma are already turning their sights on other opioid manufacturers with more assets than Purdue Jonathan Johnson is really getting hammered by the AGA and Oklahoma, and they do have pickpockets and probably wouldn't be candidates for bankruptcy. Well, Purdue pharma weighs its options. The company hoped to delay the first big test trial in Oklahoma state court this week a judge rejected the request, and that's civil. Case we'll go forward as scheduled in may, Brian man, NPR news. This message comes from NPR sponsor Capital One offering a variety of credit card options with features for a range of customers from foodies to travelers Capital One what's in your wallet credit approval required capital. One Bank USA NA.

Purdue Purdue pharma NPR Brian man Comcast Adams Zimmerman Richard house Capital One Oklahoma university of Kentucky Jonathan Johnson Bendon professor painkillers Bob Josephson PGA nicotine university of Kentuck
"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KCRW

"This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm David green. And I'm Rachel Martin lawsuits. Connected to opioids have been really bad for drug makers and this year alone. There have been a lot of them. So many that one company Purdue pharma, the maker of Oxycontin says it might file for bankruptcy north country. Public radio's Brian man reports in a statement sent to NPR Purdue pharma spokesman Bob Josephson said the company has made no decisions, but is considering all its options. And that includes bankruptcy Richard Alston's is a law professor at the university of Kentucky who follows opioid litigation closely. I guess they're serious if you declare bankruptcy. There's an automatic stay in all the lawsuits that would be a serious blow to the more than fifteen hundred local and state governments suing big pharma. They argue companies like Purdue triggered the opioid epidemic by aggressively marketing highly addictive painkillers, they want help paying for things like increased law enforcement and rehab programs Adams Zimmerman and opioid. Litigation expert at Loyola University says companies like Purdue facing a barrage of civil claims often use bankruptcy to limit their exposure, bankruptcy, historically, proven to be one of the most powerful tool. Dependent. About this companies through today. PG at NEA bankruptcy as a way to globally. Resolve large numbers lawsuit. Purdue is a privately held company internal documents made public in recent months showed the Sackler family which owns a controlling interest pulled roughly four billion dollars out of the company while pushing opioid sales legal experts differ on whether those prophets would be affected. By purdue. Bankruptcy Zimmerman thinks Sackler private fortune could be vulnerable. The company that declared bankruptcy has the ability to go after other party in order to clawback money that bit wrongly taken away from a bad actually happened in bankruptcy that definitely could happen in a case. Like this to these opioid lawsuits. Target a wide range of companies including Purdue, but also name brand companies like CVS, WalMart and Johnson and Johnson. If Purdue does seek bankruptcy protection the whole interlocking web of. Cases becomes much more complicated than trials could be delayed by months or years. Richard alston? At the university of Kentucky says government swing. Big pharma are already turning their sights on other opioid manufacturers with more assets than Purdue Johnson and Johnson is really getting hammered by the Augean Oklahoma. And they do have pickpockets probably wouldn't be candidate for bankruptcy. Well, Purdue pharma weighs its options. The company hoped to delay the first big test trial in Oklahoma state court this week. A judge rejected the request and that civil case will go forward as scheduled in may, Brian man, NPR news. It is Friday, and it's time for story core. And today we hear from Shotsie Harrison and her father, James Flavia Koi Brown. They sat down for story courts six years ago. Recently Harrison came back to talk about that interview, you'll hear parts of both recordings. This is a clip from the first one my father has a southern drawl..

Purdue Purdue pharma Purdue Johnson Richard Alston university of Kentucky Brian man NPR Adams Zimmerman Oklahoma Rachel Martin Shotsie Harrison David green Loyola University Bob Josephson painkillers James Flavia Sackler professor
"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Dave Freeman. It's five twenty two. This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm David Greene. Rachel Martin lawsuits connected to opioids have been really bad for drug makers and this year alone. There have been a lot of them. So many that one company Purdue pharma, the maker of Oxycontin says it might file for bankruptcy north country. Public radio's Brian man reports in a statement sent to NPR Purdue pharma spokesman Bob Josephson said the company has made no decisions, but is considering all its options, and that includes bankruptcy, Richard Alston? This is a law professor at the university of Kentucky who follows opioid litigation closely. My guess is they're serious if you declare bankruptcy. There's an automatic stay lawsuits that would be a serious blow to the more than fifteen hundred local and state governments suing big pharma. They argue companies like Purdue triggered the opioid epidemic by aggressively marketing highly addictive painkillers, they want help paying for things like increased law enforcement and rehab programs Adams Zimmerman and opioid litigation expert at Loyola University says companies like Purdue facing a barrage of civil claims often used bankruptcy to limit. Their exposure, bankruptcy starkly grew to be one of them was how old bender. Companies ninety through today. PG at NEA bankruptcy as a way to globally recalled large numbers law. Purdue is a privately held company internal documents made public in recent months show, the Sackler family which owns a controlling interest pulled roughly four billion dollars out of the company while pushing opioid sales legal experts differ on whether those profits would be affected by Purdue. Bankruptcy Zimmerman thinks the Sackler private fortune could be vulnerable. The company that declared bankruptcy has the ability to go under other party in order to claw back money that bit wrongly taken away from a that actually happening in the made up bankruptcy. Definitely could happen to these opioid lawsuits. Target a wide range of companies including Purdue, but also name brand companies like CVS, WalMart and Johnson and Johnson. If Purdue does seek bankruptcy protection, the whole, interlocking web of cases becomes much more complicated than trials could be delayed by months or years. Richard Alston is at the university of Kentucky says government swing. Big pharma are already turning their sights on other opioid manufacturers with more assets than do Johnson and Johnson is really getting hammered by the Augean Oklahoma, and they do have pockets probably wouldn't be candidate for bankruptcy. Well, Purdue pharma weighs its options. The company hoped to delay the first big test trial in Oklahoma state court this week a judge rejected the request, and that's civil case. We'll go forward as scheduled in may, Brian man, NPR news. It is Friday, and it's time for story core. And today we hear from shot see Harrison and her father, James Flavia Koi Brown. They sat down for story course, six years ago. Recently Harrison came back to talk about that interview, you'll hear parts of both recordings. This is a clip from the first one my father has a southern drawl nine.

