20 Burst results for "Adam Harris"

"adam harris" Discussed on The Argument

The Argument

08:25 min | 8 months ago

"adam harris" Discussed on The Argument

"We have seen that for whatever reason, people will support the idea of underrepresented minorities getting a better shot. But when it comes into practice, specifically when it's on the ballot, we've seen that blue state voters have wanted to ban it. Is that because of how these ballot issues are being put? Is it because of how people are like, yes, I want this, but no, I don't want this. What do you think is behind those votes? You know, when we look at public opinion polls, I think that gives you a sense of the complexity of how people feel about affirmative action in the United States. So Americans are famously very wishy washy on affirmative action and if you ask the question in one way, 60% of people will agree with it if you ask it another way, only 30% will agree. So I think that part of the problem is this overarching narrative of it's all about a diverse student body, right? And that that's supposedly the only reason why we practice affirmative action. And there's not enough attention to racial inequality and the way that race operates again apart from class in American society. And I think people don't really understand that and I think that's a failure on our schooling system, even higher education that students are hearing things like understanding what redlining was, what the GI Bill actually excluded a lot of African Americans. All of these engines of social mobility have a systematically excluded, particularly African Americans. And so I think when we don't understand that, what we're left with is, well, it's supposed to, you know, it's a diverse learning environment. And then what I found when my research with these students on elite college campuses, there is this what I call a reverse discrimination script, right? When you say that affirmative action is to benefit you white student, then any setback you have affirmative action is an easy thing to kind of pull. It's a script to pull out of your pocket and blame. You know, we asked all these students questions students of color and white students. Do you feel like you've ever experienced racial discrimination? And this white student said, well, if I hadn't gotten into Harvard, I would have felt I had experienced racial discrimination. If this a black kid at my school got in and I didn't. And imagine this student going on to apply for a job or a graduate school. They don't get in. This is like an easy thing to blame. But I think the solution is not to pivot away from affirmative action. I think the solution is to really start talking about racial inequality, racism, racial exclusion, because these are things that continue to have an impact on where people live, what their income is. Well, how much wealth they have accrued. All of these things that matter. I want to zoom out for a second. And it seems to be that there are two strategies when it comes to justifying affirmative action. And Natasha, you brought up one, which is that it makes college campuses more diverse, which is good for everyone. We've talked about that. But there's also the idea that it's a form of justice for people who have been historically discriminated against, which argument do you think is more effective? Well, I think legally in the Supreme Court, the former has been the argument that has been upheld. And so that's why legal teams have focused on that argument, exclusively. And there's a lot of data that's shows the incredible positive impact that diversity on campus does have. And so I buy that a 100%. I think the equity and reparations argument is even more compelling because it's a moral argument. You've seen there's this new book by Adam Harris called the state must provide. And it looks at the morel act where a lot of these state schools were created. And he shows how these state schools in the south did everything they could to keep African American kids out. And now, you know, the disparity between them and the HBCUs that were created so that they could have segregated education, where these schools have been building their endowments for decades and they have alums and the children of alums and the grandchildren of alums who are donating all of these resources and the HBCUs are struggling to stay afloat. And that continues today in the institutions, not just in terms of individual families, but in the differences in the resources of these institutions, is so vast. How can we not have reparations? And again, I don't think that affirmative action is the only thing, you know, I think it's one small policy. I also think that we should have reparations outside of education as well. But that's a different issue. But you know, I think all of these things are part of creating a more just society. Ian, what do you think about the moral argument here? Well, I think the challenge with that argument is that it doesn't acknowledge just the tremendous progress that exists and the factors that determine success in our society. So, for example, there's a great racial wealth gap. And so I think it was the 2019 survey of consumer finances. If you look just at race, the average white family has about a $160,000 more wealth than the average black family. And for some, that's it. That's the proof of the history of racial discrimination. And yet, if you look at the distribution within the black community in terms of wealth, like Nigerians, ghanaians, like recent immigrants from West Africa from Caribbean, do extremely well. And so the question is why is it that they're not subject to the same oppressive forces that seem to result in lack of achievement in other black communities? Let's dive into it. It's not necessarily reparations for the people who were succeeding for the black community that succeeding. It is often related to strong family structures, strong choice and education, usually some kind of faith or religious commitment, a value around entrepreneurship. Well, there's also if you are a first or second generation immigrant that's generally people who are coming in with a higher income. But I've also had extremely poor immigrants of all races who have come and by hooker by crook, their kid is going to have an incredible education. And so when you say the moral argument, my maral argument is that, you know, we try to sort of solve these things on the back end, whether it's affirmative action by race or reparations by race with no reference to class, because to me, poverty is definitely the thing that impedes from the beginning in addition to unstable family structures. And so you started the conversation. We never want to have a conversation about race. I think we have to talk about race and we have to talk about things like family structure, nonmarital birds, how all of that plays into the mix of impeding or creating opportunity for the next generation. I keep thinking about how we've talked a lot about the motivated parents. But I've known a lot of people in college whose parents had zero motivation whatsoever. There is a sense and it's an overwhelming weight. I feel sometimes that there are many people I think white people who believe that affirmative action is so endemic that there is not a nonwhite person alive within elite job of any kind who got it through the right way. But I'm curious Ian, the end of affirmative action in colleges, does that start this domino of ending affirmative action type practices in workplace hiring and elsewhere? Well, given the current makeup of the Supreme Court and given the data that's represented in the Harvard case, I can not see a way that affirmative action by race survives at all. I think it's dead. So I think it's almost like we have to start thinking about what is the world look like in a post race based affirmative action world. And what are going to be the levers? And my sense is most Americans will support the idea of a leg up based on economic disadvantage. So that's my guess. I think it'll create more pressure on K to 12 systems. There's a lot of poor education going around. It's just a disproportionately more black kids have lower literacy and math rates. But I think we gotta start with.

Adam Harris Harvard Natasha United States Supreme Court Ian West Africa Caribbean
"adam harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 11 months ago

"adam harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Elect Glenn youngkin was one of many to pepper the closing months of his run with warnings of the harm posed by CRT We've watched critical race theory come into our schools and try to divide our children based on seeing everything through a lens as opposed to the content of their character And even before election day state legislatures across the country passed laws to limit what kids could be taught in school The critical race theory movement in the headlines is Florida becomes the latest state to ban schools from teaching about systemic racism The Texas Senate passed a controversial piece of legislation that would actually prevent teachers from discussing polarizing social issues and class like critical race theory Ironically the use of the legal system to dictate how kids learn about our racial history is something that true critical race theory as opposed to the boogeyman would neatly explain But the academic idea that the root of this debate is hardly ever taught below the college level meaning that the thing actually getting banned or campaigned against isn't the theory but the history it was created to explain We're not talking about potential elimination of a academic theory right We're talking about a chill on free speech more broadly that discusses race in America Adam Harris is a staff writer at the Atlantic earlier this year he walked us through the emergence of the term critical race theory as a tactic to freeze rather than frame discussions of America's past and present race problem Now we wanted to find out how much impact that strategy had not just on the bigger campaigns but on the fundamental level of curricula and school boards Ballotpedia.

Glenn youngkin Texas Senate Adam Harris Florida America Atlantic Ballotpedia
"adam harris" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

06:43 min | 11 months ago

"adam harris" Discussed on On The Media

"Media. I'm Brooke gladstone. Adam Harris describes the battles taking place over the American story everywhere from newspapers to school boards to classrooms. The people engaged in these battles know that to the narrative victors go the spoils. And so they're giving it all they've got. But they're far from the first people to wage this kind of battle. Alan Jenkins is a professor at Harvard Law School and cofounder of the opportunity agenda, a social justice communications lab. He says that those deep in the work of narrative shifting understand that it's not just about knowing what story you want to convey. It's also about knowing when that story needs to change. I became the director of human rights at the Ford foundation. Three weeks before September 11th, 2001. And so the narrative of the decency and dignity of every person and why torture is wrong. Those stories fell flat. The stories that were effective on September 10th were no longer effective in a society and to some extent a world that was now afraid afraid of the other afraid of people from other countries afraid of harm. And so we really had to go back to the drawing board and tell a new story. But that works in both directions. How all those people home because of the pandemic watched the killing of George Floyd? Exactly. Speaking here especially of people who are not black, because of the terrible and televised murder of George Floyd and the killing of Breonna, Taylor and ahmaud Arbery and so many others. We now see increased understanding and openness to the story of systemic racial bias and injustice. The everyday biases that we all carry around. That is a big change over a very short period of time. It's about events, but it's also about the largest outpouring of activism and movement participation in our nation's history. You say that narrative change is about reaching agreements. We've been talking about how hard that is. What do you mean? I can walk into any room in America and say that we need systems that keep all communities safe and that uphold the values of equal justice and accountability. And I've said that in rooms filled with police officers with movement for black lives activists with swing voters. I never get pushed back on that statement, right? Because it articulates values that we all share. Then we're going to have to fight about, well, does the system currently uphold those values and what are the right alternatives? But once you've framed it in terms of those shared values and outcomes, you already have brought people together in a way to work through how to achieve them. But isn't the devil in the details? If we're arguing about the details, that's productive democracy. It's when we're walking in alternative realities that I think we're going to have a hard time coming together as a nation. Let's talk about semantics. You've described a particular slide of hand involved in the invention of the term tax relief. Here's former congressman Paul Ryan in 2012. President Bush delivered broad tax relief for all Americans because he understands that people not government start the businesses and create the jobs that drive our economy. Cognitive linguist George lakoff has pointed out that a relief frame is an affliction. So the hero is the person who protects you from the affliction, the villain is the person who imposes it on you. The taxpayer in this instance is the victim. And so going from tax cuts to tax relief actually introduced a moral component. Democrats blindly just repeated that tax relief phrase to their detriment. Democrats have not been so successful as Republicans in this regard. Democrats are terrible at narrative and framing. We're seeing this now, despite an environment in which the safety net programs and protections that President Biden is trying to advance should be at their highest level of receptivity. He's allowed the debate to devolve down to how many trillions of dollars. When your agenda is framed in terms of dollars, fewer dollars is always going to be better than more dollars. But by contrast, when it's about opportunity, are people going to have the opportunity to go work a decent job because they have paid family, leave when they get sick, they have resources for child care. That's the story that Democrats should be telling. Capital punishment is an example of a discourse that has changed within the past couple of decades anyway. What was the shift in narrative there? For many, many years, death penalty opponents were telling a story of abolition that the death penalty is wrong in all instances. It needs to be abolished the way slavery was abolished. It was clear in the 80s and 90s. That story was not being effective. The anti death penalty community came together and began to tell a new story about the death penalty as a flawed system that threatened to execute innocent people. Now that was controversial within the movement because those of us who oppose the death penalty oppose it in all instances. But the research and experience and the field testing made clear that that news story about the risk of executing the innocent would reduce support for the death penalty across the board. So they began to tell that news story and it began to work. DNA testing was freeing people from both death row and from prison generally. And so that helped to build momentum for that story. Both journalists and the innocence project have played a huge role in telling that story, right through the exoneration of real people who've been wrongly convicted. In your class, you teach about a Stanford study that showed how much a single.

