17 Burst results for "Adam Gop"

"adam gop" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

12:10 min | 1 year ago

"adam gop" Discussed on KNSS

"Be talking about the incredible chasing the sun how the science of some light shapes our bodies and our minds so how did you get interested in astronomy and physics and all this well George it goes way back to my childhood but maybe that doesn't surprise anyone no not at all we all did that yeah I think everybody does and I think that is somewhere between eight and eleven some switches get set in your brain and you become interested in something and I you know I build a telescope by age ten or eleven was trying to pick take photos of Jupiter's moons through it not very successfully but the. yeah I was interested I want to you know planetariums alive read aloud books text that sort of thing did you ever think your your application would end up being this no I I can't say that I did but I I I I again I think that that's a rather Clinton in response to that question I mean most people say well I never imagined doing this even ten years ago that is that by the way to work I I I do need to say something here to avoid a slew of abusive emails tomorrow I screwed up when I talked about Xena reticulate being yeah very young I wonder I knew you did me in a million years all right out of the Pleiades you see are are quite young you know they they they might be less in a million years in the plan to be a billion years where some aliens have come from but they reticulate you know that system is maybe two billion years old for that old enough and I'm sure now that we observed it when we were doing our observations down with the telescope in Austria you can only see from the southern hemisphere there's there's a tribe called the Dogon tribe you've heard of them yes I have and they knew about the binary star system and in the serious our system and way before even telescope spotted this are they claim that they were told from someone above about the star system that would be another area I think you aim the array at. well I have to say it was Sirius is the actually is a very bright star so it it really is going to last very long but it'd be the Dogon story about you know the fact that it has a companion and she has two companions that's a complaining that the white dwarf they wouldn't have known that that's true that wasn't discovered until I think the Victorian here when people have bigger telescopes but it's also the case that this story originated after the discovery of that white dwarf and apparently there's some evidence I don't know whether it's credible or not yet they were told about it having a second star. what do you think a Roswell that case well I think it's the best thing that ever happened to Roswell yeah that's true that's for sure no I you know that I I I sort of hesitate to make my opinion known here because of course Stan Friedman was the you know great proponent of all my god yeah that that Roswell representative sailed landing attempt by aliens trying to get a good tex mex muse meal in in New Mexico but you know. I I don't know I would. I I look at that story and I consider the fact that project mogul was running at the same time for which there is still I think living witness witnesses to what project mogul was all about it was a you know a secret airforce project to try and find out if the Soviets had the bomb at the end of the nineteen forties and it accounts for all the aspects of the Roswell story so here you have it I mean it could be a secret project to find out if the alien society to Soviet said the bomb or could be aliens a crash landed in the desert forty miles north northwest of Roswell I tend to believe the first explanation and when they are there anybody with then said he that believes we've been visited from eighties well then you know I certainly haven't paying them all on it but I would wager and next week's wages which isn't much to wager. that none of them do now none okay and let me ask you this horrible question and that is if you don't get funding for study what happens well I mean it is essentially does away I mean it's it's that simple of nobody's willing is that a is that a real possibility of course it's impossible yes No Way Out it's it's hard to believe but it's it's true and I might point out that you look at Europe for example or for that matter Japan China all these places they they talk a good game they say they're all interested in doing city because they all admit that a discovery would be very very interesting and perhaps even important. but they're not willing to pony up the the money I lived in Europe for thirteen years and you know they had they had the began tennis they had the money they had the talent they had the expertise they could do it but they didn't and the reason they gave for that was well you know it's it we're we're too serious for that so that's unfortunate but on the other hand I think it speaks to the fact that in America you can take a long shot and you know Americans are willing to bet on the dark horse and that's not so true in these other countries. cancer. well I don't know it's the I I would hate to see said he go away well I I do too I mean I don't know that will never go away because it's always going to be somebody somewhere the fight is interesting because keep in mind that said he is not a static endeavors not that what we're doing today is the same with that we would have done ten years ago it's always getting better because the equipment keeps getting better. can somebody get to Jeff Bezos. well little our check yeah well and I don't know the guy personally do you know I don't know him I'm a good customer of it yeah well. like this defendant basis and he does have an interest in this sort of thing I mean you need to find somebody who is interested right and you know I'm I mentioned the the you know that chief technologist ten o'clock on he is interested in this matter so he's willing to fund the development of new receivers well okay that that's what it takes somebody than just having money is not good enough and you can ask anybody who's looking for money for something they also have to have a personal interest in the subject. let's take some calls here for you this hour since self though let's go to mark in Baltimore Maryland to get things started Hey mark go ahead Sir thank you George to take my phone call thank you our own by the way you know I'd be willing to donate if the doctor wants to give out any information on how to donate women I'm not rich or anything but you know I'm willing to donate because you mentioned donations before I also here's my here's my question okay I actually have to once a simple yes or no question my first question is to the doctor do you know how small an object and we're at is capable of detecting because I was in rate or man in the navy so that's my first question and my second one is just a yes or no when that is to set I operate under any kind of secrecy oath yeah well beyond it in into the second one is is the easy one mark and no we don't there's there's I mean look it is a is a nonprofit research organization there's no policy of secrecy nobody is ever been told Hey if you find a single don't tell anybody and in fact we've had some false alarms and you know they demonstrated what really happens if you find a signal that looks promising that media start calling you up right away and you talk to them as it first question to get repeat the first question I'm sorry to waste your time by doing that no you're not wasting my time at all doctor it was I was no radar man in the navy yeah learn about rec NORAD and everything like that I think that's something that stands for north of America something about that that how they do you know how small or large of an object that NORAD is capable of detecting well of course you know the the real idea was to detect incoming missiles and something you know is is stuff like that but if you consider the radars being used today for example the maps space junk which is important to do because otherwise you know of the international space station collide with something the size of a tennis ball then that's the end of the international space station so they they do want to map. the stuff and that's typically a couple hundred miles up and normally they can find anything down to the size of depends on the the day of the week or you know the the wind direction whatever but they they can find things between the size of the ping pong ball and maybe of baseball that's dramatic that's pretty incredible incident. there really is what do you think the next big break throughs gonna come remember the old wow signal yeah sure in the these little bursts that are coming in now these fast radio burst is that equivalent to the while or was the wild. radio burst don't have the characteristics of a signal made by a transmitter they really don't and so I I don't think that their equipment and the fact that they were being found all over the sky I think the more could lead to the discovery of pulsars back in the nineteen sixties you know that we're called little green men Cambridge astronomers for awhile until they found three of them and when they found three of them at different spots on this guy they said well whatever this is its nature it's not intelligence so they stop calling the little green men and eventually call them pulsars and I think the same thing will happen with the fast reimburses I said earlier I think that within a couple years there's enough there are enough data now that I think within a couple of years some clever he retention to kind of figure out what the most likely explanation is we have a gland in Harding's in the Texas welcome to the program Hagelin go ahead. Hey how you doing George set yes Greek. say set their Preciado everything you do but I'm I'm reminded as that of a cartoon I saw that white saucer asked why you would give the LA you guys pulling data Lafayette in trade radio. no no I I really appreciate your and that but you you mentioned that yeah there were a lot of stars close it and and they all have plates to I find that fascinating out to what about a dozen light years we've got about thirty years so stars something like that usually a couple several of them were found to have Goldilocks planet and maybe even a couple one of them had a couple of it in the Goldilocks zone I find that incredible so and I guess that I guess that means they're pretty much Jack search all the closest planets could you comment on that but but one thing before you do set so that I think that. the idea of it yeah they can't get here we can't go there you know if you're traveling at relativistic speeds that relativistic speeds that ships tightened I mean it's it's not you don't have to go faster than light the distances are are all easily traversed my goodness what is it orange is it forty light years and three months. I think so yeah well if you go forty my hot like years and three months you got a pretty fast vehicle there sure yeah what eight you're pushing it to the point where you're not you know stand out in your constitutional Adam GOP he didn't you know become particles of light Magnotta what won't kill you and other words just below the ask the kill threshold aghast at speed but could you comment on that the closest planet and your search at that have you all will be scrutinized as we close in planet close it starts with well you know we haven't we haven't because on the one hand we've looked at the essentially all the nearby star systems and I think nearby.