Purdue Purdue pharma Richard Alston Brian man Johnson NPR Adams Zimmerman university of Kentucky Oklahoma Dave Freeman Rachel Martin Harrison David Greene professor Bob Josephson James Flavia Loyola University painkillers
"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm David green. I'm Rachel Martin lawsuits. Connected to opioids have been really bad for drug makers and this year alone. There have been a lot of them. So many that one company Purdue pharma, the maker of Oxycontin says it might file for bankruptcy north country. Public radio's Brian man reports in a statement sent to NPR Purdue pharma spokesman Bob Josephson said the company has made no decisions, but is considering all its options. And that includes bankruptcy Richard law. Professor at the university of Kentucky who follows opioid litigation closely. My guess is they're serious. If you declare bankruptcy. There's an automatic stay and all the lawsuits that would be a serious blow to the more than fifteen hundred local and state governments suing big pharma. They argue companies like Purdue triggered the opioid epidemic by aggressively marketing highly addictive painkillers, they want help paying for things like increased law enforcement and rehab programs Adams Zimmerman and opioid. Allegation expert at Loyola University says companies like Purdue facing a barrage of civil claims often use bankruptcy to limit. Their exposure, bankruptcy starkly grew to be one of them looked how old tool Bendon it's about this ninety through today. PG and E bankruptcy as way to globally recalled large numbers loss. Purdue is a privately held company internal documents made public in recent months showed the Sackler family which owns a controlling interest pulled roughly four billion dollars out of the company while pushing opioid sales legal experts differ on whether those profits would be affected by Purdue. Bankruptcy Zimmerman thinks the Sackler private fortune could be vulnerable. The company that declared bankruptcy has the ability to go after other party in order to claw back money that that wrong tweet taken away from a that actually happened in in the made up fake. That definitely could happen in a case. Like this to these opioid lawsuits. Target a wide range of companies including Purdue, but also name-brand companies like CVS, WalMart and Johnson and Johnson. If Purdue does seek bankruptcy protection, the whole, interlocking web of cases becomes much more complicated and trials could be delayed by months or years. Richard Alston is at the university of Kentucky says government swing. Big pharma are already turning their sights on other opioid manufacturers with more assets than Purdue Johnson and Johnson is really getting hammered by the Augean Oklahoma, and they do have pockets probably wouldn't be candidate for bankruptcy. Well, Purdue pharma weighs its options. The company hoped to delay the first big test trial in Oklahoma state court this week, a judge rejected the request and that civil case we'll go forward as scheduled in may, Brian man, NPR news..

Purdue Purdue pharma Purdue Johnson Brian man NPR university of Kentucky Adams Zimmerman Rachel Martin Oklahoma David green Richard Alston Loyola University Bob Josephson Professor painkillers CVS WalMart
"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm David green. And I'm Rachel Martin lawsuits. Connected to opioids have been really bad for drug makers and this year alone. There have been a lot of them. So many that one company Purdue pharma, the maker of Oxycontin says it might file for bankruptcy north country. Public radio's Brian man reports in a statement sent to NPR Purdue pharma spokesman Bob Josephson said the company has made no decisions, but is considering all its options. And that includes bankruptcy Richard houses, a law professor at the university of Kentucky who follows opioid litigation closely. I guess they're serious if you declare bankruptcy. There's an automatic stay and all the lawsuits that would be a serious blow to the more than fifteen hundred local and state governments suing big pharma. They argue companies like Purdue triggered the opioid epidemic by aggressively marketing highly addictive painkillers, they want help paying for things like increased law enforcement and rehab programs Adams Zimmerman and opioid. Allegation expert at Loyola University says companies like Purdue facing a barrage of civil claims often use bankruptcy to limit their exposure, bankruptcy, historically, drew to be one of them. Most powerful tools for the Bendon. It's about this ninety through today. PG at need bankruptcy as a way to globally. Resolve large numbers lawsuit. Purdue is a privately held company internal documents made public in recent months showed the Sackler family which owns a controlling interest pulled roughly four billion dollars out of the company while pushing opioid sales legal experts differ on whether those prophets would be affected by produce. Bankruptcy Zimmerman thinks the Sackler private fortune could be vulnerable. The company declared bankruptcy has the ability to go after other party in order to claw back money. That bet wrong take it away from a that actually happened in in the made off bankruptcy. No. That definitely could happen to these opioid lawsuits. Target a wide range of companies including Purdue, but also name brand companies like CVS, WalMart and Johnson and Johnson. If Purdue does seek bankruptcy protection the whole. Interlocking web of cases becomes much more complicated in trials could be delayed by months or years. Richard alston? At the university of Kentucky says government swing. Big pharma are already turning their sights on other opioid manufacturers with more assets than Purdue Johnson and Johnson is really getting hammered by the H in Oklahoma. And they do have pockets you probably wouldn't be candidate for bankruptcy. Well, Purdue pharma weighs its options. The company hoped to delay the first big test trial in Oklahoma state court this week judge rejected the request and that civil case we'll go forward as scheduled in may, Brian man, NPR news. It is Friday, and it's time for story core. And today we hear from Shotsie Harrison and her father, James Flavia Koi Brown. They sat down for story court six years ago. Recently Harrison came back to talk about that interview, you'll hear parts of both recordings. This is a clip from the first one my father has a southern drawl.

Purdue Purdue pharma Purdue Johnson Brian man university of Kentucky Adams Zimmerman Oklahoma Rachel Martin Shotsie Harrison David green Bendon Loyola University Richard alston professor Bob Josephson NPR painkillers James Flavia
"adams zimmerman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"adams zimmerman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Streaming service from the founder of Discovery Channel where people can watch history. Science and nature shows. More at curiosity. Stream dot com slash NPR C three C threes. AI software suite enables organizations to use art official intelligence at enterprise scale to sow previously unsolvable business problems. Learn more at C three dot AI Dartmouth offering master of healthcare delivery, science and online program for physicians and healthcare executives teaching business leadership and health policy to transform healthcare at healthcare, delivery dot Dartmouth dot EDU. This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm David green. And I'm Rachel Martin lawsuits. Connected to opioids have been really bad for drug makers and this year alone. There have been a lot of them. So many that one company Purdue pharma, the maker of Oxycontin says it might file for bankruptcy north country public radio. Brian man reports in a statement sent to NPR Purdue pharma spokesman Bob Josephson said the company has made no decisions, but is considering all its options, and that includes bankruptcy, Richard Alston? This is a law professor at the university of Kentucky who follows opioid litigation closely. I guess they're serious if you declare bankruptcy. There's an automatic stay and all the lawsuits that would be a serious blow to the more than fifteen hundred local and state governments suing big pharma. They argue companies like Purdue triggered the opioid epidemic by aggressively marketing highly addictive painkillers, they want help paying for things like increased law enforcement and rehab programs Adams Zimmerman and opioid. Litigation expert at Loyola University says companies like Purdue facing a barrage of civil claims often use bankruptcy to limit. Their exposure, bankruptcy, historically, grew to be one of the most powerful tools. Independent. Companies ninety through today..

