17 Burst results for "Adams Group"

"adams group" Discussed on Fantasy Football Today Podcast

Fantasy Football Today Podcast

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"adams group" Discussed on Fantasy Football Today Podcast

"I can't put him above. I think that hopkins hill digs thomas adams group. I think that's kind of cemented for me. But i think he would be the next man up totally get that right. Let's let's get into our advanced stats here. The other report was that that i wanted to bring up today. Sports illustrated saying russell. Wilson is committed to the seahawks for twenty twenty one. So hopefully can stop with the trade rumors at least for this year. Yes one more the happen. I don't we. Don't we discussed it. But antonio brown was actually not yet. On the buccaneers because he had failed his physical at some in past his physical today and is at the facility. Okay good stuff. I want tom brady. And no. other buccaneers this year. Maybe brown actually tonight. Sandra cheap best. I gotta figure he'd be pretty good in best ball he will. I was actually considering him for my favorite late round values. But when i put the list together he still wasn't actually signed he. Okay okay so. Let's talk about advance stats. I do best ball later. And i don't think we'll get emails today but remember. We have a mailbag tomorrow with your emails. And your apple. podcast questions. If you submit your apple podcasts questions today and tomorrow is actually gonna publish on thursday but if you submit them today i don't know that they will be in apple on time for them to be read on the show but don't worry we're committed to reading or apple podcast questions if you leave us a five star review so if it doesn't happen this week it'll happen next week. Okay so look chris. Let's just do a quick explainer. There's no way we can talk about all of these we have a lot of stats here in. You know so with that said here are the advance stats that you wanted to bring up for passing and the passing game intended air yards. Yeah and to just to highlight like intended areas is one of those things you can find on pro football reference to the players advance. Stats or the advance stats. Leaderboards entire dare yards is just how far down the field. The receiver was targeted. So that applies for both quarterbacks and wide receivers and tom brady led the nfl. Intended air yards last season. Just actually almost two hundred yards ahead of matt ryan so he was taking a lot of shots. Last season and basically deeper targets tend to have more value. It's not necessarily true of everybody but it's generally you want someone who's airing it out. Ok just we'll get through the passing stats for now and then we'll come back and talk about some of the players that we wanted to highlight on target rate. Just how accurate are how. Oh go ahead. yeah just. It's basically accurate accuracy right. How often the the pass was considered catchable. Yeah and this. Is this a better stat than just completion. Percentage it's a better indicator of accuracy than completion percentage completion percentages a kind of combination of what the wide receiver and what the quarterback doing whereas accuracy.

thursday next week tomorrow antonio brown Wilson Sandra five star tonight this week chris matt ryan tom brady today this year seahawks both quarterbacks apple brown nfl russell
"adams group" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"adams group" Discussed on Set Lusting Bruce: The Springsteen Podcast

"Darkness should have been this incredible double album. That what he ended up saying about the river. Oh, I needed the party songs and the Syria songs. Well, if you listen to the incredible outtakes from darkness, he some incredible love. Songs. Darkness, in other words I understand and respect Bruce's final decision that doesn't mean that I can't be sort of critical decisions while at the same time, the release darkness album is still a masterpiece. That's how great this guy is. Talking about Mozart it's like I'm sure if Mozart had a fisher releases and then he had outtakes, they're all break. And here is the second half of my discussion with passionate and opinionated fan but great guy. Arlen Schumer. I always like to talk to someone who's been a fan during your this long as you have. taught me about the dark years? What did you feel when after tunnel of love and they broke the band broke apart what? What was your feelings as a Fan Well. Number one he listened to sting on the human rights through saying, Hey, Bruce. If you want to expand your yourself, man gotta leave the East St bad behind. Now looking at what's thing did he left the police benign? He teams up with all musicians has his great solo career but what is Bruce to? He leaves these rebound behind, but he kind of keeps Roy bitten as like a crutch death, and then you know whereas thing I think shows really great musicians. I mean I'm not a big fan of sting's Solo, work. Here but my point is you know I don't think Bruce. necessarily. Did that although to tell you the truth. I saw a couple a couple of shows on that I. Call East. Street light to our allies ee and man I. Think it was at the meadowlands when he played born USA, even with that each street light ban. I remember member, we were talking about sense memories. Yeah. I had the feeling that the roof of the random burner re arena was being lifted off another say raise the roof. So. This is bruce with the East street light band and he's raising the roof. Play born in the USA. So that's just the test. The Bruce but when you say the dark years for me, so you as a fan, what were you feeling? Okay. So, as a creative person myself that understands or tries to understand and introspective about what it takes to create art. You have to allow Bruce. You know his his music has always been autobiographical. It's always reflective tunnel of love ironically when that came out, which is a brilliant record. If, you knew Bruce's life. The fact that his lyrics were always reflective in his experience. The minute you read those lyrics in the fall of one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven, I remember getting that when the minute the album came at regional going. This guy's marriages over. And the media which always said, Oh bruce writes about tyrod Taylor. He doesn't write about himself. They all miss the point and they didn't understand about Bruce's marriage situation till the following spring of eighty eight when he was infamously photographed in Italy I on the terrorist with Patti Scalper, and then the media finally had dirt on Bruce for the first time in his career. But that's a whole nother story. The point I'm trying to make is Bruce. I loved Bruce but I'm also very critical of Bruce. I'm I'm super into his outtakes and unreleased material. The river is one of my least favorite bruce albums but it's many bruce fans favorite. But when you hear the river outtakes many of which he hasn't really release in their proper form, but that's a whole nother story. But my feeling is I can name single outtakes on the river that are better than the entire released river album put together. You sent me a link and I'm glad you brought that up because you sent me a link in prepping for the show that had a you had a list of Of Of out takes that you argue restraints greatest hits you've never heard. Yeah, and really really great article. Wonderful. Click on IT I. I listen. Yeah I read it. It's like a radio program with all the ear on PBS it's. On the Bruce Page of my website Arlen, Sharon and I will. Show you're. GonNa post all the links. For People's. Insert them. Off The cuff optel will do that and. You. I made you smile because I said, you had HBO hot boss Opinions Hot, Bruce Opinions, you have hot opinion you. Finished you love the man. But, you can be pretty hard on some of his artistic choices and songs. All the things that I love that are on my website that have separate pages are like I have three pop culture children, and in the same way you don't know Sean you love the most, I love all of them equally. But in the same way, we discipline our children. Yes. In E for instance, twilight zone the one, hundred, fifty, six episodes I think half of them are dogs, dogs half. And then you're left with seventy five episodes. I think fifty of them are what I call. Good to. Great. And then you're left with twenty five half hours and those are what I would give to the aliens if they had room on their spaceship only one earth television show. That's what I'm going to give him. Comic Book Are Complex History I'm a major neal Adams Fan. I. Run a Neal Adams Group, but I'm as critical. About a you know a large portion of his career as I wax poetic Ad Nauseam about the other part of his career that I honor and respect and continue to lecture on. So my feeling is as a critic you know I feel like I can prove by the things I've written and published and presented that I'm as critical of the things I. Love as I am Rhapsodic Li. Honoring them. Literally at the same time like almost like a Yin Yang. So when it comes to Bruce. Yeah I can be very critical of many of his artistic decisions especially in relation to what he chose to put out. In the great part of his career, which is really from his first album. Including four in the USA. That is his hall of fame years so to speak SCHERF. The amount of incredible songs from that era that he left off. In relation to things he put on..

