18 Burst results for "Adam Cohen"

"adam cohen" Discussed on Future Hindsight

Future Hindsight

06:13 min | 3 weeks ago

"adam cohen" Discussed on Future Hindsight

"Hi, feature hindsight fans I wanted to introduce you to our civics club content. Every guest shares an inside with me about what gets them excited and keeps them engaged in fighting the good fight for our democracy. I'm so excited to let you hear this since we don't normally share this out publicly. I know we all feel. It's so crucial right now to stand up and do something. If you want to hear more of what are incredible guests share join our civics club on patron. The website is patron dot com. Forward, slash future hindsight head over there and sign up today for some serious civic knowledge. Welcome to the future hindsight's six club. Our guest today is Adam Cohen. He's the author of supreme inequality the Supreme Court fifty year battle for more unjust, America. I really really loved this book and I recommend that you read it for yourself. His Passion for Justice and Equality is so infectious and he explains the injustice and flickered upon the poor by the Supreme Court so clearly. I wanted to know why he was so passionate and how he came to write this book. So, what are you doing personally what's the kind of advocacy that you do? Well I mean I do think that that's why I wrote this book I felt like we all think about what we can contribute a bit of honored honestly and I was public interest lawyer for many years working in Alabama where I lived for some time I some of these issues on trying to get school funding increased in the black belt for poor black students and trying to get integration for the schools. In Hartford. So I worked as a lawyer in many of these issues I've worked as a journalist these issues but with this book I thought one thing I can contribute is I think I have some insight into just how horrible the court has been and in addition to writing the book I been trying to speak out a lot about it. So I see right now is trying to be people's consciousness safer. Now. About the importance of our taking back the court. So, I have a question about your past with Southern Poverty Law Center how did you end up there after law school because you know not a lot of people choose that path. It was a bit of a an unusual course I felt like I did in school my entire life, and then I did one year of as a law clerk and that felt a lot like school and I really wanted to do something very different and moving Alabama and doing on the ground litigation was that and it turned out to be that I worked on the case that we filed to try to challenge a county jail. Alabama were just had a terrible jail where the prisoners were being very badly treated and over time jail was replaced with new jail. So. It was things like that I really wanted to like be in the front lines and the idea of going to Alabama was to me exciting because I spent my whole life in the northeast. So I really wanted to all that stuff and I did, and then after that after doing that for one year, I went to the ACLU where they were just starting a big school case in Alabama. So is able to continue working with people in Alabama on it of poverty law things like that. But from New York and going back and forth between. New, York and down. That's fantastic. That's so commendable. Question about sort of some of the cases that you spoke about in the book about being of poor people and expanding the rights of the rich and I kind of want to go back there because the Supreme Court Two things, it separately rob the rights of the poor and also. Expanded the rights of the rich, but it did them in tandem and so and what way does robbing the rights of the poor actually expand the rights that the rich even indirectly. I think as the court views it as conservatives viewed, it very often is zero sum in their minds. So like any race you give to the poor in their mind or being taken away from the rich and from big business. So welfare rights for example, if we recognize any kind of a right to real constitutional protection for welfare would probably have a war robust welfare system and as we all know. The welfare system in the country right now is incredibly deficient rate people who receive welfare living well below the poverty line in some states, it's become almost impossible to get cash welfare. So imagine if we had a different system where poor people really were taking care of for some conservatives, they think, well, that's money out of my pocket you that's money that's can come out of my taxes and then in the electoral context, for example, I think the Conservatives of the court very much feel well, if we have voting rights act strictly enforced and more poor and minority voters vote their candidates are more likely to win. That means they candidates to support tax cuts for the rich and the rights. Of corporations that are more like Middle Lose. So I, do think conservatives look at these things. They do tend to have this feeling that your rights are some things taken away from me and you know this came up again with this case, we've not mentioned about gain transgender rights where people point out that Cavanaugh road such an angry dissent and you wonder like what is there to be so angry about I mean why are you so concerned that you gave people in Trans people can't be discriminated against his workplace how does that hurt you? How does it affect at all but it's amazing. The degree to which people certain kind of person feels very personally aggrieved when other people get their rights. Yeah that's Definitely fascinating but although he is I, think personally agreeable a lot of things cavanaugh. That's all for this week's edition of the future hindsight six club and I hope that Adam has inspired you to become a citizen change maker yourself. Until next time stay engaged I'm Mila.

Alabama Supreme Court Adam Cohen Southern Poverty Law Center Trans law clerk New York ACLU York Hartford America
"adam cohen" Discussed on Future Hindsight

Future Hindsight

04:08 min | 3 weeks ago

"adam cohen" Discussed on Future Hindsight

"Think all things are possible in politics when the messages of my book is, you see how terribly effective Nixon was, why don't we be just as effective for our side? Yeah I agree with that but in any case. Looking into the future what gives you hope. Well. Certainly, the events of of of the last few weeks and the public outpouring on the street and the recognition we now as a society have for the fundamental inequalities, it's richly levels. It's having an effect, the polls showing that. So I actually think although this is a very troubling time and we'd had to see some horrible horrible videos of things that absolutely. Never should have happened and our sickening to watch, and although we've had is terrible disease and we've had the quarantines we've all been living through a lot. There's also a lot of very good things happening right now in fact for people who care about creating a more equal society these are you know oddly enough some of the most encouraging times in many years. While said, thank you very much for being on future hindsight. Thank you. I I really. As I mentioned earlier, this interview was taped in. June. So the four liberal justices on the court have now been reduced to three with a Senate majority leader and the president promising to fill the vacancy left behind by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg passing as soon as possible. Could be facing a supreme court that is even more conservative and on the side of corporations and the rich. I don't know if they'll succeed but in the event that they cannot pull this off before inauguration day the best way to prevent another conservative justice on the court is to flip the Senate where Supreme Court nominations are confirmed. Early, voting has already started in Virginia and from the footage I've seen people are motivated to vote and are lineup even before the polls open. After the justices death record-breaking donations poured into the coffers of Democratic candidates, which may boost the chances for victory for those who are in close racist. If you care about the Supreme Court standing for a more just and equal America make sure you're registered and that you go out and vote. Make a plan about when you're going to vote today. I plan to vote early and in person. Next week our guest is just catch. She's the CO founder and Co Executive Director of COWORKER DOT ORG A lab for workers to experiment with power building strategies, and when meaningful changes in the twenty first century economy. When people are motivated to come together to.