Purdue Purdue pharma NPR Rachel Martin AI Discovery Channel founder Brian man David green Loyola University university of Kentucky Bob Josephson Richard Alston painkillers Adams Zimmerman professor official
"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Christ. New Zealand is on high alert after gunmen attacked two mosques killing an undetermined number of worshippers. Police Commissioner Mike Bush has several improvised explosive devices were found on near the mosque have been safely removed. Bush says four suspects are in custody. The attack is where apprehended by police staff is being some absolute exa bribery almost hugely proud police staff the way, they responded to this much says it is unclear if all the comforts happen apprehended. He says the thirties remain on alert for problems. Elsewhere New Zealand's, Prime minister, just in the Dern is calling Friday's attack. One of her nation's darkest days. Clearly, what has happened here is an extraordinary and unprecedented. Act of violence Christ Church remains on lockdown amid efforts to mobilize national security forces in Washington, the Senate has joined the house voting to block President Trump's national emergency declaration a dozen Senate Republicans sided with Democrats. On the chamber congress still lacks the votes needed to override a threatened presidential veto Trump declared an emergency on the southern US border to get around congress to obtain money. He wants to build his promised wall. The democratic led house has overwhelmingly approved a non-binding resolution in favor of making the special counsel Russia probe report open to the public more from NPR's, miles parks. The resolution calls for the public release of any report that Muller provides to attorney general William bar, it provides an exception for any portion that is quote expressly prohibited by law. The resolution also calls for the full release of the report to congress house passed a resolution four hundred twenty two zero with four members voting present. It's a remarkable show of bipartisan support for making noise work part of the public record. But it doesn't require it. The final call on how much the report is made public is automatically up to the attorney general, according to federal law attorney general bar said during his confirmation hearing that he would provide it's much transparency is he? Could but he stopped short of guaranteeing. The entire report will be made public miles parks. NPR news, Washington. China's parliament approved a new foreign investment law that promises to create transparency for foreign companies operating there a draft document shows the law will ban forced technology transfers and government interference in foreign business practices. It also show some last minute changes to strengthen clauses that call for criminal penalties for violators. Some US businesses are expressing skepticism about whether the law will be enforced. Friday's vote comes as China and the United States tried to reach a deal to resolve their trade war on stock markets in Asia shares are mostly higher following mixed. Trading. On Wall Street Tokyo's benchmark Nikkei climbed one percent after the Bank of Japan announced plans to keep its key interest rates unchanged. This is NPR news from Katie news. I'm Tara Siler. A number of students are suing Stanford and other colleges in a San Fran. Cisco federal court over the widespread admissions bribery scandal. Kikuchi Kate wolf has more the lawsuit alleges that several elite universities are negligent in their admissions processes. It comes days after the FBI charged more than fifty people with bribing officials to get their kids into the schools. Lawyers say that the students want their application money to those schools back Adams Zimmerman a professor of law at Loyola Law. School is skeptical that the case will go far in court. It's going to be hard for them. Substantiate their claims that they they wouldn't have applied at all. And they should be entitled to their admission. Tease back. In a statement. A Stanford spokesman said the lawsuit is without merit other named schools did not immediately reply to requests for comment. I'm kate. Wolf kick news three Oakland police officers. And a sergeant have been taken off the job this week over a fatal shooting of a sleeping homeless man who was in reach of a gun K Kunis. Alex Emslie has more police chief Anne Kirkpatrick recommended light punishment for officers who fatally shot Joshua Pollack last year, despite a recommendation from an internal board of police commanders for stiffer discipline. The police departments federal monitor called the chiefs analysis of the incident. Disappointing and is moving to override her decision. Under court oversight of OPD that's been in place for sixteen years. The dispute was brought to light by records released under California's new police transparency law police union attorney, Michael rains has said the cases become politicized. And he believes the..

Police Commissioner Mike Bush attorney congress bribery New Zealand Kate wolf United States President Trump NPR Michael rains China Washington Loyola Law Stanford FBI Senate Republicans
"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Last few years of fortunately is the president fearmongering scapegoating immigrants. There is a humanitarian crisis, but there is no invasion in the end. Even a bipartisan rebuke is largely symbolic though, since neither chamber has the votes to override a threatened presidential veto Trump wants to use the declaration provide three point six billion more for border barriers. More people were filing first time claims for unemployment benefits last week suggesting some slowing in the labor market, though, perhaps not as much as would be suggested by last month's week. Hiring statistics Labor Department says initial claims for state unemployment benefits were up by six thousand last week in February the government reported the economy created just twenty thousand jobs, the weakest jobs creation since September two thousand seventeen a mixed close on Wall Street today. The Dow Jones industrial average was up seven points to twenty five thousand seven zero nine the NASDAQ fell twelve points. This is NPR from Katie news. I'm Tara Siler. A number of students are suing Stanford and other colleges in a San Francisco federal court over the widespread. Admissions bribery scandal K cuties Kate. Wolf has more the lawsuit alleges that several elite universities are negligent in their admissions processes. It comes days after the FBI charged more than fifty people with bribing officials to get their kids into the schools. Lawyers say that the students want their application money to those schools back Adams Zimmerman a professor of law at Loyola Law. School is skeptical that the case will go far in court. It's going to be hard for them to substantiate their claims that they wouldn't have applied at all. And they should be entitled to their admission. Tease back. In a statement. A Stanford spokesman said the lawsuit is without merit other named schools did not immediately reply to requests for comment. I'm kate. Wolf news three Oakland police officers. And a sergeant have been taken off the job this week over a fatal shooting of a sleeping homeless man who was in reach of a gun cake. UD's Alex Emslie has more police chief and cook Patrick recommended light punishment for officers who fatally shot Joshua. Pollock last year despite a recommendation from an internal board of police commanders for stiffer disciplined the police departments federal monitor called the chiefs analysis of the incident. Disappointing and is moving to override her decision. Under court oversight of OPD that's been in place for sixteen years. The dispute was brought to light by records released under California's new police transparency law police union attorney, Michael rains has said the cases become politicized. And he believes the officers will keep their jobs in the end..

Kate Wolf Michael rains president Trump Tara Siler scapegoating Labor Department FBI bribery Stanford Loyola Law Adams Zimmerman San Francisco California
"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:20 min | 2 years ago