George Floyd Adam Harris Alan Jenkins Breonna ahmaud Arbery Brooke gladstone Harvard Law School Ford foundation President Biden George lakoff Paul Ryan Taylor President Bush America Stanford
"adam harris" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

07:39 min | 11 months ago

"adam harris" Discussed on On The Media

"Into these previously segregated spaces. But there's also the excess ability of a school board meeting, right? I mean, you can actually be heard by someone. I mean, there's even a remote possibility that you could have an impact. Yes, when you are trying to talk to a public official, it is going to be a lot easier to talk to your school board member where you can go to a meeting at your local middle school, your local high school, or if there's a county office where they hold their meetings, you can go to that school board, meaning there's an open public comment session, and you can have your voice heard. In a way that you can't with your local Congress member in the way that you can't with your governor. And so people feel that schools are a place where they can go and have that conversation with a public official in a way that will affect change. Okay, you've been sitting in on a lot of school board meetings recently. Yes. Can you give me an example where you saw this kind of thing play out? Yeah, so I went to a school board meeting recently in Michigan, where for about an hour and a half, you heard just kind of the general stuff that you would typically hear at a school board meeting. They honored some national merit semifinalists. They showed a video of kids in the classroom who were wearing their masks. They do all of this, they go over the budget audit for the district and shows that the district is on a pretty financially sound footing. They move to the part of the meeting where there is the public comment. That's when it just sort of goes off the rails. And you have people who are standing up and talking about Doctor Fauci and following the money and the corruption that is happening on the board, you have people talking about a manipulated image that had been shown in a classroom of a whiteboard that the board had already discussed and said was not an accurate depiction of what the teacher had been showing. But effectively, that period of the meeting lasted for about 30 minutes. If that part of the meeting becomes the primary part of the meeting, then you have to worry about what that function of this really bedrock of democracy ends up being. So historically, does the public servant prevail or do the angry voices? Historically, what you've seen is there's a sort of leveling out. But it was speaking with Joseph federici, a political science at hunter college hoop who really studies education politics. And oftentimes if we're living through a moment that feels new, there's always a tendency to think that it is different than it has been historically. But he's been studying this for a long time and what he told me was this moment actually does feel new. This moment does feel like we're in uncharted territory. In part, because people are operating and pretty legitimately different realities. And so when you think about school boards as a sort of ground zero for the larger debates, when you are having those debates on two different playing fields, you're not even playing the same sport when you're having those debates. That environment, the sort of partisan environment mixed with the fears that people have for their children just creates a really toxic cocktail that is a really new thing and unprecedented moment. So we see politics trickle down to school boards because school boards are accessible. But not every debate seems to make it. For instance, inflation is a big confusing topic right now, but I haven't seen people yelling about how it's being taught to students. What makes the co opted critical race theory idea such a powder keg. At a very fundamental level, the sort of current battle over the way that history and literature or taught in school is about culture. It's about the stories that we tell ourselves about who and what America is and what America can be. Is it this sort of rosy image of unfettered progress that starts with the constitution moves on to the 13th, 14th and Fifteenth Amendment moves forward again to the Civil Rights Act and broad equality and the end of segregation and then you have a black president, which proves that you're in a post racial America. Done and done. Done and done. Yeah, you kind of wipe your hands in call it a day. Or is it in the sort of messy details and understanding the ways that slavery and segregation has imbued the laws in and continues to affect the America that we live in today? And so at a very fundamental level, that is about teaching what children learn about going forward. It is about controlling the narrative of our culture. Not just children, but your children who could be turned against you. Yes. And when you play up that fear, even if it's not a realistic fear, right? The first graders second graders are not learning this really intense version of history. Even if it is not grounded, in fact, people fear for their children. It is a natural thing to do. Historically right there has been a large push to control the narrative of American history in their place. The lost cause was a push to control the narrative of history and the south's place in it. After integration, there was a push to control the narrative of what was taught about segregation. This is not unrelated or unlike those previous bushes. But as I mentioned, what is different is at a very base level. There's an argument happening on different playing fields. Where do you see all this headed, and how do we cover it? It's difficult to say, right? Where it is specifically, but one of the key things to do is at the very beginning and coverage defining what we are talking about. So when you're talking about CRT, as it's kind of currently understood, not in the sort of traditional academic language, then we should lay bare the fact that it is not the legal study, but rather the catch all for the range of concerns about how schools teach history and literature and that it is part of this broader kind of cultural conversation. To say that, oh, we're not teaching CRT in schools is not sufficient to establish at the beginning in stories as you're covering it. What it is you're actually talking about. When you're saying CRT, what do you actually mean? And then to press on that question is incredibly important. But beyond that, I think that to draw sort of broad narratives from one instance. By which I would mean Virginia, folks should really work to examine what is happening more broadly across the country. And how important is the school in this whole trajectory? It's incredibly important. When you think about what schools are and what they provide public schools in particular for the future, it is the education of the next generation of Americans. And so you see why people want to control the narrative in those spaces because it is creating the next class of politicians to create the next class of teachers to create in the next class of lawyers and doctors. And so they are incredibly critical. And it's important that folks of all strips kind of recognize that and keep the business of schools about school. Thank you very much, Adam. Thank you for having me. Adam Harris is a staff writer at the Atlantic and the author of the book, the state must provide why America's colleges have always been unequal and how to set them right..

Doctor Fauci Joseph federici America hunter college Congress Michigan Virginia Adam Harris Adam Atlantic
"adam harris" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"adam harris" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Of pointing to this legacy of discrimination in higher education. That said that you know for a long time. Black people were shut out of higher education And this system that. The university of california davis implementing is is an effort to to remedy that so what is legal now for universities to do in admissions in order to try to expand the number of african americans and people of color who are admitted. Yes so so. Institutions are allowed to use race in admissions in concert with a host of other factors including. You know sat's gpa's extracurricular activities In order to make admissions decisions in what is called a holistic admissions process But race cannot be the deciding factor in admissions decision. That said there are admissions. College admissions and a lot of ways have have historically been a black box and that is one of the things that leads those kind of holistic admissions processes to be challenged in court. Then maybe we introduce you if you're just joining us. My guest is adam harris author of the new book. The state must provide why america's colleges have always been unequal. And how to set them right. We'll be right back. This is fresh air. This message comes from. Npr sponsor best scenes legend tells of a game so refreshingly challenging that all who play are unable to resist. It's endless amusement. That mythical game is best fiends. Solve tons of fun puzzles.

university of california davis adam harris america Npr
"adam harris" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"adam harris" Discussed on Fresh Air

"That better team grows stronger with adp hr talent time and payroll. Let's get back to my interview with adam harris author of the new book. The state must provide why america's colleges have always been unequal. And how to set them right. He's a staff writer at the atlantic where he writes about education and national politics. He formerly wrote for the chronicle of higher education. What do you see as the importance of h. See us in higher education in america. People often talk about the historical importance of the institutions. But i think that kind of under sells the the kind of current role that they play in creating and sustaining the black middle class So even though hpc's make up about three percent of the four year nonprofit institutions in the country. They educate something like twenty five percent of black stem graduates and produce fifty percent of black lawyers and doctors and eighty percent of black judges. So they're still a very current and real need for hp's not. But i think that extends even beyond you know people's success after college because oftentimes hvac user doing the work of enrolling students. that may not otherwise. Get a chance from other institutions So h are often. They have an outside share of pell eligible students so students who are eligible for federal pell grant for low income students And that's that is an important role that they are are serving. And i think that it also points to the fact that oftentimes they will need more money in greater resources in order to to educate those students and prepare them as best as possible for success in the future. It's one thing to to take you know. The top five percent of students of the you know the top three percent of students from high schools across the country. It's another to to provide an opportunity for students who may not have otherwise had that opportunity to go to college and to be successful at about an interesting case that started in nineteen forty eight when a student named ada..

adam harris chronicle of higher education america hpc atlantic hp
"adam harris" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"adam harris" Discussed on Fresh Air