Supreme Court Senate CO founder Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Nixon Virginia Co Executive Director president America
"adam cohen" Discussed on Future Hindsight

Future Hindsight

04:03 min | 3 weeks ago

"adam cohen" Discussed on Future Hindsight

"Civic engagement in our society. Our guest today is Adam Cohen. He's the author of Supreme Inequality, the Supreme Court's fifty year battle for a more unjust America. He's also a former member of the New York Times editorial board and senior writer for Time magazine. I've been thinking about the Supreme Court's Power and the far reaching effects. The rulings there have in our everyday lives. This episode explained so much about the way we should be thinking about the role and the power of the highest court in the land. In the interview, we often refer to the courts history. So there's a bit of shorthand the Warren Court was a period when Earl Warren was chief justice and led a liberal majority. This was followed by the Burger court in Nineteen sixty-nine, which was a conservative majority court, and it has essentially state that way since Warren Burger was nominated by Nixon. Another reference you make is to the nineteen. seventy-six Buckley ruling when the Supreme Court decided that limits to election spending is unconstitutional. When you hear people say that money is free speech. This is the ruling they're referring to. Also we take this conversation in June right after the court decided that the nineteen sixty four, Civil Rights Act protects gay lesbian and transgender employees from discrimination based on sex, which is the context for comments about justice. Gorsuch. We discussed the courts perspective and treatment of the poor. The common misperceptions we have about the Supreme Court and the ways in which it is supporting Republican and Conservative power. We've seen the last six years has been a supreme court that has been very activists on the conservative side. So if we look at some of the things they've done in the campaign finance cases including citizens united. The court has very aggressively struck down laws enacted by Congress in some cases, state legislatures to keep money out of politics or to control influence. The court has used a very radical view of the First Amendment to strike down those very good laws. So what we're seeing now is a court that is very confident in its own position in its very conservative views and it's using its power in many cases to run roughshod over the decisions of the democratic branches. Let's less than thank you for joining us. Pleasure be here. Here Book Super Fascinating you really showed that we have been living in Nixon's court for the last fifty years and that the Progressive Warren Court was not only short lived but has essentially been dismantled. How did the need to dismantle the new deal lead to the rise of the conservative court and the way that we know it today Well. You know we had one kind of court in the nineteen sixties and it was one that respected workers rights respected welfare respected the rights of poor people that was the Warren Court and it was doing a lot of incredible things. Many of which we all know have entered the popular culture. The World Court recognized the Miranda warning. Right. The right to be warned that you had the right to remain silent it court handed down Gideon v Wainwright which was the decision that said that if you're poor and you can't afford a lawyer statehouse still point one. was consistent with the new deal expanding the rights of workers and poor people, and then all of a sudden hundred sixty eight Richard Nixon is elected on a platform of changing the court making the court conservative and in the three years after he's elected when he takes office, he gets four appointments and he's able to completely change this liberal court into a conservative court. What's really fascinating is that conservative majority that Richard Nixon built in the late sixties and early seventies is still with us today we've had that conservative court with conservative chief justice all the way through..

Progressive Warren Court Supreme Court Burger court Richard Nixon Adam Cohen Warren Burger Earl Warren New York Times Time magazine America Buckley editorial board Congress Miranda Gideon writer
"adam cohen" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:41 min | 7 months ago

"adam cohen" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Slip down to make sure that there could be a young Replacement for him. And you know We GINSBURG and Stephen Bride did not do that. During the Obama Administration the Democrats really need to play to win. Take back record all right out of let me let me just challenge you a little bit here and I say this as someone who was raised by a pack of lawyers and and and did a year of law school and still remains fascinated by all these things like where does where does that begin right like you just use. Examples of how Kennedy basically orchestrated this whole thing to get cabin on there. You know and and there's been various different reporting about it and we. We could probably argue to what extent he did but certainly Ginsburg brier refused to sort of contemplate. The idea that they would step down and sort of like put that type of strategy in their forefront of their minds have certainly the prerogative And you know the the idea that we need to to win the political battle but we we hear stories of like you know what was done with Fordis- in the idea of like Merrick Garland and I see Chris coons going on the air. You know six months ago and saying if we win back the Senate the first thing we should do is reinstated institute the Filibuster for for for justices. I mean this is like a what point do in this comes from lawyers and I and I understand it right. I mean like I say I was raised by a lot of them. At what point do does the sort of the broader institution of law as opposed as distinct from? Let's say the conservative movement and all the lawyers who make up Who are who? Who who serve that have been to Diagram. Covers both of them? At what point did they say we're going to give up the ghost on the Supreme Court not being a political body because it seems to me that you know you've outlined that at the very least the Republicans it more aggressively gave up? That goes fifty years ago. But I you know. I think you can argue that coming out of reconstruction they had given up that ghost. It's just that The the the Democrats the laughed. They don't seem to sort of be able to let go of that vision of the Supreme Court. I think that's right. And I think as a result you know they're bringing you know a watered down to a nice site. I mean you know I Mcconnell has been very clear you know he. He refused to have any Hearings at all for Maryland and then. He went out of his wages. Hello Kentucky Audience Dot long ago of course if there were a vacancy in the last year of trump administration.

Supreme Court Stephen Bride Democrats Mcconnell Kennedy Obama Administration Ginsburg brier Merrick Garland Senate Chris coons Maryland Fordis
"adam cohen" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:50 min | 7 months ago

"adam cohen" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"The Court of Appeals The next step and then it gets up to the Supreme Court and again five to four. They say nope. There's no obligation of any remedy across the district line. So if blacks are trapped in Detroit and were unable to give him an education because there aren't enough weights and each weight too bad so the combination of these two rulings mutually ensured. We would not have equality of education this country. 'cause one said you don't have the right to equal funding for your district and the other said if you're in a big city where so many minority students were you've no right to integrated education and again if eighty four been there. It would have been fired for the other way. So those are the key education rulings that have obviously implications Through the decades that followed and and and continue on today and I think in many respect also Made our education system so susceptible to the Corporate Reform Movement. That we have more or less just sort of passed through And which also did a tremendous amount of damage to our education system. And the other sort of I guess I twin horse of the apocalypse of of inequality as you as you outlined it is Has To do with our campaign. Finance system and really what that ultimately means is the failure of politicians to be responsive to the issues sets and the needs of ordinary people as opposed to monied interests. Exactly right and you know I talk about how the World Report that came out in twenty eighteen By Thomas Ticketing other on this. And they said there were two main drivers of inequality in the United States one was educational inequality which we just talked about. The other said was the lack of progressive taxation. Which you know. The top tax rates have gone down so much In in recent decades and that really is both of these are attributed to the Supreme Court and the reason are terrible unfair taxes attributable pinker is just what you said is that starting nineteen seventy six. The Supreme Court just begin striking down campaign finance law after campaign finance law and as a result the Supreme Court ensures that wealthy individuals and later corporations really have undue influence Congress in the legislatures and it really did starting nineteen seventy six when the same conservative court decides that money equals speech and they struck down. It was after Watergate. Congress actually passed a very strong campaign. Finance law really would have changed the role of money in our society and the Supreme Court strikes down strikes down the limits on expenditures. And says you have a First Amendment right rich person to spend as much money as you want to get someone elected. And that's really been the undoing of our democracy Let's talk about some of the Those you know those cases in the sort of the the The I guess the like you say Buckley v Vallejo is the most important one. Just give us a sense of what was involved there and then I guess we could talk about Obviously that that goes through a series of other cases to get to citizens United Buckley. V Vallejo is the original sin in that regard right and So as I as I said after Watergate there was just tremendous tremendous popular pressure on Congress to pass campaign finance or for reform because people forget now but watered the Watergate scandal dishes being about breaking into the Watergate Hotel. There were major major campaign finance improprieties uncovered of corporations. You know delivering money to the committee. Re like the president in paper bags and things like that so Congress does pass this very strong reform. It gets challenged by James Buckley the then. The New York's conservative senator and some other people The D. C. Circuit Court of Appeals in Washington. Dc which is the case. I actually uphold the entire law and quite reasonably says. This really isn't about speech. You know this you know that giving money to campaign isn't really speech and it also has very strong language about how this is very very important for Congress to act to protect our election so that was a great ruling from the DC circuit. It goes up to the Supreme Court and they reverse and as I said. They created this framework. That you know Is still with us where they said. Okay well if you're giving money to a campaign that could lead to some. You know our fear of corruption. So we're going to allow regulation of that but if you're just spending money on.