Bruce Opinions Arlen Schumer Mozart USA. Syria USA neal Adams Rhapsodic Li Roy HBO Bruce Neal Adams Group tyrod Taylor Sean Patti Scalper Italy Sharon
"adams group" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"adams group" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"Because he and his company or one of the largest. In State of Wisconsin and probably outside of that When it comes to commercial real estate, and all the things that we're hearing about commercial real estate and working from home, and how it's GonNa Change you know the model for a lot of companies I thought. Let's gets got on in here his. Perspective because he lives it every day so Scott Welcome to the show. Migrate Ear looking forward to this. Conversation and giving you my perspective on what to on from our optics. So first thing I want to start with before we get into the business. The Business Scott is you sort of had an I know you explain to me before we started that you kind of. Had a different arrangement over the winter, but I'm just curious about your thinking because you moved from. You know not not too long before this. You moved from sort of a home in the suburbs to a high-rise in the city. And now there's obviously there's a change that comes to that, but now when you have a pandemic come along. It probably changes. More so I just wanted to see what's going on with you on that front. Yeah, I mean. If. You're looking from the emotional standpoint is week three years ago sold our house. Suburbs had the the the big yard and placed the room. When this we moved downtown, the Laki Are Now in a high-rise lot of black away from my office building and when the pandemic hit, my wife and I had rented a house in Florida for a number of months. And I was just going to take a back and forth to Milwaukee do my job, and then we go back. And we decided that I would stay down there for almost two and a half months while we did zoom meetings and shut. The doors are office space and so it allowed me to be a place warm and still be outside. Get work done and. You know. The pandemic is challenging for many many different people in different aspects, but It's kind of a blessing in disguise by family was down there with a bigger house. We can all be together. All Man. I would say we wrote that part of it. L. Pretty well, and we're grateful for that. Okay and then coming back. If you're looking from that perspective back in my apartment, where none of the amenities are open, it's a small apartment and it's relatives so i. don't WanNa. Use Square footage is. in downtown Milwaukee's. In a sense that you know it's not open restaurants in. The world becomes pretty small, so you know. Between my office in my apartment and my family's back altogether number walkie again so that's the blessing, but. Is Definitely challenging on conducted the new normal yeah. Okay well thanks for sharing that I just wanted to I was kind of curious about. I was curious about that So let's move onto. Let's move on to what's happening in the in the commercial real estate world so You and I were talking before we went on. You know your there's. There's a lot of pundits out there now. That are talking about how this pandemic is going to. Essentially change the way people work and maybe change it. It's it's obviously changed it. temporarily. Significantly and and at least temporarily, and some people are saying well. It's going to change. Permanent, it's going to create a permanent change that's going to impact commercial, real estate and office buildings. Negatively What are you guys thinking about? It helps me tell the story to get to that point. So why not count rewind a little bit? Go for spent the last month. With my team and my executive team how to get our office back open. And We WanNa do it from on many different reasons, we are deemed essential We touch you know tens of millions of square feet that we take care of and. None of our properties. Shut down. You know they were down to a slow, Moan. Until we shut properties down. So people were busy working remotely, but we're a company that me. One of our core values is better together. And the way our spaces designed is designed around the embattled together, and how great we're multifaceted. Real Estate Company. They add to have many different. Divisions in companies networked together and the way we do is we support each other and communicate with each other, so we were able to during the pandemic that we're in to have zoom meetings like everybody else make companies you'll meetings every Monday at one thirty to keep everyone up to speed. By month ago I just knew that. We're going to get to appoint a real thing. And I did all kinds of research with a bunch of deal guys to getting a PCP. Way Finding the hand sanitizers the communications, the cleaning of space which continued on during the. In on from a from a billion perspective, but what we call covid, nineteen cleaning ambassadors, and having care packages for everyone to hand sanitizers gloves masks. Collier's masks that we had made up from Bryan Adams Group of Olympus. And you really have a great program in place because I think optics are super important when people come back to work of believing that their company's doing everything to keep it safe. and. Beyond optics at the actual office.

Milwaukee Real Estate Company Wisconsin WanNa Collier Florida executive Olympus Bryan Adams Group
"adams group" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

06:04 min | 2 years ago

"adams group" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Comes down off of right guard a former judge of elections in Philadelphia Pennsylvania has been charged former judge and plead guilty to illegally adding votes to Democrat candidates in judicial races in two thousand fourteen fifteen and sixteen this is incredible story so I just just got a hold of her fact let me see the times posted this comes down does give a time insist today may twenty first is given actual time I'm Thursday department of justice DOJ announced charges against former judge of elections Dominic to Meryl seventy three or stuffing the ballot box for Democrats in exchange for payment by paid political consultants now again this is nothing no this stuff happens all over the place all the time we're shocked by it because we think that we route it all out this could never happen again really it's going to happen in this come November we have to really be on the look out for this but listen this to charges and guilty plea include conspiracy to pry Philadelphia voters of their civil rights by fraudulently stuffing the ballot boxes for specific democratic candidates in two thousand fourteen fifteen two thousand sixteen primary elections in violation of what's called the travel act the trump administration's prosecution of election fraud stance is in stark contrast to the total failure of the Obama justice department force these laws yeah remember the fact is said city Philadelphia where those two Black Panther thugs run front to bring people that was just the tip of the iceberg by the way of public interest legal foundation president Christian Adams he's well he's so good this guy is so good glad he's still around so in a statement right now other federal prosecutors are aware of cases of double voting in federal elections as well as non citizen voting Attorney General William Barr should prompt those other offices to do their duty and prosecute even unknown election crimes I wonder if you will again this isn't bar stepping out so we're gonna bust people this is Christian Adams group Krish Adam's was the guy the guy kicked out of Obama's justice department remember yeah according to the mural pled guilty on this DOT please stay city was paid political consultant to illegally add vote to particular Democrat candidates the primary Irish political consultant who allegedly paid tomorrow I had been hired by democratic candidates courting to the indictment the political because it had to be Obama's crew consultant allegedly solicited payments from Democrat candidates who hired him classifying them as consulting fees and other payments range from five from three hundred to five thousand dollars were then allegedly used to pay election board officials such as tomorrow in exchange for those officials illegally adding votes for the Kuwaiti here how they did this any votes for consultants a democratic consultant democratic candidates tomorrow admitted that he illegally voted I added votes to the Democrats on election day and then certified litter the votes counted were accurate oh man so he's vote illegally and any certified here's the good part dimmer of fraudulently stuffed the ballot box by literally standing in the voting booth and voting over and over as fast as he could well that's again dangle a ballot box voting as fast as you could over over well he thought the coast was clear US attorney William mix when Swain said in the statement this is utterly reprehensible conduct aha sure is one thank you other sectors the charges announced today do not a race forty did but they do ensure that is held to account for his actions to criminal complaints been filed with U. S. District Court Eastern District of Pennsylvania will happen this guy I wish her well you never know under roe trumps a presidency this guy could go to jail for a long time let's hope he does I mean big time now for every one of him there's probably in twenty I never got caught and for everyone of those twenty never got caught there's probably forty had never got caught maybe sixty dead serious this is huge we don't ever forget when Patrick Colbeck was pushing for when he was in the Senate and he was pushing for reform on the way they do the elections in Detroit and they had evidence that they have boxes sealed and certified in this box are a hundred and fifty votes unable to open because they were doing the Jill Stein I don't remember Jill Stein made it happen this is a winner of the so there's a hundred and fifty votes there's only a fifty in here what does that say well they lied this is they lied about a hundred votes so we're there hundred votes cast for the somebody other than what they're certified for yes get it or or maybe this box as opposed to a hundred fifty but they were Republican votes of this over to put fifty a receipt whatever voter fraud we found out that it was rampant and that was an audit of maybe what ugh a billionth of the entire vote cast yeah man it's just never stops when you think we've learned something after all the corruption is taking place throughout this entire course of this entire nation which is it's it's standard operating procedure now come up of November we've just been told in Michigan that you're gonna get a you're gonna get a get out of jail free card to vote however you want absentee everybody's getting a ballot mailed to them trump's call it straight up criminal and he's threatening to not give money to the state of Michigan through money that is given out to the state of Michigan all the all the states to by the federal government analysts said what's your name Jocelyn best Benson axis remember the election when it was Jocelyn Benson against what's your name there she had three names I loved her she was so good wearing so couple times um anyway so one of the three names and stuff great lady in fact a lot of.

