31 Burst results for "Adam Grant"

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:48 min | 3 d ago

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"It's going to draw something different than what they said they just saw. It's going to draw whatever was presented on the left side of the screen. And from that, the idea of an interpreter was born. A left hemisphere interpreter, which has subsequently been followed up by a lot of research looking at how the left hemisphere in most people is interested in causality and sort of how one thing leads to the next. But also using this kind of computation, the left hemisphere is telling you a story about why you did the things that you did, even a little bit after you've done them, and even though, in an intact brain, there's still a huge amount of what drives our behavior that we're not consciously aware of, right? Like all of our implicit biases, all of our instincts, all of our over learned things are influencing much of our behavior, but that interpreter is telling us the same kind of, oh, you did this because this. And this is where the analytical hemisphere was born, but it's eerier than that. Okay, so you just explained why, in addition to wanting to name everything, you and I both love doing experiments. Exactly. Exactly. Explanation. We get to interpret. Yes, yes. You might feel resistant or that it's weird that your brain tells you a story. Think about a time where you just wake up in an unfamiliar location. And you open your eyes and you can hear the kind of hypothesis testing going on. You can hear your brain going. That's not my house. Where am I? Oh yeah, I'm in a hotel. I'm on the road. I'm doing this. I think it's in those sleepy moments, you know, where your hemispheres are waking up, you can catch that kind of experimentation happening in your brain. I guess this also sheds some light on why. Sometimes people find it annoying that I have to analyze the lyric to every song instead of just enjoying the music. Well, I think that that's really cool because one of the things that I think makes you interesting is that you're trying to understand people all the time. Language is this powerful behavioral cue that tells you something about the mind beneath it, right? So what does it mean? Where did the sort of thought zeitgeist that drove this lyric? Where was it? What were they trying to communicate? I think that's really cool. Well, you might be the only one from the data that I've gathered under totally. If it's better to understand left hemisphere dominance in terms of interpreting. What's the equivalent mistake we're making on the right side? It's not creative, but what? If we were talking about a language system in the left hemisphere, it's building sounds into words and words into utterances and utterances into songs and songs into what does Adam grant think that this song means, right? Whereas the right hemisphere is broadly connected and taking in the hole, right?

Adam grant
"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:10 min | 3 d ago

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Only in pictures and what's interesting is that people tend to think that everyone thinks like them. These people who think in pictures here are this internal narrative on TV and think, oh, this is just a weird way of illustrating thought, but wouldn't it be like schizophrenia if someone was talking in your head? But I think there were some new research looking at representation of concepts. And this is something that I really want to study because I think that the way you think tells you something about the efficiency of your brain's representational systems, right? So I just went from how you die and how strong the two halves of your body are to the code of thought. And I think something that elementary what is the nature of your internal musings, the fact that we can differ there just is so exciting and so completely understudied. I'm going to give you a bunch of examples from my own brain in part as a stand in for the listener's brain and in part because I think you're going to teach me things that I don't know I need to know. So apologies for making this be all about me, which is generally not my thing. Oh no, this is so exciting for me because I wanted to be, I want to know about you. I'm so curious about you. Here we go. I'm going to try not to make you regret that. This is the neuroscience of you, Adam grant. Okay, this is the neuroscience I didn't know. I think entirely in words. I can form plenty of mental pictures, right? Visualization is easy. But I would never visualize a concept unless there was a specific reason to do it. And so that still means I'm a verbal thinker, correct? Yeah. Okay. Check. Okay, just wanted to make sure I was understanding that accurately. Something I really struggle and I wonder if this is part of why and if you can shed light on it, is what a concept that all of our show takes introduced me to when I was in grad school, which I think he had called referential processing, which was, as I understood it, the ability to translate from the visual system to the verbal system. So if I look at a painting, I can't

schizophrenia Adam grant
"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

01:45 min | Last week

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Thank you, at all. One of the tools points builds on something that Danny kahneman, the Nobel laureate psychologist, told me that it's more important to reduce misery than promote happiness. I agree, in principle. But in practice, I've often felt that the circumstances with the greatest misery are the most difficult ones to help him. Because it drags us down to be surrounded by so much pain. But a tool challenged me to rethink that with his comparison of plastic surgery and emergencies. In a true emergency, the worst case scenario is that you don't succeed in making things better. Whereas, when you're trying to improve something that's already good, the worst case scenario isn't just failing to make progress. You can actually make things worse. Yeah, being unable to help hurts. But causing harm hurts a lot more. Rethinking is hosted by me, Adam grant, and produced by Ted with cosmic standard. Our team includes Colin helms, Eliza Smith, Jacob winnick, Michelle Quinn, Sammy case, and Anna field. This episode was produced and mixed by cosmic standard. Our fact checker is Paul Durbin. Original music by Hans Dale Sue and Alison Leighton Brown. I think most of the world is glad that you chose medicine rather than music. Well, if you heard that early music, you are definitely very glad one song, for example, was about the fall of Marxism and the rise of my love for my girlfriend. Well, we'll try to get a recording of that later. PRX.

Danny kahneman Adam grant Colin helms Eliza Smith Jacob winnick Michelle Quinn Anna field Paul Durbin Hans Dale Sue Alison Leighton Brown Ted Sammy
"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:08 min | 3 weeks ago

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"For sponsoring this episode. Hey everyone, it's Adam grant. Welcome back to rethinking my podcast on the science of what makes us tick. I'm an organizational psychologist, and I'm taking you inside the minds of fascinating people to explore how they think and what we should all rethink. My guest today is Mark Cuban, the outspoken serial entrepreneur, Shark Tank investor, and owner of the NBA's Dallas Mavericks. Mark's latest venture, cost plus drugs, is made hundreds of prescriptions more affordable. We have a rollicking conversation about what it takes to disrupt an industry. And when to bet on a person and an idea. We also discuss some basketball rules that I think are long overdue for change. And why it's terrible advice to follow your passion. So

Adam grant Mark Cuban Shark Tank Dallas Mavericks NBA Mark basketball
"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

01:35 min | Last month

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Hey where clay first it's Adam here and I have some exciting news. Last year by popular demand, we started releasing more conversations and debates with my favorite thinkers, creators, doers, and leaders. The goal is to figure out what makes them tick and what they can teach us about a life well lived. Sometimes we talk about work, but often it's just been a window into the interesting ways their minds work. If you haven't had a chance to listen, the guests have included Lin-Manuel Miranda, brene Brown, Ava duvernay, and Malcolm gladwell. You asked for more episodes. So we're doing just that. Regular episodes all year round. We've decided to call it rethinking with Adam grant. Because that's been the pull for me. A chance to reexamine the things I think are true, and to dig into the psychology of these fascinating guests. We'll kick off the fall with conversations with entrepreneur Mark Cuban, bestselling author, Celeste ng, Oscar winning actor and producer Reese Witherspoon. Neuroscientist shantel Pratt, Nobel laureate physicist Saul perlmutter, and death defying rock climber, Alex honnold. And season 6 of work life will still be coming out right here next year. Thanks as always for listening. Follow rethinking with Adam grant on Apple podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen. PRX.

Manuel Miranda brene Brown Ava duvernay Adam grant Adam Malcolm gladwell Lin Celeste ng shantel Pratt Saul perlmutter Mark Cuban Alex honnold Reese Witherspoon Oscar Apple
"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

02:32 min | 3 months ago

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"The world evolves, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> your culture <Speech_Music_Male> needs to evolve <Music> with it. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Next <Speech_Male> time, wrapping up <Speech_Male> season 5 <SpeakerChange> of work <Speech_Male> life, people <Speech_Male> have this sort of skepticism <Speech_Male> about <Speech_Male> change and <Speech_Male> everything you hear <Speech_Male> about changes, <Speech_Male> pessimistic. I <Speech_Male> mean, everything in our lives <Speech_Male> has changed <Speech_Male> for some reason. <Speech_Male> We <Speech_Male> code <Speech_Male> the really difficult <Speech_Male> things has changed <Speech_Male> and <SpeakerChange> everything else is <Speech_Male> just like a choice. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Organizational change <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> from the bottom <SpeakerChange> up <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and the top down. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Work life is tested <Speech_Music_Male> by me, Adam grant. <Speech_Music_Male> The show is produced by <Speech_Music_Male> Ted with transmitter <Speech_Music_Male> media. Our team <Speech_Male> includes Colin helms, <Speech_Music_Male> Greta cone, <Speech_Music_Male> Dan O'Donnell, Joanne <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> deluna, Christ rubinstein, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Michelle <Speech_Music_Male> Quinn, Ben Ben <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Chang, and Anna phelan. <Speech_Music_Male> This <Speech_Music_Male> episode was produced by <Speech_Music_Male> constanza Gallardo, <Speech_Music_Male> our show is mixed <Speech_Music_Male> by Ben Shane. <Speech_Music_Male> Our fact checker <Speech_Music_Male> is Paul Durbin. <Speech_Music_Male> Original music <Speech_Music_Male> by hansel su and <Speech_Music_Male> Alison Leighton Brown. <Speech_Music_Male> Ad <Speech_Music_Male> stories produced by pineapple <Speech_Music_Male> street studios. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Special thanks to <Speech_Music_Male> our sponsors. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> LinkedIn, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Morgan Stanley, <Speech_Music_Male> ServiceNow, <Speech_Music_Male> and UK G <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> for their <Speech_Male> studies of organizational <Speech_Music_Male> culture, gratitude <Speech_Music_Male> to the following <Speech_Music_Male> researchers and their colleagues. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Charles O'Reilly, <Speech_Music_Male> Chad hartnell, <Speech_Music_Male> shalom Schwartz, <Speech_Music_Male> Joanne Martin, <Speech_Music_Male> Shawn <Speech_Music_Male> Martin, Alan <Speech_Music_Male> Benson, <Speech_Music_Male> Donald sull, <Speech_Music_Male> Constantino's kuta <Speech_Music_Male> Ferris, and <Speech_Music_Male> my beloved <Speech_Music_Male> Lake colleague, Seagal <Speech_Music_Male> bar saint. <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence>