Supreme Court Congress Court of Appeals United Buckley D. C. Circuit Court of Appeals Watergate Hotel Corporate Reform Movement Vallejo Detroit United States DC president Washington New York senator
"adam cohen" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

03:16 min | 7 months ago

"adam cohen" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"I think it did pave the way in some ways for you know liberals to do things like reject Judge Bork down. The road So I I think I think it it aged meeting somebody boulder role for the Senate but But I think that you know in in in my looking back on it. The real tragedy works is over lost opportunities that we have there to have a liberal court to last longer. And what's incredible is that what is his name is really never mentioned now. you know if you go to a loss to. Yale law school where where was graduate of the most brilliant graduate of your law school? He's just not talked about. He's considered in the BARRASSO and It's an overreaction. You know he did some things. The main issue got Got In trouble for was accepting money from a foundation that was run by a Wall Street financier but it was a good foundation and judges injustice. Who actually did do consulting work at the time. It sounds a little strange now Although we do judges and justice certainly do a lot of speaking occurrences but there there. Just wasn't that much that terrible but the idea that Ford is now considered a liberal harassment. He's very much a conservative embarrassment. Because he's really mean exhibit in how the Conservatives used skulduggery to take over the court and sixty nine much as they used it. You know half a century later with Merrick earl to hold onto the liberal majority. So that's the Ford is next project. I think people should know but it's just not when the people are talking about off Okay let's move on to the cases that that follow this right wing. Takeover of the court We've cases like San Antonio School district versus Rodriguez that we can talk about and Milkin be Bradley Alati case and dangerous re Williams. Where where do you WANNA start in terms of an in some ways? We have sort of different Tracks depending on what the issues are right and then I to you mentioned are absolutely critical and I say that you know not only because When I graduated from Moscow I became public interest lawyer for the ACLU Southern Poverty Law Center. And I worked on education tastes and I was really me and my colleagues working in the shadow of these cases because those two rulings Rodriguez nineteen seventy-three and Milliken nineteen seventy four really close the door to Progressive Reform in education. Coming from the Supreme Court Rodriguez was a case in which poor Mexican American Stevenson parents in Texas sued Texas because there were such enormous funding disparities between rich and poor school. This baited maybe education say very equal. They made the very logical argument that if the government is going to provide education to children The equal protection clause says do that equally government is supposed to treat its citizens equally. They won the Federal District Court level. Three Court judge unanimously ruled for them. It gets up to the Supreme Court and in nineteen seventy three. The court rejects their case. Five to four and you know that one.

Supreme Court Rodriguez Federal District Court Yale law school Ford Judge Bork Senate Merrick earl Texas San Antonio School district harassment Moscow ACLU Bradley Alati Progressive Reform Poverty Law Center Williams Milliken
"adam cohen" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:11 min | 7 months ago

"adam cohen" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"New state. They moved to Connecticut and Connecticut had a awaiting a residency requirement. That you had to be there for year before you got welfare. And some people put people move their for their first year. Wouldn't get welfare. The Supreme Court struck down now. There were those who had hoped that they will do it. Even more expansive ways come up with some kind of broader rights welfare or something like that according to do that in Shapiro it grounded its decision on the rights to travel but still it was a very very important decision that in practical terms delivered welfare to a lot of people who are being denied it and I guess I guess my point is that that's the type of case. Because we're we're starting to see like analogs of this case in the Roberts court where you start to slowly Develop a line of cases that begins to expand or contract. writes in some fashion and that that Shapiro case could have been radically the building blocks of expanding the State's obligation to its citizens. That's right and you know one of the things I talk about. In the book is there was h really robust movement in the sixties of poverty. Lawyers who were there were many of them around the country and they were very wind. Chill who were an academic? There were a lot of poverty. Law Academics will working Wyndham who were trying to establish much broader right so actually in nineteen sixty nine. The same year that Shapiro. B Thompson decided Frank Michelman who was then a young Harvard law professor constitutional epicenter. He's still a professor there now. Really very disgust much discussed article in the Harvard Law Review the first article in the Supreme Court issued that year argument there was actually perhaps a constitutional right to subsistence to things like food and healthcare from the federal government. And that was the high watermark but those arguments were being made and some people hope that Shapiro Thompson would be the case in which the court embrace that kind of broader idea about Economic Rights.

Shapiro Thompson Supreme Court Harvard Law Review Frank Michelman Connecticut Wyndham professor
"adam cohen" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:54 min | 7 months ago

"adam cohen" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"The Supreme Court thinking outside. Things always works In nineteen fifty four with Warrants FIRST YEAR ARRIVING COURT HANDS DOWN. Brown versus education and After that begins we slow but eventually fairly successful project of desegregating schools in the south and the same time. They are transforming many other areas of law. This is the period in which we got the Miranda decision. Which leads to tell you that you have the right to remain silent before the question. You we got giddying Wainwright wainwright which promised every poor criminal. Defendant the right to a lawyer. We got Decision striking down the poll tax. We got decisions striking down Force prayer in public schools so in many many areas. The Warren Court was Transforming Society for the better When you say activists I mean what made the Warren Court activists? Well the Warren Court was not afraid to strike down laws or to Issue orders to institutions when it's thought unconstitutional things going on so for example Striking down laws. We just didn't south segregating not just schools but you know Jim. Crow segregated every aspect of society. The court was willing to strike those laws down in the way that the court had not been before. But also you look at the decision like Gideon B wainwright guaranteeing every indigent defending the rights to aware. That's a huge thing with that is imposing on every jurisdiction in the country and affirmative obligation to come up with lawyers for people that was inexpensive ruling for every city and county and state in the country. The Warren Court wasn't afraid to do that when they thought it was a constitutional rate that had to be vindicated. And let's just I so there's really two different elements to activism in this context. One is A willingness to strike down laws and really in some ways act contrary to a Legislators legislative will based upon the Constitution. And then the other is to create mechanisms or requirements to protect constitutional rights. As in like you said in Gideon I think that's right exactly and these were thing that the court had done at some time in the past it it more often that the conservative direction In nineteen twenties court was being activists to strike down progressive legislation including laws against child labor. But here in the sixties Starting fifties mainly the sixties. We had a liberal quote was actually willing to do this activism on behalf of the most disadvantaged members of society. Okay and so.