Philadelphia Pennsylvania
"adams group" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

05:27 min | 2 years ago

"adams group" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"To prepare for a potential pandemic are ministrations continue taking very strong action to protect the well being and health of the American people looks like the corona viruses being weaponized as yet another element to bring down Donald Trump yes Sir Adams group want to drive if you see an alien I was wrong no they're talking about of the Democrats the media weaponizing Mister one of our story to try to win back the president's approval ratings the economy but I don't think it was the corona virus that caused the thousand point drop yesterday the three and a half or so I think was the Bernie virus that's all I think I did it I mean I think the market now Wall Street ground and they're going to get punished severely if Bernie becoming president they're now realizing this guy's a front runner Biden's failing and and then that brings me to my next point again I know I know we have fun at his expense you know on a regular basis on a regular basis but I now have serious concerns about the mental faculties of a former vice president Joe Biden you're the one December October the presidency and I have a simple proposition here I'm here to ask you for your help right come from you don't get far less ask my name's Joe Biden I'm a democratic candidate for United States Senate look me over here like was he help out if not both together by give me a look okay that's all I really got a stadium about while however when I know he's running for the U. S. Senate and if you don't like him vote for the other Biden right and I I heard that correctly yeah yeah you did okay yeah and and again there's one thing does he have to lose because everybody gets confused when you're touring on a band or of the press you get views from city to city but the the gaps are so many and when you're confused about what race you ran in one who your vote and that to me I just I think this is the reason why he's not resonating and I think there are legitimate concerns about judge Joe Biden look it happens all of us in overtime I happen to my dad I have a my grandmother or no as you know it watching each other slowly decline right toward the end of their life and I think you're right I think there is something to be concerned about their because the home this is too frequent where there's confusion it's not a gaffe it's genuine confusion as to what the circumstance is right now this second of that the individual is facing and I'm not a psychologist psychiatrist or medical professional liability does not raise questions just like it raises questions about Bernie's health he's already had a heart attack again you seems like he's not withstanding the the rigors of the campaign okay so far but again you're asking to be the present United States for that for years and there's going to be a lot of stress and a lot of issues and and Joe Biden I don't think mentally is has got the alertness or is he sharp enough to to be the president of United states any longer so is on the user's concerns and I think we should of the at least consider those by the way more Democrats now following letters in support of former mayor Pugh the employee Kurt Schmoke who's seen this is basically an hour gosh almighty a lot of her to have her come out roaming the streets again yeah okay I just don't buy that other season we've what is that old old old TV show you can't do the crime don't diagnose the can't do the time don't do the crime but are they has all that on TV where her son was Robert Blake isn't there Jamal Bryant pastor of the again longtime publisher of the Afro American and of course our local megachurch pastor he has written asking for leniency and along with other ministers the Reverend Patrick Claiborne a senior pastor of the Bethel A. M. E. church saying he found to be honest about our transgressions are claiming ownership of wrongdoing she however she was caught I was just amazing to me he says the US system is repent now wants very much to live a life over healing your city repair all of suffer the process I believe she's deserving of a second chance Reverend Alvin halfway she is by no means we could she was just weak world now hold on a second I'm sorry the first one this miss on conflation of of what happened was she ever gets in and and the gift cards that was frankly my your money it was alright for five hundred Bucks somewhere like that you're talking hundreds of thousands here this is not a minor crime so I think she was weak she engaged in criminal activity if there's there's a difference here and in our society when people engage in criminal activity is not inappropriate to say well you're guilty and now that you're guilty you have to face a sentence for what you did well and then when the first Baltimore sun article went out on this healthy Holly series and everything she had an opportunity to fess up that measured noise or try to sell try to sell it healthy poly clothing right she shook whatever yeah who needs no bye bye clover healthy Holly traffic.

Donald Trump Sir Adams
"adams group" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"adams group" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Best seller on Amazon and I want to give this way is my gift to you to the first five callers return on principle seven core values to help protect your money in good times and bad so call in to the toll free number that's eight four eight two income that's eight four eight the number two and the word income eight four eight two four six two six six three you can also go to our website that's Mick Adams group L. L. C. dot com McAdams group LLC dot com I've been talking about income we've been talking about the difference in the liquidation method versus people that are not having to liquidate assets are actually living on the income the I. part of the formula and why is this so critical during retirement well I remember back in two thousand seven do you remember two thousand seven the market had fully recovered from the dot com bubble many of you remember nine eleven it was about a fifty percent drop in our stock market from two thousand two thousand three by two thousand seven it was back to the previous highs in one of my clients said I'm referring a friend of mine to you he's got a four one K. at work and he's going to meet with you about how much income you can after retirement anyways to get prepared for the next stage in life well my first appointment with the gentleman he was very up front with me said David I want you to know I'm shopping financial advisors and I've decided that is down between you and another gentleman now the other gentleman work for a big Wall Street firm it doesn't really matter which one because frankly over my twenty five years when I see some of these hypothetical proposals you know we're basically the proposal is some numbers on a piece of paper that are generated using you know a color laser printer yet some charge you get some pie charts and you get some frankly rather fictitious numbers that hypothetically assume what's gonna happen down the road.

Amazon David Mick Adams L. L. McAdams group twenty five years fifty percent four one K
"adams group" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"adams group" Discussed on 600 WREC

"We're talking about twelve things that everyone needs to do to get your fares order. And the next thing I want to talk about the importance of asset titling you know, most of you are not going to know all of the different ask. Titling methods, you can title, something individually, you can add a joint with a spouse or child or friend, you can have a tendency in common tenants. With rights of survivorship you could put it into a trust, and so on, and so on. You can make it payable on death. You can make it transfer on death. Well, what all these titling methods, you know, I'm getting lost in the alphabet soup. P O. D. T O D. What's the difference? Well, here's the thing, which you probably don't know is that every one of those titling methods is critical to your overall planning. Everyone has a different impact in the event of a lawsuit or a divorce or a death or any number scenarios play out in your affairs. We see all sorts of mistakes in asset tiling. I see people they'll put their daughter or their son, and their Bank account or jointly. Title with real estate. No, no, no, no, no. Have a little two year old baby Benjamin. He watches the show. And they say. And I'm telling you that's how I feel when I see these asset tiling mistake. I no no, no, no, no. If you have your daughter or son on your Bank account, and they're getting a divorce or they're getting sued after a car accident, or they're having I arrest problems or medical bills. You know, if anyone's ever coming after them and their jointly titled on your assets. Guess who else has money they can come after? Okay. Now acid tiling is a critical thing to get fixed in twenty nineteen. I wish I had time to go over all the different methods, but I don't have much time today. Maybe I'll do a whole show on in the future. If you need help with that get help, you know, if you don't know somebody could call us you could come here, speak at one of our workshops, set up a complimentary meeting, our website, mcadams group, LLC dot com. That's Adams group, LLC dot com. The next thing I want to talk about his beneficiary planning. I have often said that ninety nine percent of the people that I meet with, I can find at least one major mistake. And the reason I say ninety nine percent is because we know at some point, maybe I'll meet that person that actually has everything correct. But in twenty five years, I have yet to meet that person. And I've had hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of meetings over my career. I've never met one person or couple that had their affairs in order, even though many thought they did now just let that sink in one of the common areas, I find mistakes or in the area of beneficiary planning, okay? I had a couple come in recently and he had his benefits restructure properly. But when we checked on the whites the cow, she had her husband on there is the primary, but there was no contingent on her company plan and her financial advisor twenty years never asked about it, not once in twenty years, I found it in side of the first thirty minutes of knowing these folks. Just having a contingent beneficial doesn't solve all the problems because similar to the asset titling. There are literally dozens of ways you can structure beneficiaries. There's per capita. There's purse turkeys you can make the beneficiary a trust oftentimes, if you have IRA's making the trust the beneficiary could be a huge mistake. That's a common thing that we see a lot. So you gotta get your beneficiary planning addressed and fixed. You may not know how to fix it. You need help. I need to take a break on the other side of the break. We're going to pick back up on the twelfth things. Everyone needs to be doing to get their affairs in order..

mcadams advisor O. D. T Adams ninety nine percent twenty years twenty five years thirty minutes two year
"adams group" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"adams group" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Report, you know, this show is for you, the listener one educate you and one of the ways you can protect your assets is to protect your money. Protect your investments. Well, how can you do that we can start by investing defensively we're giving away a report called the importance of financial defense, and you can get that report by calling toll free eight four eight two four six two six six three. And by the way, we've been talking about estate planning some on first few segments of the show if you'd like to attend one of our workshops, we speak on a number of topics estate planning social. Security, optimization, planning income, planning tax, planning investment, planning on and on. And if you'd like to attend one of our complimentary workshops, you can go to our website mcadams group, LLC dot com. Make Adams group LLC dot com. Or when you call toll free, you can ask an or Therese for one of our staff. Let them know that you want to attend again that toll-free numbers eight four eight two four six two six six three. When we come back. We're going to continue talking about estate planning a little bit in protecting your sell through legal planning. But we're also going to talk about how to protect yourself from a catastrophic health incident instead of giving all your money to a nursing home. What can you do? And also we're gonna talk about how to protect your principal and protect your investments from catastrophic stock market crash or investment losses. Stay tuned. We'll.

