8 Burst results for "Adam Cohn"

"adam cohn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:57 min | 8 months ago

"adam cohn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Weekend edition from NPR news under the car seat of RO and it's time to play the puzzle joining us is will Shortz he's puzzle editor of The New York Times and weekend edition's puzzle master I will good morning Lulu good morning what was last week's challenge yes it came from Joseph young of Saint cloud Minnesota and it involves pi day which was yesterday March fourteenth commonly written as three fourteen of course that's pi day because three one four are the first three digits of pi and I said the letters of pi day P. I. D. A. Y. also have a curious mathematical significance what is it and the amazing thing is the numerical positions in the alphabet of P. I. D. A. Y. R. sixteen nine four one and twenty five which are the first five perfect squares we received over thirteen hundred correct responses in the winner this week is Bernice B. that of Louisville Kentucky congratulations thank you how do you solve it I wrote down the numbers and the letters of the alphabet in a parallel column and circled the only ones to go along with the pi day and I saw that a perfect score at school I'm a suicide from puzzles I hear you're into photography would you like to photograph anything but most of my pictures are unusual quirky things signs billboards T. shirts what the what welcome my complex our license plates is a good ones are you ready to play yes okay well take it away all right Bernie every answer today is a word name or phrase in which the only consonants are C. and T. repeated as often as necessary all the other letters are vowels for example if I said understood without being stated you would say tacit so here's number one we're gonna start with five letter answers your first one is room at the top of the house Eric had in his right number two is like an angle that's less than ninety degrees huh a group of eight musicians Dr uhhuh desert plants with needles correct that's it an adorable person good city on the Erie Canal obviously in upstate New York tweet between buffalo and Albany well what if I told you it starts with you your music is it now we're on the six letter answers and your first one is strategy huh and starts with the tea I'll tell you that one it's a tactic right now but this something invisible a grade schooler doesn't want to get could be a booty a brand of breasts meant it's two words that's it I kind of acid that's it ancient Greek state with Athens Erica that's it it's a nice was a two word answer and that means to mis behave and to say you have frustrations you might do these two them actor act out as it now seven letter answers a virtuoso musical piece played on a piano starts with T. I traveling outside alone it's a Takata all right and we'll move on to eight letter or more answers and your first one is a large lake between Bolivia and Peru that's it a cry a meeting stop that's enough it's a three word phrase someone is doing something to you you don't like you might say credit out in your last one is a hyphenated word it's a game with exes and ohs background that's it finish strong how do you feel relieved for playing a puzzle today you'll get a weekend edition lapel pin as well as puzzle books and games you can read all about it at NPR dot org slash puzzle and Bernie was member station to listen to W. F. P. L. that's plenty stock of Louisville Kentucky thank you so much for playing the puzzle here all right will what's next week's challenge yeah comes from Adam Cohn of Brooklyn think of a well known entertainer six letters in the first name four letters in the last you can change the first letter of the entertainers last name to name an animal and you can change the first letter of the entertainers first name to get what kind of animal that is who is it so again a well known entertainers six four change the first letter of the last name to name an animal and change the first letter of the first name to get what kind of animal that is who's the entertainer and what words are these when you have the answer go to our website NPR dot org slash puzzle and click on the submit your answer link remember just one entry per person please our deadline for entries is Thursday March nineteenth at three PM eastern include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time and if you're the winner we'll give you a call and you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and weekend edition's very own puzzle master will Shortz thanks so much well thanks for the Chemed Chemed Chemed to Corazon good local local local much she decided to senior class on that opinion is let alone that I may have been now the other thing is mix of.

editor NPR The New York Times
"adam cohn" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