Warren Court Supreme Court Transforming Society Wainwright wainwright Gideon B Brown Miranda Crow Jim
'Supreme Inequality' Argues That America's Top Court Has Become Right-Wing

Fresh Air

08:29 min | 8 months ago

'Supreme Inequality' Argues That America's Top Court Has Become Right-Wing

"Us my guest is Adam Cohen he's a lawyer and a journalist and author of the new book supreme inequality the supreme court's fifty year battle for a more unjust America it's about how the Supreme Court has grown more conservative often ruling against the poor against workers rights against voting rights while favoring corporations and the wealthy overall contributing to income inequality you read that in the five decades since the Nixon presidency there've only been three Supreme Court chief justices and they've all been conservative burger Rehnquist and Roberts yes and they've had a conservative majority behind them the whole time and that's really stunning right because if you think about going back to nineteen seventy we've had so many changes in the White House right we've had conservatives we've had you know we've had Reagan we've had George W. bush and we've had Clinton we've had Obama Congress has switched parties multiple times right back and forth back and forth we have just had a right wing court for sixty years so do you think that's kind of coincidence that justices tend to to leave or die during Republican presidencies or it do you think that Republicans are better at getting Supreme Court justices appointed well the game the whole system much better than Democrats do in many ways so one way is that they do tend to step down in strategic ways that Democrats often don't so Anthony Kennedy stepped down at a time when he knew that trump would be able to replace him and get his nominee confirmed by Republican held Senate with Peter Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer did not step down towards the end of the Obama administration's that's one part of it but another part of it really is that they just do the skulduggery a little bit better to write so when Obama nominated Merrick garland it's garland had been confirmed that would have restored a liberal majority to the court for the first time in half a century and look what the Republican Senate did they just said we're not interested what I can do anything so you're actually say in the book that these are kind of two book ends on the the half century that Nixon steals for this is C. and Mitch McConnell refuses to allow a Democrat to fill Scalia's seat and the both propped up the current conservative majority there's something about the process of nominating and confirming Supreme Court justices that seems to have changed now you mention the McConnell blocking the Merrick garland nomination but you know trump named his potential justices during the campaign that that's kind of unheard of isn't it's gotten much more political and just the way in which trump is saying you know I we were putting together this list and we're consulting with the federal society and and I think it's pretty much acknowledged that you know trump in many ways was not very traditional right wing presidential candidate by background by temperament to many other things one thing he clearly did to solidify his support from the right wing from fundamentalist Christians and all that was to make it clear to them we're going to choose the kind of justices you walked and they've been very emphatic about doing that it used to be the was not supposed to be a litmus test for Supreme Court justice but now both Democrats and Republicans seem to be boldly mentioning their support of a litmus test I mean some democratic candidates have said that yeah they would choose you know Supreme Court justice who supports abortion rights at that would be essential so I think that's something that's changed too with that you know intentionally stating to the public yes this this judge is coming in with you know certain points of view in advance I think that's right the mask is falling off right everyone can see what's really going on you know in theory if the court is the sort of legal body we like to pretend it is what present should be saying is I'm gonna look for the best interpreter of the law I will look for someone who maybe got very good grades or road very good lord you articles or who is a fabulous teacher or who has shown just a general you know excellence in the craft but that's not what they talk about it all is as you say they talk about the politics because everyone's pretty much admitting now that the court is a political institution you read that the area in which the Supreme Court has changed the most is in the area of economic class give us an example of that sure during the war in court which we were talking about the court really embraced poor people and their problems so we began to see them being very active around issues like the poll tax but also really about welfare right I mean welfare used to be something that was kind of disparaged and embarrassment people didn't talk about it we looked out the people who are on welfare well the Warren court comes along and says no welfare is an important thing in our society that allows people to subsist and the and actually right after the Warren court ended with the momentum of the Warren court in nineteen seventy the Supreme Court did an amazing thing in a case called October versus Kelly they actually ruled that under the due process clause localities cannot remove people from the welfare rolls without giving them a formal hearing first chance to be heard so that's that's something that is you know it would have been unheard of a decade earlier so that was the kind of new approach the court took to the poor but then when the burger court rises and when the Nixon justice is really begin to take control the quick very quickly turned his back on the poor and and it's actually just a couple weeks later that the court issues a ruling that really sounded the death knell for the poverty law movement case called energy Williams where the court not only said that they were going to uphold really discriminatory unfair local welfare rule but he basically said you know we're washing our hands of welfare law cases where it's you know it's the this is something we're pretty much going to leave to the government to do as they want and after that Dandridge case although not in on the court began to rule against the poor and to make clear that they didn't care about things like whether welfare was fair by the controversy over whether the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment should include poor people as a group with special protected status yeah this is one of the most fascinating things that was going on during the war in Europe so there is this notion of a suspect class is there certain classes that the court says I have a higher standing under the equal protection clause so it it's mainly you know racial minorities religious minorities non citizens groups like that and the idea is that if you're a discreet and insular minority that is unable to really effectively protect itself through the political process which is often true of the groups I just mentioned the court will give you extra care so the court had been for years identifying different groups it considered to be in this class and if you get in this class the court is that much more likely to strike down any laws that puts a burden on your disadvantages you and for years the court was edging close to putting poor people in this category they would say things like you know what lines with the government draws against poor people are very similar to lines of the drive against racial groups and you know everything but actually calling the suspect class and we don't know what the Warren court would have done if it had been allowed to continue but one of the first things the burger court did in that dentures case as I mentioned was really make clear no the poor not could be a suspect class and they're not getting any special attention from us so if the court had ruled differently and said poor people were a protected class how might that have changed things the poor would then be given a very powerful legal tool to use in a lot of different context to challenge a lot of ways in which their heartbeat so right now we have very unequal distribution of of welfare around the country there are some states that if you live in California New York not that welfare is munificent because it is not but with the other states where you get almost nothing you know if you're if you're in Wyoming and you need help so things like that could have been amenable to being challenged by under equal protection for people to say look we're not being treated equally by the federal government how it distributes well for so there are a lot of categories like that we're we're populars would've been able to step up and say this is a way in which a law is really hurting the poor and remember there are a suspect class my guess is Adam Cohen author of the new books of freedom and

Adam Cohen America Supreme Court
"adam cohen" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"adam cohen" Discussed on Broken Record

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"adam cohen" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