"adams group" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

09:24 min | 3 years ago

"adams group" Discussed on KPCC

"To science writing Sioux City. Hi, how are you? Hi there. Hi, how are you fine? Go ahead. I was wondering if it isn't the word constant that might be the issue here. Throughout the entire universe. And maybe the university's expanding at different rates in different places. Right. That that's a great question. We actually had used the same tools to determine if the universe is expanding at the same rate in different directions. And in fact, that has been confirmed to very high precision. But you're also right that constant is kind of a funny misnomer anyway because it is a number that will change as the universe ages. It's just we think constant at any one point in time. But the same in all direct could could the dark energy that is pushing the universe further apart. Could that have something to do, you know, we don't know anything about it with the number being wrong? Yeah. That is in fact, the one of the possibilities. You know, we take a very I would say vanilla guess at what the nature of dark energy is. And we've tried to measure that and you know, it roughly looks like that vanilla guests, but you know, that could be part of the story of what's going. On is that we have kind of a turbocharged dark energy that makes the university. Celebrate and expand even faster today. I'm going gonna bring another one of our favorite topics into this. And this is like a black holes and gravity waves. He's there ally. Go measuring it could be the referee of these two other measurements. Yes. Absolutely. I think that's the that's going to be the exciting thing over the next five years. So your listeners know that LEGO which is the laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory detected gravity waves from the merging of black holes in the past few years, but in August of twenty seventeen it had another event that it observed that was actually very interesting which was the merger of two neutron stars. And so these two neutron stars when emerged they generated gravitational waves, but they also generated a burst of electromagnetic radiation, and in order to calculate the Hubble, constant you need to things that you need the distance to some astrophysical objects, and you also need to measure its recession velocity. So the gravitational wave signature from the neutron star merger. Give the LEGO team away to tell the distance to this merger event and electromagnetic radiation, which was captured by other. Telescopes gave them Redshift information, which then allowed them to figure out how fast this is receding from us. Putting those two together they came up with the Hubble constant value of seventy which sits bang in the middle of the plank and the data from Adams group except that the Airbus because there's just one event, and they just don't have enough. Data to have good statistical significance the bars are so big that they can accommodate both plank and the result from Adams group. So what's exciting is that, you know, this just this week LEGO announced that they have upgraded that instrument and a restarted observations, and they're going to I think in about a year's time close it down and upgrade again. So over the next five years they're hoping to absorb about fifty such neutron star mergers, and that will give them enough data to pin down this number two within two percent. And it will be really exciting to see which way they move whether they move towards plan. Or whether they move towards the data from Adams group every interesting I have a tweet from Sarah. Who asks a question that's been asked of every bite every the last hundred years, I want to repeat it if the universe is everywhere. You know, what I'm gonna say. How is it? Expanding is it becoming more infinite, Adam. Oh, I was hoping you were gonna ask a Neil. This question. I was going to punt it. Yeah. Yeah. What we really mean when we say the universe is expanding. We mean locally around us. And as far as we could tell everywhere else that whenever two things are separated like galaxies that separation grows we can't really verify what happens much further than we could see there's a limit. We can only see as far as the age of the universe times the speed of light. But we believe that the universe continues to expand. And so of its infinite it's infinite and getting bigger, you know, as as my father used to like to say what's bigger than 0 well 0, plus one I'm I replayed and this is science Friday from WNYC studios. Now, you're getting into Allah finale, one Kanter all those sorts of things. We have a lot of calls her interested in in whenever we talk about the universe of people want to talk about the universe and has expansion. I'm and that that tweet reminded me of a letter I so many years ago that was sent Einstein himself about what happens if you poke your thumb through the. Finite universe. Where does it go that sort of stuff has been around all the time? You already. Here's another tweet. Let's go to the phones. Go to the to four I walk up to science Friday. Charleston. Hi, charles. Go ahead. Yes. Thank you. I would like to know if this E M B boundary is expanding. Or is it too far to tell if it's expanding the cosmic background radiation. It's leftover from the big bang. Right. Well, the cosmic microwave background radiation is actually a tiny slice in time. It's a snapshot of the universe at a certain moment. The moment when the universe went from being a fog where light couldn't really propagate very far until it suddenly became thin enough diluted enough by the expansion of space that it suddenly gets out. And so it's not really expanding. But it is getting more distant from us in time as time goes on. But because we can always look back to it. And it's an all directions. It's always available to us. We can always see. Well, let me just wrap up because we're running out of time. Is it possible that we need new physics here? Could there be particles unknown particles unpredicted particle? Yes, yes. I would say, you know, on on our menu of possibilities. Our new particles like what we would call a sterile neutrino exotic dark energy dark matter that inter. Iraq or decays another episode of dark energy, all kinds of interesting possibilities. And that's why we're so excited about this this discrepancy. But do you have the tools to discover those new particles? I think so I mean new tools are coming online. The various predictions of what would happen if you had exotic particles make specific predictions of you know, what other signatures, you should see. So hi, this is just the way science works is, you know, you might get your first clue when your first clue leads to a hypothesis, and that hypothesis recommends another experiment, and so we may be going through a generation of that. Then let me see if I can get a quick caller in from Johnny in beacon, New York. I John welcome. Hi, thanks. How's it going guys? So great discussion. My question was. These potential differences in measurements. From these two groups based off of we always assume that the initial big bang causing ever expanding universe as a constant in one direction. What if the universe hit appoint were, then it works you retract and almost come back to let's say that initial point. Gravitational pull is there any evidence why that is not possible. And I think we always just assume that it was I got about thirty seconds for an answer. I could jump in here on this one. You know, we don't really get a good glimpse of the universe between the time shortly after the big bang to oh, the last seven or eight billion years, and so there's kind of a dark ages in there, if the if the universe took a break, you know, it took a snooze during that, you know, we wouldn't know, and that really could also mess up these calculations of course, we would look for. What is the exotic new physics at explains why that would happen? But you know, just generic has a statement. We don't think the the universe. Took took a break. Thank you. Madam Reese twenty eleven Nobel laureate in physics talking with us also an airline anther Swamy a science journalist author based in the bay area working the science scientific American every once in a while. Well, we're gonna take a break when we come back. We're going to talk about the flu did you? Void flu this season. We're going to talk about blue near you. It's was our citizen science project that Joel helped to create to give real time updates and how the virus spread. Season. We have the results there in a bell ringing. But we'll be back after this break. Stay with us. This is science Friday from WNYC studios. Science Friday is supported by progressive insurance, offering its homequote explorer designed to provide information about available home insurance options in one place. More information at progressive dot com..

Adams group WNYC studios flu Sioux City Iraq Madam Reese New York Kanter Adam Einstein Joel Charleston Swamy Sarah John Johnny five years
"adams group" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