12:52 min | 8 months ago

"adam cohn" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"Post in other Murdoch needed in the states or here the Murdoch press in the Murdoch television there's there's a certain segment of the population I don't know exactly you know what it is but probably in the high thirties to low forties that is is trapped in that that bubble of misinformation and disinformation and it's almost impenetrable and it's very difficult to change their minds about any of this but then there's the rest of the population and there's sort of a you know the the middle of the sort of the swing voters who are paying quite a bit of attention to what's happening on the very concerned obviously about what's happening to our country and they see images of Scott Morrison not just holding a hunk of coal in parliament on the floor of parliament to actually in this photo of him just adoring a piece called to sort of fit in an effort to display his his commitment to helping the fossil fuel industry continue make record profits here but it was the other seniors at the bush fires were playing out he was vacationing in Hawaii indoor photos of him that showing and celebrating this is people are dying and this agent forests were being destroyed homes were being destroyed he then came back to Australia but already you know his tone deaf initial response they can quite a toll on his public standing and then he came back and started hitting some of the communities that had been hit and there were just some remarkable photos square he's reaching out his hand and people don't want to shake his hand in one case you literally have to grapple with this woman and she kept her up because she was resisting doing so you know that's not a good look for a prime minister is popularity right now is exceptionally low I think gets us somewhere in the upper thirties and so the question is will Australians have enough memory the elections right now or two years away and will they remember everything that happened when they go into the voting here in Australia this compulsory voting and so it's very different dynamic it's not about turnout as it often is in the state in the states people do turn turned out they were required to turn out but will they remember what they've been through will they remember how Scott Morrison in the current level coalition liberal national coalition that's the conservative coalition will they remember how how more soon and the the coalition government left in the lurch exorbitant after the greatest time of need I hope so well if they ignore them they will get a reminder because global warming is getting worse and it will be just as bad if not worse in the intervening two years front in Australia well that's right and we're proud to be the next chapter in the saga unfolded in the form of a bleaching event that may be the worst bleaching event yet for the Great Barrier Reef at this point it's looking as if they needed a larger the five percent of the of the reef will be hit by this bleaching event than the last devastating other twenty sixteen so and you know that will be next summer then there's no reason to believe that we won't see more epic cheat and droughts and bushfires up you know maybe not as bad as this season but you know this what the scene is that we saw play out this summer are going to be at the very best the new normal for Australia the best in the normal because in normal and plies that things were to stay the same same level crisis that we're at the crisis could get worse if we continue down this road the frustrating that contributes to that by continuing to build leading exporter of coal in the world well my command I think you very much for joining us thank you and always a pleasure thank you and I've been speaking with Michael Mann the director of the US system Science Center at Penn state university he's a co founder and a contributor to the award winning science website real climate dot org and in two thousand seven he shared the Nobel Peace Prize with other something intergovernmental panel on climate change his books include dire predictions understanding global warming and these latest is the madhouse effect how climate change denial is straightening out planet destroying our politics and driving us crazy and he joined us from Sydney Australia where he is a visiting professor at the university of New South Wales getting a base station break we're back speaking with the office of the brand new book just out supreme inequality the supreme court's fifty year battle for a more unjust American welcome back IBM monsters in this is background briefing available twenty four seven a background briefing dot org and joining us now is Adam Cohn who served as a member of the New York times editorial board and as a senior writer for time magazine the author of imbeciles the Supreme Court American eugenics and the sterilization of Carrie back and nothing to fear of chaos in a circle and the Hundred Days that created modern America these latest book just out is supreme in the quality of the supreme court's fifty a battle for more on just America welcome to background briefing Adam Cohen good to be here well thank you and there is actually a really serious battle underway involving the Supreme Court with the president having at targeted the two liberal justices Sotomayor and Ginsburg suggesting that they should recuse themselves from any trump related case what we know that there are trump related cases coming up one of which will be argued in the coming months and that is about this many subpoenas out there particularly the ones with full information on trump's dealings with Deutsche Bank and by extension the Russians which the family the trump family of four assiduously in from Japan