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

07:04 min | 3 months ago

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"I found this job opening for marketing manager. And I thought, oh, that would be really fun. They were looking someone who could do everything, like very strategic. So I applied, got the interview. And they were actually really nice. This is Maria. Or at least, that's what we're calling her. You know, to protect the innocent. Anyway, Maria was very excited about this new opportunity. From the outside, the job was everything she wanted. And she called me at the end of the day tour for me the job. So I quit my job two days later. A few weeks later, she started the new job, eager to share her ideas. And as I sat down, in my new desk, the designer that was sitting next to me, just like, I tried to find you on LinkedIn to warn you not to take this job. Why? And she told me these people are crazy. Definitely not a good start. I just laughed because it was like, okay, well, let's see how bad it actually is because I also wanted to give it a chance. Thank you, maybe she's just angry. She just doesn't like it. But in this case, I should have listened to her. The next few weeks were a wild ride. So we had a sales meeting. I was like, okay, let's try and look for a marketing way of getting customers in. And the owner was like, no, how about we just do an energy circle? And I was like, sorry, what? They all knew what that meant, so they all stood up and helped hand and I'm just looking around like what the hell's happening. And they started like shaking, like, okay, shake the bad energy and shake for the universe and then the owner was like, okay, universe, we need you to send us some sales and understanding they're like, okay, we're done. Folder, take full of strategies and ideas and campaign ideas. Nothing. Was this a company or a cult? It was a big cultish because at the Christmas party, the owner wrote a song for everyone with everyone's name on it, and we had to sit there listening to him sing to us. And by early December, we get a list on my desk and it's just a little everyone's names in an envelope. And then on top of the list it says, please give whatever you'd like to contribute to show your appreciation for working here and your appreciation to the owner of the company. That was just so angry and I loudly when like what, so we have to buy him a present. I put 50 cents. I suggested to buy everyone in the company. A Christmas present out of the marketing budget, and they said, no, having a job is present enough. So the highly paid owner gets a gift, but the hardworking employees don't call poison control. We have to rescue some people from a toxic culture. Organizational culture has big consequences for success and happiness. But we often overlook it because it's hard to analyze. So what culture clues should you look for before you join an organization? And how do you shape the culture once you're there? I'm Adam grant, and this is work life. My podcast with the Ted audio collective. I'm an organizational psychologist. I study how to make work not suck. In this show, I take you inside the minds of fascinating people to help us rethink how we work, lead, and live. Today, culture at work, how to recognize it from the outside and strengthen it from the inside. Thanks to Morgan Stanley for sponsoring this episode. When I was in junior high school, one of the things that I used to do as type up surveys that I would give to my parents. Well, actually, not just my parents, anyone who came over. And I would ask them to fill out a paper in pencil survey. I just loved surveys. I know super weird. I would ask all kinds of questions about how happy they were at work and what their work was like. And I just thought that was fascinating. Jenny Chapman is an organizational behavior professor at Berkeley. And she was clearly destined to become the queen of organizational culture. I like being a queen. I continue to be an optimist about this, that there is a place for everyone, and there are organizations and jobs that really fit with some people but not others. And through her many years of research and countless surveys, Jenny has the clear view, what organizational culture is. Culture is the values and behavioral norms that one sees expressed within an organization. And it has to be sort of a systematic pattern of norms and expectations that people have in a particular setting that they might not have in another setting. And one thing that's interesting about norms is there's no rule book to teach them to you. Instead, we learn them through social interaction. They're different from what's written in the corporate handbook. These are observed patterns of behavior and expectations that we pick up from interacting with colleagues within an organization. People often claim their cultures are unique, but when you study thousands of organizations, you can start to see underlying patterns. It all has to do with how we balance key priorities. Research reveals that there are two fundamental tensions in organizational culture. Results versus relationships and rules versus risk. If you ignore one of those values altogether, you end up committing one of my four deadly sins of organizational culture. Toxicity, mediocrity, bureaucracy, and anarchy. The first sin of culture is toxicity that deadliest sin of them all. New evidence on the great resignation shows that toxic culture is the biggest driver of turnover. More than burnout, more than low pay. Toxicity exists when a culture prioritizes results without relationships. Getting things done at the cost of treating people right. The organization tolerates disrespect, abuse, exclusion, unethical decisions, and selfish cutthroat actions. If people don't get fired for those behaviors, or worse yet, still get promoted, Houston, we have a problem. At the opposite end of that spectrum is a second sin, mediocrity. Valuing relationships above results. There's no accountability. People are so worried about getting along that they end up forfeiting good work. In a mediocrity, even if you do a terrible job, you can still get ahead as long as people like you. Before long, you end up with.

Maria Adam grant Jenny Chapman LinkedIn Christmas party Morgan Stanley Berkeley Jenny Houston
"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

02:00 min | 4 months ago

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"To do anchor days. <Speech_Male> We're going to do retreats <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> what I love about that is <Speech_Music_Male> it creates variety. <Speech_Music_Male> And not just in <Speech_Music_Male> the work day, but <Speech_Music_Male> also in the workweek <Speech_Music_Male> and the work month. <Speech_Male> I can <Speech_Music_Male> imagine <Speech_Music_Male> 2030. <Speech_Music_Male> Office <Speech_Music_Male> space, new <Speech_Music_Male> edition. <Speech_Music_Male> What the hell is <Speech_Music_Male> the case in the Mondays <Speech_Male> every Monday is different? <Speech_Music_Male> Why <SpeakerChange> would I <Speech_Female> hate Mondays? <Speech_Music_Female> You would <Speech_Music_Female> never hate Mondays. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Next week, <Speech_Female> on work life. <Speech_Female> The weirdest finding <Speech_Female> was that not <Speech_Female> only did people <Speech_Female> say they were more embarrassed, <Speech_Female> they <Speech_Female> actually endorsed <Speech_Female> more stereotypes <SpeakerChange> that <Speech_Male> related to disability. <Speech_Male> Designing <Speech_Male> workplaces that <Speech_Male> benefit both people <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> with disabilities <Silence> <Advertisement> and those <Music> <Advertisement> without. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Work life has hosted by <Speech_Music_Male> me, Adam grant. <Speech_Music_Male> The show is produced by <Speech_Music_Male> Ted with transmitter <Speech_Music_Male> media. Our team <Speech_Music_Male> includes Colin helms, <Speech_Music_Male> Greta cone, <Speech_Male> Dan O'Donnell, Joanne <Speech_Music_Male> deluna, grace <Speech_Music_Male> Rubenstein, Michelle <Speech_Music_Male> Quinn, Ben Ben <Speech_Music_Male> Cheng, and Anna <Speech_Music_Male> felin. This <Speech_Music_Male> episode was produced by <Speech_Music_Male> constanza Gallardo. <Speech_Music_Male> Our <Speech_Male> show is mixed by Ben <Speech_Music_Male> shano, our fact <Speech_Music_Male> checker is Paul Durbin. <Speech_Music_Male> Original music <Speech_Music_Male> by hansel Sue <Speech_Music_Male> and Alison Leighton Brown. <Speech_Music_Male> Add <Speech_Music_Male> stories produced by pineapple <Speech_Music_Male> street studios. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Special thanks to our sponsors. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> LinkedIn, Morgan <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Stanley, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> ServiceNow, and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> UK gene. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> For their research, <Speech_Music_Male> gratitude to xani vos, <Speech_Music_Male> Dan cable <Speech_Music_Male> and Glen vos on <Speech_Music_Male> organizational identity. <Speech_Music_Male> Lynn van dyne <Speech_Music_Male> and colleagues on interdependence, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Nancy Katz on <Speech_Music_Male> sports teams at work, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and Alexander <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Dennis and colleagues <Speech_Music_Male> on introverts <Speech_Music_Male> in virtual teams. <Music> <Music> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male>

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

01:43 min | 5 months ago

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Diving coach at Michigan state university. He's been the Big Ten coach of the year, and he's now coaching multiple Olympic medalists at Indiana. There is this one guy that I coach. He wanted everything to be so perfect. There's this thing in diving called a Bach. You start your motion to do the dive, and then you stop before you complete the dive. Well, he had a lot of problems with blocking. I would spend hours and hours watching this guy waste a lot of his practice time. Yes, I am talking about Adam grant. Guilty as charged. I never thought about it as an expression of perfectionism. Oh yeah, but you're right. You would do that on the most basic dive. I look at the Bach as a manifestation of everything is not perfect up to this point, so I can't do the perfect dive from here. And because I can't do the perfect dive from here, I'm going to restart. Well, guess what, folks, you can't restart diving and you can't restart life. Diving exposed my perfectionism. But it also taught me to manage it. I learned that instead of aiming for perfection, it's healthier and more effective to strive for excellence. I'm Adam grant. And this is work life. My podcast with the Ted audio collective. I'm an organizational psychologist. I study how to make work not suck. In this show, I take you inside the minds of fascinating people to help us rethink how we work, lead, and live. Today, the psychology of perfectionism and how to overcome it. Thanks to.

Adam grant Michigan state university Olympic Indiana
"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

08:17 min | 5 months ago

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Ideas still made it to implementation. Pat sadder strum is a management expert at NYU. And she led a research team that spent nearly three years studying teams in clinics. These seem like great places to understand how people who didn't have as much power typically in the clinic like front desk, employees would have an opportunity to share ideas and really try and understand how ideas made it or didn't make it to implementation over time. It wasn't fast though, sometimes it took 48 56 weeks to get there, but they did eventually and what was interesting is that sometimes a person who initially brought it up was no longer there. It already quit in frustration, but the idea lived on. Because it was picked up by others who heard it. Through this process, pat's team identified different techniques that people use when pitching an idea. And the strategies that worked in healthcare, mirror what Franklin Leonard has seen succeed in Hollywood. The thing about reviving pitches, there's probably three routes to doing so. The first is reconception, you take what you had before and you reconceive it and just something that seems at least a little bit different. And then you take it back out and people are like, oh, this version, I'm interested in. Succession would fall in that category. So Succession was a script written by Jesse Armstrong was a feature script about Rupert Murdoch gathering his children for his birthday to basically decide who he was going to give the company to. And you know, people were fascinated by it, but no one was going to make that movie. But what Jesse did was go back to the drawing board and said, well, what if it's not Rupert Murdoch? What if it was a fictional person? And fictional kids. And what if it was a television show? And obviously HBO bought it and it's one of the best written shows I've ever seen. Oftentimes, part of the reason why pitches get passed on is that they're not workable as they're pitched. It doesn't mean that the pitch is dead or that the thing that you're trying to do is dead. It means that you probably need to do it a little bit differently. Is a bit about reimagining the idea, but it's also about asking questions to help people think differently about the idea. So knowing what all the pushback is going to be, all the issues we're going to be and developing, asking questions about how this would work, why it would work a second strategy is what Franklin calls re contextualization. Context changes. All of a sudden, Hollywood knows this kind of movie works and they didn't have that information a year ago when The Hunger Games manuscript went out. I remember reading the book and manuscript forum and being told that the action doesn't work and it was too violent. Coincidental to me, that Wonder Woman happened shortly thereafter. Because it's like, oh, you can make the female driven action movie. And you can invest a lot of money in it, and there's a lot of money to be made. But all of a sudden, the industry now had information that said, wait a minute, if you make these movies well, you make a lot of money. Enter patty tank is a Wonder Woman. Venture Captain Marvel, enter any number of other female driven action movies that have come about as a result of that. And that is because the industry now said, oh, wait a second. We have new information. And we need to change our behavior. With this new information, you're showing that what seemed impractical yesterday is practical today. Yeah, it is. It's showing that what once was deemed unfeasible, all of a sudden, is actually doable. That's a huge kind of paradigm shift for people. You could ask yourself, can I think of a situation where I have seen this idea work? Can I personally vouch for this idea being feasible and important? You could ask yourself, is there a small, low state test of this idea that I can do to bring back data? This is data and evidence becomes so important from taking an idea that's disregarded to an idea that all of a sudden becomes feasible. And a third approach is amplification, getting other people to vouch for the idea. I think that's what The Blacklist does for people, which is to say, okay, you pitch the screenplay and they all passed. But what if now all of a sudden there's an announcement that a bunch of people love that script. It's going to make everybody else be like, wait a second. Let me just double back and see, see what I might have missed the first time. That's definitely this idea of amplifying. And legitimizing, showing that people who care about it, people who are important, but also just showing that this is something that has credibility to it. By doing a small experiment or in this case collecting some evidence. As I've been thinking about amplification is a strategy, it seems like a lot of people hesitate to amplify other people's ideas, especially after they've been rejected because the thought is, well, I don't want to stick my neck out. If that person already got shot down, this is a risk to my career. And yet, I recently read some evidence showing that amplifying other people's ideas doesn't just help them get heard. It also makes you look good. It does, it makes you seem like a team player. It makes you seem like you were paying attention and it makes you sound caring and concerned for others because this is not about me and what benefits me. This is me thinking about the team thinking about the organization. And if other people see it frame that way, it actually reduces the risk quite a bit to you personally. And it means that, you know, other people are grateful that you remembered what they said. And especially if you can bring it up at a different time with a different problem or a different opportunity or the fit is better and that's an extremely important skill set that teams can Pitches can feel threatening. Your ideas and your ego are on the line. But it's worth remembering that when you make a pitch, there's usually someone out there rooting for you to succeed. When you apply for a job, there are interviewers hoping you're a superstar. When you propose a small project, there are leaders wanting it to be a big hit. When you pitch a startup, there are investors praying that you're the next Steve Jobs. And when you pitch your first film, there are studios crossing their fingers that you're the next Ava duvernay. Like at the end of the day, the person that you're pitching to is also a human being and as human concerns. And probably wants you to succeed, they want you to pitch them the best idea they've ever heard because you don't no one goes into it being like, I hope this is terrible. You were going to a receptive room in the sense that everybody is hoping to walk down to the Christmas tree on Christmas morning and unwrap the best gift ever. Everybody's hoping for it. So give them the best gift they've ever gotten. Tell them a story about a problem that you're going to solve. A story that you're going to tell that they can be excited about and that they know that other people can be excited about too. Next time, on work life. The way that fiction is built, it makes us a very sensitive and vulnerable to those setbacks affairs which occur all the time and of course that creates a lot of worry and stops us taking risks stops us pushing ourselves forward. How perfectionism holds us back and how to overcome it. Work life has hosted by me, Adam grant. The show's produced by Ted with transmitter media. Our team includes Colin helms, Greta cone, Dan O'Donnell, Joanne deluna, grace Rubenstein, Michelle Quinn, ban ban Chang, and Ana feeling. This episode was produced by constanta Gallardo, our show is mixed by Ben Shane, our fact checker is Paul Durbin. Original music by huntsdale Sue and Alison Leighton Brown. Add stories produced by pineapple street studios. Special thanks to our sponsors, LinkedIn, Morgan Stanley,.