06:59 min | 3 years ago

"adams group" Discussed on KPCC

"Oh. You know, the story once upon a time everything in the universe was crammed into a very small space, and then the big bang and the universe has been expanding ever since. Well, so the theory goes, but just how fast is it expanding calculating that expansion rate is a problem. Dating back almost a hundred years when Edwin Hubble use data from Harvard astronomer Henrietta swan Levitt to define expansion rate has a number. They came came to be called, the Hubble constant, but the value of that constant has been hard to pin down two different approaches to measuring the Hubble constant have come up with close but different significantly different answers. Joining me now to talk about why that matters are my guests a Neil. Swamy is science journalist and author based in the bay area. He recently wrote about this for scientific American muck up the science Friday, and he'll. Hi is good to be on the show. Thank you. Nice to have you and professor Adam Riess. He's a twenty eleven Nobel laureate. In physics, professor of astronomy. And physics at Johns Hopkins University senior member of the science staff at the Space Telescope Science institute in Baltimore. Welcome back, Dr wreath. Hi nice to be here. Nice to have you. All right. Let me start with you. What is the Hubble constant in lay terms? Double consonant tells us about how fast the universe is expanding in. And it's it's related to the if you're looking at some galaxy than if you know the distance to the galaxy, and you know, how fast the galaxy is receding from us. You can use those two numbers to calculate the Hubble constant which tells you of us the universe is expanding. And Dr Reese, why is it so hard to measure them? Yeah. Well, it's just the universe after all that should be pretty simple. But no, really, you know, it's not that. It's so hard. It's that it's so hard to measure it. So precisely and particularly when you see a disagreement that may tell us something really interesting about the universe. You wanna be really right about your measurement? So we've been measuring and remeasuring for about a decade using the Hubble space telescope to calibrate the universe. And we have we think the most precise answer today, which is the answer. We pretend it last week. And then but that answer is in disagreement with other measurements is Inada. Neil. Yeah. So that measurement is quite significantly in disagreement with another way of measuring it, which is the value that comes from the European Space Agency's planks that late so they measured. The cosmic microwave background, which is radiation leftover from about three hundred eighty thousand years after the big bang, and that radiation has features in it that you can use in order to correlate what happened in the early universe with what's happening now and use that to calculate the sort of estimate the expansion rate now and those ways of doing it Adams groups and the data are in disagreement. So Adam, how do you how do you measure it? How do I measure it? Well, I use a different kinds of exploding and pulsating stars in the nearby universe. And by calibrating their luminosity using geometrical methods like building triangles in space, we can determine how far away they are from how bright they appear and then we measure what's known as the Redshift. And as Neil described that tells us how fast the universe is expanding today, our number if you like these eight four four seven two four eight two five five eight four four site talk or you can tweet us at scifi. So why do you think there is this discrepancy in if it seems to be significant one why is there a doctor is well, let me give you an analogy. You know, imagine you were trying to measure your height and one person started at your feet and measured to your head and the other person's already your head and measured to your feet. And if they got different answers, you'd say, well, you know, somebody's made a mistake. That's not so interesting. But let me imagined in a different way instead somebody measured their height when you were two years old now when you're two years old if you're like an average person you reach about half, your height of your eventual height. And so you double that number and you say, okay three feet tall when I'm two years old. I guess I'll be six feet tall when I'm all grown up. Then we go out, and we actually measuring. Oh my gosh. You turn out to be seven foot two you're going to play center for the Knicks. But what's exciting is something has gone awry in our understanding. So what we failed to mention was that the other measurement than one made. From the cosmic microwave background is not really a measurement as much as a prediction is a measurement. When the universe was very young. And then we use our understanding of the physics of the universe to figure out how fast the universe will be expanding today. And just like that that child who has grown up. We then go out and measure how fast or how tall the child is. And we find a very different very surprising answer. And that's why this is really so exciting. It's not just like two people measuring the same thing and getting a different number. It's a two scientists are two teams of scientists measuring at opposite ends of the history of the universe and finding that those two do not connect that. There's something missing or another wrinkle in how we understand the universe. And both teams of scientists are dug in on their they really pretty sure that they've got the right number right anew. Yeah. Teams have you know, reduce their errors substantially. So you know, the plankton is very confident of its measurements. And you know, as Adam said, they they're measuring the cosmic microwave background with very high position. But then they have to use this thing called the standard model of cosmology to extrapolate to the universe has it is now and make estimates of the Hubble constant so, but the actual measurement that, you know, the position of the measurements is very high, and as you know, the data coming from Adam's team. So what does it matter? What does it matter if it's sixty seven or seventy four I it's true. I don't actually care what the number is what I care about is that these two ways disagree, and that it might tell us something interesting about the universe. So for your listeners who may or may not know about ninety five percent of the universe. We believe is made up of dark matter and dark energy. These are these mysterious components that we see only by their. Gravity, but we don't really have a detailed understanding of their physics. They're very mysterious to us. So when we as Neil said when we extrapolate from the youthful universe to the present universe..

Adam Riess Neil Edwin Hubble Space Telescope Science instit professor European Space Agency Henrietta swan Levitt Swamy Oh. Harvard Dr wreath Johns Hopkins University Dr Reese Knicks Baltimore Inada two years three hundred eighty thousand ninety five percent hundred years
"adams group" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"adams group" Discussed on Science Friday

"And it will be really exciting to see which way, you know, they moved whether they move towards plank or whether they move towards the data from Adams group. Interesting. I have a tweet from Sarah who asks a question that's been asked of everybody every the last hundred years, I want to repeat it if the universe is everywhere. You know, what I'm going to say how is it? Expanding is it becoming more infinite, Adam. Oh, I I was hoping you were gonna ask a Neil. This question. And I was going to punt it to Adam. Yeah. We we really mean when we say the universe is expanding as we mean locally around us. And as far as we could tell everywhere else that whenever two things are separated like galaxies that separation grows we can't really verify what happens much further than we could see there's a limit. And we can only see as far as the age of the universe times the speed of light. But we believe that the universe continues to expand. And so of its infinite it's infinite and getting bigger, you know, as as my father used to like to say what's bigger than Infinity well Infinity, plus one I replayed her. This is science Friday from WNYC studios. Now, you're getting into Allah phonology, one Kanter all those sort of things that we have a lot of calls who are interested in whenever we talk about the universe. People wanna talk about the universe and has expansion. I'm and that that tweet reminded me of a letter I saw many years ago that was sent to Einstein himself about what happens if you poke your thumb through the. Finite universe. Where does it go that sort of stuff has been around all the time you already here's another tweet. Let's go to phones. Let me go to the Cusco to line four. Hi, welcome to science Friday. Day, charles. Hi, charles. Go ahead. Yes. I were. Thank you. I would like to know if this E M B boundary is expanding. Or is it too far to tell if it's expanding the cosmic background radiation. It's leftover the big bang. Right. Well, the cosmic microwave background radiation is actually a tiny slice in time. It's a snapshot of the universe at a certain moment. The moment when the universe went from being a fog where light couldn't really propagate very far until it suddenly became thin enough diluted enough by the expansion space at suddenly gets out. And so it's not really expanding. But it is getting more distant from us in time as time goes on. But because we can always look back to it. And it's an all directions. It's always available to us. We can always see let me just wrap up because we're running out of time. He's it possible that we need new physics here. Could there be particles unknown particles on predicted particle? Yes. Yes. I would say, you know, on our menu of possibilities. Our new particles like what we would call a sterile neutrino exotic dark energy dark matter that inter. Reacts or decays another episode of dark energy, all kinds of interesting possibilities. And that's why we're so excited about this this discrepancy. But do you have the tools to discover those no particles? I think so I mean new tools.

Adam Einstein Cusco Adams group WNYC studios Sarah Kanter hundred years
"adams group" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:21 min | 3 years ago

"adams group" Discussed on Science Friday

"Science Friday and Sioux City. Hi, how are you? Hi there. Hi, how are you fine? Go ahead. I was wondering if it isn't the word constant that might be the issue here. The same throughout the entire universe. And maybe the universities expanding at different rates in different places. Right. That that's a great question. We actually had used the same tools to determine if the universe is expanding at the same rate in different directions. And in fact, that has been confirmed to very high precision. But you're also right that constant is kind of a funny misnomer anyway because it is a number that will change as the universe ages. It's just we think constant any one point in time. But the same in all direct could could the dark energy that is pushing the universe further apart. Could that have something to do, you know, we don't know anything about it with the Hubble the number being wrong? Yeah. That is. In fact, the I one of the possibilities. You know, we take a very I would say vanilla guests at with the nature of dark energy is and we've tried to measure that and you know, it roughly looks like that vanilla guests, but you know, that could be part of the story of what's going on. On is that we have kind of a turbo charge dark energy that makes the university. Celebrate and expand even faster today any alone. I'm going to bring another one of our favorite topics into this. And this is like a black holes and gravity waves as their ally. Go measuring, you know, it could be the referee of these two other measurements. Yes. Absolutely. I think that's the that's going to be the exciting thing over the next five years. So your listeners will know that LEGO which is the laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory detected govett-asia waves from the merging of black holes in the past few years, but in August of twenty seventeen it had another event that it observed that was actually very interesting which was the merger of two neutron stars. And so these two neutron stars when they merged the generated gravitational waves, but they also generated a burst of electromagnetic radiation, and in order to calculate the Hubble constant you need to things do need the distance to some astrophysical object, and you also. Need to measure its recession velocity. So the gravitational wave signature from the neutron star merger. Give the LEGO team away to tell the distance to this merger event and electromagnetic radiation, which was captured by other telescopes gave them Redshift information which allowed them to figure out how fast this is heating from us. Putting those two together they came up with a Hubble constant value of seventy which sits bang in the middle of the plank and the data from Adams group except that the ever bars because there's just one event, and they just don't have enough data to have good statistical significance the bars are so big that they can accommodate both plank and the result from Adams group. So what's exciting is that, you know, this just this week l'aigle announced that they have upgraded that instrument, and every started observations, and they're going to I think in about a year's time close it down. Great again. So over the next five years they're hoping to absorb about fifty. Neutron star mergers and that will give them enough data to in a pin down this number two within two percent..