"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. And I'm no L king in Washington DC. Good morning. Facebook has drawn a lot of criticism for failing to protect the privacy of its users. And then yesterday, the New York Times reported in great detail about how Facebook gave other giant companies access to its users data those companies, including Microsoft, Amazon and Yahoo. Some of them reportedly even had access to users private messages. So what does all of this mean for Facebook and possibly as important? What should it mean for Facebook on geared? It us is with me. Now, he wrote the book winners take all the elite charade of changing the world. Good morning on it. Good morning. So is it fair to say right off the bat that you have been critical of Facebook and other big corporations that is fair. Okay. We'll go from there. Facebook has misused user data before? I mean, we've we've seen these stories break several times over the past couple of years, and it often feels like nothing happens. Why does this company? Seem immune from repercussions. I think it's because we haven't actually figured out a claim our power is a public to do something about this. You know this week as yet another revelation spilled out, and this one in many ways, I think was a Rubicon for a lot of people, and this is private messages being read by other companies, and yet the dominant response that I witnessed was a kind of delete Facebook campaign, which you've seen in the past and at one level, this is emotionally satisfying, and it's sort of maybe funded delete the app heart of why we are unable to solve it. As you ask is because when you delete Facebook as an individual, you're Personalizing, what is in fact, an issue of systems and the abuse of power, and this cannot be solved in my view by individual action and kind of personal fortitude. That's interesting you're saying, this is not about personal responsibility. As many people would argue it's about something bigger than that. So so when we get to the bigger than that, let's talk about what direction you'd like to see this go in. What specific changes would you want to see either to protect user data or simply to regulate a company like Facebook. There are two major areas of change. When you look at Facebook one, we need a privacy law that actually deals with the reality of what these companies have been doing time. And again, you know, Mark Zuckerberg, and Sheryl Sandberg and their squad have revealed themselves to be stewards of our privacy that we that we don't need. And so that needs to be just privacy protection? The second is the revival of antitrust in American. This is a predatory monopoly. You don't if you want to go online and look for a high school sweethearts to feel nostalgic about there is no other option besides Facebook. And all the other things we do on Facebook. We should we should say we should be clear the question whether or not Facebook is a monopoly. I mean, you could put to a communist into the room into a room and get fistfight. Right. That that is that isn't a week. Despite but it would be. But I think when it comes to these the reason whether it's privacy or anti-trust to other things what I'm talking about our legal fixes, and I think it's worth thinking about analogies here when you think about the predatory power of big food and big sugar specifically, I think we've now learned that all of us trying to diet harder is no match for their political power when we think about the opioid crisis. And the people who promoted Oxycontin, people individually fighting the demons of addiction is no match for that power. When you think about the coke brothers and the deregulation agenda around pollution you buying better. Paper towels and doing homework on which rivers are safe for your kids to swimming is no match for that political power. And I think by the way when you think about Sheryl Sandberg of Facebook and her advice to women as Michelle Obama recently reminded us women's simply leaning in and raising their hand higher is actually no match for thousands of years of oppressive patriarchy. So this company is actually part of this larger narrative that plutocrats. And big corporations have been spreading in American life. Which is that abusive behavior by the powerful is in fact, your problem to solve as an individual you're arguing that it should be the problem of lawmakers who who who regulate things just briefly on. And why hasn't why haven't lawmakers done it? I mean Facebook's gone before congress what's going on. Where's the disconnect? I mean, let's be real. We have a grandpa grandma, congress that is unable to understand the apps that now shape the modern world as is evident every time we have these hearings and one of the most important things we need to do is bring the age of congress into line with the age of this country. Also, these companies present new legal issues because we are there conveniences for us that we love and you're abusing us. And so we need a new legal framework. And I I there are members of congress out there who are smart and thinking about this, and we need to support their efforts to solve this through the law on unbearded wrote the book winners take all thanks. Thank you so much. A federal judge is allowing a massive civil case to move forward against some of the nation's biggest drug makers and distributors. The ruling was handed down yesterday. Hundreds of local governments are suing hoping to recover damages caused by the deadly opioid epidemic. NPR's Brian man has more cities and towns across the US argue that companies like Purdue pharma, WalMart and Rite Aid that made and sold. Opioids like Oxycontin should pay to help remedy the drug epidemic now raging. It just never seems to end it feels like every day. There is a new story of loss of life loss of hope. Greta Jonsson works for summit county, Ohio. She says government resources. Police courts foster care have been swamped a number of children we have in. Our children's services bureau has just ask financially increase, and it is as a result of opiates. So summit county became one of hundreds of localities that filed civil suits consolidated in the federal court of. Judge Dan pollster in the northern district court, you know, Hieaux the company's urged him to dismiss the soups. They argued that the statute of limitations had run out and made the case that cities and counties work eligible to seek compensation for these kinds of damages but on Wednesday judge pollster rejected those arguments in a strongly-worded ruling he described the opioid epidemic. As a made plague and said communities will have the opportunity to try to prove the drug industry contributed to the addiction of millions of Americans. Alexandra lava is a law professor at the university of Connecticut. She says this is an early ruling, no liability has been proved, but she thinks the judges language should worry drug companies. A lot of litigation is about taking control of the narrative. And having a story about yourself as a good guy. That's seems like an uphill battle for this set of defendants. This case matters in part because it's seen as a bellwether for other opioid lawsuits around the country Adams Zimmerman law. Professor. At Loyola University says if the industry is forced to pay to help clean up the opioid mass the price tag could run into the tens of billions of dollars. It's big in terms of the total liability and number of aces being sorted by municipalities, which is now thousands. I've never seen a case as big as this case is now.

Facebook Sheryl Sandberg Washington DC New York Times David Greene summit county congress Culver City California Loyola University Microsoft Judge Dan pollster Mark Zuckerberg Yahoo Adams Zimmerman Michelle Obama Professor US NPR Alexandra lava
"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Why hasn't why haven't lawmakers done it? I mean Facebook's gone before congress. What's going on? Where's the disconnect? I mean, let's be real. We have a grandpa grandma, congress that is unable to understand the apps that now shaped the modern world as is evident every time we have these hearings and one of the most important things we need to do is bring the age of congress into line with the age of this country. Also, these companies present new legal issues because we are there. Conveniences for us that we love and yet are abusing us. And so we need a new legal framework. And I there are members of congress out there who are smart and thinking about this, and we need to support their efforts to solve this through the law on ungeared it asks wrote the book winners take all thanks. Thank you so much in Ohio federal judge is allowing a massive civil case to move forward against some of the nation's biggest drug makers and distributors. The ruling was handed down yesterday. Hundreds of local governments are suing hoping to recover damages caused by the deadly opioid epidemic. NPR's Brian man has more cities and towns across the US argue that companies like Purdue pharma, WalMart and Rite Aid that made and sold. Opioids like Oxycontin should pay to help remedy the drug epidemic now raging. It just never seems to end it feels like every day. There is a new story of loss of life loss of hope. Greta Jonsson works for summit county, Ohio. She says government resources. Police courts foster care have been swamped the number of children we have in. Our children's services bureau has just ask financially increase, and it is as a result of opiates. So summit county became one of hundreds of localities that filed civil suits consolidated. In the federal court of judge, Dan. Pollster in the northern district court in Ohio, the company's urged him to dismiss the suits. They argued that the statute of limitations had run out and made the case that cities and counties weren't eligible to seek compensation for these kinds of damages but on Wednesday judge pollster rejected those arguments in a strongly-worded ruling he described the opioid epidemic. As a manmade plague and said communities will have the opportunity to try to prove the drug industry contributed to the addiction of millions of Americans. Alexandra lava is a law professor at the university of Connecticut. He says this is an early ruling, no liability has been proved, but she thinks the judges language should worry drug companies. A lot of litigation is about taking control of the narrative. And having a story about yourself as a good guy. That's seems like an uphill battle for this set of descendants. This case matters part because it's seen as a bellwether for other opioid lawsuits around the country. Adams Zimmerman a law, professor. At Loyola University says if the industry is forced to pay to help clean up the opioid mass the price tag could run into the tens of billions of dollars. It's big in terms of the auto liability and number of eighth of being sorted by municipalities which is now up in thousands. I've never seen a case as big as this. What this case is now expected to go to trial next fall with more than one hundred Americans dying each day from overdoses judge pollster has urged local governments and the drug industry to reach a financial settlement that would pay for new programs to fight the opioid epidemic without bankrupting drugmakers and pharmacies. Brian man, NPR news. This is NPR news. Then this is public radio..

congress Ohio Brian man summit county Greta Jonsson NPR professor Facebook overdoses US Alexandra lava Loyola University Purdue pharma Adams Zimmerman Dan university of Connecticut Rite Aid WalMart
"adams zimmerman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:33 min | 2 years ago