Pat sadder strum Franklin Leonard Rupert Murdoch Jesse Armstrong patty tank Hollywood NYU Captain Marvel HBO pat Jesse Franklin Ava duvernay Steve Jobs Adam grant Colin helms Greta cone Dan O'Donnell Joanne deluna grace Rubenstein
"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:14 min | 5 months ago

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Show that you've already figured it out. Very much makes sense. It kind of makes my team more rigid than fluid. And I can see how, you know, by me taking the statement of we have the best team in the world to do this. It doesn't leave room for, well, what if we could be even better or what if that's different in a year when we're serving couples at different life stages? Or we go beyond couples. The research that I really like on this is on what's called signaling receptivity, which again, I don't think you have to do because of your personality. It comes across naturally. But in writing, I'd want to see that you're committed to both identifying and overcoming the limitations of your approach, basically. So I might suggest here's a current challenge that we're facing, which also, by the way, is a potential adviser that makes me more interested in helping. I think asking a question or two is another way to signal receptivity. So when you write a pitch like this, you could easily say, if you are willing to talk to us here are the three initial questions that we would love to run by you. Which signals you're going to use my time well. Admitting uncertainty and acknowledging mistakes are probably the other two that come out in the research. So acknowledging uncertainty would be saying, we know there's a lot of people are struggling with relationship health. We know that there are plenty of people who say that they want a couples counseling. We don't know yet if people will stick with it. We don't know yet how that will go online at scale. And that would be an example of this is an open question that we're excited to explore. And I guess the last way you could do it is to say something about how when we started the organization, we actually made a relationship health mistake. And here's now how we're dealing with it. And that only further reinforced for us the need for this third party. Any reactions to those? Yeah, two reactions. My first reaction is I feel a little relieved to hear that I can in pitches admit that we don't know everything. And I didn't realize until just now how much pressure there was to feel like we have everything figured out and we have this plan and it's going to be really successful because there's a lot that we don't know yet. The second thing is it dawned on me as you were saying this we were emailing you to be an adviser and to get your advice and of course asking a question or showing where we have gaps is the best way to show you that we know that you would add so much value. Okay, I have to ask, do you want to try your pitch again? I'm afraid you would ask me that. As you know, we have seen over the past several years that couples increasingly are turning to couples therapy, proactively, to invest in their relationship. And yet, couples therapy today isn't serving their needs the right way. It's antiquated. It's hard to get started. It's expensive and largely inaccessible to most people in the U.S.. Over the past year, Adam Liz, Tyler and I and our team have piloted several different approaches to couples therapy and what we found is that this hybrid approach to couples therapy and relationship health incorporating both the magic of a therapist's relationship with their couple and the power of technology and content. Enables us to provide couples with proactive relationship health at any life stage in an effective and truly transformational way. Our model also helps alleviate the therapist capacity problem in the U.S. by amplifying the therapist's efforts and making their relationship with their couples more effective. And we just closed our seed rounds. We're launching in April of this year. And we're at an incredibly special time where we could really value Adam grant's input on the research side of our business, where as you know, we have not developed out to date. Thanks. Whoo. That was good. I was nervous. So good, in fact, that I'm now pitching her to take me on as an investor and adviser. If you only have one shot to give your elevator pitch, it helps to lead with the problem before the solution. Focus more on signaling preparedness than passion. And show receptivity, along with confidence. But what if you're pitching as part of an ongoing interaction? Like, you want your boss to agree to a new project, or your mentor to co author an article with you. If you have a whole meeting instead of a cold email, how do you get your ideas heard? And if they get rejected, how do you revive them? More on that after the break. Okay, this is gonna be a different kind of ad. I play a personal role in selecting the sponsors for this podcast because they all have interesting cultures of their own. Today.

Adam Liz Adam grant U.S. Tyler
"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

07:40 min | 5 months ago

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"When you make a pitch, it's often not the idea that leads to rejection. It's how you present it. In tech and entertainment, there are tons of great ideas that initially got denied. Excite decline to pitch to buy a tiny startup called Google. Blockbuster passed on a pitch to acquire Netflix, a dozen publishers turned down Harry Potter and multiple movie studios, rejected Star Wars. These ideas eventually found a receptive audience. But in many cases, you only have a chance for a short elevator pitch. So you want to maximize your chances of a yes before the door closes. A couple months ago, a venture capitalist sent me a pitch from a startup founder named Jessica Holton. I wanted to follow up on our conversation recently about potentially partnering with Adam grant. We believe he would be a strong addition to our investor and partner group as we seek to. I was intrigued. She was clearly excited about her idea to make relationship counseling available online. But as I read her pitch, I had some hesitations. I wrote down my feedback. If it's helpful, why do we need it? How do we know if it'll work? Just close at three and a half $1 million seed round that was three times oversubscribed, led by TMZ with participation from Serena ventures, collaborative fund, and Lake house ventures. Okay. They've convinced investors who are kind of a big deal. But we have the best team in the world to build a brand that makes relationship health accessible. Best team in the world, more than a little self aggrandizing. I sent them some tough love and I didn't hear back. So I decided to call the founder and see if she wanted to talk through what happened. I'm Jessica, and I am one of the cofounders of ours, which is a relationship health company. Did you know when you wrote that pitch that you're pitching yourself to be on work life? Not at all. When you got my feedback, how did you react? Well, the first reaction truly was, oh my gosh, I was proud to know that you now know what ours is. And clearly want us to succeed. The second reaction was embarrassment and I felt a little defensive to be honest. I thought the idea itself had merit, but the pitch fell into some common traps that I see regularly. Not just in startup pitches, but in meetings and job applications, too. And to her credit, Jessica had the confidence, the humility, and the courage to discuss them with me. There are three big myths that limit the effectiveness of a pitch. And I want to bust them because they often lead to bad advice. Oh, I got in a lot of advice. One is how to sell a vision, sell that future, paint a world where what our mission is comes true and becomes reality. That's the first myth. Lead with your bold idea. Tell us how much better the world would be in the future. When you're successful, but research suggests that no one cares what you'll create in the future. Until you convince them, there's something wrong with the present. Before you propose your solution, you need to highlight an important problem. In her pitch, Jessica led with a solution. We seek to revolutionize relationship health. You have this bold vision to revolutionize relationship health. Why does relationship health need to be revolutionized? Where is the proof that it's broken? That people are in pain that they're struggling with their relationships that they don't have the existing access to the solutions they need. Why did you leave that out? We left that out because we got feedback time and time again that when we tell the kind of more bottoms up story around how I got interested in couples therapy and didn't paint as big enough of a vision as changing an entire industry. We see couples all the time who love what we're doing and we help their relationship get better and we change their lives. So to us, it's like how a fish doesn't know it's in water and to us it's just truly a given that there's so much need and untapped demand for what we're building that to us it's obvious. When you pitch your idea, you suffer from what's called the curse of knowledge. You've spent days, months, maybe years thinking about the problem. It's so crystal clear in your mind that you often forget to explain it to others. Before people will believe that your idea will make the world better. You have to explain what's wrong with the world right now. This isn't unique to entrepreneurs. In his most famous speech, Martin Luther King Jr. didn't open with his dream. Before turning to his vision for tomorrow, he spent the first 11 of his 16 minutes describing the injustice of today. As communication expert Nancy duarte explains, you have to show people what's unacceptable about what is. Before they'll get excited about what could be. As a job applicant, instead of leading with what makes you a strong candidate, start with what the company needs. As a leader, rather than opening with your vision, tell us what the market demands. There's actually very little data around couples therapy around couples who want to go to couples therapy. We have this moment of, well, we could actually go do that survey. And we could go find that data. And so to be honest, that's the reason why we wrote this email before we realized that. And before we started going out there to find the data. Have you done that survey yet? It's in progress right now. Great, because there are so many things that I would want to know from that. And I think, frankly, that's even something you could say. We know anecdotally, there's a pressing need. We're in the process of trying to document that need. I think that what was missing for me in the pitch was there is a pressing need and the existing offerings are just not cutting it. You're absolutely right. And it starts with the problem and then a survey of what's happening right now, and then a solution. And I can very much see why that's more compelling than just, I mean, we could revolutionize everything, right? And what I'm hearing is a why does this need to be revolutionized? Yeah, I can see your passionate about improving relationships. I think that that passion is what fuels me. That brings us to a second myth that a great pitch is filled with passion. I see this in so many founders. They want to electrify the room with their energy. But in a study of a business plan competition, the amount of passion that founders showed had no bearing on whether judges decided to fund their pitches. It didn't matter how much excitement they expressed. The founders who got investments were the ones who were rated as thoughtful, logical, and fact based. In another study of over 1400 pitch videos, founders who showed too much joy were less likely to get funded. They.

Jessica Holton Adam grant Serena ventures Lake house ventures Jessica Excite Blockbuster Netflix TMZ Harry Potter Martin Luther King Jr. Nancy duarte Google
"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

02:02 min | 6 months ago

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Next time, on work life, oftentimes, part of the reason why it just get passed on is that they're not workable as their pitched. It doesn't mean that the pitch is dead or that the thing that you're trying to do is dead. It means you probably need to do it a little bit different. How to get your foot in the door with a great pitch. And what to do if the door slams shut. Work life is hosted by me, Adam grant. The show is produced by Ted with transmitter media. Our team includes Colin helms, Greta cone, Dan O'Donnell, consensus Gallardo, grace Rubenstein, Michelle quint, van benching, and Anna feeling. This episode was produced by Joanne deluna. Our show is mixed by Rick Kwan. Our fact checker is Mary Jesus. Original music by Hans Dale Sue and Alison Leighton Brown. Add stories produced by pineapple street studios. Special thanks to our sponsors. LinkedIn, Morgan Stanley, ServiceNow, and UK gene. For their research, gratitude to Nick bloom at hybrid and remote work. Long QI Yang and colleagues on static and siloed networks. Mark granovetter and Marcus Bayer on the strength of weak ties. Nancy Katz on interdependence and teams, Han Shan kao and multitasking and meetings, Jason sanvi and colleagues on sales lunches. Yavor bojanow and colleagues on virtual water coolers, Erika petal and colleagues on intrinsic motivation and Stephen Humphrey and colleagues on autonomy and performance..