George Adam GOP Lafayette LA Jack million years three months forty light years two billion years thirteen years billion years thirty years ten years one hand
"adam gop" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

Real Time with Bill Maher

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"adam gop" Discussed on Real Time with Bill Maher

"Welcome to an HBO podcast from the HBO latent series. Real time with Bill Maher start. No, no. No. You've got debate fever. That's what it is. Did you watch all four hours? How many watch all for crops out nobody okay? I think I know what America's biggest problem is now. Overcrowding. There was twenty liberals. Onstage FOX, Fox News called it Kami con. But the debates, of course we're held in Miami. So for an old Jew, like Bernie Sanders it was a home game. And it started out strong burnt Bernie promised healthcare for everybody. And after what Kamala Harris did to Joe Biden Joe needed it. Jio definitely got his bell rung a little bit. It didn't he? I mean by the second hour he was sniffing his own hair that was very. Very. Luckily, Marianne Williamson broader. Rotary healing crystals. You know, always the last show before they start to lose it. I'll be lucky but I thought it was really interesting that this is I thought Joe is actually worth moment. They went around, and they asked, what would be your first act as president and Biden said to defeat Donald Trump? That's when the kids came onstage and took away his driver's license. First of all, I want to say. I always come out against ageism, but before it's yoyo hypocritically do old jokes. Yes. I do money joke because ageism does not mean everything old people does is okay. It means judge people individually by who they are. And how they acted. I'm sorry. It's a case by case basis. Some people do look good at Joe's eight. He didn't look good last night. He did look old and it works the other way swale. Well looked too young. Kept asking to pass the torch passed the tore, you wouldn't stop bringing it up finally Yang offered him a thousand dollars shut the fuck. I mean, honestly, the Democrats so often their own worst enemy still trying to get the Twitter mob instead of the ninety eight percent to give shit about Twitter on the first on Castro won the woke Olympics on the first night. When he said, trends, female should have the right to an abortion. I agree. Now if only they had a uterus. Selling that in the red states. If a man identifies a woman than we stand with her. Right. Not only to imagine that she's pregnant, what to terminate that pregnancy, which is not. I know really. Oh, they were going nuts that first night, they were trying to out Spanish each other. And then do you see the Blasi? Oh, I am the only person on this stage with a black sun. It was like Billy Zane Titanic. I have a black song. He knows his new campaign slogan different strokes. And then. And then they were asked to give the closing statement, you know what the most important thing to you. They all said their thing and Marianne Williamson said to beat Trump with love and. Putin tweeted, and he said, make sure to get it on tape. Max works lead, Adam GOP, Nick and heroin later. Speaking with my good friends McClellan is back. As the first female combat. Veteran running to be president nited states and Hawaii's rep from the second congressional district there. Tolsey gabbard. Wow. Crew out here. Is that inorganic? Did you bring some beep? Yeah. Okay. Well, I love you. And I love Hawaii. I thought you did quite well. Thank you. I, I did we're going to eliminate some people tonight and you're not one of them, I want you to stick around. No, what do you think of the debates in general? How did you think the party in general looked?.