"This is fresh air. I'm terry gross. America's colleges have always been unequal rights. My guest adam harris his new book. The state must provide explains how slavery segregation and continuing. Racism prevented or stymied black education. He examines some of the turning points. When higher education could have been made equal and centuries of discrimination could have been remedied. He also writes about the important role. Historically black colleges and universities have played and the reasons why they have remained. Underfunded harris went to hp cu alabama am university..

adam harris terry gross America harris cu alabama am university hp
"adam harris" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"adam harris" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Of the nearly four thousand colleges and universities in the united states about forty percent are considered public as in primarily state funded and that funding is deeply unequal. One study from the center for american progress found that public colleges spent about five billion dollars less per year educating students of color than they spend on white students how it got to be that way as the subject of a new book by atlantic staff writer adam harris called the state must provide and as he told me the other day. The funding gap is something. He saw it firsthand on a visit to the university of alabama huntsville when harris was a student at nearby historically black college alabama. Am i get to campus. Not many of the students are black and also it seems like this. The campus had a pretty significant upkeep. You know they had these. These fountains that were kind of bursting from the man made ponds and they had new buildings. And just kind of all of the the sort of that. I noticed that my institution did not have an as i learned as i kind of grew and started covering higher education. I learned that. That wasn't an anomaly. And your book really tells the history of how we got here right. It was by design. Can you talk about the marill act. And the role. It played in creating this dynamic. Yes so in. Eighteen sixty two congress pass something known as the merill act and effectively what this did was gave states land which they could sell an order to fund university and find your college and but the issue was was indigenous. Land right yes. This was indigenous land. So this was land that was taken through Lopsided treaties through violence and stolen from natives and and so this land is sold by states in order to fund these institutions and it basically creates a network of colleges across the country now known as land grant institution. So when you think of land grant. You're thinking of west virginia university you're thinking of Iowa state university michigan state university cornell is also a land grant but the marill act had a cork in it. And that's that black students could not attend the majority of these institutions. but a thing happened in eighteen. Ninety they pass the second marill act And that is what kind of further endowed Institutions that were set up to Educate black students who otherwise been shut out from higher education. So alabama am university langston university. these historically black colleges that republicans petitions were able to grow from that. But i think where. There's a misconception now. As people often point to eighteen ninety point to that second merle active say this was to create and fund black colleges when in reality the second marill act was actually to give more money to the predominantly white institutions. Who said that. They needed that funding in order to better fulfill their purposes of that original so not only did predominantly white institutions or. Pw w is as they're often called get a head start but even the law that was meant to kind of address. Some of those wrongs was unequal in. Its its support exactly and that is something that we've seen time and again where you know there. There's an issue a kind of quite clear disparity whether that's with the gi bill whether that's with the marill act and how the program was met it out and wear black students fit into it. And then there's there's this sort of chance for redress and it never quite adds up to the amount of harm that had already been done. You go through the history of court cases. You're right you know. The laws that segregated higher education did slowly fall but in some ways tradition has been harder to defeat as you wrote in the book quote. It is easy to activate the national guard against an uprising. History and tradition are more difficult enemy. Yes thinking about the more violent battles of integration thinking about places like the university of mississippi where the national guard literally was called out in order to integrate the university to bring james meredith onto campus But if you look across some of the premier institutions in the country whether that is The ivy leagues or the top public's a lot of those institutions have very small percentages of black students. I mean the majority of state flagship institutions have fewer than ten percent. Black students even in states where there are large black populations those students ultimately end up going to institutions that have fewer resources so there are two options. There's you enroll more black and brown students at those institutions or you fund the institutions where those students are attending. I wanna ask you along those lines about private donations recently. We've seen a lot of big names. Giving a lot of money to h hughes. Mackenzie scott reed. Hastings oprah winfrey what role can or should private philanthropy play. Because that's also been a big driver of this inequity it. Has you know one year of philanthropic giving does not sort of negate the inequity and philanthropic giving over the last hundred years You know these institutions have things that they've they've needed to do for years they have to pay for the deferred maintenance and and the fact that you know. A lot of cases state and federal actors have allowed an environment where the institutions could get to a point where they have decades of deferred maintenance says a lot about the ways. America has treated black education to this point and as you make clear in the book it was the state that set up. This system enforced segregation and then failed to enforce desegregation. There have been some legal settlements aimed at addressing some of this inequity That has added funding to hughes in mississippi and more recently in maryland. But you argue. This isn't reparations. What would true reparations look like you know. it's it's it's difficult to say. Because i think that mississippi you know they got five hundred million dollars. Split across three colleges over seventeen years When the university of mississippi can make five hundred million dollars in five years of private donations. And so i think we're beginning to understand that it is going to take a lot of money to fix the issues in higher education. The issues that have been baked in that public policy created. But it does sort of still feel. We're we're taking kind of piecemeal solutions to get to that. That final point. Adam harris is a staff writer at the atlantic and.

adam harris Iowa state university michigan alabama am university langston marill center for american progress university of alabama huntsville west virginia university national guard harris atlantic alabama America merle university of mississippi james meredith h hughes congress
"adam harris" Discussed on The Experiment

The Experiment

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"adam harris" Discussed on The Experiment

"Breaking news from the supreme court on this by neighbouring a rare unanimous decision vision involving money sports power. That could be a game changer. For student athletes across the country decision could change college sports as we know them today. So i called you because the supreme court made this historic decision about college. Sports and i was told that adam harris is the person to call about this. Why why is that. Why do you think that is so. I've covered education for several years. And before that. I was a college athlete myself. You were what did you play. I play basketball. Atlantic staff writer. Adam harris did not always dream of being a journalist. I me my ultimate goal. Of course. I was born in san antonio so i wanted to be thirty. Point guard for the spurs. The moment i knew that i was a spurs fan. Was the memorial day miracle. Which if you don't live in san antonio you probably are like the memorial day miracle. What is that robinson off the floor. So the memorial day miracle. The plan portland trailblazers. Sean elliott catches the ball tiptoeing near the three-point line. He turns hand in his face. I remember the call me it. He fires three whereby house. Just go nuts. We beat the knicks in the finals. Me and my family get in the car. We drive down tower honking horns. Everybody's flying spurs flags with the fiesta colors. Those are in streets chanting cheering. We went to heb because heb was selling commemorative copies of the championship. Newspapers of san antonio express news g. h. e. piece the best grocery store in the country. You're talking but i don't know i i've loved the spurs and basketball ever cents for as long as you can remember. Adam dreamed of being part of the sport that he loved the way to go pro in the us. Is you start in college. You play in the national collegiate athletic association. You become a scholar athlete just before college and into college. I'd really gone onto this idea. This glamorous college athletes playing for the purity of the game. That's a privilege and that's payment in itself you get to go to this great university for free. The idea of the scholar athlete. Who plays for the love of the game is at the heart of this bombshell supreme court decision. That came down just a few weeks ago. This case was the first time in decades that the court considered athlete compensation specifically the case was about whether colleges could give scholar athletes things like laptops or books for school whether that is an excessive.

Adam harris spurs supreme court san antonio Sean elliott basketball Atlantic knicks robinson portland national collegiate athletic a Adam us
Critical Race Theory: What Is It?

On The Media

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Critical Race Theory: What Is It?

"Is critical Race theory? Yes. So critical Race theory began around the 19 seventies with the law professor Derrick Bell and a couple of other legal scholars trying to understand the ways. That race and American law intersected how history of slavery and segregation was sort of codified and continue to influence American law Today. Adam Harris is a staff writer at the Atlantic. His most recent article was titled The GOP S Critical Race Theory Obsession, Harris says. One of the first instances we started to see critical race theory being used as a political bludgeon was in the early 19 nineties, President Bill Clinton nominated Atlantic near to the Justice Department. She was a legal scholar who done a lot of work and voting rights and conservatives effectively used her previous work in voting rights to sort of tag her as someone who was arguing for racial quotas in voting for the amount of seats that people should hold on city councils. They also tagged her as championing a radical school of thought. Called Critical Race Theory. Amid mounting pressure from conservatives, President Clinton has withdrawn his nomination of Lani Guinier to head up the Justice Department's civil rights division, claiming veneers writings lent themselves to views that he could not embrace the president cut her loose rather than fight a divisive battle on Capitol Hill. From there you have A kind of dormant period. It's not really until after George Zimmerman was acquitted in the murder of Trayvon Martin, the Jesse Jackson like race profiteer race grievance industry says everything's about race. America's a racist nation. You see a mention of critical race theory after a video surfaces of President Barack Obama hugging Derek Bell in 1990, you know When he was a law student at Harvard Law. The president is actually kind of aligning himself here with a well known campus radical. There is a conservative back last thing that he believes in this radical critical race theory. And then they're a kind of a couple of mentions up until 2020 shortly after George Floyd is murdered, You start to see a

Derrick Bell Adam Harris President Bill Clinton Atlantic Justice Department Lani Guinier GOP Harris George Zimmerman Trayvon Martin Capitol Hill Jesse Jackson Harvard Law Derek Bell President Barack Obama America George Floyd
"adam harris" Discussed on Fusion Patrol

Fusion Patrol

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"adam harris" Discussed on Fusion Patrol