Adam grant Colin helms Greta cone Dan O'Donnell grace Rubenstein Michelle quint van benching Joanne deluna Rick Kwan Mary Jesus Hans Dale Sue Alison Leighton Brown pineapple street studios Gallardo Nick bloom Long QI Yang Ted Mark granovetter Marcus Bayer Anna
Shifting From Time Management to Attention Management

How I Built This

01:06 min | 1 year ago

Shifting From Time Management to Attention Management

"Had a love hate relationship with time management on the one hand i wanna use my time as efficiently and productively as possible on the other hand. All the time. I've spent trying to optimize my schedule. Just makes me more aware of how much time i waste and at the end of the day. I do not know how to get more hours in the day. I've tried to sacrifice. Sleep doesn't work. I can't function. So i think that what i've tried to shift to is from time management to attention management to say that the one thing i can really control is what i focus on and i'd like to start every week with the people in projects that matter to me and that way when i'm focused on you meaningful relationships and trying to accomplish something worthwhile. It doesn't really matter how long it takes. And i found that that's much better for my productivity than setting a goal of using my time more efficiently because efficiency serves no one what i'm ultimately after is doing work. That's interesting and important and that means it's got to be intrinsically motivating to me. It has to be beneficial to others. And if i can concentrate on. That doesn't really matter whether it takes two hours or

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

06:15 min | 1 year ago

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Twenty eight years five months and three days in the us navy. I know that because that's what the retirement clerk told me. When i was checking out of the navy meet navy. Seal captain bill wilson when he was stationed in afghanistan and the joint special operations command. Bill had a commander who stood out. He was just so approachable his wife would send him eminem's peanut ebbs and he had this big jar eminem in his office. And normally you'd never go into the old man's office by yourself. But i go in there to drop things off and i noticed that the eminem jar is going down mike. I'm gonna talk to the guy easy way to much candy here. You know you gotta will turn. Everyone was going in. They felt so comfortable they would go in and and nip his candy. The commander was admiral. William mcraven one of america's most decorated military leaders he led the missions that captured saddam hussein and killed osama bin laden. Admiral mcraven went to great lengths to build psychological safety in his team's not just by letting people feel his eminem's it was cleared a bill that the admiral wanted to be challenged and corrected. He would say something that was so outlandish. We look at each other. And he's like okay. I just said something absolutely idiotic. Who here has the fill in the blank to tell me. I'm an idiot. You guys are ridiculous ridiculous because you failed all of you fail failure fired. And he did that he does. I did that just a early on to create the opportunity for you guys to know. We're not doing that sir. That's crazy crazy talk. And he said. That's the the environment that i want to cultivate. Is you guys are fearless in telling me when something goes to stakes or two. I bill even had a shorthand for telling admiral mcraven. He was wrong or he was about to make a bad call. My code sort of expression with the admiral was sir. I don't believe The staff has given you a fully informed option. If you could just give us twenty four hours we'll come back to you with some information that sir stop. Just please stop talking. He was also receptive in a way that. Okay i'll i will stop talking obviously. There's something here that were going to sort out later. Which very few leaders will do that. Bill also knew he could bring the admiral bad news and mistakes. He remembers a time. When one of his colleagues told the admiral about emission. they went on without the proper permissions. Here's what the admiral didn't do. He didn't turn red and start screaming or humiliating. It mcraven owned it. He just like. I'll take care of that. When did you learn from it. okay What are we going to do differently. Next time okay. Thanks and then change the subject rather than sitting there and kind of picking apart the scab of what we've just done but bill says admiral mcraven did have a clear weakness. He honestly will collect strays. So he'll take people who have struggled at something and gosh wants to give you know. Let's give bill a chance. You know he's gonna kill me divulge. Hey admiral this might be a good time to introduce yourself. I'm a retired navy. She'll latte also spent thirty seven years as a navy seal sir. I've told him that you know one of your blind spots as you collect strays you. Just you always see the good in somebody. I remember refusing to do it. Sir sir we are not gonna put that person lovely human being. We're not gonna put person there. They will not be successful. And i will not allow that to damage your credibility. You chuckled off go. Yeah i know i do that. Thanks bill i appreciate it and i just was thinking. Yeah thanks sir. Thanks for listening the folks that worked for ya. Ya have to listen to their advice and counsel and then part of bills responsibility to me as he said was to protect me from myself and and bill always made sure when i when ever had no clothes. Bill was never concerned about telling me point play. We ain't gonna do this or this is really a bad idea. After finishing his extraordinary military career. Admiral mcraven served as chancellor of the university of texas system. I got to know him when we were on a board together at the pentagon and yes. I'm still trying to convince him. To run for president so resistant. I've seen the admiral in action and his leadership behaviors exemplify the principles of building psychological safety. i've never heard of the term psychological safety. I understand it. Good leader knows you have got to listen to the rank and file. Because if you don't then you're going to be on the bus to abilene. You're heading in a direction that is not good for the organization. And if you don't empower people below you to speak their mind then you're gonna find yourself in a lot more trouble and and be embarrassed a lot more than if you decided that you didn't want them to speak up. Is this something you thought about often. As you moved into leadership roles every single time you bet so the first thing a leader has to do is you know. Set the tone for the organization and you have to do that on day. One research by amy edmonson and others has identified several key steps to establish psychological safety for set the tone by acknowledging your own fallibility and appreciating people. Who pointed out. I don't think that's a good idea. But then you also when people come to you and say that you got to say i appreciate that. Was there a critical moment when somebody challenged your decisions. Oh just about every day it happened. During one of the most consequential missions the admiral's career the raid on the bin laden compound told the president that we weren't going after refuel our way into the tar and rethought just helicopters there did on target get bin laden and tobacco talks going back because ritually was gonna take another twenty minutes while kind of late in the team on my senior guys senator. We've run the numbers a hundred times but on the hundred and first time. We're really concerned. We think we're going to have to refuel and like man. I mean this was. It seemed like a major change to the operation. I went to the president said sir. I'm sorry but this is a chain of land..

navy eminem admiral mcraven Admiral mcraven joint special operations comma William mcraven mcraven bill wilson Bill bin laden Sir sir saddam hussein afghanistan mike america amy edmonson university of texas bill pentagon abilene
"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Direct line to share concerns with top management for ed. It was those production pressures and management failures. That really stood out. There's one conversation with a colleague that continues to haunt him. She said i'm sick to my stomach. Every day i come to this meeting. And i'm sick to my stomach and i. I didn't have anything to say other than i'm sick to. When you factor in that fear and all of a sudden now what happens is people. Stop talking. You can't have that you can't have that. People were unwilling to speak up as a leader. How do you create psychological safety for people to speak up even people who are hesitant to speak up in the first place. More on that after the break okay. This is going to be a different kind of ad. I played a personal role in selecting sponsors for this podcast. 'cause they all have interesting cultures of their own today. We're going inside the workplace at lincoln so my mom actually wanted to be a writer. She actually was inspired by the work of my angela. Which is where. I got my name as a kid i had to memorize still i rise. Meet maya pope. Sha pailin in twenty fifteen made leap from traditional news outlets lincoln news where she now serves. As senior managing editor for audience engagement and distribution my overseas editorial strategies produces original content and works with experts across industries. She's rethinking how news can be reported and shared on din. There were really two things that attracted me to the role at the time won the opportunity to approach news and a different way. I thought it was a good opportunity to contribute to. What news could look like on a social network. And then the second thing in terms of linked and specifically. I really believed in the company's vision which is to create economic opportunity for every member of the global workforce research suggests that in the face of uncertainty shifting from shit. I too could. I can unlock new possibilities. Might as eagerness to embrace the unpredictable has served her well in a rapidly changing industry. I've tried to use. I would say fear as a driver. There's always gonna be uncertainty and what you do. But i think that's where you have the most opportunity to grow and to discover new things. Not only about what you're doing but about yourself. Maya says the core values of journalism are still at the heart of lincoln news. A lot of the same skills that i use that the j whether it was news judgment figuring out like what a story is are things that i do every day at linked in i was always at person who would stay for the credits for movies. Because i'm very interested in like who's working on this stuff. Who's all the people kind of pulling it together. My video series on in how i got here is an example of this curiosity. Each episode shines a light on the career paths of her guests with the rise of the crater economy. Lincoln news is focusing on how to help this. New workforce share their ideas and build community. Our next big investment is really in creators. How can we do our part to make sure that. They're reaching the right. People and being able to connect create. Those communities has just memorized the words. To still i rise. She's lived them being a black woman. Having had the experiences that i've had.

maya pope Sha pailin lincoln news lincoln ed angela Maya Lincoln news
"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"I'm adam grant and this is work. Let my podcast with the ted audio collective. I'm an organizational psychologist. I study how to make work not suck in this show. I take you inside the minds of fascinating people to rethink how we work lead. And today psychological safety every culture needs it and how to build it thanks to linked in for sponsoring this episode in four seasons of work life. There's one theme that comes up more than any other psychological safety. It was a big deal in creative teams from pixar to the daily show. It was key in high pressure situations for astronauts and olympic athletes. So i thought it was about time to call the expert who put psychological safety on the map. I'm amy edmonson. I'm a professor at harvard. Business school and i studied teams and organisational learning and leadership. So tell me what is psychological safety. Psychological safety is climate in which one feels. when can be can't it's it's a place where interpersonal risks seal doable interpersonal risks. Speaking up with questions concerns and half baked ideas and even mistakes. Amy started her career. As an engineer working for buckminster fuller the architect and designer most famous for inventing the geodesic dome. He was often called the renaissance man. Probably more davinci than edison. Although we did have a couple dozen patents. When amy showed up at work she was surprised. By how bucky treated the team. He was eighty six when i started working for him and he was. He was generous and always giving credit he was. He was enormously appreciative of the hard work of of the ideas. You know it would. He would listen intently. People were encouraged to share ideas. Even if they weren't perfect and bucky listened to them. This was a workplace with a lot of psychological safety high candor. Low fear and amy was so taken by the climate bucky created that eventually she changed careers to study it in. Psychologically safe workplaces. People don't have to mask their concerns and ideas they can speak up and share them. The opposite of psychological safety might look something. Like what ed pearson described at boeing chilling meetings where people are grilled and reprimanded punishment if employees voiced concerns that to me would be psychological danger. Maybe you felt that sense of danger in a job where manager silence dissent or a team where no one ever suggested a new idea because people lived in terror of making mistakes but a lack of psychological safety can also be more subtle like in a midwest manufacturing company that amy studied. She spent months observing the top management team meetings and they were threat that time trying to formulate a new strategy and the tiptoeing the reluctance to to speak up the reluctance to disagree was so palpable that would observed was they were having the same conversation. Sort of vague conversation. Didn't seem to get anywhere. You've probably stat. Through one of those circular meetings. They suck you know. Psychological safety is missing in your team if people say different things behind leaders backs than to their faces. And you know it's missing in your organization if leaders have to run anonymous surveys to get people to tell the truth. That's a red flag. What are the telltale signs that you pick up that of a team or a workplace might be lacking psychological safety a preponderance of if not exclusively good news or happy talk as opposed to asking for help. Raising puzzles raising concerns. That's a red flag because you expect lots of uncertainty and complexity in interactivity. Meaning that bilby many things going wrong or many things that don't make sense or many things that are not getting done as fast as they were hoped to. And and so on so. The question isn't whether those things are happening. The question is how much are. People eagerly speaking up to talk about them to get help with them. Who when you're in. It isn't always easy to tell whether your team has psychological safety. It helps to ask yourself. Are you afraid to share bad news. Ask for help or admit you're wrong. Things will go wrong. That's the nature of work. Make it unsafe to acknowledge that is a problem but feeling safe to speak. Up is only half the equation. Psychological safety isn't about making people feel comfortable being nice or brushing aside mistakes to work well. Psychological safety has to be coupled with accountability that combination creates a culture where people take intelligent risks. So the problem with some of these misconceptions in particular like being agreeable and being nice is that they're exactly the opposite of what i'm talking about being nice in the workplace often means not telling you what i really think because it wouldn't be nice. This doesn't have to be for your next dinner party but for the workplace that we can be straight that we can be candid like get it wrong. We will get it wrong. Lots and lots of times but we won't hold back and read. The tea leaves before speaking up. Let's say i run into this all the time you do not have to be nice to other people to be respectful of them or to be kind for them. Kind is not nice at least colloquial the way. We use nice as often not very respectful. Because you're sort of saying something that you believe. The other person will think is nice. Yeah that's a great presentation when inside your thinking now. That was a very weak presentation. That's neither kind nor respectful. What you're aiming for on a team is a commitment to high standards and the psychological safety to be candid with each other as you try to achieve them. Amy's research shows that psychological safety has three key advantages at work. The first benefit is preventing errors. She studied this for decades in hospitals. Where the stakes are. High and mistakes are inevitable. In healthcare like an airplane manufacturing psychological safety is critical to physical safety. What we see again and again especially non physicians in our nurses and physician assistants and others failing to speak up when they have a doubt right when they think a dose of a medication might not be right or or when they see a surgeon about to operate on what they're pretty sure but not one hundred percent sure is the wrong location. The wrong site. The most important problematic outcome is that patients get harmed in ways. That were preventable. Amy has found that in the absence of psychological safety. People hide their mistakes to protect themselves when errors aren't detected. They get repeated in the presence of psychological safety. People admit their mistakes to protect the group. Emmys research has even shown that better teams report more mistakes. They're able to learn what caused the errors.