Joe Biden Joe Marianne Williamson Bernie Sanders HBO president Donald Trump Bill Maher Hawaii Twitter Billy Zane Titanic Kamala Harris Fox News FOX Miami America Jio Yang Tolsey gabbard
"adam gop" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:41 min | 1 year ago

"adam gop" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's very Lehrer show. WNYC. Good morning, everyone. With me knows New Yorker staff writer, Adam got Nick who decides countless interesting articles for the magazine. He was just reminding me that the last time he was on. We were talking about his piece on learning to drive in middle age. But he's also in many diverse and intriguing books from his one in two thousand called Paris to the moon about as experiences in Merican living in pass to through the children's gate in two thousand six about falling love with New York all over again after moving back from his five years in France to angels ages short book about Darwin, Lincoln and modern life in two thousand nine to twenty seventeen book at the strangers gate about arrivals to New York, and now comes a thousand small sanitize the moral adventure of liberalism, and don't get lulled into complacency by the title. This book takes us much aim at the illiberal left. As frame as the illiberal. Right. Thanks for coming on animal comeback. WNYC always a pleasure to be here. And you open this book with a story about you and your daughter Olivia, then seventeen years old on the morning after Trump was elected president, but don't go right to Trump. You introduce Livia as intelligently skeptical of all progressive pieties, especially her father's, can you set that scene force. I what are some of your liberal pieties, or just one, good example, that your daughter grew up to be intelligently skeptical about I'm nothing but Thala g of Progressive Party. So I don't already one that she would be be skeptical. I guess my the urge to see two sides of every issue, you know, insisting that, you know, there's no board so thin that it doesn't have to sides. She can be impatient with the times because I think she rightly thinks that it's it can act as a stopper in some way. So she's impatient with that progressive. You get stuck and able to act. If you're seeing two sides of the issues, and there is an old joke about liberalism. I don't know if it's in your book, that the definition of liberal is somebody who won't take his own side, and I'll give it absolutely it isn't it is in the book, actually, and one of these wanted to write this book, Brian was to say to her that ain't so that you can have a vision of liberalism. In fact, the right vision of liberalism is as a movement crusade for radical change, but always through humane measures and this book, then is kind of a letter to your daughter, totally. Well, I also kind of distillation of thirty years of thinking about liberal writers and actors, but yes, it's a letter to my daughter about liberal humanism. You actually take a shot at defining liberalism in this book on page twenty three. Would you read it for our listeners? Yes. Of course. So here I am struggling to say, what makes liberalism is. I understand different from right wing were left wing causes. And I wrote. Liberalism is involving political practice. That makes the case for the necessity and possibility of imperfectly, again, -tarian social reform, and ever-greater, if not absolute tolerance of human difference through reason, and mostly unimpeded conversation demonstration and debate. And then I say instantly that this is probably the worst sentence I've ever written. It's an infuriating sentence, because I think it captures all of the nuances and qualifications all of the rhetorical squishing of liberalism. The, you know, Marxist revolutionaries says I am for freeing men from his chains and a Christian. Authoritarian says I am for faith and flag. And the liberal says, I'm for being nice to everyone is we realistically can be given circumstances. Right. And this in practical, political terms has been a big problem for the liberal party in this country, the Democratic Party, because they come out with things like that, to some degree. While the Republicans turn around and say, I'm for a free market family values and the flag. Absolutely. And it works the other way it works. You know, the rights tack on the left left attack on liberalism. One of the things that's always been true Bryant's one of the themes of this book. Is that liberalism, always looks hopelessly at any moment of crisis liberalism? Always look, hopelessly swish e week, confused and so- pluralistic. And so many side is to be ineffectual. But historically whenever there's been a real crisis. You know, you think about the nineteen thirties, almost all intellectually, minded people in that period, said, liberal democracy is finished liberal humane values are relic, and they went either towards the extreme left, or they went towards the extreme right? And at the end of the day, by the time the second World War was over seemed just the opposite, it seem that the values of an open society that liberalism in capsulated were not just persuasive, but we're also extremely potent and powerful and that I think has happened again. And again and again and I'm trying. Reinfuse reinfuse liberalism, in the liberal, and liberal, people with a, a more. What's the right word slightly more pugnacious view of their of our inheritance than we might have sometimes but of the three basic chapters in the book. After the one that just defines liberalism. The other two are why the right hates liberalism, and why the left hates liberals. Absolutely. So I think what's newsworthy from your book, is that you Adam GOP Nick are going after the left as a threat to what you've value in liberalism as much as you're going after the right. Absolutely. That's historically. It's always been that way, you know, liberalism, liberal left. I'm a liberal leftist liberal leftists have always been in dispute with radical leftists just as they've been in dispute with right wing -tarian. That's been the traditional liberalist. Well, that might have been true in Stalinist Russia, but is it really true in America today? Well, I think that the threat from the left to liberal values is trivial in America today compared to the