10:14 min | 1 year ago

"adam cohen" Discussed on Broken Record

"He seems to be saying. We're all puppets yes sir. Yeah you studying with his guy called belts car in India where he would he would go after his His n teacher passed away and the thesis of Balsa car which he was really taken by the end and became his sort of central spiritual backbone bone was. There is no doer. There is no doer whatsoever as a kind of fatalistic but without the oppressiveness serve. The word fatalist is idea that it's all written by some program. So puppets for sure but even but even smaller than puppets he would often say you can read every word on the page age. You just can't change any of them the script of your life and also speaks to the Resign meant in the lyric that you quoted earlier of waving the neighbor and the other resignation of A. I sit in my chair. Look at the street. The neighbor returns my smile of defeat had moved with the leaves. I shine with the chrome. I'm almost alive. I'm almost home. Yeah and also it relates to the What we're talking about in in the in the making of art process affected this out of our control it all? It's it's all it's all one thing. Do you know what I'm saying again. Dan I I go back to being infuriated by his contradictions. I just have another another story again. Yeah Yeah I finished a record at one point. And I met him at starbucks on Wilshire and La Brea and I had this big declaration into him for which I was. I think seeking validation and maybe even a compliment. I said Dad once. We sat with coffees in the Sun. I should datum. I'm scrapping the entire recommend to start over and I thought he would put his hand on my shoulder and say like my son. You know a the kipling Paul you know he says what an amateur move he says to me. I said what are you talking about. He says he says it's show business. Man This is how you feel about the work. It's about how you make us feel about. The work has nothing to do with altruistic that the writing is that yes the you know be truthful while you're writing seek you know to be stirred by the muses but once the recording. I mean that is that is an act of pandering you have you have to go the whole hog. He says you think I mean it every night. When I'm on my knees singing Hallelujah? You think mick means that every night when he's singing I can't get no. This is the the true generosity to not care whether you do or don't mean it you know and then I'm thinking like wait a minute that hold i. I've been in the studio with you now and I see how many times U. S. have trashed and begun again and not accepted installed. And so wait a minute you know and again these infuriating diametrically opposed and and battling telling notions remember that Michael Ascher pairs publisher parish. He said he just kept on repeating that. Get off have to get off the pot and see what about you dad. You know like twelve years to finish a song. You know he'd say Oh. Yeah well I was getting it right. I think he was telling you what he wanted to tell himself. I also think that the there is Is a much of a sports fan. But it's a there's A. There's a thing the boxers say to each other they say there's levels to this. You know just 'cause Ali can do it doesn't mean you can just because floyd mayweather can do. It doesn't mean you can and I don't. I don't mean to suggest that. He was as callous and conceded as to imply that that is clearly as I'm indicating but I think he was saying. Look when you're writing. Psalms of King David like I am his. You know you can afford to take your time. I don't think he's saying that okay. I know I. I don't think they can for. Its waging my concern owner. No I think he's saying he's telling you what he needs to hear. That's what I think was happening. He was giving you his best advice that he was not able to take for himself. I don't know I don't I that doesn't resonate is true and I am not I think you might be close. Yeah I might be too close I I don't feel like myself bucking you know or or Or Tangling Antlers with you. Because that's that's I I don't have the stature to to to win it that Biz. No burning there's no by with byways no confidently no sharing ideas but I do but I do believe that that's not true in I'll tell you why why I myself I don't believe in the idea of all things equal and in fact I believe that you went to the definition of the word. Miracle is a breach in the law of nature. This he he was a breach in the love of nature. Yes he can allow himself exception. That's what he was and a two good another serve analogous for the sisterhood of that idea would be the word scarcity. You know the idea that that something is is something's value is directly. We measured by how little of it there is. And he was not a prolific man. And unlike dillon who was you know just spat them out you know. He was chiseling at marble and he would always refer to himself as slow. But it was never disparagingly yes. There was a methodical conscious. There was a notion from a young man if you go back to his journals which I have unfortunately or fortunately had had to do. I'm so buried in all things. Leonard Cohen these days But there was this sense that he had this mandate from Jeez dash ask the to go into the darkness. And we don't all have that that would be. That would be presumptuous and arrogant do you do you think he included himself in the puppets in the song that we just absolutely yes. Okay yes then yes. You're right but again there's puppet mountains and there's puppet molehills yes okay we agree yes okay. Good this is i. I'm not I'm not thinking that he thought less of himself in any way and I'm not thinking and an I'm I will tell you. I don't think he looked down on your work versus versus his work. I don't believe that that would be crazy rick. I don't believe that I just don't believe I promise on the drive home. Think more about this because I think for as I think he clearly you knew he was great. But he also saw all of the downsides. I don't think that he saw anything. Is is perfect. No that's what I'm thinking at. I don't think he thought about things by rank. I I don't think but I don't know no I in general that from where he wasn't in the position of Joe he was one of these judgmental characters I've ever met so for that I agree but understanding things place in resonance and understanding that some things things were whispers and some things were Seismic tremors for example. He would say I'm not one of the big guys but I do understand that I have you know I think he would say my little toe in the door. Jamb of the Annals Ainhoa history kiss and so this was a sense of modesty a sense of place yes. I think it's realistic Jenner. He was realistic. Yeah but boy. The exception that he was that as his contemporaries aged out our aging out that their offerings there little wild bouquets that they're still holding have have less and less pertinence and have more and more of that sense of like being in the style jacked and that he as opposed to them remained so so vital and it was. I think it was because he was really clawing his way up. You know with his deteriorating little frail body even it clawing his way and really speaking from the rank at which he found himself. Yes you know. He was really. He wasn't trying to say baby baby here he was trying to say we kill the flame. Lame if that's what you want my Lord you know he was he was really a wasn't revisiting anything. That's why took offence to some notions that he go backwards. Let's see you know. He's trying to remain vital yeah. I don't think.

India La Brea Dad starbucks Leonard Cohen King David Michael Ascher Dan mick Annals Ainhoa floyd mayweather Ali U. S. dillon Jenner rick Joe Wilshire
"adam cohen" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