adam grant amy edmonson bucky amy ed pearson buckminster fuller pixar Amy edison harvard olympic boeing midwest
"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"adam grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"A kind of safety or security a sense of deep sense of home that i may don't feel now because circumstances have changed. I'm in a different place in my life. And that's what i was thinking about. I was thinking about how there's always there's always a past that you can't get back to that part. At least part of you wants to return to right. Like i would love to have a conversation with people. I love who've who've died. Or i would love to be able to. I would love to be able to go back and spend one day in the apartment that sarah and i shared in in new york when we were in our twenties. Now i am happier in almost every way now than i was then but i still do sometimes feel a longing for for an old an old self so that that speaks to what i found so interesting about it after i stopped rejecting the idea it it seemed like you were defining a new type of nostalgia or at least one that i never thought about before because normally when i thought about nostalgia. It was longing for an experience or a moment that was passed. Its person i've lost or It's a place. I was in a group that i was part of. That's moved on and you wanted to go back. it sounded like identity nostalgia. You wanted to recover a version of you. And as i thought about it more i realize yeah there are parts of my pass selves that i miss The just the the sheer wonder of being curious about what career i might pursue a little bit even though that was mostly an anxiety provoking but but i think there is a weird phenomenon where once we've gone through something it feels different so everything feels survivable after you survive it and i think that's a lot of why i allow myself sometimes to think about those those past versions of myself fondly. Well my favorite review that you did in the whole book was cut..

new york sarah one day twenties one
How dirt bikes and STEM ignite ingenuity in Baltimore | Brittany Young [TEST]

TED Talks Daily

08:10 min | 1 year ago

How dirt bikes and STEM ignite ingenuity in Baltimore | Brittany Young [TEST]

"Hi it's bryce dallas howard guest hosting today on ted talks daily. Here's a talk from an incredible ted fellow and the stem educator brittany young a community leader tackling national issues by turning passions into opportunities for stem education and career development. Hey ted talks daily listeners. I'm adam grant. I hosted another podcast. From the ted audio collective called work life and it's about the science of making work not suck next time the number of protests targeting firms. Today it's on the order of sixty times. The numbers that you would see and early tens employees activism is on the rise. But how can we use our voices effectively. And how can leaders manage all those voices find. Work life on apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you listen. I show people all around. Dc antiquites my guests engaged. I liked sprinkle in a fun factor to net. Stop dupont circle. Also here's a lifestyle tip for you. Try apple pay. You can now just tap with your phone or watch to get on the bus or train all over the dc area at your smart trip to the apple wallet then just have to ride apple. Pay on iphone now. Arriving on metro. Support for ted talks daily comes from odu odors suite of business. Apps has been you need to run a company. Think of your smartphone with all your apps right at your fingertips odu is just like that for business but instead of an app to order takeout or tell you the weather you have sales inventory accounting and more union the department we've got it covered and they're all connected joined the six million users who stopped wasting time and started getting stuff done go to odu dot com slash ted to start a free trial. That's od co dot com slash. Ted i want you to take this journey with me. Let's set the stage. Is a sunday in baltimore in a park. We endure a hill watching dirt bike. Riders go pash do tricks. Willies do stunts zipping. He hit the engines revving. Smell the gasoline. You could see the join excitement. Netface someone's probably learning how to fix the dirt bike way too expensive to buy. Then they can go to school. They can get a pop quiz or a test teacher. You'll account we all heard. And we've all hated train as leaving new york to cleveland. But they're here in baltimore. How does this relate. They don't get it. They fail the test and now they can hate then now. World can turned upside down. They can get on facebook instagram. Get a call or text. They can watch as their friend can become a hashtag. A kid in the wrong place wrong time lost to the streets loss of the system lost a gun violence or kick that could be arrested for dirt bike. Because of my city it can be a misdemeanor. Possession of dirk like this can be elected story for black kids across the country. And he's like miami. Cleveland atlanta philly. Whatever please had the dirt bike task force now. Acts yourself if the thing you used to relieve your stress if it was demonized would you still do it if it was criminal us. The answer is yes. That's the reality black people across the us right now. They've watched as we made room in. Cities escape borders bicycles in any other sport. They can watch tv in seattle games olympics on. Espn the style and stain ad campaigns and films but in baltimore would they have looked forward to would do. Right is get from all of it. No space no outlet just typical narrative. Like i said this is a communist story. I was a kid in the park. I wanted to be just like the big crowd is but i hate the fall. Instead i became like bill nye the science guy i was doing all kinds of experiments blown out burrows off glowing people to the chair and i may or may not have made stink bombs at school. They would describe me as a bad kid. Where they didn't see was all my jeans. My talent my voice was not hurt. Then i became that black girl from west baltimore working stem my first position. I was confused for the secretary was pissed but liquefying soon get more people in industry and it's one eight hundred. That's what i start doing. Working small groups for kids students teach them some activities then and twenty fourteen. I lost my little brother to the prison system. In twenty fifteen. I lost all faith. In system period. The world watched following a freddie gray uprising as possible burn. I wondered people go and listen. Where would it solutions. And where was investment into my community and twenty sixteen. I broke the system and became the founder and ceo of beat through sixty carbonell. I went back to my experience in park. I thought about the kids bikes those scales. People use to pay the bills just like mechanics mechanical news. We lane in system s sights the sign's behind popping best willie playing in dirt bike. It's home o'clock is busy quesion technology. The technology needed to get the best radio tires. So you don't have the channel asphalt engineering. The engineers needed to fix peg dirt bike. But the also get the best mac mac. 'em mathematics the math needed for the guests to oriole ratio. So you dirt. Bike does not explode then also gonna step further. I thought about the rights new only way to have programming solutions was ahead of them at because the people closest to the problem onto solution i thought about. Mike says he was six. He's rendered by geez when he seventeen graduating high school. He didn't know what you wanted to do but he knew he loved everything about their bikes and started working with us and beat through sixty. He's helped us. Educate kids trained by gratis and x twenty one. He's our lead instructor. He's created mates showed them across the country and he really represents the best to be three sixty at the corvallis. Work is constantly thinking about what people like. Like one for mike. He was a space. Basically work of students on our curriculum space. Keep training more. Riders and growing a skill sets a space where he no longer has skating but he has something his own city for him with your support and it's of more cities we can make this reality since two thousand seventeen. We've saved the city of baltimore about two hundred thirty three million dollars by dorm programming over seven thousand students. We saved the city of baltimore. One million dollars by growing workforce opportunities for people. Just like mike. That's less people that could possibly go to jail. Less money spent on dollars and cents of incarceration and more money going and saw black communities our leaders our culture and our voices. We don't need to black squares. We don't need your campaigns but will we do need as your dollars and cents behind us to make roach. We need more people like you and cities to believe in invest in our model of growing the people. What will you choose to be an ally being impact be the revolution be three sixty. Thank you hello there. I'm chris anderson. The guy lucky enough to run. Ted now has a podcast called the ted interview and this week on the show. I took someone really special name me. The woman married to jacqueline nova 'grats. She's been that he is learning how to use the tools of business to tackle global poverty got drawn into capitalism raised to the rank of religion. And now we have an opportunity to have a very different conversation. Find the ted interview. Wherever you listen to podcasts.

TED Apple Brittany Young Adam Grant Baltimore Pash Netface Bryce Dallas Howard Bill Nye West Baltimore Cleveland Carbonell Espn Olympics Miami Atlanta Seattle Facebook
There’s a Name for the ‘Blah’ You’re Feeling

The Mom Room

02:19 min | 1 year ago

There’s a Name for the ‘Blah’ You’re Feeling

"Many of you sent me this article that was written by adam grant so he is a organisational psychologists. He's often while i think a few times. He's been on armchair expert with docs record. Such great episodes highly recommend listening to them. He's such a great speaker but anyways he had this article in the new york times. That was all about languishing. And how so. Many of us are feeling this way. And he explains what exactly that is and some ways that you can get out of feeling that way. It's so funny to me. Because i often explain it as feeling blah because i don't know how else to verbalize it and that is literally in the title of this article. So it's called. there's a name for the blah. you're feeling it's called languishing. He describes it as being a dominant emotion of twenty twenty one. And it's interesting because they talk a lot about how when the pandemic i started and it was all over the news and we were on the super high alert mode. Almost like adrenalin was kicking in and we were like wiping down all our groceries and doing everything we could to you know. Follow the guidelines and stay safe and that has kind of worn off now and it's more so he describes it as dulling our motivation and focus. And it's not that were not staying safe now and we don't care about the guidelines it's more so that they have just become a regular part of our everyday life so we're not so much thinking about them anymore. It's just how we're living our life now like every time i get into the car. I'm using hand sanitizer without even thinking about it whereas before all these little changes to how we live our everyday life was a noticeable thing and it was a novel thing so we were constantly thinking about it and it was more of not exciting but it was just we were in that fighter flight mode and now it's just exactly what they describe it as it's very blah. It's interesting because they talk about how it can. Doll your motivation and your focus. And this languishing feeling makes it difficult to concentrate.