extremely upset about and arguably quite paranoid about so what is clearly trying to do is to try and get these two judges off the court so you get a safe majority to bury this isn't that what's happening I think that's quite possibly what's happening another thing that may be happening is you could be setting himself up to reject the ruling when it comes down to say remain on the court and the court rules against him he made and say this is not a valid ruling because I told you to the justices have conflicts okay it's very disturbing for all the reasons you described is not the way the system supposed to work so why is the Chief Justice on on this well I mean we don't know it's hard to interpret silence right so what part of the reason may be that he it doesn't want to get involved he's someone who's very worried about his own reputation he's shown so he may not want to alienate any side by saying anything but we don't know maybe to some extent he is not you know I'm happy that you know the president's putting a little pressure on the court I don't want to say that I have no basis for that but the silence is you know out there and and we we don't know what he's saying we do know that he's not defending the justices well but he's not defending an independent branch of government that's a part of this extraordinary and you would think that he would want to step up and made isn't too concerned about if they rule in a partisan manner on trump's taxes once the scales come off and basically will realize that these guys are just conservative operatives in black robes well yes but you know a lot of people say the skills came off in two thousand in bush versus gore right that was the first time that we really saw the court be so incredibly political right I mean they not only voted exactly along the ideological lines to make George Bush the president to stop the votes from being counted but they actually wrote in the decision this decision is not precedent in other cases that's unheard of and when we all read that in two thousand we thought well they're hardly even trying anymore to hide the fact that their becoming a political branch rather than a legal branch so I don't think that this would be the first time the skills to come up with a group of youth the skills would come off right so much for states rights yes it comes and goes doesn't it right so you book though he takes a much broader perspective in one of the things it's always struck me is that even the definitions we have about the court's liberal minority in that conservative majority I'm not even sure that does titles of right I mean federal the courts not really liberal in this that liberals on the court I don't think I've particularly liberal in the way that we met Douglas the second motion company where so is that what's happened is moved so far to the right that we've actually change the definitions I think that's exactly right I mean I write in the book about the war in court of the Warren court of the fifties intricately nineteen sixties which really was liberal they were doing some really is very strong liberal things they were striking down rules that made it hard for people to get welfare they were you know if you think of a decision like Gideon V. Wainwright that was a decision in nineteen sixty three the guaranteed every poor person who's accused of a crime pretty much every poor person who's a crime a lawyer that's a huge thing every every locality around the country had to provide lawyers to poor defendants so those with major label things I think you're right the liberals on the court right now you know I I I I know Elena Kagan and and I think she's a great dresses but she's not a political issue that we're willing to Douglas's I I studied with Stephen Breyer use my administrative law professor in law school he's a wonderful dresses but he also is not William O. Douglas I think you're right that the entire court has shifted more to the center in case of liberals and more towards the right in the case of the conservatives so according to the two thousand and eighteen global inequality report the two main reasons for rising inequality in the United States are unequal education opportunity and a regressive tax system and this is what you focus in on in terms of your new book that we're talking about here today Supreme inequality the supreme court's fifty a battle for a more unjust America a very ironic title service work walking through this that broad thesis of why in targeting education and the tax system the court has punished the poor and rewarded the rich sure so when we look around our society today we see a huge growing income inequality and wealth inequality right me dramatically growing and we wonder why and the explanations we get tend to be the global things like there's more global trade and jobs are going overseas or automation and robots are taking our jobs or we hear about policies from the Congress and the president like some of the tax laws and welfare laws that that have been passed in recent years the point of my book is I want to put a spotlight on the Supreme Court and say Hey you know the Supreme Court this right wing Supreme Court we had for fifty years since Richard Nixon appointed for conservatives to recorded into the Warren court we had a concert of course for fifty years and these decisions in the coming year after year decade after decade I've been a driving force of inequality and it's for just the reason you said when you look at the world inequality report twenty eighteen done by Thomas to could be another very good economists they say the two main drivers of inequality in eight states are as you said educational inequalities and a lack of a progressive tax system will both of those things are very much due.