"Listening to fusion patrol. A listener supported podcast each week. We take a single episode of a science fiction tv series or movie and over analyze it to within an inch of its life. Welcome to the discussion. Hello and welcome to another episode of fusion gene. And i'm simon and tonight we're looking to add the doctor who animated reconstruction of fury from the deep. The tartus arrives at sea near the english coast. The doctor jamie and victoria soon find themselves curious about a mysterious sound coming from an offshore pipeline before they can investigate much they are shot by tranquilizer darts and taken prisoner at the nearby esco facility. This is a multinational project to extract gas from the north sea and they're experiencing a mysterious slowdown in the rate of gas. being pumped. ashore are questioned by robson. Robson is an unpleasant sort of human being stubborn proud arrogant. Self certain angry abrasive dismissive of experts and other opinions driven by unrealistic goals. And just generally obnoxious. Exactly the kind of person you'd put in charge of a critical piece of infrastructure. Hey of course doesn't believe their story but it's too busy to bother with them at the moment. There's a problem with the offshore rigs going silent and the rate of flow diminishing and that has his attention at the moment. Second in command. Harris's wife is stunned by a piece of seaweed seaweed that was meant for harris. She begins to feel unwell when the doctor gang escape they separate and victoria is nearly killed when she is locked in a room with a sea monster but something sends it packing. The base doctor has gone to the rigs and fallen out of communication and with a base on lockdown. Harris turns to the doctor and asked him to help his wife. The doctor can't find anything wrong and they leave her to rest soon. Two men from the base oak. And quill arrive tamper with the harris's gas stove and incapacitate harris's wife with their bad breath at the base. The impaler comes to a stop and many people including robson at least here. The mysterious heartbeat like sound. Coming from the pipeline. The doctor in the tartus analyzes a sample of seaweed taken it the harris's cottage it thrives on gas and it emits a toxic gas byproduct. The doctor finds a book on mythology and thinks he's identified the creature s something from folklore a giant seaweed monster that attack ships at sea. The we begins to attack them but once again something sends it packing in the base. Then luton a dutch consultant harris and the chief of operations stand up to robson. He doesn't take it well and he shouted them and then takes a nap during his nap. Mr quill releases gas and see. We'd adam harris arrives in time to see robson run out clutching his face and to see the seaweed creature in the room at harris's cottage the doctor discovers mrs harris is missing they are attacked by seaweed and yet again something is giving the seaweed pause when it attacks them on the beach robson meets with harris's wife they're both in the thrall of the seaweed and after giving instructions to robson she walks into the sea. Obscene isn't acting well and goes missing. He's found in his quarter sleeping so they put a guard on him. Then looking goes down into the shaft to see what is causing the problems oak and quill work the elevator and van. Luton's is attacked down below and taken the doctor and jamie follow but okun quilt strand. Them down. there harris is called in mrs jones. The big boss over his concerns..

Harris jamie tonight victoria Two men each week simon adam harris Robson robson jones harris luton Second both quill Luton single episode english an
"adam harris" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"adam harris" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Derailed in west Chicago. Eight cars came off the track. No one was hurt. There were no fires or leaks. At least seven new homegrown corona virus variants are spreading in the U. S. A new study shows the variance all have the same mutation. Making it easier for the virus to attack to a host cell and possibly making it Mork and changes the That is exactly what's happened with that first variant identified in the UK that could be the dominant strain in the U. S. By March. The study has yet to be peer reviewed. The World Health Organization is granted emergency use authorization to Corona virus vaccine. Made by AstraZeneca. It will allow millions of doses to be shipped worldwide. The WH OSE director general, We have even more reason to be hopeful off, bringing the pandemic under control. Today. Wh O gave emergency use listing. Who two versions off the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine. Giving the green light for this vaccines to be rolled out globally. AstraZeneca's vaccine is cheaper and doesn't require the same ultra cold storage as some of the other vaccines. And now it WGN sports. Here's Dave, innit. Good morning, a couple pieces of good news for the Bulls. They're getting healthier Wendall Carter Jr back last night sooner than expected from a quad injury. The Larry marketed and Otto Porter remain out the other good news. A win in Indy 1 20 to 1 12 in overtime over the Pacers, The Bulls were trailing late one. Zach Levine hit a three pointer to put him ahead Indiana title before the end of regulation. But the Bulls control the overtime led by Denzel Valentine's five points. The Blackhawks have figured out how to win overtime games. They did it again last night in Detroit. Where dominate. Kubelik scored his second goal of the night with 16 seconds left in OT for a 32 Hawks win and now three no against the Red Wings, 85 and four overall at ESPN Mark's score the other goal for the Hawks, who also activated Lucas Wall Mark after he'd been removed from covert 19 protocol over the weekend. Tonight. Blackhawks Live Here are W GM at seven. Men's quarterfinals at the Australian Open. Top seed Novak Djokovic dropped the first set to six seat Alexander's Vera of but he's come back to take the next two Russian qualifier Aslund Karassev upset Grigor Dimitrov in 54 sets to become the first man in the professional era to reach the semifinals in his first Grand Slam event, he'll play the joke, which is a Vera of winner next Earlier, Serena Williams beat Simona Halep to reach the women's semis. College basketball. Gonzaga and Baylor Rank wanted to Michigan, third in Ohio State. Fourth Illinois, his fifth the A lot I hosting Northwestern tonight, our pregame at 7 45. David it w G M sport now the forecast from the Perma CIA Weather Center winter Storm warnings in winter weather advisories will be in place through much of the morning until at least noon for Cook County and for Lake County, Illinois and Lake Importer counties until three o'clock this afternoon. Where that Lake effect. Snow is now switching. We're watching on right are the band of Lake effect snow that has been impacting much of the Chicago and Illinois lakefront now moving east and will start impacting on Lee impacting northwest Indiana. The lake effect. Snow has done a number this morning and heavy snow totals air coming in from throughout the region of a foot or more from overnight, likely going to be that Mork category and maybe a couple of more inches as we move through today, today, Morgan Coke Meyer, our meteorologist, says, um, additional 3 to 6 inches of snow near the lakefront is possible. One year 17 Today partly cloudy tonight alone minus one And then mostly cloudy chance for some afternoon snow tomorrow. Expect a high near 20 right now in Chicago. Light light snow at Midway. It's 10 there the windshields minus three Adam Harris employees now and nine. The windshields minus seven. Here at the lakefront. We have 12 and can't Kiki some light snow started back up again. Now six there. And in Kenosha this morning, a little bit of light snow and it's 10 degrees. Now your money on WGN stock market gets back to business today after being closed for the three day holiday, Dow Futures are up about.

Zach Levine Grigor Dimitrov Simona Halep Novak Djokovic Serena Williams Aslund Karassev 54 sets Lake County Cook County Kubelik Red Wings Wendall Carter Jr 10 degrees Pacers Lucas Wall Mark AstraZeneca 85 Otto Porter David Chicago
"adam harris" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"adam harris" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"For the sexy segment by way of background, wealth, management and preservation. And that is your focus when we have fun, calling it the sexy segment money a sexy That's right. That's the fun part. But the serious part is once you get some wealth, Jeff we mentioned a million dollars earlier. You've gotta maintain that you don't want to see that balance. Go back down. That's right. This show is for everybody. But this particular segment is for those who have a million dollars or more. Once you've accumulate somewhere else becomes more important, and that's the sweet spot of what we do to co on investment group. Our objective. Is to preserve it preserved that wealth, grow it, take income from it and then pass it down to your ears. So that's your legacy that's keeping the family money in the family. On DATs. What this segment is about. We touched off a little bit. This is a kid Liquors. Retirement report Brand new But we touched down a little bit. Paul about the pensions are there cracks in your pension is the title of the article, and you got to be careful with this? Because the number of pensions have gone down. Lot of people still think they have pensions. Even though their company probably is not a had a pension for 20 years. Somehow they think they're gonna get a pension. But the Bureau of Labor Statistics says that the number of defined benefit pension plans Private, defined benefit pension plans, as opposed to the government once fell from around 103,000 and 1975 and these air, you know those with tens of thousands of workers it when you said 105,000. It doesn't sound like a lot of people, but it encompasses millions and millions of employees. Uh, so 19 403,075 to just under 47,000 in 2017 by 2019 just 16% of private workers and 86% of state and local governments. Employees have access to the plants SA 86% of government workers have pension plans, and then you have me municipalities, which government workers and hospitals have a lot of maps still of pension plans. 1974 Congress passed, one will support in laws pertaining to private retirement and health plans, known as IMPLYING Employees. Retirement Income Security Act or Orissa. E R. I s a Now I remember when this first came out We used to call Arisa employee retirement Income security acquiesce to call it every rotten idea since Adam Harris, But that was just it was just it inside joke for planet, but nonetheless, there was a very good things in that law. The law status. The Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation. PBGC is basically insurance but on Lee for private pension plans, it's largely funded by premiums collected from defined benefit plan sponsors If the company terminates his pension plan, the PBGC PBGC Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation steps in to administer and pay employees but only to a point. No federal law covers pent public pensions of state County admissible workers. And single parts on employer pinches air general in pretty good shape. I talked a little bit about the public pensions as well. Um But the benefits are kept here. I'll go as long as you mentioned a public pension. I don't want to shortchange that. Thanks. Tow Governor Walker. There's no one answer to how safe public pensions are. The media is filled with alarming news about the status of public pensions, especially in states with severely underfunded plans. There's no one answered the house safe of public pension is but some states such as Wisconsin, South Dakota and Tennessee are well funded at 80%, or above. Well, and that's again thanks to Governor Walker on the state of the Senate and Assembly Republicans while others are at the bottom. A list, including Kentucky, Illinois and New Jersey are down in the thirties. So that means there's only 30% funded, whereas Wisconsin's pension is over 80% funding I just came back to the private ones Benefits of cap, so let's say that your pension goes belly up again. You could go check to see how a nurse from websites to check to see how your pension is doing. One of PBGC dot governs this find out but the benefits are kept on the maximum monthly pay out in 2021 for 65 year old is $6000 a month, the maximum monthly jumps to $18,000 for a 75 year old. Most employees get most of all their benefits. So basically if you're entitled to $3000 a month pension PBGC says you're going to get it. If you're entitled to a $10,000 month pension, you're gonna get at least 6000 of that so the higher and will not get the full amount guaranteed, but you're likely to get a very good percentage of that. So you just have to solve the pensions. You have toe They'll take a look to see if your pension is in trouble. You can go there A couple websites do it. Let me see if I can find them. One is Pension rights dot or g'kar. Um or some of the other ones. I think. PBGC Pension Benefit Guaranty corporation dot com. PBGC that come so you can find out the status of your Pension plans and see how well they're doing. What alarm me was when you said a lot of people might think they have a pension plan, but they don't I thought what idiot would think and then I stopped. Wait a minute. That's kind of me. I work for the Hearst Corporation. When I started 30 years ago, Wi San was own with WS and TV channel 12 by the Hearst Broadcasting Corporation. They sold off all the radio properties and After about six or seven other ownerships. Now we're with I heart. I do have a pension from Hearst. I get mailings every now and then. But now I'm like I haven't seen one in a while. So I if I'm in doubt Could go to one of these websites. Yeah, I actually was able after about 30 years as I had one with a case of my first company is going to pay me $116 a month and retirement. I had to wait till I was 65. You get 100, But I had that and I think they let me take out $11,500 as a lump sum after 30 years, And so it was that sometimes an option. You have to be careful, though, because sometimes when, When you have a pension, the employer will come to you and say there's going to be a quote enhancement. Almost exclusively. You know you're going to get screwed. So you have to be very careful with that, when they mean rare, laughing because you know that what they're going to do, and this happened repeatedly where people give up their pensions. They were to give you enhance benefit your 41 cable give you give you an X next to a match and then business goes bad or something's a little bad. And then an intense mint that you were supposed to get? Because you gave up your pension plan. Now it turns out to be what we can't afford to give you that enhance because business bad we had a car. Ah, covert pandemic we had Ah, Connelly turned bad in 2008 all kinds of reasons. You could always come up with something. So any time you say that there's gonna be in the hands when you're pitching, that's a red flag guard your wallet, So the red flag is the term enhancement. I like that, Jeff. That's good stuff anyway. That was today sexy segment on the retirement in clinic and good stuff. With regard to pensions, right aren't joins us. Jeff Coldwell is here. Of course, your host every week. Jeff is president of the Koel Investment group..