Adam Grant The New York Times
Why Leaders Need to Get Better at Changing Their Minds with Adam Grant

The EntreLeadership Podcast

06:07 min | 1 year ago

Why Leaders Need to Get Better at Changing Their Minds with Adam Grant

"Guest. Today is adam grant. Adam is an organizational psychologist and a ted speaker who helps people find meaning and motivation at work. He's a bestselling author and he's also the host of worklife a great podcast. You should check out in his new book. Think again adam challenges us to slow down and stop doing an executing all the time and actually spend time thinking thinking about our business where it's going what problems we have to solve. Why is it that we have such a temptation to just stay on that treadmill of producing an executing and we never stop and make the time to think one is that whip rewarded for what we deliver right and it's sometimes hard to connect the dots between cardi. I've got a bunch of new ideas or a fresh perspective and and what that actually means for my small business. I think the the second thing is we get rewarded for doing things. The same way over and over again that gives us excellence of execution. It helps us build productive routines and then we get really comfortable in our best practices. And i think the danger of that of course is that we don't look around ask if there are better practices and i think what a lot of us end up doing. Is we think too. Much like preachers and prosecutors. When we're in the mindset of preachers were convinced. Where right when we're thinking like prosecutors were proving people who are challenging us wrong and that means we stop thinking flexibly and sometimes we fall into the trap of foolish consistency and we see this happen all the time with huge companies right. I don't think that that berry or blockbuster kodak or sears. Had any problem with doing right. They were great at executing. The problem was they were executing the things that made them great in the past and they missed out obviously on a bunch of digital disruption. Some of which was brought from the outside. But if you look at a kodak they actually pioneered digital imaging and then they said no. Our business model is selling film. Obviously that didn't work out very well for them. and i see the same dynamics. In small businesses pretty regularly where people are unwilling to rethink their strategies their products services on some of their practices that have driven their success in the past. And and that means sometimes we get trapped instability where we should be embracing change. I love the kodak example. Because in hindsight we can all see how they actually could have become instagram me. They were the market leader in photography. And had they been thinking this way. They could have shifted that and caused that revolution. Knowing what you know what you studied that goes into this book. Think again if you could go back and be a consultant into the executive team at kodak at that time what do you imagine they would have been saying that was keeping them entrenched in. And what would you tell them about how they were thinking and the opportunity that they would miss if they didn't change the way they fought that such an interesting question. Well i would have. I mean it would have been great to introduce them to the future of the internet. Talk to them about how we were. All going to be posting selfies. One day but i think long before that where i would have started would have been to talk to them a little bit about the fat cat syndrome right where we tend to rest on our laurels and get complacent when things are going really well. And that's the perfect time to shake things up because we have the resources and slack capacity to do it. And then i think the next thing that i probably would've done is i would have encouraged them to stop preaching that they were right. Stop prosecuting me for being wrong and instead think a little bit more like scientists daniel one of my all time favorite experiments was done recently with small business owners in italy. So they're all pre revenue. They're taking a three to four month. Crash course in hottest start and run a business. They all get the exact same training and education. What they don't know is that half of them have been randomly assigned just to think like scientists in the way that they build and run their businesses. They're told your strategies just theory. Go do customer interviews to develop some specific hypotheses and then when you launch her first product or service. That's just an experiment to test your hypotheses and it turns out that group that's just encouraged to think like scientists over the next year they bring in on average more than forty times the revenue of the control group which is a stunning effect. Right and the major reason why they're so successful when they think scientists is that there are more than twice as likely to pivot they. They run their their first product. Launch or service launch and. it doesn't work and instead of doubling down. They say you know what i guess. I learned that my theory was wrong. Or hypotheses. didn't work in this market or a need to rethink my minimum viable product. And i would have encouraged kodak to do the same thing. I would've said okay. You all are great scientists when it comes to figuring out how to process film and build a camera. Why don't you apply that same. Ab testing that you normally do with products to your strategy to the kinds of products that you create to how you run your company and let's just let's try the digital camera. You have the technology what's going to happen if we roll it out instead of waiting for a couple dozen get rolled out first and then saying lips. It's too late. What are the hallmarks of thinking like a scientist that we don't see when you're thinking like prosecutor or a preacher who i don't think you have to own a microscope or telescope writer even a lab coat thinking like a scientist to may just means you favor humility over pride and curiosity over conviction. That means you know what you don't now and you're excited to discover things that might actually teach you a fresh perspective or you know an area of expertise that you don't currently have access to and one of the things that scientists do best at least good scientists right sometimes. Even scientists don't think like scientists but good scientists is is somebody who says i'm knocking to let my ideas become my identity right. I'm not going to start to define myself as as the kind of person who only leads a certain way. Or i won't define us is the kind of business that only does one thing and i think that flexibility is is a huge part of what allows the scientific thinking mindset to allow small business owners to continue adapting and not only responding to change the world but actually creating

Kodak Adam Grant Blockbuster Kodak Cardi Adam Sears Berry Daniel Italy
The Joy Of Being Wrong With Adam Grant

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:58 min | 1 year ago

The Joy Of Being Wrong With Adam Grant

"Adam. Hello thanks for coming on. Hey dan it's such a treat to be back although i have to tell you. I have not started meditating. That's fine. I have no plans to berate year for that fact what i plan to say off the top of this adam grant has done it again. You've written many books but the book for me. That's been most impactful as give and take and as i dive into this new book. I realized that this is landing in a lot of ways for me so just as an audience of one atom grande has done again. So congratulations well thank you. I hope i don't make you rethink that conversation. That would be poetic. But i doubt it's going to happen. So speaking of rethinking. Can i just get you to state the basic thesis of this book. This book for me is about rethinking. What intelligence means in a rapidly changing world. I think in a stable worlds which most of us for a long time thought we lived in intelligence was basically the ability to think and learn but now we live in a crazily turbulent world and i think increasingly being smart having good judgement even writing it wisdom requires us to be equally good at rethinking and learning and a lot of people assume that those things are the same that if i'm good at thinking and learning i'm also going to be good at rethinking and learning but as you know sometimes the better you are thinking the worse you become at rethinking because you can find so many compelling reasons to support your beliefs and essentially outsmart your own ability to question yourself and i think that's a very dangerous skill set and so for me this. This book is about saying look in many ways. Twenty twenty was a year where we were all forced to rethink so many things. We took for granted whether it's where we work or her whether we can get access to food and toilet paper or what are stances on racism and my hope is that in twenty twenty one and beyond we all get to be a little more proactive about rethinking before were forced to and saying you know what there might be some assumptions or opinions that i've held for a long time that no longer fit in the world that i live in. I said this to you before we started rolling. I think this is of evergreen importance this argument and it's particularly important right now. This is the word you use in the book. It's about mental flexibility and i struggle with it And yet i've just found it to be incredibly important because there is like now i'm going to get a little meditative with you but we'll see if you agree with me on this. I feel the more self aware. I become an. I'm not super self-aware but i'm somewhat software. The more that grows the more. I can see a sort of subtle pain. That's associated with dogmatism. Does that land for you. Yeah that's such an interesting way to frame it. Because i think for most people. What sailing is the pain of changing your mind right and just how much it hurts to admit that you were wrong to recognize that some of the major choices that you made in life maybe even some of the most important decisions you've made poorly thought out and if you could go back and do it over again you might actually have different views or make different choices and that discomfort for so many people it creates a ton of cognitive dissonance right and it's just easier to be consistent than it is to be flexible but i think you're you're exactly right that in the long run it hurts a lot more to stick to convictions that turn out to be false or at least ineffective for us. There was a great psychologist. George kelly who had what i think is an endlessly interesting definition of hostility. He said that hostility is the emotional reaction. You have when you find out that one of your beliefs is wrong and you always suspected it was wrong. But you don't want to admit it.

Adam Grant Adam DAN George Kelly
Burnout Is Everyone's Problem

WorkLife with Adam Grant

02:08 min | 2 years ago

Burnout Is Everyone's Problem

"Hey work lifers. Today's episode focuses on burn out of the way recorded it before the corona virus amick if features dedicated professionals who put their own well-being on the line to protect help. Those who are vulnerable in this difficult time hope. The following information is useful. Not just for your job but also and understanding the pressures of other people's jobs. I am a person who gets stuff done. Like I always had never filed late. I you know if something needs to be done I do it. My job is my entire identity and Helen. Peterson is a senior culture writer. At buzzfeed she covers a wide range of topics from Hollywood to the White House. And sometimes when any rights story the Internet trolls out of the woodwork. I write articles for the Internet but I'm also told the kill myself I'm fat or the someone's GonNa come and slipped my dog's throat then. She spent several months covering the midterm elections nonstop. And something happened to her. Oh I burnt burnt out the sense of exhaustion. That doesn't go away with a good night's rest or an annual vacation. Kind of went numb. I didn't feel like anything was exciting that I wanted to cover. I didn't feel like at any good ideas. I cried on Skype with my editor which is very out of character for me. She wasn't just exhausted. She was puzzled rice started with. Why can't I get these dumb errands done on my to do list and that opened the door to these larger questions burn out any ended up writing an article about burnt out? Which went viral. She argued that millennials are so overworked and exhausted. That simple errands like mailing a letter or taking your shirts to the dry cleaner. Feel impossible to complete. I think the condition of is dumb lineal condition. So it's the thing that best describes this generation's baseline I agree. That burnout is a big problem. I just make a little editing. Burnout can happen to anyone in any line of work. But it doesn't have to.

Rice Helen Hollywood Peterson White House Editor Writer
When Strength Becomes Weakness

WorkLife with Adam Grant

06:03 min | 3 years ago

When Strength Becomes Weakness

"I do. Just wondering if you actually worked on your voice muscles. Yes. I do I do squats with my boys muscle in squadron. Michael Hartill is a chiropractic physician in Fort, Wayne, Indiana. He wasn't always strong when I was in high school. I could barely bench one thirty five. But for the last twenty years, he's basically been the hunk. He's won a national title in the bench press, his personal bests came in two thousand six how much did you let five hundred thirty five pounds, which is to forty two point five kilos. Oh my gosh. I mean, you basically benched a baby elephants. Yes, sir. Exactly. Powerlifters know something that many amateurs, don't you're at your strongest when you're well rounded than the gym. What you hate the most is you what you need the most and some people at the gym are a little lopsided. You might go into Jimmy look at someone and you see him from the waist up there. Very developed a got them big chest, big shoulders big packs and everything else. Then also you see they're skinny little toothpick legs. That's how easily a very undeveloped a person or a wrong person should develop the whole body at if you push that to the extreme is is there an injury risk. Oh much. Yeah. Very much. So do you think that this is not just the metaphor? But that it's true in our lives that the same way you can over develop one muscle, and you know, and underdeveloped another do you kinda see your job that way too? We all the time. I mean, you can see it in the academic role of natural role relationship wise that if you always focus on one part of it and not the whole global pitcher. You're gonna have issues if you're a powerlifter, you can't get stronger if you don't work on your weakest muscles. You've probably been told the same thing at work you have to fix your weaknesses. But it's a mistake to just focus on what's weakest great things can happen. If you have the chance to build on your strengths. I'm Adam grant, and this is work life my podcast with Ted. I'm an organizational psychologist a study how to make work not suck this show inviting myself inside the minds of some truly unusual people because they've mastered. Something I wish everyone knew about work today. Strengths at work how and when we're at our best. Thanks J P Morgan Chase for sponsoring this episode. When it's performance review time at work. How does the conversation usually go your boss probably says some version of? Yeah. You did a great job in this one task. But what we really need to talk about our your areas for improvement. Psychologists have found that for many of us bad tends to loom larger than good. So your boss tells you you have a weakness, and boom, that's all you can think about and this starts long before you have a job beginning very early in kindergarten all the way up through school and college and so forth, and then perpetuated in the workplace, Marcus Buckingham is an author and consultant and so for long time we taught that we should be zeroing in on all weaknesses in. Now. That's remediation remediation the idea that we can examine our weaknesses and take concrete steps to fix them. We live in a remedial world Ola punishment Donna, but we live. We're living in a remedial world. But remediation is really just a way to help people go from bad to average at a particular activity. You don't remediate you away to excellence? And in fact, if you're not really careful you get people's minds thinking much more about failure prevention than about soaring. No one has ever excelled because they stopped making grammatical errors in their writing Marcus started his career at the research firm Gallup, I love anything people that are really good at what they do. Like, my first job galette was on building an interview to select that housekeepers I want to go. Holy moly. Vacuum yourself out of a room every day, and you make a scene for the guests with the fluffy toys on the bed every day any job done an excellence is amazing to me. Burqas started to recognize that any job done an excellent wasn't because people spend all their time trying to repair their weaknesses. It was usually because someone was working from a natural or developed strength. A strength is more than a scaling technical proficiency like working with numbers or using a certain kind of tool, your strengths, are broader aptitudes you have or build for solving problems getting things done influencing people or developing relationships, Marcus played a major role in lodging an influential movement around y workplaces should emphasize strengths all messages to be you'll not broken. But you're not amazing yet and the for the question should be. How can you be amazing? Now, huge employers like Facebook and McKinsey call themselves strength space, the basic ideas that when we do something unusually, well, we should focus on learning to repeat it we should play to our strength and manage around our weaknesses in his research, Marcus found that one of the key signs of a great manager is a clear focus on recognizing and developing people strikes. But he's concerned that most of us don't get to use our strengths enough at work right now sixteen seventeen percent of people saying they have a chance to what they do best every day. We just finished this nineteen country study looking at that question around the world. It's that's not a big number in China at six percent.