Murdoch
"adam cohn" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

09:56 min | 1 year ago

"adam cohn" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Leonard cone from the final album. That was released while he was alive. The title track. You want darker. My guest is his son. Adam Cohn who wrote the introduction to a new collection of Leonard Cohen's final poems notebook entries lyrics and drawings called the flame that song is so much about facing death and of having a god who allows suffering and accepting the suffering. be it yet not being like happy about it or trying to make it seem like sufferings great. No He's not trying to be spiritual and a dismissive way of of all the suffering that we endure I I wanna read what he wrote about you for the liner notes of this album whom he wrote that without your contribution there would be no record. He said at a certain point after over a year of intense labor both pat who wrote the melodies an I. coincidentally broke down with severe back injuries and other disagreeable visitations in my case the situation was bleak. The discomfort acute cute and the project was abandoned. Adam sense that my recovery if not my survival depended on my getting back to work he took over. The project check established me in a medical charity to sing and brought these unfinished songs to completion. Preserving of course many pets haunting musical themes it is because because of my sons loving encouragement and skilled administration that these songs exist in their present form. I can't thank them enough. What were you able to to do for him physically to make it possible for him to record the album he mentions you put him in a medical of chair? Can you describe the sat up there that you helped create for him. I think maybe the more interesting thing certainly to me would be to to just say that we were riding some kind of mysterious wind and the grace of the the occasion. There was an urgency to the entire mission and of course it had to do with his serious health issues he was mobilized he had multiple compression fractures of his spine and it involves an incredible monastic effort on his part to to be present and to deliver the way he did but but there's something about his work in general not just on the last album but in this book and in general he he invites you. Oh you into your own inner life. Because he takes the inner life seriously he's not like one of these contemporaries. I won't mention any names but there there are many wonderful contemporaries of his who have in my estimation become nostalgia acts. They're still jax. Because there's somehow they've succumb to come to the temptation of going back into their older catalog and their regurgitating things whereas this man was speaking from the very wrong that he found himself at in life. I'm going to ask you to read a poem that published in the new collection in the posthumous this collection of Leonard Cohen's works So is there something that you could choose. That would be relevant to what we're talking about now. You know what I. I don't WanNa read this poems. I think that I think in some way or another if we could urge people to To consult the work with smaller samples otherwise it takes a kind of lugubrious tone that I think he would have been very very reticent to To accept it I'm wondering if you think that's because like when your father saying his songs are read his poems there. Was this really dark quality but there was like kind of existential distance from it at the same time and transcendent quality as well that made for really complicated mix of emotion Is that what is troubling you about the idea of you. You're reading the poems yourself that he brought this kind of just you know. Even through his voice this complicated quality of whatever pain or anguish and spirituality who is expressing at the same time. And that you don't feel like you could. I think it's simpler than that. You know I'm reminded of I'm reminded of so so many lines in which he talked about the solitude you'd of the experience of the of reading and there's so many poems in which he alludes to the idea that That this is this this is a private matter and so there's something contradictory feels like a transgression for meteoroid them. I appreciate you saying that as the sun but as a fan fan of your father's work I will say that. He performed his work in concerts to large crowds of people. And they're so many performers who have performed his songs so they have their have his work has a life outside of his mouth and and his work has a life outside of the solitary experience of reader sitting alone in his room quietly reading his poems. So I go on the record essay and I'll go one step further other with what you're saying just because I don't believe that they're contradictory in a sense. I mean this is a man who's put the word Hallelujah. On many millions of people's of lips lips so that that's the sound of a preacher man The of course. When it's attached to song it's supposed to lift and And exist the way songs vos existed. I just mean that there's something about reading the poetry that feels instructional now or has kind of rigor to it. of a lugubrious quality that I don't believe was intended. There's something more beautiful full about the notion of people quietly thumbing through this book and absorbing and as I say really taking the time with the gills that are embedded in every line taking their our own time not with my meter with my voice. Since you've declined to read more poems by your father. I'M GONNA play him being cantankerous or intransigent transient. I'd I'd be lying if I didn't say it was a little disappointing but I I can. I can live with that so I thought I'd play your father reading a enough another poem of his from the interview that we recorded in two thousand six and this is a poem called titles and it was published in a book. Look that he did in two thousand and six of Poems and lyrics so this is Leonard Cohen recorded in two thousand six on fresh air. I had the title poet and maybe I was one for a while. Also the title singer was was kindly accorded me. Even though I could barely carry a tune for many years I was known as a monk think I shaved my head and wore robes and got up very early I hated everyone but I acted generously and no one found me out my reputation. As a ladies' man was a joke. It caused me to laugh bitterly through the ten thousand nights. I spent a loan from a third story window above the park to Portugal Portugal. I've watched the snow come down all day as usual. There's no one here. There never is mercifully. The inner conversation is cancelled by the white noise of winter. I am neither the the mind. The intellect nor the silent voice within that's also cancelled and now gentle reader. And what name in. Whose name do you come to idle with me in these luxurious and wendling realms of aimless privacy poem Adam gets a little but we were talking about the connection of your father the writing in solitude and the reader re reading alone and as you know yeah entering his solitude? Yeah as you you noted also kind of of humor you know remember. I love one of his lands where he says Feel so good not to love you like I did. It's like the tore away my blindfold and said we're going to let this prisoner live that those hilarious Adam Cohen. The son on of singer Songwriter. Leonard Cohen Speaking to Terry Gross last year a book collection of Leonard Cohen's formerly unpublished writings and drawings titled. The flame is now out in paperback. A new posthumous Leonard Cohen Album. Thanks for the dance comes out today after a break. We'll continue. Terry's conversation with Adam Cohen and film critic Justin. Chang will review the new movie a Beautiful Day in the neighborhood in which Tom Hanks plays children's TV host. Fred Rogers. I'm David Being Cooley. Hooghly and this is fresh air support for NPR and the following message come from air from advances in health to innovations in agriculture. There is advancing science. Thanks for a better life because someone with heart issues should still be able to have their heart jumped with joy because a farmer using less water should still be able to grow grow their crops because someone getting older should still be able to act young at bear. This is why we science. Let's get back to Terry's interview from last year with.