11:41 min | 1 year ago

"adam cohen" Discussed on Broken Record

"Had in follow too closely what he was reading a other than what he would tell me and there was A. I think he's again. These are all admissions. That I'm having trouble making 'cause you know I I sort of feel like he would say that you're incorrigible. Don't demystify I've spent my whole life putting bales up but I I think he had forfeited reading for the Iranian ease of online publications ends of Lectures Online. And I know that he was following some pretty wacky folks From from rabbis and seeks to to Hindu new gurus and he was deep deep into listening to P.. Two people speaking. Yeah he invited me to see Rabbi Finley with him several times have not yet done it. Still blurbs go let's go. Let's go one of these days. He's he's a beautiful robust interesting charismatic nick character ex-marine from Irish descent Who became incredibly versed in and all things Jewish but with with a really modern and moderate bent very Quebec after the break will debut a song? I'm from Leonard. Cohen's new album thinks the dance broken record is presented by Lexus. which asks what amazing ideas will? Oh you inspire next. Is there a color you've never seen before. That's a question. Only Lexus would ask. Color is product of light interference but conventional paints and pigments can only reflect half light at most access was curious could they create a new pigment that reflects nearly a hundred percent of light creating a color never before experienced by human. I for clues. They looked to the earth's most vibrant creatures like the Martha Butterfly Mimicking its unique properties of light interference and they came up with solution that requires eight months Twelve production steps and twenty inspections to create the world's first Omni directional color structural blue. There is there a color you've never seen before yes and you'll find it on Alexis L. C.. Discover what amazing ideas you'll inspire fire next at Lexus dot com slash curiosity or back with Adam Cohen. Should we talk a little bit about the the album before this one. The hit the last one. He was present for when I was beautiful for me and not just because the record turn out beautifully and all my father passed away only three weeks after it came out. He did get to you know when he played for you came over to the house when he played it for people whose opinion he was seeking or or with with whom he just wanted to share the music and then eventually the world That that a collect you know. This is where it's he was such an unsentimental guy that I almost feel like. I'm trespassing but for me. It was sentimental to be summoned to work with my father other in whose footsteps I tried with clumsiness to follow to To Go from basically glorified coffee boy. You know in the in the basement of the building tending up in in the penthouse making boardroom. Decisions with the boss Except set the boss was in a medical chair you know in his living room ended Wilshire. tit tau actually actually having this resonant music to to wrestling with the master and and not getting creamed and in fact you know when another thing that when you came up in conversation you know and pardon me for the oversimplifying but when when he would say rick or or Don Wasser Delana. They want they want me to go back. They want me to. They want me to literally regress to making you know an old Leonard Cohen album with just nylon string guitars and stuff. Like I don't WanNa do that. You know like I'm not a museum am piece. I'm not even particularly nostalgic But of course I believe you were right. and and the that desire tire for Leonard Cohen to tickle that and evoke that sense that we have in our minds eye of what Leonard Cohen is. Not just list not just spiritually not just lyrically but also sonically into the architecture that accompanies him. was such a strong desire tire and when he finally was weak enough to relent and allow that just for a second second especially with this his son To have that nylon string guitar come back to to quiet. The background vocals and excavate enough space for him in the verses so that the narrator ship was unchallenged lodged And they could go back to that other union that he had created which Yin and Yang where he has his masculine ESCULENTA baritone narrator narrator ship and then there's this incredible generous complicitous from the female backgrounds. So this this union. This is an architecture that he he helped excavate so to to restore that but at the end of his life with that Kravitz with that sombreness with that sharpness with that courage to go into the darkness and come back with a little little parcel of truth that the ad was incredibly edifying. You know touching me and you mentioned his medical chair when I came to visit him it it. He literally looked like a King Ima thrown. It was unbelievable. He was so elegantly dressed as as always Yes but so beautiful and sitting in this grand chair in the small space. Yeah if it it took my breath away. At every time I visited him. It was always It was always thrilling for me but maybe even more so than and none of us. I mean I certainly didn't know that he was going anytime soon because we were already talking about what he was going to do. Next it's like really told music's I was writing for the next album uh-huh which is which is now happening. Yeah Yeah Yeah No. He was living often said to my friend. Cacao who again mixed and recorded both that record in this one in I said I you know he's staying alive for this. This is the only thing he's living for yet and Often unfortunately that statement was made that declaration was was uttered when we were going nowhere and it just felt like he was stalling and it was like dead. We get when you finish this record. You'RE GONNA you're GonNa let go but only when you finish the work. He was a pit bull at the sleeve of this mission whether it was blackening pages. You're finishing a a lyric and then refinishing it. But there was this indelible and very clear sense that he was living for the work. That's all I was living. That was that was why when he played me you. The new finished work. The first thing I said was so. What's the next song manipulate you know? Have you started on the next album yet. Knowing that he needed that. Yeah and knowing that we want to hear that good for everybody did he. Did he do that. Thing that he that he sometimes uh-huh we do Almost like a magician with a card trick did he dispense on you lyrics and he was working on. Yeah isn't that just magical. Yeah amazing one of the things. I missed the most is in dropping by and having him without a teleprompter. And we're talking about a man who is literally swimming in Tom's Tom's Tom's of notch words put like heavy condense and delicious the language and for him to pull them out and it doesn't matter whether it's pulling up blake or Shakespeare or his own work the acidity in the sharpness right to the end But then to hear the deliciousness of a concoction that he was in the in the throes of you know then it wasn't an isn't that just delicious memory believably unbelievably thrilling. And I'm sure over the years there were many that you got to hear that may be never. It came to pass. Well you know it's funny. Say That because on this record I had to beg him as dead you know. That's on puppets. Just just speak it. I know you never. I know you are not cosigning. You don't believe that there's music that exists for this yes or Knight of Santiago or As several others where I I said just just read it. Read it to to a Metronome S.. We'll figure that out later but don't not speak this into a microphone. Yes and That's how delicious some of those moments were you know. Yeah there's some unfortunate and get in fact. The last song on. This album is called Listen to the hummingbird and We were done with the record and Michael and I were in Berlin at a festival called People Festival which is organized by Justin Vernon Bonnie Blair and and the designers from the national and a bunny ears. Music was we were sharing a studio and they were. We had a shared wall and all of these is incredible. Moving of occupy of Sonics. Were coming through the wall and instead of hating him and resenting him for interrupting what would otherwise have been our session were inspired and And we sit her so all my goodness the very last time. This man spoke in public. He impromptu did what we're talking about. Hey said hey do you wanna hear something. I'm working on. And he read into into a fifty eight in a halogen lit conference room oppressive and he read out loud. This poem and We remembered it contacted Sony said. Is there any way you could locate that one moment in that press conference turn it into a way file. Send it to us and with this stuff coming through the shared wall. We composed this This track maze.

Leonard Cohen Lexus Adam Cohen Rabbi Finley Tom nick Quebec Alexis L. C Kravitz Sony Lexus. Wilshire. Yin Santiago Don Wasser Delana Justin Vernon Bonnie Blair rick Berlin Michael
"adam cohen" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

08:41 min | 1 year ago

"adam cohen" Discussed on Broken Record

"This is broken. Can Record liner notes for the digital age unjust. Enrichment Rick Rubin New Leonard Cohen for about a decade before his passing soon afterwards Leonard Son Adam reached out to rick wanted to tell the story about his father. The one you're about to hear when's the last time we saw each other as China remember. It's feels like so long ago all of it. I was China. Remember men of the feeling that I was left with In that story that my dad always used to tell about you and you became the brunt of almost like a punchline at but now the whole thing's dissipated into a general tapestry and feeling of you know I guess a a mix a cocktail a blend of maybe inaccuracies in feelings mixed together. But I I WANNA try letters summoned if it's appropriate S. The story about you took. Tell me the story as you remember it. It has something to do with. You've his general feeling about himself. Not Being a stallion in the race of show business us and by that I mean he would refer to other guys he came up with whether it's Christopherson or biohazard Zurve Joni your dylan or all. Cats are coming up in his era. As knowing what to do he would say these guys know what to do. All I've ever known. Is that a black lacking page. You would say that's where you have to understand that context before Rick Rubin enters into the conversation so then then the question is two who guys sitting at a table and some music industry related question emerges and he says I know Adam. I mean. They don't like we. We should ask Rick like Rick Rubin would know this and so very quickly that morphs into any question that we have asked. Rick Ask Rick you know I come to him with genuine question dad you know. What should I do about this? If it's music related and then turns into punchline said at him you know what I'm about to say ask Rick Rubin and of course I had met you know it's so funny I A and as I said I. I didn't know any of this until you told me this. Fda Dad passed. Yeah and so I felt like I had to track down on on the off chance he was right. You know I have after at Rick and I have subsequently asked you on many occasions. You've proven right every time. Wow so thank you my pleasure. It's an amazing story. It makes me laugh every time. Yeah me to tell me about the The New Your Dad's newest project I know is not credible. It so cool I suppose that The most gratifying part other than the fact that it wasn't a humiliating disaster. And the fact that is is resonant and that I think it's beautiful and people are responding to it so favorably. I think the headline is the person after person who hears it one of the most gratifying things that is set of it. Time and time again is that they feel like my God Leonard. Cohen is still here. He speaking to a still and with this message in tow this beautiful offering this command of languages inimitable. Gift that he's always had still having map. Of course. I could go into detail because I have the help. Tell me about the the specifics of the making of it like how how did it. How did the idea come straight from the beginning? Well the the first thing that happened was mile man passed away and I live about seven hundred fifty meters down the same street where you visited. And I'm left with this notion that one of the ways in which I can visit with him mm-hmm so palpably as opposed to so many other people who lose a parent or someone I've got all these recordings. And they are the some of his being. In many instances they are the some of what he practiced to be in this world and They are literally his words. His voice in recordings and at one point I out of desperation and a tiny tiny pinch of courage. I- I dared. Open up two sessions in my backyard and I just wanted to sit with him. I missed him And it was a wave of conversing of remaining in dialogue with the guy that was the beginning. And then something really unexpected and magical happened. A record is not affect complete. You know even good songs do not result in good recordings. Even in your hands doesn't matter if the artist and the song and the producer reducer and the musicians eight is not a guarantee of anything and so the fact that that a record actually emerged. It's finished and that's resonant that's emotional and that's truthful it's not in my hands I don't have the qualifications to do that. It emerged and it's out of our control. That's the it's out of our art controls again. And so I have two strikes against me for this record in terms of my actual true participation. You know one is that I neither have great and esteemed credentials and to. This wasn't my record. You Know I. I wasn't trying to make my choices. Of course I was trying to at all times because of this conversation that I was in dad would do you like this. Is this what you would do. Is this truthful and So it eliminated this tragic layer that we often impose on ourselves of doubt it was. I don't have to consult myself. I'll have to do his consult him. He was very clear about what he didn't in like. That's the great advantage that I had over people who are ag- you for example. I knew what he hated. Of course you know what's interesting never thought what about this before but for any other artist this would be a more difficult process. But because Leonard's music always always essentially started with the poetry and that was the basis of the greatness of the songs the heavy lifting was already done so this is the best example of being able to make something really truthful truthful to him where the participation that he already did really is the key. Yeah I I was thinking that on the drive up here. You know. There's a there's a song called the goal which is literally no more than a minute long and his reading which had no music who's just reading his reading. Sounds like a Thespian. From the other other side of the world the command of language the cinematic transport of quality and then to end you know by saying no one to follow nothing to teach except that the goal falls short of the reach. Can't leave my house or answer the phone going down a gain but I'm not alone settling at last accounts of the soul. I sit in my chair. I look at the street. The neighbor returns my smile. Mild defeat I move with believe.