Marcus Buckingham Michael Hartill Indiana Powerlifters Jimmy Facebook Morgan Chase China Adam Grant Fort Wayne Donna Mckinsey Consultant TED Gallup Five Hundred Thirty Five Pound Sixteen Seventeen Percent Twenty Years Six Percent
Bouncing Back from Rejection

WorkLife with Adam Grant

06:09 min | 3 years ago

Bouncing Back from Rejection

"Was just starting my career. I knew that to one day get tenure I had to be productive publish or perish. So early in grad school, I started submitting research papers to top journals the first one got rejected. So did the second experts in my own field were telling me that my work was not good enough. I wondered if I should drop out I've been working on a third paper. So I decided to give it one more shot. I spent months perfecting, it got feedback from more than a dozen leading thinkers and shipped it to our premier journal with that one got rejected too. Emailed the editor and asked if I could have another chance he said no that afternoon. In adviser told me to put it away in a drawer for six months and come back to it. Once the painted faded. I was appalled by didn't want to be the kind of person who couldn't face rejection. So I did the opposite. I spent the next three days at my desk in my pajamas subsisting on Robin noodles and take. I wrote the paper and send it back in the editor replied with four words. Dear Adam you win. A few months later. I had my first publication in a prestigious journal, the editor told me he didn't give me a second chance because he believed in my work. He gave me a chance because he saw me accept rejection. And then use it to improve my work. I ended up publishing plenty of papers. And getting tenure the make your name in the field hasn't really helped. We submit papers anonymously for blind review. And I still get rejected all the time. I've already had two papers rejected this year. One reviewer even wrote you should go back and read the work of Adam grant, dude, I am Adam grant. They're different ways to cope with rejection that can help you get through it. But they're also techniques for handling rejection that can actually make you stronger. In case. It's not clear yet. I'm Adam grant, and this is work life my podcast with Ted. I'm an organizational psychologist study how to make work not sucked in this show, inviting myself inside the minds of some truly unusual people they've mastered. Something I wish everyone knew about work. Today rejection and how it's possible to not just bounce back but bounce forward. Thanks to Hilton. I sponsor in this episode. I moved my entire life across to Manhattan, and I didn't know a soul on the east coast and I- maxed out every single credit cod. Move into my I should he hot sweaty apartment in Manhattan and showed up for work serve. Rob o'hagan was in her mid twenty s she's a native New Zealander and coming from a country where there are far more sheep than people. She'd always wanted to travel. She just landed her dream job in marketing for Virgin Atlantic. She jumped at the chance to work for her idol when I was in college, Richard Branson, and the regional vision ale lines had really ascended, and he just represented such a incredibly awesome anti-establishment view that I just personally really connected with and it didn't take long before Sarah was making waves at virgin, she pitched an ad campaign to Sir Richard himself. And it was a huge. Success? I just thought this is amazing. I can do no wrong. My career's just off to the races. How awesome is this? That campaign led to a big promotion to lead marketing for virgins music division in LA. So I take the job thinking that. I am the shit at this point, you know, I sort of stolman through the door like I've been hanging out with Richard braids. And here I am. This is going to be amazing and a year into it almost a year to the day. I walked into the office. And I still remember sitting down my coffee and popping up my computer. And there was a phone call that said, I should go to my boss's office. You know, when your boss, and your boss's, boss and HR is sitting in the room that it's it's not going to be good. There was no discussion of why it was happening. It was just your job is eliminated. You are getting one week severance pay and a one way ticket back to New Zealand because we have to get rid of your visa in other words, Arab legation to send you out of this country. That's how bad you. And I remember like being an absolute shock. I still get sort of pains bangs. I he remembering walking through this fucking office with everybody sitting at the desks, and as I'm walking out they like little prairie dogs with their heads popping over the tops of the cubes going who is this. And why is this loser? Being matched out of the office. And it's a just horrific feeling of I dunno you feel like a criminal rejection. It leaves us feeling incompetent and worthless. The pain of rejection often gets explained in terms of evolution in prehistoric times. If being rejected didn't bother you. You could end up on your own with no food and no group to protect you from being mauled by a tiger. Which would make it awfully difficult to pass on your genes. Even though rejection rarely has life or death consequences today. We're still wired to have those intense. Reactions neuro-scientists argue that rejection actually causes physical pain. There's a great demonstration of this in a cruel online game called cyber ball under computer screen, you're tossing a ball around with a few other players like a game of catch. But after a little while the other players suddenly stopped passing the ball to you. You've been excluded rejected by the rest of the grip. How would you feel? To find out neuroscientists scan

Adam Grant Editor Manhattan Virgin Atlantic Richard Branson Robin Noodles Rob O'hagan Richard Braids New Zealand Sir Richard LA TED Sarah Six Months Three Days One Week One Day
How to Remember Anything

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:06 min | 3 years ago

How to Remember Anything

"They were relocating back from Saint Louis to Los Angeles, a fresh start a new home, but they only won four games and lost twelve they stink. And they hadn't had a winning season in fourteen years with the next year two thousand seventeen things were different. When you find a way to come on the road finish up your record seven and one and win division. There's only one thing you could say. The following season. The Rams win thirteen out of sixteen games tying for the best record and football. They make it all the way to the Super Bowl their secret weapon. The Rams had hired a new head coach, Sean McVay. He was just thirty years old the youngest NFL coach since nineteen thirty eight his secret weapon his memory. We saw you on television. And you remember two ton of place. Sean McVay can recall on-command almost any moment. He's ever seen on a football field. Listen to him being grilled by a couple of sports reporters about completely random plays from past seasons week twelve saints at Rams four twenty nine in the second quarter second and seven on the saints seven what happened? Oh, gosh. Reynolds touchdown off schedule players, the three men rush. You're absolutely kidding me. You're unbelievable. You don't need to know the playbook or understand the lingo to hear that. This is sort of crazy now we are getting back to twenty fifteen weeks, seven bucks. At skin's second seven on the Tampa Bay twenty four fifty eight seconds left in the fourth quarter, famous Crowder wheel route down the right side. Jamison Crowder, we are out down the right sideline. South the first down of that. How did that drive in ordinary touchdown four by one individual eyeso- slant? Shake the brain on shore amazing. He even remembers plays going back sixteen years when he was in the state semifinals in high school, this kind of recall gives him a big edge as a coach when he needs to make a quick decision with the game on the line. He isn't entire library of successes and mistakes at his fingertips. Sean McVay is clearly a savant. But memory is not just an innate talent, you can strengthen yours like a muscle. Your team can use it to pump up creativity and boost sales and just maybe we can all figure out exactly where we left our car keys. I'm Adam grant, and this is work life my podcast with Ted. I'm an organizational psychologist, I study hot make work not suck in this show. I'm inviting myself inside the minds of some truly unusual people because they've mastered. Something I wish everyone knew about work. Today memory, how to make your own recall stronger, and how to build your organization's memory too. Thanks to censure for sponsoring this episode. Through most of human history, the most valuable people to have in your tribe. We're the ones with great memories. Even in the area of cavemen your life depended on that friend who remembered which mushroom was poisonous or where to find water in a drought as civilizations developed you needed to remember which merchants were trustworthy, and which guilds were hostile in Lincoln's era. A Mark of a well read person was the ability to quote at length from many sources now you're probably in the habit of outsourcing your memory to electric devices with the ability to retain and recall information in your head is still crucial. One it helps you establish expertise under uncertainty. If a car salesperson knows safety specs off the top of her head. You'll assume she knows what he's talking about. To having a good memory as a central for making fast decisions. When a patient goes into cardiac arrest during a procedure surgeons don't have time to run a Google search about what to do. And three memory helps you build and maintain relationships you expect a financial planner to remember your risk preferences. You wanna therapist to recall how your worldview was shaped by your your family and before a performance review? You hope your boss hasn't forgotten all the good work. You've done. As a professor I've always encouraged by students to develop their memories. The problem was when they ask how didn't really have a good answer. Then I came across this guy. I've been known to be well a little bit forgetful, Joshua Foa is a science journalist for as long as he could remember he'd had a terrible memory. What are the things that? You've always had the hardest time remembering.

Sean Mcvay Rams Jamison Crowder Football Los Angeles Joshua Foa Saint Louis Tampa Bay NFL Google Crowder Professor Reynolds Adam Grant Lincoln TED Twenty Four Fifty Eight Second Twenty Fifteen Weeks
The difference between an a**hole, an a**hat, and an a**clown

WorkLife with Adam Grant

04:55 min | 3 years ago

The difference between an a**hole, an a**hat, and an a**clown

"There's a difference between being an asshole an asshole at an ask clown. Yep. The Oxford English dictionary has recognized all three, but as hat and ask clown don't have the same sting. They're mostly synonyms for obnoxious and asshole is someone disrespects in demeans other people and either denies it. Or just doesn't care think about the assholes you've had to work with how do they show it? Sometimes it's passive aggressive stealing credit doling out blame unfairly invading privacy breaking promises. Other times. It's active aggressive badmouthing, screaming ridiculing. My father used to say to me when you grow up, whatever you do don't be an asshole and don't work with them and don't work for them. Meet Bob Sutton. He's an organizational psychologist at Stanford. He's become something of a connoisseur of assholes at work. An asshole is somebody who leaves you feeling demean de energize in disrespected somebody who leaves you feeling like shit in two thousand seven he wrote a whole book on assholes, and well, he touched a nerve. I got thousands of emails from people who felt as if they were victims of assholes turns out workplaces are full of them and through his research Baba's learned that it's pretty tough to be an asshole to the people above you being an asshole has to do with how you treat the people across from you. And especially below you. Abuse does seem to roll downhill when I looked at my emails and also the research in about eighty percent of the cases, the person who was named as the asshole in their life was their immediate boss. The more Bob heard from employees leaders about the impact of this kind of a heavier the more he became convinced that it must have an actual measurable costs. Just in the last decade studying all forms of abusive behavior in the workplace is become sort of a growth industry in if you and I started doing the list of all the costs that nasty people impose on the people around them about the fiscal in and mental health cost. It's just stunning when notable experiment was done with medical teams in Israel. You see him had a physician in to nurses from the newborn intensive care unit. And they were brought in to work with visiting expert. Some teams are randomly assigned to be berated by the expert. He told them he wasn't impressed with the quality of medicine there. And they. Last a week in his department after being salted like this. The accuracy of the teams diagnoses was almost twenty percent lower and the procedures. They did were fifteen percent less effective. I'm guessing you wouldn't want a fifteen percent less effective heart transplant. I mean, this is one of the biggest problems with treating people like dirt or less likely to call out errors done by others to avoid mistakes. People have to communicate especially about things that Mike wrong. And asshole creates an environment of fear where people stay silent to avoid rocking the boat. And if getting demotivated isn't bad enough get this working with an asshole literally makes you dumber. There's some evidence that that after one who's been abused or disrespected that one's cognitive ability is temporarily affected when experiment is especially revealing student showed up for a study only to learn that they were in the wrong room and had entered a professor's office for some students. Professor just directed them to the right room. The other half of the time the students got this. Excuse me. Can't you read? There's a sign on the door. That tells you the experiment will be in room one twenty three, but you didn't even bother to look at the door. Did you? Instead, you preferred to disturb me and ask for directions when you can clearly see that. I'm busy. I'm not a secretary here. I'm a busy professor. What an asshole the poor students who were randomly assigned to that treatment were then asked to solve some anagrams, and they solved a quarter fewer anagrams correctly. Then the students saw someone drop a bunch of books the ones who just been verbally abused were nine times less likely to help. Assholes undermine our ability to think, clearly and creatively. But what seems absolutely damning is that they also leave us with more negative attitudes toward others, prolonged bullying turns other people in Astles. So it's a contagious disease that spreads. Of course, everyone has a limit at some point people just give up they quit, occasionally, they even get revenge. Others research from fast food restaurants that that when people have an abusive supervisor running the restaurant that employs are more likely to steal. Although if they're stealing fast food, they're only punishing themselves.