Leonard Cohen Adam Cohen Adam Leonard cone Adam Cohn Terry Gross Fred Rogers NPR Portugal Portugal Tom Hanks David Being Cooley Hooghly Chang Justin
"adam cohn" Discussed on All Songs Considered

All Songs Considered

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"adam cohn" Discussed on All Songs Considered

"This is Leonard Cohen. The album is thanks for the dance. This incredible edible song is called happens to the heart. Another posthumous release. He died three years ago now. But unlike a lot of posthumous releases. These are all new songs. These aren't besides sides or demos out takes whatever but these are totally new songs. Yeah these this album was made deliberately. This wasn't a case where Leonard Cohen's estate found a bunch of scraps graphs and tried to turn them into a record. Leonard Cohen made this in collaboration with his son. Adam Cohn who's also a singer songwriter. And he recorded these songs understanding that they would come Out after he died and so he left his son and some of his friends and collaborators to finish this record and I will tell you I think it is a great. I have sometimes struggled with his music in the past because he tended to surround his beautiful words with arrangements that I found really Tinian inch easy. And you know he liked he. She dresses songs up in ways that felt very dated. And this doesn't this. Has this very spare graceful production to wit and then. His words are pretty stunning. I mean they're clearly words written with his mortality in mind but they still have a lot of those Leonard Cohen signposts like Songs Songs that touch on lust and and loss and in in in really interesting ways. He's such a quotable songwriter. It later in the song that you played he sings things. I had no trouble betting on the flood against the ARC like that is an awesome line about death. I guess I was going to say that he could have written at any other time in his life. Life because it says geniuses anything he's done but maybe not actually given where he was in his life when he wrote the songs but found the songs to just be profoundly profoundly. Moving Really Beautiful Yeah love this one. Keep them coming. This is our final new music Friday of 2019. We'll be back in the in the New Year not a whole lot of releases come out in December but there are few that we wanNA mention just flag them put them on your calendar. Starting off with Camilla Cabela's album romance that comes out on December six As does the WHO's new album who that comes out. Also so on December sixth. Yeah really fascinating singer. We've talked about on this show before La Fonda has a new record called ancestor boy to is obviously the follow up to a record that we really liked talked about show show called ancestor boy Harry styles of recent Saturday night live host and musical guest His very hotly anticipated new album. Fine Line comes out December thirteenth I say Harry styles very funny. I was impressed. I was really impressed. He had great timing all those albums coming out in December. While we're taking a break we we will be back in the new year. Thanks Steven thank you. Robin to hear full versions of the songs we featured and a whole lot of other new releases from the week checkout. NPR's expanded new new music. Friday playlist you'll find it in both apple music and spotify you can also find it on our website along with a list of everything that we discussed on this episode just go to NPR dot org slash all songs as always sign up for our newsletter to keep up with the latest from NPR music. Good NPR DOT org slash music newsletter and for NPR music. I'm Robyn Hilton. Be well have a great weekend and treat yourself to lots of music..

Leonard Cohen NPR Robyn Hilton Adam Cohn Camilla Cabela ARC La Fonda Robin Harry apple Steven
"adam cohn" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:42 min | 2 years ago