"adams zimmerman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. And I'm no L king in Washington DC. Good morning. Facebook has drawn a lot of criticism for failing to protect the privacy of its users. And then yesterday, the New York Times reported in great detail about how Facebook gave other giant companies access to its users data those companies, including Microsoft, Amazon and Yahoo. Some of them reportedly even had access to users private messages. So what does all of this mean for Facebook and possibly as important? What should it mean for Facebook on geared us is with me? Now, he wrote the book winners take all the elite charade of changing the world. Good morning. Good morning. So is it fair to say right off the bat that you have been critical of Facebook and other big corporations that is fair. Okay. We'll go from there. Facebook has misused user data before I mean, we've we've seen these stories break several times over the past couple of years, and it often feels like nothing happens. Why does this company seem immune from repercussions? I think it's because we haven't actually figured out a claim our power as a public to do something about this this week as yet another revelation spilled out, and this one in many ways, I think was Rubicon for a lot of people, and this is private messages being read by other companies, and yet the dominant response that I witnessed was kind of delete Facebook campaign, which you've seen in the past and at one level, this is emotionally satisfying. And it started maybe funded delete the app heart of why we are unable to solve it. As you ask is because when you delete Facebook as an individual, you are Personalizing, what is in fact, an issue of systems and the abuse of power, and this cannot be solved in my view by individual action and kind of personal fortitude. That's interesting you're saying this is not. What about personal responsibility? As many people would argue. It's about something bigger than that. So so when we get to the bigger than that, let's talk about what direction you'd like to see this go in what specific changes would you want to see either to protect user data or simply to regulate a company like Facebook, the two major areas of change when you look at Facebook one we need a privacy law that actually deals with the reality of what these companies have been doing time, and again, Mark Zuckerberg, and Sheryl Sandberg and their squad have revealed themselves to be. Stewards of our privacy that we that we don't need. And so there needs to be just privacy protection. The second is the revival of antitrust in American. This is a predatory monopoly. You don't if you want to go online and look for a high school sweethearts to feel nostalgic about there is no other option besides Facebook. And all the other things we do on Facebook. We should we should say we should be clear. The question of whether or not Facebook is a monopoly. I mean, you could put to communists into the room into a room and get a fistfight. Right. That is that isn't a week despite but it would be a fistfight. But I think when it comes to these the reason whether it's privacy or antitrust other things what I'm talking about our legal fixes, and I think it's worth thinking about analogies here when you think about the predatory power of big food and big sugar specifically, I think we've now learned that all of us trying to diet harder is no match for their political power when we think about the opioid crisis. And the people who promoted Oxycontin, people individually fighting the demons of addiction is no match for that power. When you think about the coke brothers and the deregulation agenda around pollution you buying better. Paper towels and doing homework on which rivers are safe for your kids to swimming is no match for that political power. And I think by the way when you think about Sheryl Sandberg of Facebook and her advice to women as Michelle Obama recently reminded us women's simply leaning in and raising their hand higher is actually no match for thousands of years of oppressive patriarchy. So this company is actually part of this larger narrative. That plutocrats and big corporations have been spreading in American life. Which is the abusive behavior by the powerful is in fact, your problem to solve as an individual. You're arguing that it should be the problem of lawmakers who who who regulate things just briefly unindo. Why hasn't why haven't lawmakers done it? I mean Facebook's gone before congress. What's going on? Where's the disconnect? I mean, let's be real. We have a grandpa grandma, congress that is unable to understand the apps that now shape the modern world as is evident every time we have these hearings and one of the most important things we need to do is bring the age of congress into line with the age of this country. Also, these companies present new legal issues because we are there. Conveniences for us that we love and you're abusing us. And so we need a new legal framework and their members of congress out there who are smart and thinking about this, and we need to support their efforts to solve this through the law and ungeared it asks for at the book winners take all thanks. Thank you so much. In ohio. A federal judge is allowing a massive civil case to move forward against some of the nation's biggest drug makers and distributors. The ruling was handed down yesterday. Hundreds of local governments are suing hoping to recover damages caused by the deadly opioid epidemic. NPR's Brian man has more cities and towns across the US argue that companies like Purdue pharma, WalMart and Rite Aid that made and sold. Opioids like Oxycontin should pay to help remedy the drug epidemic now raging. It just never seems to end it feels like every day. There is a new story of loss of life loss of hope. Greta Jonsson works for summit county, Ohio. She says government resources. Police courts foster care have been swamped the number of children, we have in our children's services, you're out has just exponentially increase, and it is as a result of summit county became one of hundreds of localities that filed civil suits consolidated in the federal court judge, Dan pollster. In the northern district court in Ohio, the company's urged him to dismiss the soups. They argued that the statute of limitations had run out and made the case that cities and counties weren't eligible to seek compensation for these kinds of damages but on Wednesday judge pollster rejected those arguments in a strongly-worded ruling he described the opioid epidemic. As a manmade plague and said communities will have the opportunity to try to prove the drug industry contributed to the addiction of millions of Americans. Alexandra lava is a law professor at the university of Connecticut. She says this is an early ruling, no liability has been proved, but she thinks the judges language should worry drug companies. A lot of litigation is about taking control of the narrative. And having a story about yourself as a good guy. That's seems like an uphill battle for this set of defendants. This case matters in part because it's seen as a bellwether for other opioid lawsuits around the country Adams Zimmerman a law, professor at Loyola universe. Says if the industry is forced to pay to help clean up the opioid mass the price tag could run into the tens of billions of dollars. It's big in terms of the auto liability and number of aces being sorted by municipalities, which is now up in thousands. I've never seen a case as big as what this case is now expected to go to trial next fall with more than one hundred Americans dying each day from overdoses judge pollster has urged local governments and the drug industry to reach a financial settlement that would pay for new programs to fight the.

Facebook ohio congress Sheryl Sandberg New York Times Washington DC David Greene summit county Culver City California overdoses Microsoft Alexandra lava Yahoo professor Michelle Obama university of Connecticut Mark Zuckerberg Adams Zimmerman US
"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:39 min | 2 years ago