Bob Sutton Professor Astles Baba Israel Stanford Mike Supervisor Secretary Fifteen Percent Eighty Percent Twenty Percent
Networking For People Who Hate Networking

WorkLife with Adam Grant

02:41 min | 3 years ago

Networking For People Who Hate Networking

"It's not what you know. It's who you know, like most cliches, it's popular because it highlights and important truth, but it's partially false. Look, there's no doubt that who you know matters. We have decades of evidence that the right connection can get your foot in the door for jobs promotions and board seats, but the mere thought of networking can stop us in our tracks. This was true in one experiment, where some people are asked to think about making friends at a cocktail party, while others imagine trying to make professional connections. Afterward the one to envision networking felt dirty to the point that they actually rated soap and toothpaste more positively and research shows that no one really mixes it mixers. Anyway, we might plan to meet new people usually end up hanging out with our old friends. So how should you think about developing your network? You don't have to start by building your contact list. You can start by building your skills because having expertise to share sets you up to connect with interesting people just ask Pasia. My name is page. Mine ark landed three miles from here. San Carlos seven hundred dollars bucket when he came to the US from Iran in the nineteen ninety s he barely knew anyone. I didn't know what to do. I think the only thing I knew I was in love with the girl in Iran. And I thought I'm gonna lose her. So I should call her every day. So this is nine hundred ninety two I had to have this bag of quarter everyday going to pay phone, and it was like three or four dollars per minute. So I spend the whole seven hundred dollars in like two three weeks. He started working in California car wash. And then in a yogurt shop relived in the attic to save money. You couldn't walk stand up because it was short no air novato one night. While watching a Persian TV channel he signed for a high end rug gallery within a couple days, he visited the shop and talked. Way into a job. I work seventeen years ten hours a day. Six days a week today. Pitchman knows a lot about rugs. But he spends most of his time in a different career. He's now a successful venture capitalist in Silicon Valley the company's he's invested in our worth over thirty billion dollars. How did page mongo from selling rogues to investing in startups? It has to do with the power of building your expertise. Perriman was selling rugs and Silicon Valley in the early nineties, right? As the internet boom was happening which gave him a chance to meet some pretty important people. My customers are founder CEO of tech company. Venture capitalist lawyers bankers, and I build a close relationship with them. He built these relationships talking about rugs all day long sharing his insights in his showroom much like

Perriman Silicon Valley Iran San Carlos Novato California United States Founder CEO Seven Hundred Dollars Thirty Billion Dollars Seventeen Years Two Three Weeks Four Dollars Ten Hours Six Days
How Director Brad Bird Harnessed the Creative Power of Misfits

WorkLife with Adam Grant

02:16 min | 3 years ago

How Director Brad Bird Harnessed the Creative Power of Misfits

"We were growing up. There was only one name animated movies. Disney. For about six decades. They were pretty much the only game in town by the mid nineties. Disney films had started to follow a formula. They would take it old story at a few musical numbers and voila Pocahontas, Hercules Mulan. But then something new happened in animating. Finnity and beyond. Pixar reinvented. How you make an animated movie instead of drawing characters you code them on a computer, which makes them come alive in three D instead of being flattened two-dimensional. I'm sure you remember Pixar's first computer animated movie Toy Story. It was a smash not just because the tech was cool. But also because the story was fresh it was just so vivid and funny and the characters were original, this is Brad bird. He's a writer animator and director they weren't doing the ten songs and all that stuff that was getting very standard in animation at the time picks ours. First three films got multiple Oscar nominations. They grossed over a billion dollars. The studio was a perfectly calibrated hit machine. And that's when they made a strange decision. They hired Brad. He was coming off a big project that tanked told me go back there man, don't make me go back. And it wasn't his first failure. I got fired from Disney, and I was actually fired from two of the first three jobs I held but picks arse up promise in Brad. He came to the studio with a bold vision for a new film, and he didn't recruit the star teams who had created there earlier. Hits. Instead, he deliberately assembled a band of pictures biggest misfits, black sheep disgruntled. I say pirate doesn't exactly sound like a dream team. But somehow the movie they made together gross over six hundred million dollars won two Oscars and was picked ours. Biggest hit yet. It was incredible. Incredible. Incredible. The critics loved it almost as much as my kids did.

Brad Bird Disney Pixar Oscar Finnity Six Hundred Million Dollars Billion Dollars Six Decades
Teaser: WorkLife Season 2

WorkLife with Adam Grant

03:05 min | 3 years ago

Teaser: WorkLife Season 2

"I'm Adam grant, I'm an organizational psychologist. No, don't organiz closets. And definitely can't cure your OCD. I studied how to make work not suck. And I love learning from people who are especially good at them. Like this guy. This is herb Kelleher the founder and longtime CEO Southwest Airlines. And this recording is from the floor of boxing ring. A few years ago, south west got into a legal tangle with another airline over a slogan. They shared they didn't go to court. There was no loss of. Herman is rival CEO decided to arm wrestle for the rights to the tagline. The winner. What followed was a giant arena? Smackdown that you tons of press and raise money for charity, very much, not business as usual. But herb wasn't just a guy with a good nose for flashy photo ops. He had a lot of heart. He even wants the time to call a young, nobody an unknown. Professor says a grant is a herb Kelleher Southwest Airlines. Would you please give me a call to let me know his colleague was too sick to send me a minor Email? She owed me look forward to talking to you. Herb Kelleher was living proof that you don't have to check your heart or your sense of humor at the office door. Sadly her passed away at the beginning of the year to honor his legacy this season. I'm exploring ways to make work more, creative and more fun. What if you had more of that in your work life? This is season two of work life, my podcast with Ted inviting myself inside the minds of some truly unusual people who've mastered something I wish everyone knew about work like people who excel at making connections. Even when we all know networking can be a little awkward, a friend of mine thought, she was putting abundant appetizer in her mouth only to realize that it was a piece of their art to close friends who also happen to be ferocious Olympic rivals. We finished and I hear Chalene go was hard IT's blood. And then she goes, so awesome. As like, you know, what I'm going to find out. Exactly what I made sure like an Oscar winning director who deliberately recruits disgruntled people and turns them into innovation machines. I want racing cars that are spinning their wheels in a garage rather than racing you open that garage. And man, those people take you somewhere, and we'll search for the holy grail of workplaces the office without. Tolls. There's some evidence that it's a contagious disease that spreads don't work with them. And don't work for them work life season two launches March fifth. Subscribe on apple podcasts or wherever you know, the drill. Podcast. What's the podcast?

Kelleher Southwest Airlines Herb Kelleher Ceo Southwest Airlines OCD CEO Chalene Herman Apple TED Oscar Professor Founder Director
Deontay Wilder pours insults on Anthony Joshua and promoter Eddie Hearn

04:56 min | 4 years ago

Deontay Wilder pours insults on Anthony Joshua and promoter Eddie Hearn

"Seventy two girls eight hundred sixty five points i've got six players ahead of him that should be an eric lindros was not an all time great but people he gets an all time great because he's a publicity and advanced building but i've got sick here i'll give you i'll give you all six appear on thirteen hundred twenty seven point five hundred thirty eight goals in two thousand sixty five points tonight the second time you know he's got eleven hundred seven points i got jeremy roenick and alex smoke yo ming and for beak little ball of hate he was my favorite player of all time how can you put it in eric lindros ahead of for beak curtis joseph i would have played them in because he's got four hundred and fifty four wins he's adam grant fuhr dominik hasek i would've you very upset that eric lindros is in the hall of fame recalling we did this last year getting truscott in lash it had all this discussion i looked at it was i'm not just talking about gary bettman and then turns into eric lindros i mean honestly is out of that habit this guy clearly there's people he wants in that aren't and yet that's just keep waiting it'll happen for you fell in dallas do you mind me talking about lebron i know you're talking about that no go ahead back to the decision you know i agree with you he's a megastar i don't think he deserves any scrutiny for whichever way he goes but if he does choose to stay in cleveland he definitely deserves to get the ward cleaver award for father of the year that'd be fantastic for his kids second if he does go to the lakers i don't see any benefit the lakers ready have their mount rushmore and what could he do in four or five years to get on the level of shaq and kobe and magic and i just don't think it's beneficial foreign is i don't think he can achieve that kind of maybe he can bat i doubt it i don't see upside for going to the lake what is he but what does he have to achieve in basketball well you know when you're a mega star like that like if you're ready have your in miami your i mean just the face of the franchise you're in cleveland you're the face of the franchise when you go to the lakers you don't wanna be second fiddle can anybody when you don't deserve to be the why why why does he have to face the scrutiny of like okay magic did it kobe did it now lebron didn't do it so i mean he's already in the conversation with jordan the why would he like lower his stature right there yeah i don't i don't think there's anything he can do to damages stature i think the only thing people seem to find joy in is that he's three and six and finals everything else is gravy isn't it i mean what's there to complain about that guy's career seriously the west gate post final four odds for two hundred college hoop teams there's final four odds are out here carbide it looks so do kansas kentucky all have the lowest plus one joining the jayhawks wildcats aren't they would do all as aren't they all as favorites to win the national championship in college three year started matic i see loyola chicago now one hundred to one to win it after their great season what are the odds they've not waste their money on it that ticket adding geez how do you think that'll go over not well they're season now deontay wilder rips the promoter and a horrible foul language ran for avoiding the anthony joshua fight i told you he's blaming eddie hearn it would appear to me that the fight is off between wilder and joshua and joshua's gonna fight alexander ovechkin instead in september and they have not been able to nail down and the fight and wilder blames eddie hearn and calls him all kinds of horrible names domino's manager says conor mcgregor is running out of money do you believe that you could blow one hundred million dollars in a year have been since he fight mcgregor last year was last august i don't believe that story at all i think that that's just there camp trying to rally him up again that's all they're trying to do bela tor has announced a new multi year partnership with does on a streaming service said the launch in the us this summer the partnership includes seven events exclusive to design including an event in san jose featuring masasi and rory mcdonald's same service.

Eric Lindros One Hundred Million Dollars Five Years Three Year