threat from the right every day. We have a government in power. That is a right wing authoritarian government that is attacking liberal values and the basis of liberal democracy every single day. We are in a national emergency, so I would never want to balance the attack from the right which is daily and fundamental claim down Bryant. We're so inured by now to each day's atrocity that we sort of begin to shrug it off. With say that's not so bad, when Donald Trump talks about pardoning worker models in the in the army, this is an act of affront to every decent soldier who live by the code of conduct. That's one of the stories just from the left few days, that, that were, you know, in this constant blizzard of news. And what so many of us around here, consider, you know, the New York area, consider outrages that, that one hasn't even most people's consciousness and yet, it's one of the gravest because not only is it evil in itself. But it also implies Trump using his powers to create an effect his own Pretoria guard. Now, if you're loyal to the president, you can do anything you want. It's, it's. Horrible. Don't get me started on the on the obscenities, and the and the emergency that we're in. Right. But you wrote eighty pages or so. The left. Right. Because the left has been vociferiously critical of liberalism, historically, and to this day, still is plenty of people, I'm sure we both know them and debate them, and you have them on the show, who say from the left you say, liberalism is inadequate to this moment. We've got the global global climate change crisis. We've got the crisis of inequality. We've got a larger economic crisis. We only have to look around New York City to see the housing crisis cetera et cetera. Those with views that motivated, Occupy Wall street continued to do so, but what are you saying is the green new deal is Medicare for all know liberalism? I'm proud is a Canadian came to New York that I have been arguing for Medicare for all Canadian model for medicine since nineteen eighty-seven wrote the first piece in the New Yorker about it than a debate with. Welcome. Glad well in nineteen ninety nine where I took the socialized medicine side. Malcolm took the private medicine side. He's since converted back to Canadian view. My point is I believe in all those things passionately. The question is, how do you go about making those things plausible. How do you bring them into the realm of the plausible? The liberal view is always, you do it through as I said, in that terribly awkward sentence through the relentless pursuit of public argument and debate and change, you know, buyer Buston, the great black and gay activist is one of the heroes of this book said, three simple liberal dance steps, constitutional measures nonviolent means democratic procedures. That's the core. Those are the core practical beliefs of liberalism, and they have worked to make radical social change again. And again, the alternative is not to simply say, let's seize power and make these changes because the one thing we learned is when you take power, there is always an employer list, society going to be descent. Sometimes vehement dissent, sometimes even violent send the question is not what we want. But how we deal with those who don't want the same things that we do. We saw that in France. Brian, I still try and stay tuned in France. President Macron brought in a very powerful green new deal for France that involved as any green new deal will have to gasoline hikes tax gasoline, and it started a national revolt, not among the, you know, the bosses, but among workers rural working class people, you're going to have to intimidate and you're gonna have to see how you're gonna placate. You're going to have to understand that you're gonna build coalitions that make that change possible. That's what liberalism says my guest is Adam got Nick, who's new book is a thousand small Saturday's the moral adventure of liberalism or phones. Roping for you to question talk back to him. Give us your own, too. Many words definition of liberal two one, two, four, three three WNYC, four three, three nine six nine to just to finish the thought that you were just on who is it that you're afraid of taking power. In illiberal ways in pursuit of liberal policies that you support is it bony. Sanders. Is it L? Exander Cossio who, who are these who who's actually threatening to do that, in a practical sense in America today? They don't think I don't think anyone actually is. And that's why I'm more concerned as I said before there is a right wing authoritarian in power. But this book is not a book about contemporary politics. It's a book about fundamental premises book about values and it's a book about trying to defend the values of liberal humanism as I understand them against the historic tax on them. Is there anybody on hand who's likely to do that from the from the left to actually working? No, I will add, though, Brian that it is always a weakness of the left in this includes as we as we all know people on enthusiasts Bernie Sanders. I've Bernie Sanders jokes in the in the book, but the habit of intolerance, the habit of believing that because you are right. Right. Therefore people. Disagree with you must be on the payroll of some corporation. Or must be acting merely as stalking horses for capital. That's an old left-wing habit. And I think you still see peaking up, and that's a bad one. That's, that's essentially intolerant. The problem always is. I don't watch game of thrones the finale last night, Brian. I bet you this very elegant. No spoilers, though. Tyrian Lancaster, those wise IMP. The dwarf says to deniro star Garin, who says I want to remake the world, and who cares if we use my drag into destroy all cities in the end the world will be much better. And he says, you know, I'm not so sure that I can believe that because I've just seen what happened here makes you had burned up the city. That's the classic liberal response to leftist utopianism. So dragons are one thing when we come back from the break, you can describe while you're described, you can discuss while you're describe liberalism, as a rock rhinoceros absolutely in competing philosophies as unicorns. And we'll take some phone calls for Adam got Nick, stay with us rate.