Adams group Sioux City Redshift five years two percent
"adams group" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"adams group" Discussed on Science Friday

"From us. You can use those two numbers to calculate the Hubble constant which tells you how fast the universe is expanding. And Dr Reese, why is it so hard to measure that? Yeah. Well, it's just the universe after all that should be pretty simple. But no, really, you know, it's not that. It's so hard. It's that it's so hard to measure it. So precisely and particularly when you see a disagreement that may tell us something really interesting about the universe. You wanna be really right about your measurement? So we've been measuring and remeasuring for about a decade using the Hubble space telescope to calibrate the universe. And we have we think the most precise answer today, which is the inter we pretend last week, and then but that answer is in disagreement with other measurements is not a Neil. Yeah. So that measurement is quite significantly in disagreement with another way of measuring it, which is the value that comes from the European Space Agency's plank set late, so they measure, the cosmic microwave background, which is radiation lift or from about three hundred eighty thousand years after the big bang, and that radiation has features in it that you can use. Use in order to correlate what happened in the early universe with what's happening now and use that to calculate the you know, sort of estimate the expansion rate now and those two ways of doing it Adams groups and the planning data are in disagreement. So Adam how do you do head you measure it? How do I measure it? Well, I use a different kinds of exploding and pulsating stars in the nearby universe. And by calibrating their luminosity using geometrical methods like building triangles in space, we can determine how far away they are from how bright they appear and then we measure what's known as the red shift..

European Space Agency Adam Dr Reese three hundred eighty thousand
"adams group" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:12 min | 3 years ago

"adams group" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Data to have good statistical significance the bars are so big that they can accommodate both plank and the result from Adams group. So what's exciting is that, you know, this just this week announced that they have upgraded that instrument and restarted observations, and they're going to I think in about a year's time closed down and upgrade again. So over the next five years they're hoping to absorb about fifty such neutron star mergers, and that will give them enough data to pin down this number two within two percent. And it will be really exciting to see which way they move whether they move towards plank or whether they move towards the data from Adams group. Interesting. I have a tweet from Sarah who asks a question that's been asked of every by every the last hundred years, I want to repeat it. If the universe is everywhere. You know, what I'm gonna say. How is it? Expanding is it becoming more infinite, Adam. Oh, I I was hoping you were gonna Africa. Neil. This question. I was going to punt it. Yeah. We what we really mean. When we say the universe is expanding as we mean locally around us. And as far as we can tell everywhere else that whenever two things are separated like galaxies that separation grows we can't really verify what happens much further than we could see there's a limit. We can only see as far as the age of the universe times the speed of light. But we believe that the universe continues to expand. And so of its infinite it's infinite and getting bigger, you know, as as my father used to like to say what's bigger than 0 well 0, plus one am I replayed? This is science Friday from WNYC studios. Now, you're getting into Allah phonology wanting Kanter all those sort of things. We have a lot of calls who are interested in whenever we talk about the universe. People want to talk about the universe and has expansion. And that that tweet reminded me of a letter I saw many years ago that was sent Einstein himself about what happens if you poke your thumb through the. Finite universe. Where does it go that sort of stuff has been around all the time? You already. Here's another tweet. Let's go to the phones. Go to the Costco to four I walk up to science Friday. Date. Charles, Charles, go ahead. Yes. Thank you. I would like to know if this the B boundary is expanding or is it too far to tell if it's expanding the cosmic background radiation. It's leftover from the big bang. Right. Well, the cosmic microwave background radiation is actually a tiny slice in time. It's a snapshot of the universe at a certain moment. The moment when the universe went from being a fog where light couldn't really propagate very far until it suddenly became thin enough diluted enough by the expansion space that it suddenly gets out. And so it's not really expanding. But it is getting more distant from us in time as time goes on. But because we can always look back to it. And it's in all directions. It's always available to us. We can always see let me just wrap up because we're running out of time. Is it possible that we need new physics here? Could there be particles unknown particles unpredicted particle? Yes. Yes. I would say. On our menu of possibilities. Our new particles like what we would call a sterile neutrino. Exotic dark energy dark matter that interacts or decays another episode of dark energy, all kinds of interesting possibilities. And that's why we're so excited about this this discrepancy. But do you have the tools to discover those new particles? I think so I mean new tools are coming online. The various predictions of what would happen if you had exotic particles make specific predictions of you know, what other signatures, you should see. So this is just the way science works is, you know, you might get your first clue when your first clue leads to a hypothesis, and that hypothesis recommends another experiment, and so we may be going through a generation of that, man. Let me see if I can get a quick caller in from Johnny and beacon, New York. I John welcome. Hi, thanks. How's it going guys? So great discussion. My question was cookies potential differences in measurements. From these two groups be based off of. We always assume that the initial big thing causing ever expanding universe as a constant in one direction. What if the universe hit a point where then it were to retract and almost come back to let's say that initial point based gravitational pull is there any evidence why that is not possible. And I think we always just assume that it was I got thirty seconds for an answer. And I could jump in here on this one. You know, we don't really get a good glimpse of the universe between the time shortly after the big bang to oh, the last seven or eight billion years, and so there's kind of dark ages in there, if the if the universe took a break, you know, took a snooze during that, we wouldn't know, and that really could also mess up these calculations of course, we would look for. What is the exotic new physics that explains why that would happen? But you know, just generic as a statement. We don't think the the universe took took a break. Thank you. Adam Reese, twenty eleven Nobel laureate in physics talking with us also an anti Swamy a science journalist author based in the bay area working science scientific American every once in a while. Well, we're gonna take a break when we come back. We're going to talk about the flu did you boy the flu this season? We're gonna talk about Lou near you. It's it was our citizen science project that Joel helped to create to give real time updates. And how the virus spread this? Season. We have the results there in a bell ringing..

Adam Reese Adams group flu Charles Sarah New York WNYC studios Africa Kanter Neil Einstein Lou Joel John eight billion years thirty seconds hundred years two percent five years
"adams group" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:42 min | 3 years ago