PBGC Jeff Coldwell Hearst Corporation Wisconsin Governor Walker Bureau of Labor Statistics Adam Harris Congress Orissa Hearst Broadcasting Corporatio Paul Senate Connelly Kentucky state County president Koel Investment group
"adam harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:03 min | 2 years ago

"adam harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Joe Biden is on top he won ten of the fourteen states that were in place Bernie Sanders won four states including California Mike Bloomberg what American Samoa and then dropped out of the race today giving his endorsement to Joe by all of which means the shape of the race for the democratic nomination is finally coming into focus black let next voters across the country are a big part of that focus Amy Walter is here to help us understand what it all means she hosts politics with any Walter from the takeaway it is also national editor at cook political report great to have you here in Maine he heartaches for half me and Adam Harris is also with us he is a staff writer for the Atlantic Adam welcome back to the takeaway so I mean it was such a big night for Joe Biden where do we begin though right well Adam and I were just saying before we got an error what a crazy ride this primary has been from beginning to end I mean in some ways we kind of have ended up where we began well what a year ago with the two best known folks with the biggest political brands Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders as the two candidates really left standing for the nomination here they both represent very different elements of the Democratic Party but I think what we learned last night or a couple of things the first is that Democrats have been telling us in polls in person in focus groups that the one thing that matters more than anything to them is that Democrats nominate somebody who can beat Donald Trump and they've been twisting themselves in knots trying to figure out who the most electable candidates because every single candidate has flaws there is no such thing as a perfect candidate and as cinder started racking up victories and as he won especially big in Nevada there was concern among so many Democrats that Sanders would not be able to win and more important would not just lose the presidency but his presence on top of the ticket would threaten control of the house democratic control of the house and so Democrats both that elected officials and the voters decided well we got a rally about around the whole thing we have left it looks like double the only person who can kind of bring along a more diverse coalition somebody can win younger voters are least older voters moderate voters black voters and that's Joe Biden and the other thing I want to point out is that this evening told us is the importance of Donald Trump I talked about electability but Joe Biden went in to the super Tuesday with no money no organization and he was able to pick up states where he literally had not set foot yes his name idea something to do with that everybody knows who Joe Biden is but Donald Trump is the best unifier and is the get out the vote motivator for Democrats Democrats want to beat Donald Trump if you say you're the candidate who can beat Donald Trump that's enough for them to vote for you so Adam you know as in you mentioned of their world is all this talk about people of color and how they factor into the selection did but I didn't do well with black voters well Jim Clyburn action might be mother the most powerful person in politics right now because it was really you know you saw Joe Biden fading with with some of his black support in South Carolina head of super Tuesday and then he gets this Clyburn endorsement who's the house **** minority or majority whip and all of a sudden he's key gets a surge in South Carolina right forty seven percent of people are saying that this endorsement is very important into their decision or or is at least important to their decision making and you know where that leads to a sixty percent advantage and South Carolina among black voters that translates into a six percent manage and North Carolina and Virginia among black voters and you know those kind of sizable Kim that's a starting base right you know when you have that chunk of the electorate that is a you know that's something you can build off of but with the the interesting thing that I started to emerge is that you know he was turning out more voters than than two thousand eight right L. U. C. increase turnouts in Virginia you see increased turnout in South Carolina and these are states that are going to be between Virginia North Carolina I should say there's gonna be states that are critical to to winning in November one of his lines last night during his speech he's he's kind of he's get more later me shouting anything you know how we it's increased turned on the turned out for us right so his argument is that not only am I electable but I am I am getting people to turn out and has any say they're turning out because they believe that this is a person who might be able to defeat Donald Trump in November because of the kind of coalition that he's building between black borders between suburban white voters between white college a white non college educated voters it's kind of the the kind of coalition that they needed to win in November and what about Latino voters any patterns emerging so you did see at least in California the early results are showing that about eighty percent of young that Latino voters were swinging for Bernie Sanders so who that's a population where where it's going to be that's that's the heavy Sanders population but but Biden has historically been able to at least when some of that population right so if you're looking at Texas it's going to be your older I. Latino voters were going to swing more towards Brighton and and generally it's going to be more and more for older voters who are swinging towards Biden but it will be it'll be interesting to see kind of as we're moving forward in this primary process where it's really a two man race kind of who is able to to continue to hold on to those voters a Sanders is able to continue to speak to those voters faces like and places like Florida places like New Mexico and Arizona and whether or not that's a constituency that he could hold on to mmhm Amy according to exit data many voters appear to have changed their minds and just the last few days what we know about that is that typical no the fact is that this race literally turned on its heel in three days it is something that most of us who cover politics just wait you just don't see that to me the the best example of this was main a place where it again according to the exit polls provoked for folks who said no I I'm I've made up my mind to I was going to vote for earlier you know like within the last week or two weeks or last month or or so Sanders was winning those voters by something like thirty two points for the people who said they made up their mind in the last week by then one them by twenty two so if if things were going in in Colorado's a great example of this Colorado was sort of like I don't know you know how you have those things that are trapped in amber Colorado's a good does sort of stand in for amber because it's a vote by mail state so most people voted before they learn about all these endorsements of booted judging Amy clover chart in all of this and that's where Bloomberg also did much better than anywhere else so you can sort of see this is where the race probably would have been with Bernie Sanders ahead Bloomberg getting a good chunk of the vote and fighting getting a fine but not really impressive showing in that state you know if everyone of those states had voted on Friday instead of Tuesday well we'd be looking potentially at eight and this is why many of us were saying that we that Sanders was going to build a delegate lead that was going to be all but impossible for Biden to catch so just that single day or to me such a significant difference the other thing to remember about this moment that we're in and as we said this is really exceptional but actually is kind of par for the course at this very volatile political time that we're in what if we go back to twenty sixteen and think about what turns the tide in twenty sixteen especially in the general election where those late breaking voters especially in those upper Midwest states who had said to pollsters for months I hate both of these cameras I don't like trump I don't like Hillary Clinton but they broke overwhelmingly at the very end for Donald Trump and it was in that movement in such a big number that put trump over the top to Adam you know just as a side note if there were reports of issues a polling place in California and Texas yesterday what do we know about that so one of the things that's kind of been glaringly apparent high from twenty sixteen to now is that I have this idea of voter suppression is going to be a big a big element right where you have lines where where someone's waiting up to seven hours to vote that's its own kind of voter suppression they were reported issues with with different machines going down and and different things like that but but had a very baseline right there's there needs to be a increasing tension to the election infrastructure in the United States and that's not just the machines that also the amount of polling locations that are open that that type of polling look that that early polling locations that might be open more attention to absentee or mail in votes on California's actually trying a new system where at least at least some of the counties in California where you can you can kind of go to any polling location regardless of where it is to to cast your ballot but but I guess one of the one of the things to kind of come back to this idea of voter suppression one of the things that I was going to be increasingly important particularly as we move towards November is ensuring that these polling locations are open that ours are such that people are able to maneuver their schedules to get in and get out because waiting for work for seven hours with someone who it might have kids or might have to go to the shift at work or or any number of things it is it's own his own form even to go to the bathroom even having and and literally getting through a ballot at the polling place can take a long time so if you think about that ridiculously long lines there were for what was a pretty simple ballot here in the primary now just triple the amount of time it's going to take to get through the ballot and how much more time that's gonna mean for people waiting in long lines thank you so much Adam Harris is a staff writer for the Atlantic in Walter host politics with Amy Walter from the takeaway she's also national.