Adam GOP Nick New York Brian Donald Trump France Bernie Sanders liberal party America president Bryant Livia Paris Lehrer New York City Progressive Party Democratic Party Olivia
"adam gop" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"adam gop" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Yeah anything that was unfair or yeah i get so pissed off jota what are you gonna get blood pressure and then you know anything jewish they hate us they hate us they all hate us everyone hates us they all tell us with say the call you dirty jew they hate us yeah no that's how i grew up well that sounds like a lot of fun i can't believe i'm a comedian yeah and speaking of being a comedian in very john places you were just a back from stockholm i within listen i was doing stockholm stockholm for jewish new york festival wait one that it was amazing it it's such a beautiful place and so a lease on my girlfriend was wearing she wears this little star of david we got an israel ju ju ju and and someone said to her oh you're very brave so that was telling in sweden very very brave to where it to wear a little jewish star around or not yeah it's nice and so what is we explain to me what the jewish new york festival is in okay so they they did a symposium all day sunday it was adam gop neck and david denby from the new yorker jody rosen who's a music critic just writes about music letty cotton pogrebin who's a founder of ms magazine i eat pollen to is a jewish historian the rabbi from the ninety second street y he's the head of the nine you know peter rubin see it was julie jew from juice i mean it sounds very brave i went to synagogue i went to services on friday night and they checked my passport we had to bring our passport.

stockholm jody rosen founder ms magazine peter rubin sweden adam gop david denby ninety second
"adam gop" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"adam gop" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"In life and at the table is it one of one monotone note no just the opposite it's one of familiar opposites it's one where the salty butter meets the nutty bread and we feel simultaneously that its familiar even as we recognize that is a contradiction buried deep within it well if your life is in anarchy then you want food that is in harmony right up chris the king doffed his crown on the court jester here i'm not thinking i think that's a perfect summation of it we want is normalcy and normalcy is inherently complex we want the complexity of normalcy wilson adam gop nick if so much thank you prefer that was out of gop nic staff writer for the new yorker adam gop nick talked about what he eats when he's little down for me is that what i'm eating it's always cooking the grateful deadplaying touch gray chopping onions little sizzle the pay in the heat of the of the step by step nature of cooking all of that is a culinary extra size that brings me back into the centre of the familiar as jerry wonsang sometimes the light is shining on me you know would always shines in the kitchen that's it for this week if you're just tuning mr show you can listen to a podcast on apple podcast stitcher tune in google play or spotify please remember to subscribe to the show though automatically get every single show download it to your phone each week if you wanna learn more about millstreet just had to one seven seven bill street dot com there you can download each weeks recipe subscribe to a magazine watched the first season bill street television or ordered the milk street cookbook we'll be back next week thanks as always for listening.

staff writer millstreet chris gop adam gop jerry wonsang google spotify milk
"adam gop" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"adam gop" Discussed on Binge Mode: Game of Thrones

"Oh a god jason john yeah this seem like somebody else's fucking fantasy all the time now my members of this yeah philip k dick is one of the most prolific writers in the ciphers genre or really any genre and his work has spawned film and television adaptations for literally decades such as impact on culture that before we can actually get into parsing the themes of electric dreams we better understand the man whose work led to those theme so we're going to go a little bit out of order today before we get to the point in please clave head to the citadel which i'm pretty sure is currently located on rex are four x are for teachers anything we need to know about philip k dick fantasy builder the named philip k dick is widely known as a brand the author of tales that have become some the most famous film and now television shows in science fiction the man himself in the actual stories he wrote or a ciphers let's take a brief look at peak eighty the man the adaptions which made him a brand name in science fiction new yorkers adam gop nick in his masterful two thousand seven essay on dick's life and works titled blows against empire wrote foget as an adult reader coming back to dick you start off in a state of renewed wonder and then find yourself thumbing ahead to see how much farther you are going to have to go at the end of a dick marathon you end up admiring every one of his can seats and not a single one of his sentence that's brutal but having read last night the stories that would become impossible planet in the commuter it is fair it's fair harsh but fair harsh would fare personally of i i've always had trouble with dick i remember reading i do enjoy the dream after a for seem blade run and being like men sky sox guys.