"adam cohn" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Book. I, I'm just so struck by hearing my father's voice. I seem to be listening to almost more than I ever did even when he was alive. I love his poetry. I love his words. I love the way he marshals language. I'm weary of discussing my father. I always have been, especially when you have a person who had such an inimitable way of and command of language. So I'm hesitant him. I didn't even know whether I should I. I'm not certain. I should be here speaking about him, but it's a stirring subject. And I have been enlisted I'm enlisted in the. In the campaign to let everybody know how wonderful I think he was. I wanna play the title song on the final album that was released when your father Leonard Cohn was still alive. It's called you want a darker and then we'll talk about working with him on it and this is it's what can I say? It's a great song. Out of the game. If you are the Hilo means I'm broken. If line is the glory, mine must be ashamed. You want to duck. Kills. Sect of. Five in the human frame, a million candles burning for the help that never came. You wanna darker. Ready. S. Leonard Cohen, from the final album that was released while he was alive, the title track you want darker. My guest is his son Adam Cohn who wrote the introduction to a new collection of Leonard Cone's, final poems, notebook entries, lyrics, drawings, called the flame that song so much about facing death and of having a God who allows suffering and accepting the suffering, but yet not being like happy about it or trying to make it seem like sufferings. Great. No, he's not trying to be spiritual in dismissive way of all the suffering that we endure. I, I wanna read what he wrote about you for the liner notes of this album. He wrote that without your contribution, there would be no record. He said at a certain point after over a year of intense labor, both Pat who wrote the melodies and I co incidentally broke down. With severe back injuries and other disagreeable visitations. In my case, the situation was bleak the discomfort acute and the project was abandoned. Adam sense that my recovery, if not, my survival depended on my getting back to work, he took over the project established me in a medical charity to sing and brought these unfinished songs to completion. Preserving, of course, many of pets haunting musical themes. It is because of my sons, loving and courage meant and skilled administration that these songs exist in their present form. I cannot thank. Enough. What were you able to do for him physically to make it possible for him to record the Avas he mentions you put him in a medical of chair. Can you describe the setup that that you help create for him? I think maybe the more interesting thing certainly to me would be to to just say that we were riding some kind of mysterious wind and the grace of the occasion. There was an urgency to the entire mission. And of course it had to do with his serious health issues. He was mobilized, he had multiple compression fractures of his spine and involved in incredible monastic effort on his part to to be present to deliver the way he did, but there's something about his work in general, not just on the last help him, but he invites you into your own inner life because he takes the inner life seriously. He's not like one of these contemporaries. I won't mention any names, but there are many wonderf-. Contemporaries of his who have in my estimation, become nostalgia axe their nostalgia, because there's somehow they've succumb to the temptation of going back into their older catalog and their regurgitating things. Whereas this man was speaking from the very wrong that he found himself at in life. My guest is songwriter and singer, Adam Cohen who's the son of Leonard Cohen. Adam wrote the forward to a new collection of his father's previously unpublished poems lyrics notebook entries, and drawings called the flame will talk more after a break. This is fresh air weaken support for this podcast and the following message come from TIAA TIAA supports people who are driven by purpose. Those who build others, instead of just wealth who give back and never give up whatever your purpose may be. TIAA will help you live your definition of success, whether you have five hundred dollars or five million TIAA. Will get you where you want to be with investing advice, banking and retirement planning, start

S. Leonard Cohen Pat Leonard Cohn Adam TIAA TIAA Adam Cohen Adam Cohn Hilo Leonard Cone five hundred dollars
"adam cohn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"adam cohn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From the final album that was released while he was alive the title track. You wanna darker, I guess this his son Adam Cohn who wrote the introduction to a new collection of Leonard Cohen's final poems notebook entries. Lyrics and drawings called the flame. That's a so much about facing death and of having a God who allows suffering and accepting the suffering. But yet not being like happy about it or trying to make it seem like sufferings great. You know, he's not trying to be spiritual and dismissive way of all the suffering that we endure. I wanna read what he wrote about you for the liner notes of this album. He wrote that without your contribution. There would be no record. He said at a certain point after over a year of intense labor. Both Pat who wrote the melodies, and I coincidentally broke down with severe back injuries and other disagreeable visitations in my case, the situation was bleak the discomfort acute and the project was abandoned Adam sense that my recovery if not my survival depended on my getting back to work he took over the project established me in a medical charity to sing. And brought these unfinished songs to completion. Preserving of course, many of pets haunting musical themes. It is because of my sons loving encouragement and skilled administration that these songs exist in their present form, I cannot thank me enough. What were you able to do for him physically? To make it possible for him to record the bomb. He mentioned she put him in a medical Cherokee. Can you describe the set up there that you helped create for him? I think maybe the more interesting thing that certainly to me would be to to just say that we were riding some kind of mysterious wind and the grace of the occasion there was an urgency to the entire mission. And of course, it had to do with his serious health issues. He was immobilized he had multiple compression, fractures of his spine and it involved in incredible monastic effort on his part to to be present. And to deliver the way he did. But there's something about his work in general, not just on the last help them, but in this book and in general. He he invites you into your own inner life because he takes the inner life. Seriously. He's not like one of these contemporaries, I won't mention any names. But there are many wonderful contemporaries of his who have in my estimation. Become nostalgia axe their nostalgia tax because there's somehow they've succumb to the temptation of going back into their older catalog and their regurgitating. Thanks. Whereas this man was speaking from the very wrong that he found himself at in life. Well, let me reintroduce you. If you're just joining us. My guest is Adam Cohen, and he's the son of Leonard Cohen and others in new collection of Leonard Cohen's final lyrics poems notebook entries and drawings. And these are all collected in the new book, the flame and Adam Kohn wrote the introduction to it. We're gonna take a short break, and then we'll be right back. This is fresh air. This.