"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's five thirty five. Good morning. This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. And I'm no king in Washington. DC? Good morning. Facebook has drawn a lot of criticism for failing to protect the privacy of its users. And then yesterday, the New York Times reported in great detail about how Facebook gave other giant companies access to its users data those companies, including Microsoft, Amazon and Yahoo. Some of them reportedly even had access to users private messages. So what does all of this mean for Facebook and possibly as important? What should it mean for Facebook uninsured us is with me? Now, he wrote the book winners take all the elite charade of changing the world. Good morning on it. Good morning. So is it fair to say right off the bat that you have been critical of Facebook and other big corporations that is fair. Okay. We'll go from there. Facebook has misused user data before? I mean, we've we've seen these stories break several times over the past couple of years, and it often feels like nothing happens. Why does this company seem? Immune from repercussions. I think it's because we haven't actually figured out a claim our power as public to do something about this. You know this week as yet another revelation spilled out, and this one in many ways, I think was Rubicon for a lot of people, and this is private messages being read by the companies, and yet the dominant response that I witnessed was kind of delete Facebook campaign, which you've seen in the past and at one level, this is emotionally satisfying, and maybe funded delete the app heart of why we are unable to solve it. As you ask is because when you delete Facebook as an individual, you're Personalizing, what is in fact, an issue of systems and the abuse of power, and this cannot be solved in my view by individual action and personal fortitude. That's interesting you're saying, this is not about personal responsibility. As many people would argue it's about something bigger than that. So so when we get to the bigger than that, let's talk about what direction you'd like to see this go in. What specific changes would you want to see either to protect user data or is simply to regulate a company like Facebook. There are two major areas of change. When you look at Facebook one, we need a privacy law that actually deals with the reality of what these companies have been doing time, and again, Mark Zuckerberg, and Sheryl Sandberg and their squad have revealed themselves to be stewards of our privacy that we that we don't need. And so then needs to be just privacy protection. The second is the revival of antitrust in American. This is a predatory monopoly. You don't if you want to go online and look for a high school sweethearts to feel nostalgic about there is no other option besides Facebook. And all the other things we do on Facebook. We should we should say we should be clear the question whether or not Facebook is a monopoly. I mean, you could put to a communist into the room into a room and get a fistfight. Right. That is that isn't a week. Despite but it would be. But I think when it comes to these the reason whether it's privacy or anti-trust to other things what I'm talking about our legal fixes, and I think it's worth thinking about analogies here when you think about the predatory power of big food and big sugar specifically, I think we've now learned that all of us trying to diet harder is no match for their political power when we think about the opioid crisis. And the people who promoted Oxycontin, people individually fighting the demons of addiction is no match for that power. When you think about the coke brothers and the deregulation agenda around pollution you buying better. Paper towels and doing homework on which rivers are safe for your kids to swim is no match for that political power. And I think by the way when you think about Sheryl Sandberg of Facebook and her advice to women as Michelle Obama recently reminded us women's simply leaning in and raising their hand higher is actually no match for thousands of years of oppressive patriarchy. So this company is actually part of this larger narrative that. Plutocrats and big corporations have been spreading in American life, which is abusive behavior by the powerful is in fact, your problem to solve as an individual. You're arguing that it should be the problem of lawmakers who who who regulate things just briefly unindo. Why hasn't why haven't lawmakers done it? I mean Facebook's gone before congress. What's going on? Where's the disconnect? I mean, let's be real. We have a grandpa grandma, congress that is unable to understand the apps that now shape the modern world as is evident every time we have these hearings and one of the most important things we need to do is bring the age of congress into line with the age of this country. Also, these companies present new legal issues because we are they are conveniences for us that we love and you're abusing us. And so we need a new legal framework. There are members of congress out there who are smart and thinking about this, and we need to support their efforts to solve this through the law and wrote the book winners take all thanks thank. You so much in Ohio. A federal judge is allowing a massive civil case to move forward against some of the nation's biggest drug makers and distributors. The ruling was handed down yesterday. Hundreds of local governments are suing hoping to recover damages caused by the deadly opioid epidemic. NPR's Brian man has more cities and towns across the US argue that companies like Purdue pharma, WalMart and Rite Aid that made and sold. Opioids like Oxycontin should pay to help remedy the drug epidemic now raging. It just never seems to end it feels like every day. There is a new story of loss of life loss of hope. Greta Jonsson works for summit county, Ohio. She says government resources. Police courts foster care have been swamped the number of children, we have at our children's services bureau has just financially increased. And it is as a result of summit county became one of hundreds of localities that filed civil suits consolidated in the federal. Court of judge, Dan. Pollster in the northern district court in Ohio, the company's urged him to dismiss the suits. They argued that the statute of limitations had run out and made the case that cities and counties weren't eligible to seek compensation for these kinds of damages but on Wednesday judge pollster rejected those arguments in strongly-worded ruling he described the opioid epidemic. As a manmade plague and said communities will have the opportunity to try to prove the drug industry contributed to the addiction of millions of Americans, Alexandra lob is a law professor at the university of Connecticut. He says this is an early ruling, no liability has been proved, but she thinks the judges language should worry drug companies. A lot of litigation is about taking control of the narrative. And having a story about yourself as a good guy. That's seems like an uphill battle for this set of defendants. This case matters in part because it's seen as a bellwether for other opioid lawsuits around the country Adams Zimmerman. A law. Professor. At Loyola University says if the industry is forced to pay to help clean up the opioid mass the price tag could run into tens of billions of dollars. It's big in terms of the auto liability and number of aces being sorted by municipalities, which is now often thousands. I've never seen a case as big as this. What this case is now expected to go to trial next fall with more than one hundred Americans dying each day from overdoses judge pollster has urged local governments and the drug industry to reach a financial settlement that would pay for new programs to.

Facebook congress NPR Sheryl Sandberg Ohio New York Times DC Culver City David Greene California Washington overdoses Loyola University Microsoft summit county Yahoo Adams Zimmerman Michelle Obama Professor Mark Zuckerberg
"adams zimmerman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:38 min | 2 years ago

"adams zimmerman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Invest with confidence. This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. And I'm Noel king in Washington. DC? Good morning. Facebook has drawn a lot of criticism for failing to protect the privacy of its users. And then yesterday, the New York Times reported in great detail about how Facebook gave other giant companies access to its users data those companies, including Microsoft, Amazon. John and Yahoo. Some of them reportedly even had access to users private messages. So what does all of this mean for Facebook and possibly as important? What should it mean for Facebook uninsured? It is with me. Now, he wrote the book winners take all the elite charade of changing the world. Good morning. Good morning. So is it fair to say right off the bat that you have been critical of Facebook and other big corporations that is fair. Okay. We'll go from there. Facebook has misused user data before? I mean, we've we've seen these stories break several times over the past couple of years, and it often feels like nothing happens. Why does this company seem immune from repercussions? I think it's because we haven't actually figured out a claim our power as a public to do something about this this week as yet another revelation spilled out, and this one in many ways, I think was Rubicon for a lot of people. This is private messages being read by other companies, and yet the dominant response that I witnessed was a kind of delete Facebook campaign, which you've seen in the past. And at one level, this is emotionally satisfying. And it sorta maybe funded delete the app heart of why we are unable to solve it. As you ask is because when you delete Facebook as an individual, you are Personalizing, what is in fact, an issue of systems and the abuse of power, and this cannot be solved in my view by individual action and personal fortitude. That's interesting you're saying, this is not about personal responsibility. As many people would argue it's about something bigger than that. So so when we get to the bigger than that, let's talk about what direction you'd like to see this go in what specific changes would you want to see either to protect user data or simply to regulate a company like Facebook there two major areas of change when you look at Facebook one we need a privacy law that actually deals with the reality of what these companies have been doing time, and again, Mark Zuckerberg, and Sheryl Sandberg and their squad have review. Field themselves to be stewards of our privacy that that we don't need. And so then needs to be just privacy protection. The second is the revival of antitrust in American. This is a predatory monopoly. You don't if you want to go online and look for a high school sweethearts to feel nostalgic about there is no other option besides Facebook. And all the other things we do on Facebook. We should we should say we should be clear the question whether or not Facebook is a monopoly. I mean, you could put to a communists into the room into a room and get a fistfight. Right. That isn't that isn't a week despite but it would be a fish. But I think when it comes to these the reason whether it's privacy or antitrust other things what I'm talking about our legal fixes, and I think it's worth thinking about analogies here when you think about the predatory power of big food and big sugar specifically, I think we've now learned that all of us trying to diet harder is no match for their political power when we think about the opioid crisis. And the people who promoted Oxycontin, people individually fighting the demons of addiction is no match for that power. When you think about the coke brothers and the deregulation agenda around pollution you buying better. Paper towels and doing homework on which rivers are safe for your kids to swim is no match for that political power. And I think by the way when you think about Sheryl Sandberg of Facebook and her advice to women as Michelle Obama recently reminded us women's simply leaning in and raising their hand higher is actually no match for thousands of years of oppressive patriarchy. So this company is actually part of this larger narrative. Give the plutocrats and big corporations have been spreading in American life. Which is the abusive behavior by the powerful is. In fact, your problem to solve as an individual. You're arguing that it should be the problem of lawmakers who who who regulate things just briefly unindo. Why hasn't why haven't lawmakers done it? I mean Facebook's gone before congress. What's going on? Where's the disconnect? I mean, let's be real. We have a grandpa grandma, congress that is unable to understand the apps that now shape the modern world as is evident every time we have these hearings and one of the most important things we need to do is bring the age of congress into line with the age of this country. Also, these companies present new legal issues because we are there. Conveniences for us that we love and yet are abusing us. And so we need a new legal framework. And I I there are members of congress out there who are smart and thinking about this, and we need to support their efforts to solve this through the law and ungeared at Oscar at the book winners take all thanks. Thank you so much. In Ohio, federal judge is allowing a massive civil case to move forward against some of the nation's biggest drug makers and distributors. The ruling was handed down yesterday. Hundreds of local governments are suing hoping to recover damages caused by the deadly opioid epidemic. Appears Brian man has more cities and towns across the US argue that companies like Purdue pharma, WalMart and Rite Aid that made and sold. Opioids like Oxycontin should pay to help remedy the drug epidemic now raging. It just never seems to end it feels like every day. There is a new story of loss of life loss of hope. Greta Jonsson works for summit county, Ohio. She says government resources. Police courts foster care have been swamped the number of children, we have in our children's services bureau has just exponentially increase, and it is as a result of opiates. So summit county became one of hundreds of localities that filed civil suits consolidated in the federal court of judge, Dan pollster. In the northern district court in Ohio, the company's urged him to dismiss the suits. They argued that the statute of limitations had run out and made the case that cities and counties weren't eligible to seek compensation for these kinds of damages but on Wednesday judge pollster rejected those arguments in a strongly-worded ruling he described the opioid epidemic. As a made plague and said communities will have the opportunity to try to prove the drug industry contributed to the addiction of millions of Americans. Alexandra have is a law professor at the university of Connecticut. She says this is an early ruling, no liability has been proved, but she thinks the judges language should worry drug companies. A lot of litigation is about taking control of the narrative. And having a story about yourself as a good guy. That's seems like an uphill battle for the set of defendants. This case matters in part because it's seen as a bellwether for other opioid lawsuits around the country Adams Zimmerman a law, professor at Loyola universe. Says if the industry is forced to pay to help clean up the opioid mass the price tag could run into tens of billions of dollars. It's big in terms of the auto liability and number of aces being sorted by municipalities, which is now often thousands. I've never seen a case as big as this. What this case is now expected to go to trial next fall with more than one hundred Americans dying each day from overdoses judge pollster has urged local governments and the drug industry to reach a financial settlement that would pay for new programs to fight.