philip k dick new yorkers
"adam gop" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"adam gop" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"This is the new yorker radio oh my god or nitric this mm this is the new yorker radio hour i'm andy borowitz on today's show understanding the trump administration by revisiting an 18 eighty one short story by key demobilized song also a review of brooklyn's controversial table to farm restaurants and the creator of hamilton unveils his muchawaited new musical about another treasury secretary larry summers andy borowitz on the nose as always and and very hurtful and i think i'm not ari covered okay sorry actually think some of the segments would work great the gita mo puzzle thing you put adam gop nick into that and you've got a home run i think you do i'm david remnant today on the new yorker radio our what we're really going to do is talk with some of the leading political satirists working today so i wanted to start close to home with andy who contributes the borowitz reported new yorker dot com i could probably just read is headlines for the next half an hour in we'd be pretty happy but i spoke with any bore which this past spring and the new cycle was already keeping him pretty busy let me ask you this what's been your favorite moments of foreign that trump administration oh gosh i think that learning that frederick douglass was still alive a made me very happy i think that that the way he kicked off black history month with ben carson he's doing a his job because his black friend and yes and he the it that's one of the.

andy borowitz brooklyn hamilton larry summers david remnant frederick douglass ben carson new yorker treasury secretary ari adam
"adam gop" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"adam gop" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"But the kind of just plan whack a mole with big flareups they're not able to go on the offensive and aggressively attack the fire yet at least in the spot just because that's the reality of of this of this moment there's all that fuel out there and all that all that dry land in it's going to burn exactly you've got the conditions for this fire to spread lots of fuel some areas where it's burning right now there hadn't been fires in seventy two hundred years so you wonder what causes a fire like this i know you and i've been talking and referred that there is no known cause we do know that commonly these kinds of fires reather caused by people who set afire make a mistake whatever or parson or caused by lightning i mean they're common causes but then the question is how far the fire spreads what are california authorities and residents thinking as they've seen so many of these fires spread so far so fast yeah i think the these fires you had the napa cinema fires in october and now these be fires in december it's it's you know unusual to have this big afire this late in the year it it's very unusual on new touring the devastation this weekend california governor jerry brown called year round wildfires fed by climate change in drought the new normal for california and he sort of reserve prepping californians to say be ready this is the new reality so what does that mean on a daily basis for california it well it's unclear i mean people your i talked to our are scared in these strong santa ana winds can come up fast and move fire fast and even folks who aren't in mandatory evacuation areas are are getting ready to try to leave at a moment's notice as this fire continues to rage uncontrolled in many years and here's eric westerveld reporting from the new normal in southern california eric thanks very much thanks deep it's morning edition from npr news i'm steve inskeep and i may chill martin on the next on being the new yorkers adam gop neck on the evolution of spiritual life in a secular age i think that the negation of god dozen negate our morality but the negation of god doesn't supply us with morality either that those of things that we have to make up for ourselves and the only way we can.

climate change california steve inskeep martin new yorkers napa jerry brown eric westerveld npr adam gop seventy two hundred years
"adam gop" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"adam gop" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Kind of confrontation were getting worse and worse but of course at the same time if we feel more and more vulnerable than to control from the chinese government over us will become stronger and stronger at a weekday afternoon in a hong kong everett of mon kok uniform students three metaph schools for a halfhour of freedom before heading a nighttime cram schools timothy aiming is among them seventeen year old says history is one of his least favourite classes too much focus on regurgitation of facts he says he learned more about china and literature class when he read george orwell's dopey a novel 1984 so obviously this very but reflection all the modern society we are having today especially in the chinese contacts fellow student matthew choose says he and his class were on the verge of a history lesson last year when fellow students began handing out pamphlets they give some information about hong kongsydney separated that from china in front of us gland gift to us did and and then that he chad a cod end to go into a have room and then talk when they came out of the room the students had been disciplined dances true was the last he and his classmates heard about hong kong independence at school he says was one of the best history lessons he's hacked rob schmitz npr news on com this is npr news and you're listening to morning edition on wnyc stay tuned coming up the president trump promised repeatedly to increase military spending below one point five trillion dollar deficit increase the republican tax plan could jeopardize that i am proud to report that we have worked with congress to achieve a dramatic increase in defence spending this year while that story and more coming up in the next hour of morning edition right here on wnyc a mostly cloudy morning with gradual sunshine appearing by later today sunrise timeless warnings at 709 highs near forty two degrees we do have a slight chance of some rain and snow late tonight and then rain is likely tomorrow with a high near forty seven degrees thirty four degrees right now in central park on the next on being the new yorkers adam gop neck on the evolution of spiritual life in a secular age i think that the negation of god dozen the.

chinese government hong kong everett mon kok george orwell hong kongsydney china trump congress new yorkers hong kong npr president adam gop five trillion dollar forty seven degrees thirty four degrees forty two degrees seventeen year
"adam gop" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"adam gop" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm christina tip it and this is on being today with the new yorkers adam gop nick einstein is to to osce echoes easing i'd say the fed a sense of wonder is at the heart of the best of religion and science and the arts when he used to see those things as at their heart over lifts at way speak to each other absolutely i think that the where science and certain aspects of religion said he'd do park company is is science demands that we be skeptical even of our own favorite theories and there's a aspect as a side of religious tradition that is like that that demands that we be argumentative about them i had before yum could poor this year i did a talk at though one of the local synagogues i you know i i'm not a good enough ju to be confident the god will be writing my name down in the book but i think he you know i'm here i'm talking during my bit god don't be too harsh and one of the things i was saying is that one of my favorite artist stoorikhel treasures is the what's called the darmstadt haga which is a meaning evil jewish illuminated managed kept aren't very many of them and all it shows is jews arguing about the text and that's very as you know very very important part of jewish moses coralled whip god i mean it's there exactly added if there's something distinct about jewish interpretive traditions it's an argument of tradition you we argue with todd we argue with each other we argue with the tax and i think that that so really rich way of thinking about the part of.