Rick Rubin Leonard Cohen Leonard Son Adam China Christopherson Leonard dylan
"adam cohen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"adam cohen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Catch and release came from or if you do cross in you immediately turned herself in and claim asylum, whether the claimants now or not that is your right to do as an unfortunately, there seems to give misinformation that. If we do cross unlawfully than you should be locked up in a detention. So he didn't really have. This number of people, when, that's the other thing they the amount of people that have been closing has certainly increased and. You can put the blame on that for a upon whoever you wish, I couldn't tell you whether that's just simply. Inflow or it is the result of Coney and policies issued by the president, although they seem to be causing the, their, the number such certainly increased. And now we've got families coming rather than on the company adult men and we're having. The families being kept were months and months at a time in detention. And as we've seen through the news reports in utterly deplorable and horrifying condition on got children. Thomas one year old two years old, even vulgar that are being kept in some facilities. It's not all disabilities, but some and in well-documented that are not being cared for by Dulce but they're being cared for by children that are seven eight, and they don't have diapers. They can't even wash the children because they don't have so you don't have to faith, and toothbrushes. These are they? Facetti and things that you would under on the common decency on a happy, children that for some reason, even though it costs upwards of seven hundred seven hundred fifty dollars a day per child that used to sorties do not have for these children. It's really both unconscionable and unfathomable that this is happening. And if more and more each day, the last time I checked. It was some fifty to fifty two thousand immigrants that will be kept in detention and I think some six thousand or more children that were being catching detention and still according to reports being separated from their parents. I it's. Unbelievable to say, but that is still happening. And with even worse. This is being the. Why members of congress and there was a at elite? It was a CB issue, testified within the past couple of days and congressional hearing that the reports that we seen, which have been from lawyers, because the press courses out allowed, and so these and nobody is allowed to take those video of what's going on. So the only people that aren't allowed pursuance to a negotiated settlements of a supreme court case that, that would be the floor as case, if you've heard of it, I was site escapes me for the moment. So the only people that are able to see these children are ROY Ayers, under vis settlement of this case, they are reporting the condition to the media. The media is reporting it and CB now says voyeurs are lying because they have. Interest in the case. I mean. If meet wrong. And we will I smelt pleadings rely becomes our license tobacco for it, that simple, it, it is not something that you do not convention. What other either civil or, or perhaps, even criminal charges can be against you for lying. Especially if you why in a smart statement of any kind, it's perjury. I mean drive so. What what's going on? All reliable accounts. It is something that none of us really thought would happen country after World War Two and the Japanese interment yet, here we are. How is? We go. I don't know how to phrase this, but, like, I have a three year old, and if I kept my three year old in conditions like this, I would be reported CPS, and probably my three year old would be placed in a foster home woma investigated. So how is it legal for the government to do this is it legal for the government to do this to children? That's a very good question. And. Under the floor as settlement..

ROY Ayers Coney Dulce perjury CPS Facetti president Thomas congress three year seven hundred seven hundred fi two years one year
"adam cohen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"adam cohen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Program dealing with election protection by taking a look at seeing what each local election board. Of course, the country's doing, which is really kinda Mamat has because there's so many localities and so many different somebody different places cover what we wanna see there's an any kind of issue that really needs to be dressed, because it's -scriminate story and depriving voters of their sacred about. But I think we're probably this point best known or project cortisone, which is our border project, where we had been sending attorneys. Team that southern border for over a year and also been participating in had had other attorneys participating in remote proceedings for credible fear interviews and remote bond hearings. And the idea is obviously C in get. Pass the first hurdle or Clamper asylum and. Immigrants are going to be held in detention. At least see if we get a court to offer them the opportunity to post von so that they could be freed from detention. Fortunately, the government is leading through that remotely. So, you know, it's very hard to have the Terni travel dance the border to do one of these years can talk some about sort of a wet the situation at the border is, so I think a lot of people who are sort of half following the story. You know, obviously, we know there's, there's something going on. We know they're people it being held in poor conditions, but I think a lot of people don't sort of have a very good sense of what, what the situation normally looks like if there is such a thing as normal. You know what what's happening now? What's different could you sort of tuck little bit about, you know what, what exactly is happening? What happens? When people cross the border in how do they end up in facilities again. I'm gonna give it a little bit of qualified, you're here because this is not my expertise even though as as. A sort of lay person attorney, I got a little bit more familiarity. Because I have an extremely acted with promoting in sitting project cores on, but previously people try to enter mostly mostly legal fortune entry, and if they could not they tried to cross the border unlawfully, and really from Houston to most of the years when Obama was president, my understanding is that you had Stanley's attempting those on walk across ings. It was really migrants that were looking for work individual. Don't. And generally, even if you do cross. Not an accord it entry. That's considered to be misdemeanor. And that is not something for which would generally be held in detention for months and months, which is where the awfully names term..