Facebook Ohio congress Sheryl Sandberg New York Times Noel king NPR DC Culver City David Greene Yahoo California overdoses John Microsoft Washington summit county professor Michelle Obama university of Connecticut
"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:26 min | 2 years ago

"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. And I'm no well king in Washington DC. Good morning. Facebook has drawn a lot of criticism for failing to protect the privacy of its users. And then yesterday, the New York Times reported in great detail about how Facebook gave other giant companies access to its users data those companies, including Microsoft, Amazon and Yahoo. Some of them reportedly even had access to users private messages. So what does all of this mean for Facebook and possibly as important? What should it mean for Facebook is with me? Now, he wrote the book winners take all the elite charade of changing the world. Good morning. Good morning. So is it fair to say right off the bat that you have been critical of Facebook and other big corporations that is fair. Okay. We'll go from there. Facebook has misused user data before? I mean, we've we've seen these stories break several times over the past couple of years, and it often feels like nothing happens. Why does this? Company seem immune from repercussions. I think it's because we haven't actually figured out a claim our power as a public to do something about this. You know this week as yet another revelation spilled out, and this one in many ways, I think was Rubicon for a lot of people. This is private messages being read by other companies, and yet the dominant response that I've witnessed was kind of delete Facebook campaign, which you've seen in the past and at one level, this is emotionally satisfying. And it started maybe funded delete the app if why we are unable to solve it. As you ask is because when you delete Facebook as an individual, you are Personalizing, what is in fact, an issue of systems and the abuse of power, and this cannot be solved in my view by individual action and kind of personal fortitude. That's interesting you're saying, this is not about personal responsibility. As many people would argue it's about something bigger than that. So so when we get to the bigger than that, let's talk about what direction you'd like to see this. Go in what specific changes would you want to see either to protect user data or is simply to regulate a company like Facebook there two major areas of change when you look at Facebook one we need a privacy law that actually deals with the reality of what these companies have been doing time. And again, you know, Mark Zuckerberg, and Sheryl Sandberg and their squad have revealed themselves to be stewards of our privacy that we that we don't need. And so then needs to be just privacy protection. The second is the revival of antitrust in American. This is a predatory monopoly. You don't if you want to go online and look for a high school sweethearts to feel nostalgic about there is no other option besides Facebook. And all the other things we do on face. We should we should say we should be clear. The question of whether or not Facebook is a monopoly. I mean, you could put to communists into the room into a room and get a fistfight. Right. That is that is in a week. Despite but it would be. But I think when it comes to these the reason whether it's privacy or antitrust other things what I'm talking about our legal fixes, and I think it's worth thinking about analogies here when you think about the predatory power of big food and big sugar specifically, I think we've now learned that all of us trying to diet harder is no match for their political power when we think about the opioid crisis. And the people who promoted Oxycontin, people individually fighting the demons of addiction is no match for that power. When you think about the coke brothers and the deregulation agenda around pollution, you buying better paper towels and doing homework on which rivers are safe for your kids to swim, and is no match for that political power. And I think by the way when you think about Sheryl Sandberg of Facebook and her advice to women as Michelle Obama recently reminded us women simply leaning in and raising their hand higher is actually no match for thousands of years of oppressive patriarchy. So this company is actually part of this larger narrative that plutocrats. Big corporations have been spreading American life, which is abusive behavior by the powerful is. In fact, your problem to solve as an individual you're arguing that it should be the problem of lawmakers who who who regulate things just briefly on. And why hasn't why haven't lawmakers done it? I mean Facebook's gone before congress what's going on. Where's the disconnect? I mean, let's be real. We have a grandpa grandma. Congress is unable to understand the apps that now shape the modern world as is evident every time we have these hearings and one of the most important things we need to do is bring the age of congress into line with the age of this country. Also, these companies present new legal issues because we are there. Conveniences for us that we love and yet are abusing us. And so we need a new legal framework. There are members of congress out there who are smart and thinking about this, and we need to support their efforts to solve this through the law and ungeared it wrote the book winners take all thanks. Thank you so much. In Ohio, federal judge is allowing a massive civil case to move forward against some of the nation's biggest drug makers and distributors. The ruling was handed down yesterday. Hundreds of local governments are suing hoping to recover damages caused by the deadly opioid epidemic. NPR's Brian man has more cities and towns across the US argue that companies like Purdue pharma, WalMart and Rite Aid that made and sold. Opioids like Oxycontin should pay to help remedy the drug epidemic now raging. It just never seems to end it feels like every day. There is a new story of loss of life loss of hope. Greta Jonsson works for summit county, Ohio. She says government resources. Police courts foster care have been swamped the number of children, we have in our children's services bureau has just exponentially increase, and it is as a result of opiates. So summit county became one of hundreds of localities that filed civil suits consolidated in the federal court of judge. Dan. Pollster in the northern district court in Ohio, the company's urged him to dismiss the suits. They argued that the statute of limitations had run out and made the case that cities and counties work eligible to seek compensation for these kinds of damages but on Wednesday judge pollster rejected those arguments in a strongly-worded ruling he described the opioid epidemic. As a made plague and said communities will have the opportunity to try to prove the drug industry contributed to the addiction of millions of Americans. Alexandra have is a law professor at the university of Connecticut. He says this is an early ruling, no liability has been proved, but she thinks the judges language should worry drug companies. A lot of litigation is about taking control of the narrative. And having a story about yourself as a good guy. That's seems like an uphill battle for the set of defendants. This case matters in part because it's seen as a bellwether for other opioid lawsuits around the country Adams Zimmerman a law, professor. At Loyola University says if the industry is forced to pay to help clean up the opioid mass the price tag could run into the tens of billions of dollars. It's big in terms of the auto liability and number of aces being sorted by municipalities, which is now often thousands. I've never seen a case as big as this. What this case is now expected to go to trial next fall with more than one hundred Americans dying each day from overdoses judge pollster has urged local governments and the drug industry to reach a financial settlement that would pay for new programs to fight the opioid epidemic without bankrupting drugmakers and pharmacies. Brian man, NPR news. This is NPR news. Next time on the world is surveillance system for the US Mexico border, a kind of electronic border wall. It attracts people on the move, a reporter put on virtual reality goggles and watched a test of the system, and it said ninety eight percent probability that this thing is a person you zoom in or even send a drone to look at it. Because he's the person a virtual border wall on the world. Here the world this afternoon beginning at two followed at three by the PBS news hour, I'm Judy Woodruff. On the next news.