"adams group" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Friday. I do you know the story once upon a time everything in the universe was crammed into a very small space, and then the big bang and the universe has been expanding ever since. Well, so the theory goes, but just how fast is it expanding calculating that expansion rate is a problem. Dating back almost a hundred years when Edwin Hubble use data from Harvard astronomer Henrietta swan Levitt to define expansion rate has a number. They came came to be called, the Hubble constant, but the value of that constant has been hard to pin down two different approaches to measuring the Hubble constant have come up with close but different significantly different answers. Joining me now to talk about why that matters are my guests. A Neil Swami is a science journalist and author based in the bay area. He recently wrote about this for. Scientific American science Friday, Neil. Haya is good to be on the show. Thank you. Nice to have you and professor Adam Riess. He's a twenty eleven Nobel laureate. In physics, professor of astronomy. And physics at Johns Hopkins University senior member of the science staff at the Space Telescope Science institute in Baltimore. Welcome back, Dr wreath high ironies to be here. Nice to have you. All right. Let me start with you. What is the Hubble constant in lay terms? Double constant tells us about how fast the universe is expanding in. And it's it's related to the if you're looking at some galaxy than if you know the distance to the galaxy, and you know, how fast the galaxies receding from us. You can use those numbers to calculate the Hubble constant which tells you of us the universe is expanding. And Dr Reese, why is it so hard to measure them? Yeah. Well, it's just the universe after all should be pretty simple. But no, really, you know, it's not that. It's so hard. It's that it's so hard to measure it. So precisely and particularly when you see a disagreement that may tell us something really interesting about the universe. You wanna be really right about your measurements? So we've been measuring and remeasuring for about a decade using the Hubble space telescope to calibrate the universe. And we have we think the most precise answer today, which is they enter we pretend last week, and then but that answer is in disagreement with other measurements is anada. Neil. Yeah. So that measurement is quite significantly in disagreement with another way of measuring it, which is the value that comes from the European Space Agency's plank satellites with they measure, the cosmic microwave background, which is radiation leftover from about three hundred eighty thousand years after the big bang, and that radiation has features in it that you can use in order to correlate what happened in the early universe with what's happening now and use that to calculate the sort of estimate the expansion rate now and those two ways of doing it Adams groups and the planning data are in disagreement. So Adam, how do you how do you measure it? How do I measure it? Well, I use different kinds of exploding and pulsating stars in the nearby universe. And by calibrating their luminosity using geometrical methods like building triangles in space. We can determine how far away they are from how bright they appear and then we measure what's known as the Redshift. And as Neil described that tells us how fast the universe is expanding today. Our number if you'd like to talk about it these eight four four seven two four eight two five five eight four four si- talk or you can tweet us. At sei, fry. So why do you think there is this discrepancy in and if it seems to be significant one why is there a doctor? He's well, let me give you an analogy. You know, imagine you were trying to measure your height and one person started at your feet measured to your head and the other purchase already your head and measured to your feet. And if they got different answers, you'd say, well, you know, somebody who's made a mistake. That's not so interesting. But let me imagined in different way, instead somebody measured their height when you were two years old now when you're two years old if you're like an average person you reach about half, your height of your eventual height. And so you double that number and you say, okay, I'm three feet tall. When I'm two years old. I guess I'll be six feet tall when I'm all grown up. Then we go out and we actually measure in. Oh my gosh. You turn out to be seven foot two you're going to play center for the Knicks. But what's exciting is something has gone awry in our understanding, so what we failed to mention was that the other measurement? Then one made from the cosmic microwave background is not really a measurement as much as a prediction is the measurement. When the universe was very young. And then we use our understanding of the physics of the universe to figure out how fast the universe will be expanding today. And just like that that child who has grown up. We then go out and measure how fast or how tall the child is. And we find a very different very surprising answer. And that's why this is really so exciting. It's not just like two people measuring the same thing and getting a different number. It's two scientists are two teams of scientists measuring at opposite ends of the history of the universe and finding that those two do not connect that. There is something missing or another wrinkle in how we understand the universe. And both teams of scientists are dug in on their they really pretty sure that they've got the right number right on you. Both teams have reduced their errors substantially. So you know, the planning team is very confident of its measurements. And you know, as Adam said, they they're measuring the cosmic microwave background with very high precision. But then they have to use this thing called the standard model of cosmology to extrapolate to the universe as it is now and make estimates of the Hubble constant so, but the actual measurement that, you know, the position of the measurements is very high, and as you know, the data coming from Adam's team. So what does it matter? What does it matter if it's sixty seven or the four I it's true. I don't actually care what the number is what I care about is that these two ways disagree, and that it might tell us something interesting about the universe. So for your listeners who may or may not know about ninety five percent of the universe. We believe is made up of dark matter and dark energy. These are these mysterious components. That we see only by their gravity, but we don't really have a detailed understanding of their physics very mysterious to us. So when we as Neil said when we extrapolate from the youthful universe to the present universe. We take some night very naive guesses about the nature of that dark matter and dark energy. And so if those night guesses are failing if we're seeing this important difference. It may be teaching something something really crucial unimportant clue about the nature of dark matter or dark energy. And that's why we make these kinds of measurements. Really to learn more about these mysterious component. Well, you know, if you don't know what ninety five percent of the universe. I mean, you don't know anything. Hey, we know it's there. Isn't that? Right. I mean, why should this little you know, what could these numbers teach? You about learning. What ninety five percent of the universe is made it. Yeah. Well, you know, this becomes a quantitative game. At some point. I mean as I said we use gravity. This is sort of the the new science of cosmology in the last few decades is to recognize, hey, most of the universe is not made out of what we're made out of. And in fact, most of the universe doesn't emit light. Like things were familiar with. We have to use gravity like telescope to see parts of the universe dark matter dark energy. You may have heard of gravitational waves, which we are just getting the ability to see. And so these are our new observing tools that were using to learn about gravity, and if you were a blind person walking through a room, you know, you'd have to use a different set of senses to figure out what's in the room. And so that's where we are. Let's go to the phones. Eight four four seven two four eight two five five. Let's go to Terry. Welcome to science writing Sioux City. Hi, how are you? Hi there. Hi, how are you fine? Go ahead. I was wondering if it isn't the word constant that might be the issue here. The same throughout the entire universe. And maybe the universe is expanding at different rates in different places. Right. That's a great question. We actually had used the same tools to determine if the universe is expanding at the same rate in different directions. And in fact, that has been confirmed to very high precision. But you're also right that constant is kind of a funny misnomer anyway because it is a number that will change as the universe ages. It's just we think constant any one point in time. But the same in all direct could could the dark energy that is pushing the universe further apart. Could that have something to do? We don't know anything about it with the number being wrong. Yeah. That is in fact, the one of the possibilities. You know, we take a very I would say vanilla guess at what the nature of dark energy is. And we've tried to measure that and you know, it roughly looks like that vanilla guest. But you know, that could be part of the story of what's going. On that. We have kind of a turbocharged dark energy that makes the universe. Celebrate and expand even faster today. I'm going to bring another one of our favorite topics into this. And this is like a black holes and gravity waves. Is there a li- go measuring it could be the referee of these two other measurements? Yes. Absolutely. I think that's the that's going to be the exciting thing over the next five years. So your listeners will know that LEGO which is the laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory detected waves from the merging of black holes in the past few years, but in August of twenty seventeen it had another event that it observed that was actually very interesting which was the merger of two neutron stars. And so these two neutron stars when they merged the generated gravitational waves, but they also generated a burst of electromagnetic radiation, and in order to calculate the Hubble constant you need to things, right. You need the distance to some astrophysical object, and you also need to measure its recession velocity. So the gravitational wave signature from the neutron star merger. Give the LEGO team away to tell the distance to this merger event and electromagnetic radiation, which was captured by other. Telescopes gave them Redshift information, which then allowed them to figure out how fast this is heating from us. Putting those two together they came up with the Hubble constant value of seventy which sits bang in the middle of the plank and. The data from Adams group except that the error bars because there's just one event, and they just don't have enough. Data to have good statistical significance the bars are so big that they can accommodate both plank and the result from Adams group. So what's exciting is that, you know, this just this week LEGO announced that they have upgraded that instrument and restarted observations, and they're going to I think in about a year's time close it down and upgrade again. So over the next five years they're hoping to absorb about fifty such neutron star mergers, and that will give them enough data to pin down this number two within two percent. And it will be really exciting to see which way they move whether they move towards plank or whether they move towards the data from Adams group. Interesting. I have a tweet from Sarah who asks a question that's been asked of every bite every the last hundred years, I want to repeat it. If the universe is everywhere. You know, what I'm gonna say. How is it? Expanding is it becoming more infinite, Adam. Oh, I I was hoping you were gonna ask a Neil. This question. I was going to punt it. Yeah. What we really mean when we say the universe is expanding as we mean locally around us. And as far as we could tell everywhere else that whenever two things are separated like galaxies that separation grows we can't really verify what happens much further than we could see there's a limit..

Adam Riess Neil Swami Adams group Edwin Hubble professor Space Telescope Science instit Johns Hopkins University Dr wreath Haya Harvard European Space Agency Baltimore Henrietta swan Levitt Knicks Dr Reese Sioux City Sarah Terry ninety five percent
"adams group" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:17 min | 3 years ago