Terni Obama attorney Houston Stanley president
"adam cohen" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"adam cohen" Discussed on WEEI

"Studios. Here's the leave. And we are back on that bracket show. And what a show we have for you tonight as we will break down all the action in tonight's games. And tomorrow's games and who better to do. So then the great coaching community that only that bracket show can tap into. We will have coach Brad Underwood from deal annoy fighting a line. I he will talk about the big ten teams playing tonight as well as the team's playing tomorrow. We'll have coach Dacre Dunleavy the head coach of the Quinnipiac, Bob cats. He's gonna talk about ONA the Matt conference champions they faced North Carolina. And he'll also give you a lot of great insight on this Villanova wildcat team that place tomorrow. Coach Dunleavy and assistant for Jay. Right. And Villanova for many years was a member of that national title team. We'll have coached Jared Grasso of the Bryant university BULLDOGS. Coach grasso. Longtime assistant there at Iona. We'll hear from him coach Adam Cohen from the Stanford cardinal he'll breakdown Kansas team that they know. Well, they lost in overtime in Lawrence. And he'll also give you great insight on this Washington team. That's playing right now coach Beauvais chair of the army black knights. Then we'll go to coach Jeff Neubauer from the Fordham Rams will talk about both these VCU in Saint Louis teams that are playing tonight out of the Atlantic. Ten and we'll have rush Steinberg from mid major menace, and he's gonna talk about the Murray states the wolford's. So we've got an incredible show for you this evening. There's no better time in the year, the March madness, and we're right into these games. So exciting had an opportunity myself to be there being Hartford see Murray state up close and personal Freidel. Marquette perfect example of Murray state team all in for the moment a complete team effort. Everybody playing the role. And oh, by the way, doesn't hurt to have the great player. John moran..

Coach Dunleavy Jared Grasso Bob cats Brad Underwood Bryant university BULLDOGS Dacre Dunleavy Murray army black knights Jeff Neubauer Villanova Hartford John moran North Carolina Marquette Washington Adam Cohen Steinberg Lawrence Stanford Rams
"adam cohen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:14 min | 2 years ago

"adam cohen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Fresh air coming up at seven o'clock in the guest is Adam Cohen, he is the son of the singer songwriter and poet Leonard Cohen, he wrote an introduction to a new book called the flame that is unpublished poems lyrics Android by Leonard Cohen. He also produced his father's last album. You want it darker here. From Adam Cohen on fresh air at seven here on K, Q E D public radio. This is marketplace, I'm KAI Ryssdal. In the wake of security breaches. And then hearings on Capitol Hill. And then more security breaches Facebook made an interesting announcement today couple of new devices essentially video chat platforms one called the portal. A bigger one called the portal, plus and the big draw. Here is a camera that gets coupled with AI that can follow you as you chat, which depending on how you look at it or have looks at you. I suppose is either really cool or really creepy. Molly wood is the host of marketplace tech. She is our Goto on tech questions like this. Hey, molly. Okay. So who wants this? Do you think who were they thinking about? I mean in a world where Facebook does not have the trust crisis that it has. This is really smart. I mean, this is a device that lets people have these really direct personal connections. In fact, more private than posting on Facebook. You could imagine if you were part of a Facebook group like a book group, right or a little family group that you could have a really nice video chat together. And then you have so many connections on Facebook that the idea to be able to easily connect with them and do this video chat would be great. We're still waiting for this in some ways, actually, and this is pricing. It has a little more built in privacy. Then let's say an Amazon echo, you can turn off the camera and the microphone Facebook says this totally cuts the connection to the mothership. And it's worth noting Bloomberg pointed out, the when Amazon announced over seventy new devices and services last month. It didn't mention privacy once. Okay. Yes. And point taken, however, comma, this is Facebook, and we are in a world where Facebook has the trust crisis that it has right? I have been operating a very informal survey on ironically Facebook. Ninety eight percents of respondents would not buy this. And it's more like fifty fifty for a Google, home and the Amazon echo. It's a really surprising announcement to make for example, right after a hack right after announcing that fifty million accounts compromise. And a Pew Research Center survey from before that hack news said seventy four percent of people were reducing their use or deleting. The Facebook aperture changing their privacy settings. I mean, you have to trust a company a lot before you let it put a camera in your house. And it's a very confident assertion by Facebook. I think that that maybe people aren't worried about their privacy at all which may well be the case, right? As we have talked about let me ask you a different but related question. It's kind of business model ish. And it goes like, this hardware is not Facebook's core competency. Yeah. I mean separate from all of that. I think it is very interesting that Facebook wants to get into the hardware business. It is tricky. There are low margins. It is hard to get right. You add a whole customer service layer that didn't exist before, you know, Google and Amazon both worked for years to get consumer hardware. Right. Google arguably has not yet is only just starting to figure it out because dedicated an entire division to it your Google glass, anybody, right? I mean, that's where you know, as hardware is hard truth of all, right? Molly would she's a host of marketplace tech. Thank you. Molly. Thanks. All right. We are going to do a pair of labor market stories in the bottom half of the program today. One year one from overseas both on the common theme of the completely foreseeable perils of historically, low unemployment in this country as we learned on Friday. The jobless rate is three point seven percent. The lowest in almost fifty years employers. Having a tough time finding people and then includes a federal government. The census bureau says it needs to hire hundreds of thousands of temporary workers for the twenty twenty cents is which is going to be here before you know, it, and it's not gonna be as easy making those hires as it was last time round from WES's in Pittsburgh. Marketplace's Eric berry says that one ten years ago, David macklemore had just gotten laid off from a decades long job as a newspaper reporter in San Antonio, Texas, unemployment was high, and there were not many jobs at all he's spotted a sign at his unemployment office and along with nearly four million other Americans apply for a job as a temp worker around the time of the twenty ten census. There was a big demand for for the work. That many job bailable ten years later. The census is reaching out again for field workers and others to help. Gather information, but it may be hard because the economy is in much better shape. The national unemployment rate has been low and fewer people are out of work. The census is already making videos to explain what it does. Each decade. Residents of the United States are asked to participate and says it's.

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"adam cohen" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"adam cohen" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Yeah so i was telling you during the break here in a fantasy land man this is now the nba welcome to the nba playoffs whereas you you're not going to be perfect every time the other team is allowed to win games the other team is allowed to show spine sometimes we just so dismiss everybody who comes up against the warriors is like and i did after game one on like where's the better where's it better than these guys they beat them on the road again those were two games that you know i don't know you say that they were supposed to win one they definitely weren't supposed to win game two after they took game one but after last night i know the talks about the bench i'm disappointed in k demon you should be i am i a lack of bomb will i said to you during the break to during the leadoff spot was you know when things are going well katie's great he's a finals mvp they lost one playoff game last year but you go back further than that i mean he blew that three one lead against the warriors and putting it all on him but i want to see katie perform when their backs are against the wall and we haven't seen cope i just want to see him move the ball i he seemed like he was the biggest kind of culprit for playing that eyeso ball that the rockets said hey come our game and katie walked right in moses they did it and he he just absorbed their offense was doing like that kind of mano yvonna thing whereas i came and i'll beat you know when he's shooting nine at twenty four no so what you say the headline in tomorrow's paper leadoff spots adam copeland colin k d is a choker put words in my mouth now i said i wanna see host adam cohen says quotes k d must go right exactly berries.

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