Pat Leonard Cohen Adam Cohen Adam Cohn Adam Kohn Adam Cherokee
"adam cohn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"adam cohn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"As Leonard Cohen from the final album that was released while he was alive the title track. You want a darker? My guest is his son Adam Cohn who wrote the introduction to a new collection of Leonard calls final poems notebook entries. Lyrics and drawings called the flame that song is so much about facing death and of having a God who allows suffering and accepting the suffering bit yet not being like happy about it or trying to make it seem like sufferings great know, he's not trying to be spiritual and dismissive way of of all the suffering that we endure. I want to read what he wrote about you for the liner notes of this album. He wrote that without your contribution. There would be no record. He said at a certain point after over a year of intense labor. Both Pat who wrote the melodies, and I coincidentally broke down with severe back injuries and other disagreeable visitations in my case, the situation was bleak the discomfort acute and the project was abandoned Adam sense that my recovery if not my survival depended on my getting back to work he took over the project established me in a medical charity to sing and brought his unfinished songs to completion. Preserving of course, many of pets haunting musical themes. It is because of my sons loving encouragement and skilled administration that these songs exist in their present forum. I cannot thank enough. What were you able to do for him physically? To make it possible for him to record the he mentioned she put him in a medical check. Can you describe the set up that you helped create for him? I think maybe the more interesting thing certainly to me would be to to just say that we were riding some kind of mysterious wind and the grace of the occasion there was an urgency to the entire mission. And of course, it had to do with his serious health issues. He was immobilized he had multiple compression, fractures of his spine and it involved an incredible monastic effort on his part to to be present. And to deliver the way he did. But there's something about his work in general, not just on the last help them, but in this book and in general. He he invites you into your own inner life because he takes the inner life seriously. He's not like one of these contemporaries, I won't mention any names. But there are many wonderful contemporaries of his who have in my estimation. Become nostalgia axe their nostalgia axe because there's somehow they've succumb to the temptation of going back into their older catalog and their regurgitating things. Whereas this man was speaking from the very wrong that he found himself at in life. Well, let me reintroduce you. If you're just joining us. My guest is Adam Cohen, and he's the son of Leonard Cohen and others in new collection of Leonard Cohen's final lyrics poems notebook entries and drawings. And these are all collected in the new book, the flame and Adam Kohn wrote the introduction to it. We're gonna take a short break, and then we'll be right back. This is fresh air..

Leonard Cohen Pat Adam Cohen Adam Cohn Adam Kohn Adam
"adam cohn" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