Facebook NPR congress Sheryl Sandberg Ohio Brian man Washington DC New York Times US David Greene Culver City California overdoses Judy Woodruff Microsoft Mark Zuckerberg summit county Yahoo Michelle Obama
"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:23 min | 2 years ago

"adams zimmerman" Discussed on KCRW

"This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. And I'm no king in Washington. DC? Good morning. Facebook has drawn a lot of criticism for failing to protect the privacy of its users. And then yesterday, the New York Times reported in great detail about how Facebook gave other giant companies access to its users data those companies, including Microsoft, Amazon and Yahoo. Some of them reportedly even had access to users private messages. So what does all of this mean for Facebook and possibly as important? What should it mean for Facebook uninsured? It is with me. Now, he wrote the book winners take all the elite charade of changing the world. Good morning. Good morning. So is it fair to say right off the bat that you have been critical of Facebook and other big corporations that is fair. Okay. We'll go from there. Facebook has misused user data before? I mean, we've we've seen these stories break several times over the past couple of years, and it often feels like nothing happens. Why does this? This company seem immune from repercussions. I think it's because we haven't actually figured out a claim our power as a public to do something about this this week as yet another revelation spilled out, and this one in many ways, I think was a Rubicon for a lot of people and this is private messages. Yeah. Being read by other companies, and yet the dominant response that I've witnessed was a kind of delete Facebook campaign, which you've seen in the past and at one level, this is emotionally satisfying. And it's sort of maybe fun delete the app heart of why we are unable to solve it. As you ask is because when you delete Facebook as an individual, you are Personalizing, what is in fact, an issue of systems and the abuse of power, and this cannot be solved in my view by individual action and kind of personal fortitude. That's interesting you're saying, this is not about personal responsibility. As many people would argue it's about something bigger than that. So so when we get to the bigger than that, let's talk about what direction you'd like to see this. Go in what specific changes would you want to see either to protect user data or simply to regulate a company like Facebook there two major areas of change when you look at Facebook one we need a privacy law that actually deals with the reality of what these companies have been doing time, and again, Mark Zuckerberg, and Sheryl Sandberg and their squad have revealed themselves to be you know, stewards of our privacy that we that we don't need. And so then needs to be just privacy protection. The second is the revival of antitrust in American. This is a predatory monopoly. You don't if you want to go online and look for a high school sweethearts to feel nostalgic about there is no other option besides Facebook. And all the other things we do on Facebook. We should we should say we should be clear. The question of whether or not Facebook is a monopoly. I mean, you could put to a communist into the room into a room and get a fistfight. Right. That that isn't that isn't a week. Despite but it would be. But I think when it comes to these the reason whether it's privacy or antitrust other things what I'm talking about our legal fixes, and I think it's worth thinking about analogies here when you think about the predatory power of big food and big sugar specifically, I think we've now learned that, you know, all of us trying to diet harder is no match for their political power when we think about the opioid crisis. And the people who promoted Oxycontin, people individually fighting the demons of addiction is no match for that power. When you think about the coke brothers and the deregulation agenda around pollution you buying better. Paper towels and doing homework on which rivers are safe for your kids to swim is no match for that political power. And I think by the way when you think about Sheryl Sandberg of Facebook and her advice to women as Michelle Obama recently reminded us women's simply leaning in and raising their hand higher is actually no match for thousands of years of oppressive patriarchy. So this company is actually part of this larger narrative that plutocrats. That's and big corporations have been spreading in American life. Which is the abusive behavior by the powerful is. In fact, your problem to solve as an individual. You're arguing that it should be the problem of lawmakers who who who regulate things just briefly on. And why hasn't haven't lawmakers done it? I mean Facebook's gone before congress what's going on. Where's the disconnect? I mean, let's be real. We have a grandpa grandma, congress that is unable to understand the apps that now shape the modern world as is evident every time we have these hearings and one of the most important things we need to do is bring the age of congress into line with the age of this country. Also, these companies present new legal issues because we are there. Conveniences for us that we love and yet are abusing us. And so we need a new legal framework. And I I there are members of congress out there who are smart and thinking about this, and we need to support their efforts to solve this through the law on ungeared us wrote the book winners take all thanks. Thank you so much. Much. A federal judge is allowing a massive civil case to move forward against some of the nation's biggest drug makers and distributors. The ruling was handed down yesterday. Hundreds of local governments are suing hoping to recover damages caused by the deadly opioid epidemic. NPR's Brian man has more cities and towns across the US argue that companies like Purdue pharma, WalMart and Rite Aid that made and sold. Opioids like Oxycontin should pay to help remedy the drug epidemic now raging. It just never seems to end it feels like every day. There is a new story of loss of life loss of hope. Greta Jonsson works for summit county, Ohio. She says government resources. Police courts foster care have been swamped the number of children we have in. Our children's services bureau has just ask financially increase, and it is as a result of opioid. So summit county became one of hundreds of localities that filed civil suits consolidated in the federal court of judge, Dan pollster. The northern district court in Ohio, the company's urged him to dismiss the suits. They argued that the statute of limitations had run out and made the case that cities and counties weren't eligible to seek compensation for these kinds of damages but on Wednesday judge pollster rejected those arguments in a strongly-worded ruling he described the opioid epidemic. As a made plague and said communities will have the opportunity to try to prove the drug industry contributed to the addiction of millions of Americans. Alexandra have is a law professor at the university of Connecticut. He says this is an early ruling, no liability has been proved, but she thinks the judges language should worry drug companies. A lot of litigation is about taking control of the narrative. And having a story about yourself as a good guy. That's seems like an uphill battle for the set of defendants. This case matters in part because it's seen as a bellwether for other opioid lawsuits around the country Adams Zimmerman a law professor at Loyola University. City says if the industry is forced to pay to help clean up the opioid mass the price tag could run into the tens of billions of dollars. It's big in terms of the total liability and number of aces being sorted by municipalities which is now up in two thousand I've never seen a case as big as this case is now expected to go.

Facebook congress NPR Sheryl Sandberg Culver City DC New York Times David Greene summit county Ohio California Washington Microsoft Yahoo professor Michelle Obama Loyola University university of Connecticut Adams Zimmerman Mark Zuckerberg