"adams group" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I am I replied do. You know, the story once upon a time everything in the universe was crammed into a very small space, and then the big bang and the universe has been expanding ever since. Well, so the theory goes, but just how fast is it expanding calculating that expansion rate is a problem. Dating back almost a hundred years when Edwin Hubble use data from Harvard astronomer Henrietta swan Levitt to define expansion rate has a number. They came wealth came to be called, the Hubble constant, but the value of that constant has been hard to pin down two different approaches to measuring the Hubble constant have come up with close but different significantly different answers. Joining me now to talk about why that matters are my guests a Neil. Swamy is a science journalist and author based in the bay area. He recently wrote about this for scientific American to science Friday, Neil. Hi, it's good to be on the show. Thank you. Nice to have you and professor Adam Riess. He's a twenty eleven Nobel laureate. In physics, professor of astronomy. And physics at Johns Hopkins University senior member of the science staff at the Space Telescope Science institute in Baltimore. Welcome back to wreath high IRA nice to be here. Nice to have you. All right L. Let me start with you. What is the Hubble constant in lay terms? Double constant tells us about how fast the universe is expanding in. And it's it's related to the if you're looking at some galaxy than if you know the distance to the galaxy, and you know, how fast the galaxy is receding from us. You can use those two numbers to calculate the Hubble constant which tells you of the universe is expanding and factories. Why is it so hard to measure that? Yeah. Well, it's just the universe after all that should be pretty simple. But no, really, you know, it's not that. It's so hard. It's that it's so hard to measure it. So precisely and particularly when you see a disagreement that may tell us something really interesting about the universe. You wanna be really right about your measurement? So we've been measuring and remeasuring for about a decade using the Hubble space telescope to calibrate the universe. And we have we think the most precise answer today, which is they enter we pretend it last week. And then but that answer is in disagreement with other measurements is Inada. Neil. Yeah. So that measurement is quite significantly in disagreement with another way of measuring it, which is the value that comes from the European Space Agency's plank set late. So they measure the cosmic microwave background, which is radiation leftover from about three hundred eighty thousand years after the big bang, and that radiation has features in it that you can use in order to correlate what happened in the early universe with what's happening now and use that to calculate the sort of estimate the expansion rate now and those two ways of doing it Adams groups and the planning data are in disagreement. So Adam, how do you how do you measure it? How do I measure it? Well, I use different kinds of exploding and pulsating stars in the nearby universe. And by calibrating their luminosity using geometrical methods like building triangles in space. We can determine how far away they are from how bright they appear and then we measure what's known as the red shift. And as Neil described that tells us how fast the universe is expanding today. Our number if you'd like to talk about it these eight four four seven two four eight two five five eight four four side talk or you can tweet us. At sei, fry. So why do you think there is this discrepancy in and if it seems to be significant one why is there a doctor Yves? Well, let me give you an analogy. Imagine you were trying to measure your height and one person started at your feet measured to your head and the other person's already your head and measured to your feet. And if they got different answers, you'd say, well, you know, somebody made a mistake. That's not so interesting. But let me imagined in different way, instead somebody measured their height when you were two years old now when you're two years old if you're like an average person you reach about half, your height of your eventual height. And so you double that number and you say, okay, three feet tall went on two years old. I guess I'll be six feet tall when I'm all grown up. Then we go out, and we actually measuring. Oh my gosh. You turn out to be seven foot two you're gonna play center from the Knicks. But what's exciting is something has gone awry in our understanding. So what we failed to mention was that the other measurement the one made from the cosmic microwave background is not really a measurement as much as a prediction. It is a measurement. When the universe was very young. And then we use our understanding of the physics of the universe to figure out how fast the universe will be expanding today. And just like that that child who has grown up. We then go out and measure how fast or how tall the child is. And. We find a very different very surprising answer. And that's why this is really so exciting. It's not just like two people measuring the same thing and getting a different number. It's two scientists are two teams of scientists measuring at opposite ends of the history of the universe and finding that those two do not connect that. There is something missing or another wrinkle in how we understand the universe. And both teams of scientists are dug in on their they really pretty sure that they've got the right number right on you. Yeah. In both teams have reduced their errors substantially. So you know, the plankton is very confident of its measurements. And as Adam said, they they're measuring the cosmic microwave background with very high position. But then they have to use this thing called the standard model of cosmology to extrapolate to the universe as it is now and make estimates of the Hubble constant so but the actual measurement. They, you know, the position of the measurements is very high, and as you know, the data coming from Adam's team. So what does it matter? What does it matter if it's sixty seven or seventy four I it's true. I don't actually care what the number is what I care about is that these two ways disagree, and that it might tell us something interesting about the universe. So for your listeners who may or may not know about ninety five percent of the universe. We believe is made up of dark matter and dark energy are these mysterious components that we see. By their gravity, but we don't really have a detailed understanding of their physics. They're very mysterious to us. So when we as Neil said when we extrapolate from the youthful universe to the present universe. We take some night very naive guesses about the nature of that dark matter and dark energy. And so if those night guesses are failing if we're seeing this important difference. It may be teaching something something really crucial unimportant clue about the nature of dark matter dark energy. And that's why we make these kinds of measurements. Really to learn more about these mysterious component know, if you don't know what ninety five percent of the universe is may have. I mean, you don't know anything. Hey, we know it's there. Isn't that? Right. I mean, why should this little you know, what could these numbers teach? You about learning. What ninety five percent of the universe has made it. Yeah. Well, this becomes a quantitative game. At some point. I mean as I said we use gravity. This is sort of the the new science of cosmetology in the last few decades is to recognize, hey, most of the universe is not made out of what we're made out of. And in fact, most of the universe doesn't emit light. Like things were familiar with. We have fused gravity like a telescope to see parts of the universe dark matter. Dark energy may have heard of gravitational waves, which we are are just getting the ability to see. And so these are our new observing tools that were using to learn about gravity. I mean, if you were a blind person walking through a room, you know, you'd have to use a different set of senses to figure out what's in the room. And so that's where we are. Let's go to the phones. Eight four four seven two four eight two five five let's go to Terri. Hi, welcome to science Friday and Sioux City. Hi, how are you? Hi there. Hi, how are you fine? Go ahead. I was wondering if it isn't the word constant that might be the issue here. The same throughout the entire universe. And maybe the universe is expanding at different rates in different places. Right. That that's a great question. We actually had used the same tools to determine if the universe is expanding at the same rate in different directions. And in fact, that has been confirmed to very high precision. But you're also right that constant is kind of a funny misnomer anyway because it is a number that will change as the universe ages. It's just we think constant any one point in time. But the same in all direct could could the dark energy that is pushing the universe further apart. Could that have something to do? We don't know anything about it with the number of being wrong. Yeah. That is in fact, the one of the possibilities. You know, we take a very I would say vanilla guess what the nature of dark energy is. And we tried to measure that and you know, it roughly looks like that vanilla guests. But you know, that could be part of the story of what's going. On is that we have kind of a turbo charge dark energy that makes the university. Celebrate and expand even faster today. And I'm going to bring another one of our favorite topics into this. And this is like a black holes and gravity waves. He's there ally. Go measuring the referee of these two other measurements. Yes. Absolutely. I think that's the that's going to be the exciting thing over the next five years. So your listeners will know that logo which is the laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory detected governor digital waves from the merging of black holes in the past few years, but in August of twenty seventeen it had another event that it observed that was actually very interesting which was the merger of two neutron stars. And so these two neutron stars when they merged they generated gravitational waves, but they also generated a burst of electromagnetic radiation, and in order to calculate the Hubble constant you need to things, right. You need the distance to some astrophysical object, and you also need to measure its recession velocity. So the gravitational wave signature from the neutron star merger gave the LEGO team away to tell the distance to this merger event and electromagnetic radiation, which was captured by other. Telescopes gave them Redshift information, which then allowed them to figure out how fast this is heating from us. Putting those two together they came up with the Hubble constant value of seventy which sits bang in the middle of the plank and. The data from Adams group except that the error bars because there's just one event, and they just don't have enough..

Neil Adam Riess Edwin Hubble Adams group professor Space Telescope Science instit Johns Hopkins University Adam European Space Agency Swamy Harvard Baltimore Henrietta swan Levitt Knicks Inada Sioux City Yves Terri ninety five percent
"adams group" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"adams group" Discussed on 600 WREC

"And I'm telling you, that's how I feel when I see these asset titling mistakenly. No, no, no, no, no. If you have your daughter or son on your Bank account, and they're getting a divorce or they're getting sued after a car accident, and they're having IRS problems or medical bills. You know, if anyone's ever coming after them and their jointly, titled on your assets guess who else else's money. They can come after. Okay. Now asset tiling is a critical thing to get fixed in twenty nineteen. I wish I had time to go over all the different methods. But I don't have much time today. Maybe I'll do a whole show on it in the future. But if you need help with that get help, you know, if if you don't know somebody could call us, you could come here. A speak at one of our workshops set up a complimentary meeting. Our website is mcadams group LLC dot com. That's big Adams group, LLC dot com. The next thing. I want to talk about his beneficiary planning. I have often said that ninety nine percent of the people that I meet with I can find at least one major mistake. The reason I say ninety nine percent is because we know at some point. Maybe I'll meet that person that that actually has everything. Correct. But in twenty five years, I have yet to meet that person, and I've had hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of meetings over my career. I've never met one person or couple that had their affairs in order, even though many thought they did now just let that sink in one of the common areas. I find mistakes are in the area of beneficiary planning. Okay. I had a couple of come in recently and he had his beneficiary structure properly. But when we checked on the whites the cow, she had her husband on there is the primary, but there is no contingent on her company plan and her financial advisor of twenty years. Never asked about it. Not once in twenty years, I found it in side of the first thirty minutes of knowing these folks. Just having a contingent beneficiary doesn't solve all the problems because similar to the asset titling. There are literally dozens of ways that you can structure beneficiaries, there's per capita there's purse turkeys you can make the beneficiary a trust. Oftentimes, if you have IRA's making the trust, the beneficiary could be a huge mistake. That's a common thing that we see a lot. So we gotta get your beneficiary planning addressed and fixed. You may not know how to fix it. You need help. I need to take a break on the other side of the break. We're going to pick back up on the twelfth things. Everyone needs to be doing to get their affairs in order..

mcadams group LLC IRS advisor ninety nine percent twenty years twenty five years thirty minutes