10:18 min | 2 years ago

"adam cohn" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Song. Out of the game. If you are the Hilo means broken lane. If line is the glory and nine must be the shame you want to dark. Kills a frame. Willie name. In the human frame, a million candles burning full, the hill that never came. You want to darker. I'm ready. Leonard Cohen. From the final album that was released while he was alive, the title track you want a darker my guest, this, his son Adam Cohn who wrote the introduction to a new collection of Leonard Cohen's, final poems, notebook entries, lyrics, and drawings called the flame. That's a so much about facing death and of having a God who allows suffering and accepting the suffering, but yet not being like happy about it or trying to make it seem like sufferings. Great. You know, he's not trying to be spiritual dismissive way of of all the suffering that we endure. I, I wanna read what he wrote about you for the liner notes of this album. He wrote that without your contribution, there would be no record. He said at a certain point after over a year of intense labor, both Pat who wrote the melodies and I convinced mentally broke down with. Veer back injuries and other disagreeable visitations. In my case, the situation was bleak the discomfort acute and the project was abandoned. Adam sense that my recovery, if not, my survival depended on my getting back to work, he took over the project established me in a medical chair to sing and brought these unfinished songs to completion. Preserving, of course, many of pets haunting musical themes. It is because of my sons, loving encouragement and skilled administration that these songs exist in their present form. I cannot thank. Enough, what were you able to do for him physically to make it possible for him to record the odham he mentions you put him in a medical of chair. Can you describe the set up there that you help create for him? I think maybe the more interesting thing certainly to me would be to to just say that we were riding some kind of mysterious wind and the grace of the occasion. There was an urgency to the entire mission. And of course it had to do with his serious health issues. He was mobilized, he had multiple compression fractures of his spine involved in incredible monastic effort on his part to to be present and to deliver the way he did. But that's something about his work in general, not just on the last help him, but in this book and in general, a heat, he invites you into your own inner life because he takes the inner life seriously. He's not like one of these contemporaries. I won't mention any names, but there are many wonderful contemporaries of his who have in my estimation, become nostalgia axe their nostalgia, because there's somehow they've succumb to the temptation of going back into their older catalog and their regurgitating things. Whereas this man was speaking from the very wrong that he found himself at in life. I'm going to ask you to read a poem that published in the new collection in the pasture misc- election of Leonard Cohen's works. So is there something that you could choose that would be relevant to what we're talking about now. You know what? I, I don't wanna read this poems. I think that I think in somewhere another, if we could urge people to to consult the work with smaller samples. Otherwise, it takes a kind of lugubrious tone that I think he would have been very, very reticent to to accept it. I'm wondering if you think that's because like when you're father saying his are read his poems, there was this really dark quality, but there was like kind of existential distance from it at the same time and a transcendent quality as well. That made for really complicated mix of emotion. Is that what is troubling you? The idea of you, you reading the poems yourself that he brought this kind of just, you know, even through his voice, this complicated quality of whatever pain or anguish and spirituality who is expressing at the same time and that you don't feel like you could. I think it's simpler than that. You know, I'm reminded of, I'm reminded of so so many lines in which he talked about the solitude of the experience of the of reading, and there's so many poems in which he alludes to the idea that that this is. This is a private matter. And so there's something contradictory feels like a transgression for meter read them. I appreciate you saying that as a son, but as a fan of your father's work, I will say that he performed his work in concerts to large crowds of people, and there are so many performers who have performed his songs so they have the have his work has a life outside of his mouth, and and his work has a life outside of the solitary experience of reader sitting alone in his room quietly reading his poems. So I. On the record essay. No, and I'll go instep further with what you're saying just because I don't believe that they're contradictory in a sense. I mean, this is a man who's put the word Hallelujah on many millions of people's of lips so that that's the sound of a preacher man. The, of course, when it's attached to song it's supposed to lift and and exists the way songs of os existed. I just mean that there's something about reading the poetry that feels instructional or has a kind of rigor to it of a Googlers quality that I don't believe was intended. There's something more beautiful about the notion of people quietly thumbing through this book and absorbing. And as I say, really taking the time with the jewels that are embedded in every line taking their own time, not with my meter. Now with my voice since you've declined to read more. Your father. I'm gonna play him being Ken kit cantankerous or intransigent. No, it's just it's. It's I'd I'd be lying if I didn't say I was a little disappointing, but I can. I can live with that. So I thought I'd play your father reading another -nother poem of his. From the interview that we recorded in two thousand six. And this is a poem called titles, and it was published in a book that he did in two thousand six of poems and lyrics. So this is Leonard Cohen recorded in two thousand six on fresh air. I had the title poet. And maybe I was one for a while. Also, the title singer was kindly accorded me even though I could barely carry a June. For many years, I was known as a monk. I shaved my head and wore robes and got up very early. I hated everyone, but I acted generously and no-one found me out. My reputation as a ladies man was a joke. It caused me to laugh bitterly through the ten thousand nights. I spent alone. From a third story window above the park deport you gal, I've watched the snow come down all day. As usual. There's no one here there never is Mercifully. The inner conversation is cancelled by the white noise of winter. I am neither the mind the intellect, nor the silent voice within that's also cancelled and now gentle reader and what name in whose name do you come to idle with me in these luxurious and dwindling realms of aimless privacy? I think. Adam gets a little bit where you were talking about the connection of your father, writing and solitude, and the reader re reading alone as during his. Yeah. Entering his solitude. Yeah. As you noted also kind of humor, you know. Remember, I love one of his lines where he says feel so good, not to love you like I did. It's like the tore away my blindfold and said, we're gonna let this prisoner live. That those Larry's my guest is Adam Cohen. He's written the forward to a new collection of previously unpublished writings and drawings by his father. Leonard Cohen. After a break Adam attack about how after his parents divorced when he was a child, his father managed to stay in his life, even though Adam and his mother had moved to the south of France. I'm Terry gross, and this is fresh air. If the your meal.

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