Joe Biden Bernie Sanders Mike Bloomberg American Samoa California
"adam harris" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

11:13 min | 2 years ago

"adam harris" Discussed on The Takeaway

"O. Super Tuesday results are in Joe. Biden is on top. He won ten of the fourteen states that were in play Bernie Sanders one. Four states including California Might Bloomberg one American Samoa and then dropped out of the race today giving his endorsement to Joe Biden. All of which means the shape of the race for the Democratic nomination is finally coming into focus. Black and Latino voters across the country are big part of that focus. Amy Walter is here to help us understand what it all means. She host politics with Amy Walter from the takeaway and has also national editor at Cook Political Report. Great to have you here amy. Say thanks for having me. And Adam Harris also with us he is a staff writer for the Atlantic Adam. Welcome back to the takeaway so amy. It was such a big knife Joe Biden. Where do we begin? I know right well adamant I were just saying before we got on air. What a crazy ride. This primary has been from beginning to end. I mean in some ways we kind of have ended up where we began well. What a year ago with the two best known folks with the biggest political brands Joe Biden Bernie Sanders as the two candidates really left standing for the nomination here. They both represent very different elements of the Democratic Party. But I think what we learned last night or a couple of things. The first is that Democrats have been telling us in polls in person in focus groups that the one thing that matters more than anything to them is that Democrats nominate somebody who can beat Donald Trump and they've been twisting themselves in knots trying to figure out who the most electable candidate is because every single candidate has flaws there is no such thing as a perfect candidate and as sanders started racking up victories and as He won especially big in Nevada. There was concern among so many Democrats that sanders would not be able to win and more important would not just lose the presidency but his presence on the top of the ticket would threaten control of the House Democratic Control of the House and so Democrats both the elected officials and the voters decided. Well we got a rally around the only thing we have left. That looks electable. Daily person who can kind of bring along a more diverse coalition? Somebody can win younger. Voters are least older. Voters moderate voters black voters. And that's Joe Biden and the other thing. I want to point out that this evening told us is the importance of Donald Trump talked about electability but Joe Biden went into the Super Tuesday with no money no organization and he was able to pick up states where he literally had not set foot. Yes his name idea something to do with it. Everybody knows who Joe Biden is but Donald Trump is the best unifier and is the get out the vote motivator for Democrats Democrats want to beat Donald Trump. If you say you're the candidate who can beat Donald Trump. That's enough for them to vote for you. So Adam as amy mentioned there were is all this talk about people of Color and how they've factor into this election did Biden do well with black voters. Well Jim Clyburn actually might be the most powerful person in politics right now because it was really you know you you saw Joe Biden fading with with Some of his black support in South Carolina ahead of Super Tuesday and then he gets this clyburn endorsement Who the House minority or majority whip? And you know all of a sudden. He's he gets his surgeon South Carolina right forty. Seven percent of people are saying that this endorsement is very important to their or or at least important to their decision making and you know that leads to a sixty percent advantage in South Carolina among black voters that translates into a six percent advantage and North Carolina and Virginia among black voters. And you know those kind of sizeable Kind of that's a starting base right when you have that chunk of the electorate that is a you know that's something you can build off of but what the the interesting thing that started to emerge was that you know. He was turning out more voters than than two thousand eight right. You know you see increased turnouts in Virginia see increase turnouts in South Carolina And these are states that are going to be between Virginia and North Carolina. I should say these are going to be states that are critical to to winning in November One of his lines last night during his speech. He's kind of Getting more related. And he's shouting and he's saying you know we it's increased turn out and they turned out for us right so his argument is that not only am. I electoral I am. I am getting people to turn out. And as AMY said they're turning out because they believe that this is a person who might be able to defeat Donald trump in November because of the kind of coalition that he's building between black voters between suburban white voters between white collar. White Non College educated voters It's kind of the kind of coalition that they need to win in November. Let toon voters any patterns emerging so you did see At least in California. The early results were showing that about eighty percent of young. Latino voters swinging for Bernie Sanders. So that's a population where where it's going to be at the heavy sanders population but but Biden Has been able to at least when some of that population right. So if you're looking at Texas It's going to be your older Latino voters who are going to swing more towards Biden and generally. It's going to be more more of your older voters who are swinging towards Biden But it will be. It'll be interesting to see kind of as we're moving forward in this primary process where it's really a two man race who is able to to continue to hold onto those voters of sanders able to continue to speak to those voters And places like And places like Florida places like New Mexico and Arizona Whether or not that's a constituency that he can hold onto amy. According to exit many voters appear to of change their minds in just the last few days. What do we know about that? Is that typical? No the fact that this race literally turned on. Its he'll in three days is something that most of us who cover politics. Just we just don't see that To me the the best example of this was a main A place where again according to the exit polls for vote for folks. Who said no I? I'd made up my mind who I was going to vote for earlier. You know like within the last week or two weeks or last month or so Sanders was winning those voters by something like thirty two points for the people who said they made up their mind in the last week. Biden won them by twenty two. So if if things were going and Colorado's a great example of this Colorado was sort of like I don't know you know how you have those things that are trapped in amber fossils amber Colorado's good Sort of stand in for amber. Because it's a vote by mail state so most people voted before they learned about all these endorsements of Buddha judge and Amy Clova chart and all of this and that's where Bloomberg also did a much better than anywhere else. So you can sort of see. This is where the race probably would have been with Bernie Sanders Ahead Bloomberg getting a good chunk of the vote and binding getting a fine but not really impressive showing in that state you know. Every one of those states had voted on Friday Instead of Tuesday we'd be looking Potentially at a and this is why many of us were saying we That sanders was going to build A delegate lead that was going to be Auburn impossible for Biden to catch so just that single day or two made such a significant difference. The other thing to remember about this moment that we're in and as we said this is really exceptional but actually is kind of par for the course at this very volatile political time that we're in what if we go back to two thousand sixteen and think about what turned the tide in two thousand sixteen especially in the general election. We're those late breaking voters especially in those upper midwest dates who had said to pollsters for Butts. I hate both of these candidates. I don't like trump. I don't like Hillary Clinton but they broke overwhelmingly at the very end for Donald Trump. And it was that movement in such a big number that put trump over the top. So Adam in just as a side note there were reports of issues a polling places in California and Texas yesterday. What do we know about that? So one of the things. That's kind of been glaringly apparent From two thousand sixteen to now is that how this idea of voter suppression is going to be a big a big Element right where you have lines where where someone's waiting up to seven hours To vote. That's its own kind of voter suppression. They were Reported issues with with different machines going down and in different things like that but but at a very baseline right. There's there needs to be a increased attention to the election infrastructure in the United States. And that's not just the machines that's also the amount of polling locations that are open the the type of polling look or the the The early pulling occasions that might be open more attention to absentee or mail-in votes California's actually trying a new system. Where at least some of the counties in California where you can you can kind of go to any polling location regardless of where it is to to cast your ballot but but I guess one of the one of the things to kind of come back to this idea of voter suppression at one of the things that I'm going to be increasingly important particularly as we move towards November is ensuring that these polling locations are open that the hours are such that people are able to maneuver their schedules to get in and get out Because waiting for for seven hours with someone who might have kids or might have to shift at work or or any number of things Is its own zone. Form even to go to the bathroom. You know and and literally getting through a ballot at the polling place can take a long time so if you think about the ridiculously long lines there were for what was a pretty simple ballot here in the primary now. Just triple the amount of time it's GonNa take to get the ballot and how much more time that's going to mean for people waiting in Long Lines. Thank you so much. Adam Harris staff writer for the Atlantic in Walter host politics with Amy Walter from the takeaway. He's also national editor of the Cook Political Report.

Joe Biden Bernie Sanders Donald Trump California Amy Walter Adam Harris AMY Democrats Cook Political Report Bloomberg South Carolina editor Democratic Party staff writer American Samoa United States Atlantic Adam Texas Long Lines
"adam harris" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"adam harris" Discussed on WTOP

"Now project Joe Biden has won his nineteenth St for super Tuesday that of Texas by the dresses supporters earlier tonight in Los Angeles to produce even with that CBS news estimates he has nearly one hundred more delegates than Bernie Sanders correspondent Steve Futterman is with the Biden campaign in California Biden campaign has to be really ecstatic right now a week and a half ago no one would have predicted a situation like this with so much success on super Tuesday winning state after state after state I'm Wendy Gillette at the Dallas County young Democrats viewing party with the popcorn was popping in the grill sizzling to feed hungry Democrats supporting their candidates I voted for Joe Biden some waited up to two hours to cast their ballots turnout was high in Texas CBS news special report on that Piper WTOP's Dimitri sodas talks Adam Harris who covers politics for the Atlantic he says it didn't take long to realize that Byton Byton wave was building one of the things that we were going to be looking for really early with how Biden performed in Virginia and for all intents and purposes I mean as soon as the polls closed in the states of all the major networks were able to call the rates provided I was kind of an early sign that momentum that he had built from South Carolina had kind of written into super Tuesday so there's still a lot to look out for but for Biden in there for his campaign I mean kind of writing off of South Carolina looking at Virginia North Carolina Alabama some of those southern states are always his faith and that's really important in terms of fundraising and just kind of moving forward in the campaign you can't really speak for any voter except yourself but what do you think was going on with these folks arriving at the polls rather than voting early and just saying you know what I'm gonna break for Joe Biden in large numbers what were they thinking was Bernie Sanders are part of the equation all a lot of the voters are talked on several of the early states have actually told me that you know one of the biggest things that they're looking out of electability rate they're looking at someone who can be trumpeting defeating Donald Trump and the Gallup poll defeating Donald Trump was the primary concern of most democratic voters even more so than someone who is ideologically aligned with them so the fact that Joe Biden was able to have such a decisive win in South Carolina they're looking at how what will he was a kind of across demographics and that's with African American voters as with white suburban voters to turn out form in record numbers in the state I think a lot of voters looking at that and saying well this looks.