new yorkers nick einstein darmstadt haga todd osce
"adam gop" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"adam gop" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Adam gop nick is a staff writer at the new yorker recently son took a job as a bartender baltimore and gop nick has a few interesting observations about what his son's generation is drinking these days adam how are you i am very well today christopher how are you i my mind needs some extra size and that's that's why i'm calling so i am a human stationary bike i'd so that's what i have to do let me tell you a story chris my wonderful son luke went off to baltimore this summer he chased the girls to john's hopkins what she was doing a an internship and he went off pounding the pavement in baltimore to lead last his feet led him to an artisanal hipster restaurant and he talked his way into a job as a bartender so he spent his summer as a bartender in baltimore and you can imagine the pride with which i articulated that truth to friends all over what's loop doing oh he spending the somers a bartender in baltimore and you can also imagine the look of immeasurable pain the crossed his mother's face when i would say this because it would imply that his fate in life was to be a bartender not to be the philosopher musician filmmaker that in fact he is destined to be in her mind but i was fascinated because he called me and wanted some advice about it and i could give him a little bit of advice about wines of course but really what he was consumed in doing in the city of baltimore all summer was making mixed drinks and i got fascinated and thought alaadin our will ask you to work your knees around this problem of why it is the 20somethings and lucas 2003 are so utterly in love with mixed drinks in a way that i think it's fair to say would have seemed to us a generation lead to be embarrassing in other words we associated bronx's in manhattan's perhaps not martinis but that whole world of sweeten mixture.

staff writer new yorker baltimore christopher luke somers lucas manhattan gop john
"adam gop" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"adam gop" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Streak got helped me and all of that and the weird thing about it is is that i realised then that understanding modern art really was like a religion inasmuch as it was a practice before it was adult the i've never really get it by understanding the way one picture had changed another out cubism had created expressionism which created surrealism and so on that it was a practice of interpretation and i think that that's something that is still insufficiently uh well understood that what religion brings us is not a dogma better practice that's the rich thing it brings us that's the significant thing that it brings us and that the idea of having a spiritual practice is one that's completely compatible with the idea of being extremely sceptical of dogma that those two things are not at war they may be intentioned the way so many rich things in our life for intention but they're not a war i'm chris to tip it and this is on being today within new yorkers adam gop nick einstein is to to osce echoes easy interstate the dead a sense of wonder is at the heart of the best of religion and science and the arts when he used to see those things as at their heart overlap in that way speak out to each other absolutely i think the the where science and certain aspects of religion said he'd do park company is is science demands that we be skeptical even of our own favorite theories and there's a aspect is a side of religious tradition that is like that that demands that we be argumentative about them itin before yom kippur this year i did a talk at the one of the local synagogues i you know i i am not a good enough to to be confident that god will be riding my name down in the book but i think he you know i'm here i'm talking during my bit gun you know don't be too harsh and at one of the things i was saying is that one of my favorite artist stoorikhel treasures is the what's called the darmstadt haga which is a meaning evil jewish illuminated manuscript aren't very many of them and all it shows is jews arguing about the tax.

new yorkers nick einstein darmstadt haga Streak
"adam gop" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"adam gop" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Over and over again and then to complete the circle that little voice calls out love and you have to go all out in that case to ray totally and that's the cause of all of our cooking is our search for love i believe steel and i will go into the kitchen tonight and i will try to balance the black all love's against the sweet tomatoes in the shrimp pasta that i will make for my family i still believe in that creed but a little part of me after my experience of rene sauce tells me that what we really seek is the simplest thing and that part of the joy of cooking however much we may complicated by exoticism part of the joy of cooking and eating is its route simplicity we live for fat butter salt and sugar enriched should not be ashamed that's a tshirt adam gop nick thank you thank you because that was adam coptic staff writer for the new york adam gop nick says they what we really want israel fat and lots of humans in enjoy pleasure is so taking tiny bite at the forbidden apples really not in our nature i agree but might add that we really don't know what we want pleasure is a fleeting notion in life without just the opposite that would be pain might not be quite as pleasant as we think so when you find pleasure take you never know when you'll taste than again thanks for listening to mostly radio if you missed us you can always listened to our podcast it's free and i tuned stitcher tune in and spotify.

staff writer adam coptic new york israel spotify
"adam gop" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"adam gop" Discussed on Masters in Business