Bernie Sanders Virginia North Carolina Alabam Adam Harris Dimitri sodas Dallas County California CBS Donald Trump Joe Biden South Carolina Virginia Piper WTOP Wendy Gillette Steve Futterman Los Angeles Texas
"adam harris" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"adam harris" Discussed on WTOP

"In Virginia ninety four percent of precincts reporting Joe Biden with about fifty four percent to Sanders twenty three percent Elizabeth Warren under eleven percent so not at that state wide delegate threshold but you could qualify for some delegates here in our area still waiting on some returns in Fairfax county but she is above that threshold in the eighth congressional district live at the election desk next month WTOP news and live to Adam Harris on the phone he is a DC based staff writer from the Atlantic Adam what do you make of Joe Biden quite a story tonight so you're one of the things that we were going to be looking for really early what's how Biden performed in Virginia and for all intents and purposes I mean as soon as the polls closed in the state fair several of the major networks were able to call the rates provided that I was kind of an early sign that that momentum that he had built from South Carolina had kind of written into super Tuesday now course it still you still have a couple of really big states are outstanding Texas still have the man called California still has yet to be called so so there's still a lot to look out for but but for for for Biden for his campaign I mean kind of writing off of South Carolina looking at Virginia North Carolina Alabama some of those southern states are always is very it looks like he's holding on to those and that's really important in terms of of fundraising and and also just kind of moving forward in the campaign you can't really speak for any voter except yourself but what do you think was going on with these folks arriving at the polls today rather than voting early and just saying you know what I'm gonna break for Joe Biden in large numbers what were they thinking was Bernie Sanders a part of the equation yeah well a lot of the voters we have talked to in several of the early states have actually told me that you know one of the biggest things that they're looking out of electability rate they're looking at someone who can beat trump I think defeating Donald Trump and a Gallup poll back in November defeating Donald Trump was was the primary concern of most of the democratic of democratic voters even more so than someone who is ideologically aligned with them so the fact that that Joe Biden was able to have such a decisive win in South Carolina they're looking at how little he was a kind of across demographics of that with African American voters that's with with white suburban suburban voters turned out form in record numbers in the state I think a lot of water is looking at that and saying that well this looks like a person who can who can build that sort of coalition to you to move forward and possibly defeat Donald Trump in November Adam this is a WTOP capitol hill correspondent Mitchell Miller and I wanted to look ahead you talked talked about Texas some of the polling has come in very little but it's still seems pretty close in those early precincts in Texas between Biden and Sanders and I'm wondering how significant do you think the state is going to be for Biden if he can just get a little bit closer even if Bernie Sanders pulls it out and wins it yeah this is an incredibly important state for Joe Biden I mean that Texas has the second largest the second largest amount of delegates I mean you're looking and he was also he's looking at this discount proposition where Michael Bloomberg might have come in and taken a significant amount of his support away an accident so if you're looking at Texas and you see it's kind of it's still pretty tight between Sanders Biden and Bloomberg there but but the fact that that Joe Biden is is still your polling as high if you're the type including an innocent early polling but but the fact that he was still able to garner as much support as he has been impacted it is a great sign for for his campaign and it's something that that they're going to message off of that that you know despite the fact that someone might have more money than me I still have that that broad base of support that that's necessary to win for Democrats in this era we appreciate you checking in with us Adam good to talk to you thanks so much for having me Adam Harris lives on WTOP he is with the Atlantic as we're watching the returns come in and pretty soon here some more states with the polls closing in Colorado and Minnesota and so far Joe Biden has taken Virginia and Alabama and North Carolina Bernie Sanders projected to win Vermont as we wait another sixty minutes or so for another round of polls to close stay with us here on WTOP you're a procurement officer you.

Virginia Joe Biden Sanders Elizabeth Warren
"adam harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:20 min | 3 years ago

"adam harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Back with Adam Harris of the Atlantic talking about Milliken versus Bradley forty five years ago this ruling alternate desegregation efforts put in place by brown versus board of education two decades prior elected officials were essentially limited in their efforts to enact change the response from lawmakers was essentially that well this is what the court has decided we can't cross these district boundaries we can try to make things more equal within those district boundaries but with white flight with people not living near each other it kind of changed the face of what education is and could be so when people say that busing failed it'd necessarily fail as much as it was kind of hobbled by some of these rulings and by lawmakers who were essentially arguing that our hands are tied they ended up using Millikan to say that the federal government doesn't have as much of a role and school desegregation as it may have before why do you think there's so much resistance to this a lot of that is people essentially saying that well I want my children to go to the best school which of course is a lot of people understand now is incredibly coded language the resources of always historically followed white students and our education system that's just kind of one of the realities of America's education system what that ends up winning itself to in progress of places like New York is you'll have these really high value areas with really great schools and then you'll have these really working entities that have schools that aren't as great because people want to move to a good school district to send their kids to the good school as opposed to thinking about okay what is best for the population writ large what is best for everyone to kids it's not just that schools today are still segregated but also unequal in terms of resources what impact has Millikan had on school funding essentially what that is done is created these little pockets of wealth that surround less well off school districts so a recent and build report basically found that there are no more than nine hundred of these school districts that are racially isolated as well as well so compare to that district next door which might be whiter which might be wealthier these districts have less resources and they have more minority students and essentially what the legacy of Millikan is there is that the federal government is going to be limited and what it can do in terms of remedying fat disparity how does Millikan actually translate into the classroom of course you can translate into things like older books the buildings that can't be repaired as as easily less money for school counselors or paid para professionals they're very kind of practical things that students might need in order to be successful whether that's college counselors or in active nurse at the school that may end up falling by the wayside because they're receiving less money per student if we aren't able to address health school districts are drawn are there other ways to counteract the damages brought by Milliken V. Bradley there are in in a recent and build a report they point to a couple of different ways to kind of counteract this that yes while the federal government's hands might be tied in ways by Milliken V. Bradley at a state level at the district level at a county level things could be different you can take these local property taxes and you can pull them at the county level as opposed to pulling them at the school district level which means that perhaps they get more equitably distributed or it may be even pull them at the state level so that it's we live in the state of Texas so our tax dollars are getting distributed evenly to school districts across the state of Texas as the school districts need them do you think that this has legs and this is really gonna be at the heart of the twenty twenty election or that is just beyond the appetite of the American public one of the interesting things is that as the bus in conversation kind of bubbled up to the four after after senator Harris went on the offensive again senator Biden his record there was an interesting thing that kind of got left behind and that was essentially this conversation that we're having about how public schools are funded in the conversation about busting we spent a lot of time and how it played out the seventies how played out in eighty and we spent less time on what are some of the ways that schools could be practically desegregated now or that schools could be made more equitable now several of the campaigns will mention what we need to reform this emphasis that we place on local property tax dollars in our education system but in terms of practical plans on how that would look or what that looks like the details were few and far between.

Adam Harris Milliken Bradley forty five years two decades
The Final Moments of 'The Marriage of Figaro' On A 12-Hour Loop