"And that's where the phrase short fingered vulgarity yeah was published and that has to be 20 25 years ago yeah and and he is and it's still it's a gray it like you know it's like any publication it has its ebbs and flows but he is a great he's one of the great editors and he hires great writers in any vanity fair is a monster yelm you know michael lewis's their van nothing mclane as their william cohen as their brian burrow is there uh you know what else who else you need rainy grade nam available on so uh um the the way that they do business stories it vanity fair i i wrote for them while egypt indepth the i did like a decade's worth of work with them grade and gave me it was awesome enough to give me a lot of work for a while when i was freelance um that's how you do a good business story rose guys do a better than anybody they put a lot i i was quoted by them in something i think three different fact checkers told me it was nobody uses that does that sorted depth of and if you read that stuff and put it up sidebyside with fortune like the people had fortune where i've been a contributor they should be embarrassed of themselves so you're not going to be a contributor endoh i like that israel storytelling so gradin but then if there is like one name who i read not with an eye to uh trying to write like him because it will never happen right but who i read with just because it brings me joy a euphoric something is adam gop nick at the new yorker he is the greatest in my opinion he's the greatest.

michael lewis mclane william cohen brian burrow new yorker egypt israel 20 25 years
"adam gop" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"adam gop" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"Taylor was just a kid when he recorded his first album at apple records in london with help from the beatles and he really became a musical touchstone for his generation almost immediately for williams he was the late 90s already when she was on her way to fifty and she had a hit with the record car wheels on a gravel road to nomo's perfect mix of country in blues and folk and it arrived just as a younger generation was falling in love with genre now known as americana we're going to hear performances from both artist recorded at the new yorker festival which always takes place over an early fall weekend and to kick things off here's my colleague adam gop nick a staff writer at the new yorker for thirty years james this evening runs the risk of being an episode in the chris farley show for member chris farley on saturday night live when he would have people admired on him which is say you're member when you wrote fire and rain and say that was worry and i could go through everything you've done and simply stand here and sweat and say that was great but i will try at least to find out why it's all been so great about your music one of the things that's always sort of stunned me about is when you first appeared you had distinctive way of playing the guitar which wasn't like anybody else has distinctive kind of waste things and you had an amazing harmonic language i always think when i go through your sheet music and see that wonderful song like don't let me baloney tonight starts the eu minor ninth cord and then goes to a major seven court those weren't the see a minor f cheaper aggressions of of pop music at the time did you study music how was it that the language of music came to be the language you speak so naturally i studied cello when i when i was a kid.

Taylor london beatles williams nomo staff writer new yorker chris farley pop music apple adam gop thirty years
"adam gop" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"adam gop" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Adam gop nick staff writer for the new yorker and now staff writer for broadway not quite broadway yet but hovering in new haven let's say thanks adam thanks so much praise when i spoke with simone seti reminded me of heston blumenthal summer seaside meal if you forgotten that's the one with the ipod the place the sounds of the c while you're eating your first course one diner reportedly broke down in tears memories are powerful things for my part i don't really want my dinner to become a multi media experience but it's true the playing with wants food has an agent pedigree even the romans did it serving pheasant brains and peacock tung so instead of complaining perhaps i should just sit back put awesome headphones take a bite of scallop and just enjoy the sounds of some that's it for this week if you missed us you can always listened to milk radio on i tuned stitch or tune in and spotify and don't forget the check out our brand new website that's one seven seven milk street dot com you can get free recipes and also subscribe to our magazine thanks for listening we'll be back next week christopher kimble's no radio is produced by milk street in association with wgbf change executive producers melissa baldonnel and stephanie standard producer amy padilla production assistant carly helmet tom senior audio engineer douglas sugar senior audio editor melissa allison with help from vicky merrick and sydney lewis i am mixing by j allison had atlantic public media production help debbie patty key music to bob crew additional music by george brandel edgar christopher kimble's milk street radio is distributed by p r.

spotify george brandel bob sydney lewis audio editor douglas sugar engineer amy padilla producer melissa baldonnel executive staff writer heston blumenthal Adam gop vicky merrick melissa allison production assistant christopher kimble ipod simone seti broadway new yorker milk one seven seven milk
"adam gop" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"adam gop" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"And we all speak the same language the language of food cook as adam gop nick one of our regular contributors like to say the table comes first you're listening to christopher kimmel's milk street radio right now signed the talk about ethical eating with new yorker writer adam gop nick adam how are you i am fine christopher how are you i'm great what is on your mind this week chris i'd be honest with you i have something a little more serious than our usual lark some infancy she's inquiries into the imaginative life of food to talk about i just got the tenth anniversary edition michael pollens remarkable book the omnivore dilemma and one of the things that made me think about again is the basic unstoppable never ending arguments about sustainability pleasure and health beyond everything else the real question that haunts anybody who takes eating seriously in the beginning of the twenty first century is what are the real ethics of eating pollen of course raise that question and he wasted in terms of how we grow our food how we slaughter are animals how far our food has to travel to come to us the ills and ravages of mono cultural farming and on and on and on in response to that there's been a kind of kicked back that insist that those concerns are in some real way frivolous that no matter how much propaganda we make for the local or matter how much you and i fell about green markets in pollens own way those things still occupy a perilous lee tiny proportion of the food world that we delude ourselves if we imagine that they are more significant than they actually are and that the real ethical problem of questions of food to beating the twenty first century has nothing to do with whether our carrot was grown ten miles away or ten thousand miles away but with how we're going to feed an ever larger human population and that back and forth i think has been one that nobody who cares about the philosophy of food can really nor.

nick adam adam gop christopher kimmel new yorker writer chris milk