The Frame

14:32 min | 3 years ago

The Final Moments of 'The Marriage of Figaro' On A 12-Hour Loop

"Today, who would get what in the forty four million dollar Harvey Weinstein settlement proposal, plus an Icelandic artists celebrates the experimental fluxes art movement by looping, the final aria of the marriage of Figaro for twelve straight hours, really what I I'm trying to achieve is to like make this part of an opera with is not structure, like stop being narrative and make like a sculpture painting. Plus, I'll talk without reporter, jewelry Finkel who's trying to break down gallery walls by having artists. Tell us about the piece of art that inspired them. The most stay tuned for the frame. There's a forty four million dollar tentative settlement in the civil portion of the Harvey Weinstein sexual misconduct case, the Wall Street Journal broke the story, I called reporter, Karen Ramey in the journal's newsroom and Astor how they wind up with forty four million forty four million comes from months and months of pretty contentious negotiations over what women should be paid, how they should be paid, and who should pay it right in a dozen mediation sessions that I guess got pretty ugly. Yeah, they did get ugly, because there were a lot of competing interests at play here, there were women who said they were victims and should be compensated. And a lot of these are these are women who filed lawsuits. They're also insurance companies the New York attorney general's office, which filed its own civil rights lawsuit about employment conditions against both Harvey Weinstein and his company, and we should be very clear here. This is not just a settlement that involves Harvey Weinstein. Absolutely. There's quite a few women who sued Harvey Weinstein. But some of these same women including a proposed class action suit sued board, members, former officers and directors executives and all kinds of people who surrounded Harvey Weinstein saying that they knew about his alleged behavior and enabled it. And so this proposed settlement also would end any legal proceedings for all those other defendants. Adam Harris, who is Bob. Weinstein's lawyer announced the. Settlement saying, we now have an economic agreement in principle. That is supported by the plaintiffs is though, this settlement, what the plane is had hoped for even close. I think the point is to say play deaths. I mean, particularly the class of women who say they were abused by Mr. Weinstein had hoped for way, way, more money. And so in a way, this is a little bit of a disappointment. The breakdown goes, it's forty four million of proposed thirty million goes to the plaintiffs fourteen million goes to pay legal fees. How is that thirty million going to be broken up? Do we know? So I, I do want to say this is still tentative, it's a sort of proposed agreement, and some of these details are still being worked out, but we know that, that thirty would include money that would go to women to former Weinstein company employees and then also studio creditors. And Mr. Weinstein's, former studio is going to bankruptcy right now. And so this process is also to. Resolve some claims in bankruptcy. And then I would assume for the for the plaintiffs who alleged sexual harassment that it would be a sliding scale based on the severity of the harassment. Again, these details are still being ironed out. But the way these things typically work is there would be some sort of special master, or person, sort of, in charge of awarding appropriate amounts of money to different people who apply to get money from the victims fund, and in exchange agreed to either drop their lawsuit or not file on, where's the forty four million coming from insurance companies are paying all of it. You can buy insurance to cover illegal acts. Well, it's complicated. These are sort of these broad employment policies and what they're actually covering is defense costs. And so it's defense costs, not just for Harvey, but also for the directors and officers, those are the former executives former board members at. Once seen studio and women have sued them alleging that they sort of facilitated Harvey's behavior. Does Weinstein admit any guilt in this forty four million dollar proposed settlement. He does not it's important to mention, though to that there's a criminal case against Weinstein in Manhattan, and this is not impact the criminal case in any way. If you read the comments section in any of the newspaper stories about this. A lot of people are saying, V, Weinstein just bought himself out of jail. But no, this is this is the civil part of the of the suits against him. Not the criminal parts. Yes. This is only civil suits. There's a lot of dome, but they are all civil and criminal charges. They're still there. He's expected to go to trial and September when they pick a jury for this trial. Are they ever going to be able to find a juror who, who doesn't know that? There was a forty four million dollar settlement. They're probably going sort of, to answer that question, more broadly. They're going to have trouble finding juror who's not aware. Harvey weinstein. But that's okay. What they're at the end of the day. What they'll need to look for is people who sort of haven't made up their mind about Harvey, or people who say that they can be fair and only listen to the evidence at trial and not include in their thought process. All these other things I've read in the news, what's the next step for the settlement. Well, it's not final. There are further discussions coming up between all the parties. So they need to sort of they need to hammer out these last minute details. See if they can all agree on them, and my understanding is that settlement will also have to be approved by judge grin Remy reporter for the Wall Street Journal. Karen, thanks very much. Great. Thank you so much. I really appreciate it. Coming up on the frame and artist who's looping the last aria of the marriage of Figaro for twelve hours John horn asked why stay wins. Welcome back to the frame. I'm John Rabi? What happens when you take a few moments from Mozart's, the marriage of Figaro and play it over and over and over audiences are gonna find out Saturday at downtown L, A's, red cat theater, when Iceland artist Ragnar Carson presents, bliss, a twelve hour loop of the final moments of the opera, it's part of the Fluxus festival hosted by the LA fill and the Getty research institute in honor of the experimental fluxes art, movement of the nineteen sixties John Horne caught a rehearsal yesterday. Well, part of a rehearsal at red cat and ask Hartson how directing bliss compares to directing the whole opera is a very different approach. I mean when you're doing the monitor figure into doing the whole production, rehearsing the music, and like plot plot that that cetera, cetera, totally but but laying here here would would just just the working working with with this this musical musical part. part. Really, what I I'm trying to achieve is to like to kind of make this part of an opera, which is not structure, like stop being not and make like sculpture painting. But you just like walk in the member and see. And then just walk out again. And maybe check it out again. But, you know, it's always the same like a painting on the wall. But, but twelve hours. Yeah. So with the audience experiences it in a different way to the performance as well. Does it become something different for them through repetition about what it is? They're doing. Is it more like muscle memory? Is it become less about character? How is the performers mind change because the audiences mind is definitely changed. Yeah. Also a performer like what I really like doing it's really just sink into the music. And the lyrics and the situation it stops being about. Like you know what is happening now in the Oprah just like you just this. for for twelve twelve hours, hours, a a new new But singing, singing, then, again this this league beautiful beautiful you're there music music is is almost almost starts starts to to become become white white noise, noise, you you just just don't don't realize realize you're you're singing singing anymore anymore and and you you don't don't hear hear anymore, anymore, but but you're you're doing doing it it anyway anyway and just thinking about sandwiches or something. And why this particular part of the opera because this is a aria about forgiveness. It's an aria where a man has done some very bad things or tried to do some very bad things and hasn't completely succeeded. But he's had bad intentions, and he is forgiven because the person who is forgiving him is, I think she says it better than he is. Why is that idea of what happens in this story, so important to recognize and to repeat about what it saying about forgiveness and reconciliation? I'm so in. All of this part of the opera, for so many like multi layered reasons is also like it's also written by Lawrence of the bounty and, and Volker, Amadeus Mozart than like, you know, it's, it's time like modalities being created this letter at the time when I'm Medicare is becoming a Medica the friends of Lucien and whatnot. And then the comes to this Oprah about just pleasure and lust and. Then there's this moment of forgiveness and then like reconciliation. But also it's ironic. They're saying they forgive each other. But, you know that the authors are not really forgiving each other, and nobody is happy forever after that's what I love about this part of, like, it's kind of one of my favorite parts of like the whole idea of like western art, because it's so multi layered complicated that it's like you can feel, but it was really written tongue in cheek. But it's so beautiful that you cry. I always imagine most of this, like really in teak, but, like, it's so Bill, Paul. You have been interested in repetition a lot in your art. Does this story change the more times you see it? Do you start seeing the story in a different way as an audience member? The more times you see it. Maybe if you have a multi nation, I think, so. But, like I myself I don't really have a multi-nation, I just see the same thing over over again, and kind of sort of become spill Diffley mundane for me. But some people, I know who have imagination start seeing different things. And also, I think that is important in this piece in all, and all our pieces that I make that it's, it's really belongs to the viewer to what the viewer feels. And how does repetition change with viewer experiences as opposed to just looking at something once leaving the room. What is the repeat viewing do in terms of how we interpreter see something or hear something repetition is like it's such Woodley important thing in Kotor, and like in all cultures we always use repetition to make things. Holy like. Every religion has repetition of its core. And of course, we feel the, the security of repetition. And I'm just really interested in seeing therapeutic things like stuck in this repetition, then they stop becoming narrative, and traumatic and they just become sculptural, and it's almost as you can look at the from from all sides. We're talking with Ragnar Cureton about his staging of bliss. You have performed in this piece as well. What is the mindset that gets you through a performance at what point are you kind of losing focus? How you stay focused. How do you make sure that through the twelve hours of performance that you are able to do your work repeatedly without falling apart? I never have any like the special method for it because the funny thing is like petrol is always like this Hato thing, we're going to do this, twelve hours put like everybody has a job and they just do the repetitive thing for hours and hours. And so this is not. So far away from a regular job. But it's it's like you just go just go to it like I was like a working McDonalds. You're like I just gotta do it. Now I'm just on job. So that's kind of the mindset I have. But, but it's a it's a job, I really love a I just enjoy every moment of it, although sometimes I'm bored. The bottom is, it's almost like a relief in our modern times to be bored. It's just like just, just the idea of, we're going to perform this, and I'm just going to be doing nothing but this for twelve hours, it's really like. It's like the idea of some kind of occasion, like no will decisions about anything for twelve hours, we're on radio so we can't really picture what it is that audiences will see. But how would you describe the set in the costumes res- production told Todd cliche, like the rococo very Ricco, Cova very much of the Petiot to classical staging. And I just really liked clinical staging. I just love the idea of like painted sats and stuff like that. And to the performance get to eat and drink today. Leave stage. Are they snacking onstage? How do you make sure that they have enough energy to keep going? And I guess including that or the people who are playing the music we just bring food and snacks to the states.

Harvey Weinstein Figaro Weinstein Company Wall Street Journal Reporter Karen Ramey Adam Harris New York Finkel Harassment Astor Attorney Ricco Getty Research Institute John Rabi Mcdonalds Hartson
Jamal Rogerson, Officer And Jamal discussed on Democracy Now

Democracy Now

01:32 min | 4 years ago

Jamal Rogerson, Officer And Jamal discussed on Democracy Now

"Guard in the Chicago suburbs. Twenty old Jamal Rogerson jumped into action early Sunday morning when a shooting broke out at a bar where he was working as a security guard Rogerson was restraining shooting suspect outside when several police officers arrived on the scene a white police officer from the mid Lowthian police department, then opened fire shooting robust, son. Witnesses said the police officer opened fire even though police at the bar was screaming that Rogerson was a security guard Rogerson was armed and held a valid gun owners license. This is Adam Harris who witnessed the shooting speaking with WGN TV in Chicago. Yes, somebody growl. What is what is needed? And is back with his gun owners. Don't move. Everybody was screaming without security uses to here to guard, and they still did their job in saw black man would have done it basically killed him. Meanwhile, the Illinois state police is defending the actions of the police officer who shot Jamal Roberson a report by the state's public integrity force claim that Rogerson was not wearing the security guard uniform and ignored verbal comments to drop his gun. Witnesses have contradicted. The state report claiming he was wearing the uniform and a hat that was labeled security Greg coolest an attorney for ROY since family told the New York Times, quote, we are three days into this. And they are saying preliminarily that it was a good shoot. They traditionally take nine months or longer Jamal. Roberston death comes in the wake of a series of mass shootings in America,

Jamal Rogerson Officer Jamal Chicago Jamal Roberson Adam Harris WGN Lowthian America New York Times Illinois ROY Attorney Family Nine Months Three Days